Слова на букву uncr-wool (6399) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву uncr-wool (6399)

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>
uxoriousness
noun see uxorious
Uzbeg
noun see Uzbek
Uzbek
or Uzbeg noun Date: 1616 1. a member of a Turkic people of Uzbekistan and adjacent regions of central Asia 2. the Turkic language of the Uzbek people
Uzbekistan
geographical name country W central Asia E of the Amu Dar'ya; a constituent republic ( Uzbek Republic ) of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 1924-91 capital Tashkent ...
Uzhgorod
or Ukrainian Uzhhorod geographical name city SW Ukraine capital of Zakarpats'ka population 123,000
Uzhhorod
geographical name see Uzhgorod
V
I. abbreviation 1. violence; violent 2. volt II. symbol vanadium
v
I. noun (plural v's or vs) Usage: often capitalized, often attributive Date: 14th century 1. a. the 22d letter of the English alphabet b. a graphic representation of ...
V sign
noun Date: 1942 a sign made by raising the index and middle fingers in a V and used as a victory salute or a gesture of approval
V-1
noun Etymology: German, abbreviation for Vergeltungswaffe 1, literally, reprisal weapon 1 Date: 1944 buzz bomb
V-2
noun Etymology: German, abbreviation for Vergeltungswaffe 2, literally, reprisal weapon 2 Date: 1944 a rocket-propelled bomb of German invention
V-8
noun Date: 1930 an internal combustion engine having two banks of four cylinders each with the banks at an angle to each other; also an automobile having such an engine
V-chip
noun Etymology: violence Date: 1993 a computer chip in a television set that can prevent the viewing of certain programs or channels especially on the basis of content
V-day
noun Etymology: victory day Date: 1941 a day of victory
V-engine
noun Date: circa 1922 an internal combustion engine whose cylinders are arranged in two banks forming an acute or right angle
V-neck
noun Date: 1882 a V-shaped neck of a garment; also a garment (as a sweater) with a V-shaped neck • V-necked adjective
V-necked
adjective see V-neck
V/STOL
abbreviation vertical or short takeoff and landing
Va
abbreviation Virginia
VA
abbreviation 1. Veterans Administration 2. vice admiral 3. Virginia 4. visual aid 5. volt-ampere
va et vient
foreign term Etymology: French coming and going ; active movement ; traffic
Vaal
geographical name river 720 miles (1158 kilometers) Republic of South Africa rising in Mpumalanga & flowing W into Orange River in Northern Cape
Vaasa
or Swedish Vasa geographical name city & port W Finland population 53,364
vac
abbreviation vacuum
vacancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1598 1. archaic an interval of leisure 2. physical or mental inactivity or relaxation ; idleness 3. a. a vacating of an office, post, or piece ...
vacant
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin vacant-, vacans, present participle of vacare to be empty, be free Date: 14th century 1. not occupied by an ...
vacantly
adverb see vacant
vacantness
noun see vacant
vacate
verb (vacated; vacating) Etymology: Latin vacatus, past participle of vacare Date: 1643 transitive verb 1. to make legally void ; annul 2. a. to deprive of an ...
vacation
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English vacacioun, from Anglo-French vacacion, from Latin vacation-, vacatio freedom, exemption, from vacare Date: 14th ...
vacationer
noun see vacation II
vacationist
noun Date: 1885 a person taking a vacation ; vacationer
vacationland
noun Date: 1927 an area with recreational attractions and facilities for vacationers
Vacaville
geographical name city W California SW of Sacramento population 88,625
vaccinal
adjective Date: circa 1860 of or relating to vaccine or vaccination
vaccinate
verb (-nated; -nating) Date: 1803 transitive verb to administer a vaccine to usually by injection intransitive verb to perform or practice vaccination • vaccinator ...
vaccination
noun Date: 1800 1. the act of vaccinating 2. the scar left by vaccinating
vaccinator
noun see vaccinate
vaccine
noun Etymology: French vaccin, from vaccine cowpox, from New Latin vaccina (in variolae vaccinae cowpox), from Latin, feminine of vaccinus, adjective, of or from cows, from ...
vaccinee
noun Date: 1889 a vaccinated individual
vaccinia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from vaccinus Date: 1803 1. a poxvirus (species Vaccinia virus of the genus Orthopoxvirus) that differs from but is closely related to the viruses ...
vaccinia virus
noun see vaccinia
vaccinial
adjective see vaccinia
vacillate
intransitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin vacillatus, past participle of vacillare to sway, waver — more at wink Date: 1597 1. a. to sway through lack of ...
