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Слова на букву uncr-wool (6399)

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vanadium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Old Norse Vanadīs Freya Date: 1833 a silvery-grayish malleable ductile metallic element obtained from minerals and used especially to form ...
vanadium pentoxide
noun Date: 1869 a yellowish-red crystalline compound V2O5 used especially in glass manufacture and as a catalyst
vanaspati
noun Etymology: Hindi, short for vanaspati ghī, literally, ghee from vegetable matter Date: circa 1941 a hydrogenated vegetable fat used as a butter substitute in India
Vanbrugh
biographical name Sir John 1664-1726 English dramatist & architect
vancomycin
noun Etymology: vanco- (of unknown origin) + -mycin Date: circa 1956 an antibiotic C66H75Cl2N9O24 derived from an actinomycete (Amycolatopsis orientalis syn. Streptomyces ...
Vancouver
I. biographical name George 1757-1798 English navigator II. geographical name 1. city SW Washington on Columbia River opposite Portland, Oregon population 143,560 2. city & ...
Vancouver Island
geographical name island W Canada in British Columbia off SW coast; chief city Victoria area 12,408 square miles (32,261 square kilometers)
Vancouver, Mount
geographical name mountain 15,700 feet (4785 meters) on Alaska-Yukon boundary in St. Elias Range
Vancouverite
noun see Vancouver II
vanda
noun see vanda orchid
vanda orchid
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Sanskrit vandā the orchid Vanda tesselata Date: 1943 any of a large genus (Vanda) of eastern Asian epiphytic orchids often grown for their ...
vandal
noun Etymology: Latin Vandalii (plural), of Germanic origin Date: 1530 1. capitalized a member of a Germanic people who lived in the area south of the Baltic Sea between the ...
Vandalic
adjective see vandal
vandalise
British variant of vandalize
vandalism
noun Date: 1798 willful or malicious destruction or defacement of public or private property
vandalistic
adjective Date: 1897 of or relating to vandalism
vandalization
noun see vandalize
vandalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1832 to subject to vandalism ; damage • vandalization noun
Vandegrift
biographical name Alexander Archer 1887-1973 American general
Vandenberg
biographical name Arthur Hendrick 1884-1951 American journalist & politician
Vanderbilt
biographical name Cornelius 1794-1877 American industrialist
Vandyke
noun Etymology: Sir Anthony Vandyke Date: 1754 1. a. a wide collar with a deeply indented edge b. one of several V-shaped points forming a decorative edging c. a ...
Vandyke brown
noun Etymology: from its use by the painter Vandyke Date: circa 1850 a natural brown-black pigment of organic matter obtained from bog earth or peat or lignite deposits; ...
vandyked
adjective see Vandyke
vane
noun Etymology: Middle English (southern dialect), from Old English fana banner; akin to Old High German fano cloth, Latin pannus cloth, rag Date: 14th century 1. a. a ...
Vane
I. biographical name Sir Henry 1613-1662 the Younger English statesman II. biographical name Sir John Robert 1927- English pharmacologist
vaned
adjective see vane
Vänern
geographical name lake SW Sweden area 2156 square miles (5584 square kilometers)
vanguard
noun Etymology: Middle English vauntgard, from Anglo-French vantgarde, avantgarde, from avant- fore- (from avant before, from Late Latin abante) + garde guard — more at ...
vanguardism
noun see vanguard
vanguardist
noun see vanguard
Vanier
biographical name Georges-Philéas 1888-1967 Canadian politician; governor-general (1959-67)
vanilla
I. noun Etymology: New Latin, from Spanish vainilla vanilla (plant and fruit), diminutive of vaina sheath, from Latin vagina sheath, vagina Date: 1662 1. a. vanilla bean ...
vanilla bean
noun Date: 1874 the long capsular fruit of a vanilla (especially Vanilla planifolia) that is an important article of commerce
vanillin
noun Date: circa 1868 a crystalline phenolic aldehyde C8H8O3 that is extracted from vanilla beans or prepared synthetically and is used especially in flavoring and in ...
Vanir
noun plural Etymology: Old Norse Date: circa 1875 a race of Norse gods who warred against and later reconciled with the Aesir
vanish
verb Etymology: Middle English vanisshen, from Anglo-French vaniss-, stem of vanir, envanir, esvanir, from Vulgar Latin *exvanire, alteration of Latin evanescere to dissipate ...
vanisher
noun see vanish
vanishing cream
noun Date: 1916 a cosmetic preparation that is used chiefly as a foundation for face powder
vanishing point
noun Date: 1797 1. a point at which receding parallel lines seem to meet when represented in linear perspective 2. a point at which something disappears or ceases to exist
vanishingly
adverb Date: 1870 so as to be almost nonexistent or invisible
vanity
I. noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English vanite, from Anglo-French vanité, from Latin vanitat-, vanitas quality of being empty or vain, from vanus empty, vain — ...
vanity fair
noun Usage: often capitalized V&F Etymology: Vanity-Fair, a fair held in the frivolous town of Vanity in Pilgrim's Progress (1678) by John Bunyan Date: 1754 a scene or ...