vacillatingly
adverb see vacillate
vacillation
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act or instance of vacillating 2. inability to take a stand ; irresolution, indecision
vacillator
noun see vacillate
vacuity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English vacuite, Latin vacuitas, from vacuus empty Date: 15th century 1. an empty space 2. the state, fact, or quality of being ...
vacuolar
adjective see vacuole
vacuolate
adjective see vacuolated
vacuolated
or vacuolate adjective Date: 1859 containing one or more vacuoles
vacuolation
noun Date: 1858 the development or formation of vacuoles
vacuole
noun Etymology: French, literally, small vacuum, from Latin vacuum Date: 1853 1. a small cavity or space in the tissues of an organism containing air or fluid 2. a cavity ...
vacuous
adjective Etymology: Latin vacuus Date: circa 1660 1. emptied of or lacking content 2. marked by lack of ideas or intelligence ; stupid, inane 3. devoid of serious ...
vacuously
adverb see vacuous
vacuousness
noun see vacuous
vacuum
I. noun (plural vacuums or vacua) Etymology: Latin, from neuter of vacuus empty, from vacare to be empty Date: 1550 1. emptiness of space 2. a. a space absolutely devoid ...
vacuum bottle
noun Date: 1910 thermos
vacuum cleaner
noun Date: 1903 a household appliance for cleaning (as floors, carpets, or upholstery) by suction — called also vacuum sweeper
vacuum flask
noun Date: 1917 thermos
vacuum gauge
noun Date: 1851 a gauge indicating degree of rarefaction below atmospheric pressure
vacuum pan
noun Date: 1833 a tank with a vacuum pump for rapid evaporation and condensation (as of sugar syrup) by boiling at a low temperature
vacuum pump
noun Date: 1844 a pump for exhausting gas from an enclosed space
vacuum sweeper
noun see vacuum cleaner
vacuum tube
noun Date: 1859 an electron tube evacuated to a high degree of vacuum
vacuum-packed
adjective Date: circa 1926 having much of the air removed before being hermetically sealed
vade mecum
noun (plural vade mecums) Etymology: Latin, go with me Date: 1629 1. a book for ready reference ; manual 2. something regularly carried about by a person
vade retro me, Satana
foreign term Etymology: Latin get thee behind me, Satan
VADM
abbreviation vice admiral
Vadodara
or Baroda geographical name city W India in SE Gujarat SE of Ahmadabad population 1,061,598
vadose
adjective Etymology: Latin vadosus shallow, from vadum, noun, shallow, ford; akin to Latin vadere to go — more at wade Date: 1894 of, relating to, or being water or ...
Vaduz
geographical name commune capital of Liechtenstein on the upper Rhine
vae victis
foreign term Etymology: Latin woe to the vanquished
Vág
geographical name see Váh
vag-
or vago- combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from New Latin vagus vagus nerve
vagabond
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French vacabund, from Late Latin vagabundus, from Latin vagari to wander Date: 15th century 1. moving from place to place ...
vagabondage
noun see vagabond II
vagabondish
adjective see vagabond I
vagabondism
noun see vagabond II
vagal
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1854 of, relating to, mediated by, or being the vagus nerve • vagally adverb
vagally
adverb see vagal
vagarious
adjective Date: 1798 marked by vagaries ; capricious, whimsical • vagariously adverb
vagariously
adverb see vagarious
vagary
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: probably from Latin vagari to wander, from vagus wandering Date: 1579 an erratic, unpredictable, or extravagant manifestation, action, or ...
vagile
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Latin vagus wandering Date: circa 1890 free to move about • vagility noun
vagility
noun see vagile
vagina
noun (plural vaginae or -nas) Etymology: Latin, literally, sheath Date: 1682 1. a canal in a female mammal that leads from the uterus to the external orifice of the genital ...
vaginal
adjective Date: 1726 1. of or relating to a theca 2. of, relating to, or affecting the genital vagina • vaginally adverb
vaginally
adverb see vaginal
vaginismus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin vagina Date: 1866 a painful spasmodic contraction of the vagina
vaginitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1846 inflammation of the vagina or of a sheath (as a tendon sheath)
vaginosis
noun (plural vaginoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1984 a disease or infection of the vagina; specifically bacterial vaginosis
vago-
combining form see vag-
vagotomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1903 surgical division of the vagus nerve
vagotonia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1915 excessive excitability of the vagus nerve resulting typically in vasomotor instability, constipation, and sweating • vagotonic ...
vagotonic
adjective see vagotonia
vagrancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1641 1. vagary 2. the state or action of being vagrant 3. the offense of being a vagrant
vagrant
I. noun Etymology: Middle English vagraunt, from Anglo-French vageraunt, from present participle of vagrer to wander about, alteration (influenced by Latin vagari to wander) ...
vagrantly
adverb see vagrant II
vagrom
adjective Etymology: by alteration Date: 1599 vagrant
vague
adjective (vaguer; vaguest) Etymology: Middle French, from Latin vagus, literally, wandering Date: 1548 1. a. not clearly expressed ; stated in indefinite terms b. ...
vaguely
adverb see vague
vagueness
noun see vague
vagus
noun see vagus nerve
vagus nerve
noun Etymology: New Latin vagus nervus, literally, wandering nerve Date: 1856 either of the 10th pair of cranial nerves that arise from the medulla and supply chiefly the ...
Váh
or Hungarian Vág geographical name river over 240 miles (386 kilometers) W Slovakia rising in Tatry Mountains & flowing W & S into the Danube
vail
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English valen, partly from Anglo-French valer (short for avaler to lower) & partly short for Middle English avalen to let fall, from ...
vain
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, empty, futile, from Latin vanus — more at wane Date: 14th century 1. having no real value ; idle, worthless 2. ...
vainglorious
adjective Date: 15th century marked by vainglory ; boastful • vaingloriously adverb • vaingloriousness noun
vaingloriously
adverb see vainglorious
vaingloriousness
noun see vainglorious
vainglory
noun Date: 13th century 1. excessive or ostentatious pride especially in one's achievements 2. vain display or show ; vanity
vainly
adverb see vain
vainness
noun see vain
vair
noun Etymology: Middle English veir, from Anglo-French vair, from vair, adjective, mottled, variegated, from Latin varius variegated, various Date: 13th century the ...
Vaishnava
noun Etymology: Sanskrit vaiṣṇava of Vishnu, from Viṣṇu Vishnu Date: 1808 a member of a major Hindu sect devoted to the cult of Vishnu • Vaishnava adjective ...
Vaishnavism
noun see Vaishnava
Vaishya
or Vaisya noun Etymology: Sanskrit vaiśya, from viś settlement; akin to Greek oikos house — more at vicinity Date: 1665 a Hindu of an upper caste traditionally assigned ...
Vaisya
noun see Vaishya
Vajpayee
biographical name Atal Behari 1924- prime minister of India (1998- )
val
abbreviation value; valued
Val d'Aosta
geographical name see Valle d'Aosta
Val-d'Or
geographical name town Canada in SW Quebec population 22,748
Valais
or German Wallis geographical name canton SW central Switzerland bordering on France & Italy capital Sion area 2020 square miles (5232 square kilometers), population 249,473
valance
noun Etymology: Middle English valaunce, from Anglo-French valence, probably from valer to lower — more at vail Date: 15th century 1. a drapery hung along the edge of a ...
valanced
adjective see valance
Valdai Hills
geographical name hills W Russia in Europe SE of Lake Il'men'; highest point 1053 feet (321 meters)
Valdemar
or Waldemar biographical name name of 4 kings of Denmark: especially I 1131-1182 (reigned 1157-82)
Valdes
biographical name Peter — see Waldo
Valdivia
I. biographical name Pedro de circa 1498-1553 Spanish conquistador II. geographical name city & port S central Chile population 100,046
Valdosta
geographical name city S Georgia population 43,724
vale
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French val, from Latin valles, vallis; perhaps akin to Latin volvere to roll — more at voluble Date: 14th century 1. valley, ...
Vale of Glamorgan
geographical name administrative area of S Wales area 130 square miles (337 square kilometers)
valediction
noun Etymology: Latin valedicere to say farewell, from vale farewell + dicere to say — more at diction Date: 1613 1. an act of bidding farewell 2. valedictory 1
valedictorian
noun Date: 1759 the student usually having the highest rank in a graduating class who delivers the valedictory address at the commencement exercises
valedictory
I. adjective Etymology: Latin valedicere Date: 1651 of or relating to a valediction ; expressing or containing a farewell II. noun (plural -ries) Date: 1779 1. an address ...
valence
noun Etymology: Late Latin valentia power, capacity, from Latin valent-, valens, present participle of valēre to be strong — more at wield Date: 1884 1. the degree of ...
Valence
geographical name commune SE France S of Lyon population 65,026
valence band
noun Date: 1953 the range of permissible energy values that are the highest energies an electron can have and still be associated with a particular atom of a solid material ...
valence electron
noun Date: 1922 a single electron or one of two or more electrons in the outer shell of an atom that is responsible for the chemical properties of the atom
Valencia
geographical name 1. region & ancient kingdom E Spain between Andalusia & Catalonia 2. province E Spain area 4156 square miles (10,764 square kilometers), population ...
Valencia orange
noun Etymology: Valencia, Spain Date: 1858 a sweet orange of a juicy thin-skinned cultivar grown in the U.S. — called also Valencia
Valenciennes
I. noun Etymology: Valenciennes, France Date: 1717 a fine bobbin lace II. geographical name city N France population 39,276
Valens
biographical name 328?-378 Roman emperor of the East (364-378)
Valentia
geographical name island SW Ireland in County Kerry in the Atlantic S of entrance to Dingle Bay
valentine
noun Date: 15th century 1. a sweetheart chosen or complimented on Valentine's Day 2. a. a gift or greeting sent or given especially to a sweetheart on Valentine's Day; ...
Valentine Day
noun see Valentine's Day
Valentine's Day
also Valentine Day noun Date: 1668 February 14 observed in honor of St. Valentine and as a time for sending valentines
Valentinian
Latin Valentinianus biographical name name of 3 Roman emperors: I 321-375 (reigned 364-375); II 371-392 (reigned 375-392); III 419-455 (reigned 425-455)
Valentinianus
biographical name see Valentinian
Valera
biographical name Eamon de — see de Valera
Valera (y Alcalá Galiano)
biographical name Juan 1824-1905 Spanish writer & statesman
valerate
noun Date: 1852 a salt or ester of valeric acid
valerian
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Medieval Latin; Anglo-French valeriane, from Medieval Latin valeriana, probably from feminine of valerianus of Valeria, from ...
Valerian
biographical name died A.D. 260 Publius Licinius Valerianus Roman emperor (253-260)
valeric acid
noun Etymology: valerian; from its occurrence in the root of valerian Date: 1857 any of four isomeric fatty acids C5H10O2 or a mixture of these; especially a liquid acid of ...
Valéry
biographical name (Ambroise-) Paul (-Toussaint-Jules) 1871-1945 French poet & philosopher
valet
I. noun Etymology: Middle English vadlet, valet, from Anglo-French, young man of noble birth serving a lord, boy, servant, from Medieval Latin *vassellittus, diminutive of ...
valet de chambre
noun (plural valets de chambre) Etymology: French, literally, chamber valet Date: 1646 valet 1a
valet parking
noun Date: 1960 a service that provides parking of motor vehicles by an attendant
valetudinarian
I. noun Etymology: Latin valetudinarius sickly, infirm, from valetudin-, valetudo state of health, sickness, from valēre to be strong, be well — more at wield Date: 1703 a ...
valetudinarianism
noun Date: 1839 the condition or state of mind of a valetudinarian
valetudinary
I. adjective Etymology: Latin valetudinarius Date: 1581 valetudinarian II. noun (plural -naries) Date: 1665 valetudinarian
valgus
adjective Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, knock-kneed Date: 1884 1. of, relating to, or being a deformity in which an anatomical part is turned outward away from the ...
Valhalla
noun Etymology: German & Old Norse; German Walhalla, from Old Norse Valhǫll, literally, hall of the slain, from valr the slain (akin to Old English wæl slaughter, the slain) + ...
valiance
noun Date: 15th century valor
valiancy
noun Date: 15th century valor
valiant
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English vailant, valiant, from Anglo-French vaillant worthy, strong, courageous, from present participle of valer to be of worth, from Latin ...
valiantly
adverb see valiant I
valiantness
noun see valiant I
valid
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Medieval Latin; Middle French valide, from Medieval Latin validus, from Latin, strong, potent, from valēre Date: 1571 1. having legal ...
validate
transitive verb (-dated; -dating) Date: 1648 1. a. to make legally valid ; ratify b. to grant official sanction to by marking c. to confirm the validity of (an ...
validation
noun Date: circa 1656 an act, process, or instance of validating; especially the determination of the degree of validity of a measuring device
validity
noun see valid
validly
adverb see valid
valine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from valeric (acid) Date: 1907 a crystalline essential amino acid C5H11NO2 that is one of the building blocks of plant ...
valise
noun Etymology: French, from Italian valigia Date: 1615 suitcase
Valium
trademark — used for a preparation of diazepam
Valkyrie
noun Etymology: German & Old Norse; German Walküre, from Old Norse valkyrja, literally, chooser of the slain; akin to Old English wælcyrige witch, Old Norse valr the slain, ...
Valladolid
geographical name 1. province NW central Spain area 3166 square miles (8200 square kilometers), population 494,207 2. commune, its capital, NNW of Madrid population 320,293
vallate
adjective Etymology: Latin vallatus, past participle of vallare to surround with a wall, from vallum wall, rampart — more at wall Date: 1878 having a raised edge ...
Vallauris
geographical name village SE France NE of Cannes
Valle d'Aosta
or Val d'Aosta geographical name autonomous region NW Italy bordering on France & Switzerland NW of Piedmont capital Aosta area 1260 square miles (3263 square kilometers), ...
Vallecas
geographical name commune central Spain, SE suburb of Madrid
vallecula
noun (plural valleculae) Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin, little valley, diminutive of Latin valles valley — more at vale Date: 1859 an anatomical groove, channel, or ...
vallecular
adjective see vallecula
Vallejo
I. biographical name Mariano Guadalupe 1808-1890 American soldier & pioneer II. geographical name city W California on San Pablo Bay population 116,760
Valletta
geographical name city & port capital of Malta population 9210
valley
noun (plural valleys) Etymology: Middle English valeye, from Anglo-French valee, from val valley — more at vale Date: 14th century 1. a. an elongate depression of the ...
valley fever
noun Etymology: from its prevalence in the San Joaquin valley of California Date: 1938 coccidioidomycosis
Valley girl
noun Usage: often capitalized G Date: 1982 an adolescent girl from the San Fernando Valley; also one whose values, mannerisms, and especially speech patterns resemble those ...
Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes
geographical name volcanic region SW Alaska in Katmai National Park
Valley Stream
geographical name village SE New York on Long Island population 36,368
Valleyfield
geographical name — see Salaberry-de-Valleyfield
Valois
I. adjective Etymology: Philippe de Valois (Philip VI of France) Date: 1883 of or relating to the French royal house that ruled from 1328 to 1589 II. geographical name ...
Valona
geographical name — see vlore
valonia
noun Etymology: Italian vallonia, from Middle Greek balanidia, plural of balanidion, diminutive of Greek balanos acorn — more at gland Date: 1722 dried acorn cups ...
valor
noun Etymology: Middle English valour worth, worthiness, bravery, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin valor, from Latin valēre to be of worth, be strong — more at wield ...
valorization
noun see valorize
valorize
transitive verb (-rized; -rizing) Etymology: Portuguese valorizar, from valor value, price, from Medieval Latin Date: circa 1906 1. to enhance or try to enhance the price, ...
valorous
adjective Date: 15th century valiant • valorously adverb
valorously
adverb see valorous
valour
chiefly British variant of valor
Valparaiso
geographical name 1. city NW Indiana SE of Gary population 27,428 2. (or Spanish Valparaíso) city & port central Chile WNW of Santiago population 265,718
Valparaíso
geographical name see Valparaiso 2
valpolicella
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Valpolicella, district in northern Italy Date: 1903 a dry red Italian table wine
Valsalva
noun see Valsalva maneuver
Valsalva maneuver
noun Etymology: Antonio Maria Valsalva died 1723 Italian anatomist Date: 1886 a forceful attempt at expiration when the airway is closed at some point; especially a ...
valse
noun Etymology: French, from German Walzer — more at waltz Date: 1796 waltz; specifically a concert waltz
valuable
I. adjective Date: circa 1576 1. a. having monetary value b. worth a good price 2. a. having desirable or esteemed characteristics or qualities b. of great use ...
valuable consideration
noun Date: 1602 an equivalent or compensation having value that is given for something acquired or promised (as money or marriage) and that may consist either in a benefit ...
valuableness
noun see valuable I
valuably
adverb see valuable I
valuate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1873 to place a value on ; appraise
valuation
noun Etymology: Middle French, from valuer to value, from value Date: 1529 1. the act or process of valuing; specifically appraisal of property 2. the estimated or ...
valuational
adjective see valuation
valuationally
adverb see valuation
valuator
noun Date: 1731 one that valuates; specifically one that appraises
value
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, worth, high quality, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *valuta, from feminine of *valutus, past participle of Latin valēre to be of worth, ...
value judgment
noun Date: 1892 a judgment assigning a value (as good or bad) to something
value-added
adjective Date: 1935 of, relating to, or being a product whose value has been increased especially by special manufacturing, marketing, or processing
value-added tax
noun Date: 1935 an incremental excise that is levied on the value added at each stage of the processing of a raw material or the production and distribution of a commodity and ...
value-free
adjective Date: 1948 making or having no value judgments
valued
adjective Date: 1595 having a value or values especially of a specified kind or number — often used in combination
valueless
adjective see value I
valuelessness
noun see value I
valuer
noun see value II
valuta
noun Etymology: Italian, value, from Vulgar Latin *valuta Date: 1920 1. the agreed upon or exchange value of a currency 2. foreign exchange 2
valvate
adjective Date: 1829 having valves or parts resembling a valve; especially meeting at the edges without overlapping
valve
noun Etymology: Latin valva; akin to Latin volvere to roll — more at voluble Date: 14th century 1. archaic a leaf of a folding or double door 2. [New Latin valva, from ...
valved
adjective see valve
valveless
adjective see valve
valvula
noun (plural valvulae) Etymology: New Latin, diminutive of Latin valva Date: 1615 a small valve or fold
valvular
adjective Date: 1797 1. resembling or functioning as a valve; also opening by valves 2. of, relating to, or affecting a valve especially of the heart
valvulitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1891 inflammation of a valve especially of the heart
vamoose
intransitive verb (vamoosed; vamoosing) Etymology: Spanish vamos let us go, suppletive 1st plural imperative (from Latin vadere to go) of ir to go, from Latin ire — more at ...
vamp
I. noun Etymology: Middle English vampe part of a hose leg or shoe covering the forefoot, vamp, from Anglo-French, alteration of avanpié, from avant- fore- + pié foot, from ...
vamper
noun see vamp II
vampire
noun Etymology: French, from German Vampir, from Serbian vampir Date: 1732 1. the reanimated body of a dead person believed to come from the grave at night and suck the blood ...
vampire bat
noun Date: 1790 any of several Central and South American bats (Desmodus rotundus, Diaemus youngi, and Diphylla ecaudata of the subfamily Desmodontinae of the family ...
vampiric
adjective see vampire
vampirish
adjective see vampire
vampirism
noun Date: circa 1796 1. belief in vampires 2. the actions of a vampire
vampish
adjective see vamp III
vampy
adjective (vampier; -est) Date: 1949 of or relating to a vamp ; vampish; also risque
Van
geographical name salt lake E Turkey in Asia area 1419 square miles (3675 square kilometers)
van
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin vannus — more at winnow Date: 14th century 1. dialect England a winnowing device (as a fan) 2. wing ...
Van Allen
biographical name James Alfred 1914- American physicist
Van Allen belt
noun Etymology: James A. Van Allen Date: 1958 a belt of intense radiation in the magnetosphere composed of energetic charged particles trapped by the earth's magnetic field; ...
Van Buren
biographical name Martin 1782-1862 8th president of the United States (1837-41)
Van de Graaff generator
noun Etymology: Robert J. Van de Graaff died 1967 American physicist Date: 1937 an apparatus for the production of electrical discharges at high voltage commonly consisting ...
van der Meer
biographical name Simon 1925- Dutch physicist
van der Waals forces
noun plural Etymology: Johannes D. van der Waals died 1923 Dutch physicist Date: 1939 the relatively weak attractive forces that act on neutral atoms and molecules and that ...
Van Diemen Gulf
geographical name inlet of Arafura Sea N Australia in N Northern Territory
Van Diemen's Land
geographical name — see Tasmania
van Dongen
biographical name Kees — see Dongen
Van Doren
biographical name Carl Clinton 1885-1950 & his brother Mark 1894-1972 American writers & editors
Van Dyck
or Vandyke biographical name Sir Anthony 1599-1641 Flemish painter
Van Eyck
biographical name — see Eyck, van
van Gogh
biographical name Vincent Willem — see Gogh, van
van Goijen
biographical name see Goyen
Van Rensselaer
biographical name Stephen 1764-1839 American general & politician
Van Vleck
biographical name John Hasbrouck 1899-1980 American physicist
van't Hoff
biographical name Jacobus Hendricus 1852-1911 Dutch physical chemist
vanadate
noun Etymology: New Latin vanadium + English 1-ate Date: 1835 a salt derived from vanadium pentoxide and containing pentavalent vanadium

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.034 c;