vanity license plate
noun see vanity plate
vanity plate
noun Date: 1966 a license plate bearing letters or numbers designated by the owner of the vehicle — called also vanity license plate
vanity press
noun Date: 1950 a publishing house that publishes books at the author's expense — called also vanity publisher
vanity publisher
noun see vanity press
vanner
noun Date: 1927 a person who owns a usually customized van
vanpool
noun Date: 1973 an arrangement by which a group of people commute to work in a van • vanpooling noun
vanpooling
noun see vanpool
vanquish
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English venquishen, from Anglo-French venquis-, preterit stem of veintre to conquer, from Latin vincere — more at victor Date: 14th century ...
vanquishable
adjective see vanquish
vanquisher
noun see vanquish
Vantaa
geographical name town S Finland N of Helsinki population 159,462
vantage
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French vantage, avantage — more at advantage Date: 14th century 1. archaic benefit, gain 2. superiority in a contest 3. a ...
vantage point
noun Date: 1847 a position or standpoint from which something is viewed or considered; especially point of view
Vanua Levu
geographical name island S Pacific in the Fijis NE of Viti Levu area 2137 square miles (5535 square kilometers)
Vanuatu
or formerly New Hebrides geographical name islands SW Pacific NE of New Caledonia & W of Fiji; formerly under joint British & French administration; a republic since 1980 ...
vanward
adjective Date: 1811 located in the vanguard ; advanced • vanward adverb
Vanzetti
biographical name Bartolomeo — see Nicola Sacco
vapid
adjective Etymology: Latin vapidus flat-tasting; akin to Latin vappa flat wine and perhaps to Latin vapor steam Date: circa 1656 lacking liveliness, tang, briskness, or force ...
vapidity
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1721 1. the quality or state of being vapid 2. something vapid
vapidly
adverb see vapid
vapidness
noun see vapid
vapor
I. noun Etymology: Middle English vapour, from Anglo-French vapor, from Latin, steam, vapor Date: 14th century 1. diffused matter (as smoke or fog) suspended floating in the ...
vapor barrier
noun Date: circa 1941 a layer of material (as roofing paper or polyethylene film) used to retard or prevent the absorption of moisture into a construction (as a wall or floor)
vapor lock
noun Date: 1926 partial or complete interruption of flow of a fluid (as fuel in an internal combustion engine) caused by the formation of bubbles of vapor in the feeding system
vapor pressure
noun Date: 1865 the pressure exerted by a vapor that is in equilibrium with its solid or liquid form — called also vapor tension
vapor tension
noun see vapor pressure
vapor trail
noun Date: 1941 contrail
vaporer
noun see vapor II
vaporetto
noun (plural vaporetti; also -rettos) Etymology: Italian, diminutive of vapore steamboat, from French vapeur, from bateau à vapeur steamboat Date: 1926 a motorboat serving ...
vaporing
noun Date: circa 1630 the act or speech of one that vapors; specifically an idle, extravagant, or high-flown expression or speech — usually used in plural
vaporise
British variant of vaporize
vaporish
adjective Date: circa 1644 1. resembling or suggestive of vapor 2. given to fits of the vapors • vaporishness noun
vaporishness
noun see vaporish
vaporizable
adjective see vaporize
vaporization
noun see vaporize
vaporize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1803 transitive verb 1. to convert (as by the application of heat or by spraying) into vapor 2. to cause to become dissipated 3. to destroy ...
vaporizer
noun Date: circa 1846 one that vaporizes: as a. atomizer b. a device for converting water or a medicated liquid into a vapor for inhalation
vaporous
adjective Date: 1527 1. consisting or characteristic of vapor 2. producing vapors ; volatile 3. containing or obscured by vapors ; misty 4. a. ethereal, ...
vaporously
adverb see vaporous
vaporousness
noun see vaporous
vaporware
noun Date: 1984 a computer-related product that has been widely advertised but has not and may never become available
vapory
adjective Date: 1598 vaporous, misty
vapour
chiefly British variant of vapor
vaquero
noun (plural -ros) Etymology: Spanish — more at buckaroo Date: 1826 herdsman, cowboy
var
abbreviation 1. variable 2. variation 3. various
vara
noun Etymology: American Spanish, from Spanish, pole, from Latin, forked pole, from feminine of varus bent, bow-legged Date: 1831 a Texas unit of length equal to 33.33 inches ...
Varanasi
or Banaras or Benares geographical name city N India in SE Uttar Pradesh population 932,399
Vardar
geographical name river 241 miles (388 kilometers) Macedonia (country) & N Greece flowing S into Gulf of Salonika
Varèse
biographical name Edgard 1883-1965 originally Edgar Victor Achille Charles Varèse American (French-born) composer
Varese
geographical name commune N Italy NW of Milan population 85,461
Vargas
biographical name Getúlio Dornelles 1883-1954 Brazilian lawyer; president of Brazil (1930-45; 1951-54)
vari-
or vario- combining form Etymology: Latin varius 1. varied ; diverse 2. variation ; variability
varia
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, neuter plural of varius various Date: 1926 miscellany; especially a literary miscellany
varia lectio
plural variae lectiones foreign term Etymology: Latin variant reading
variability
noun see variable I
variable
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin variabilis, from variare to vary Date: 14th century 1. a. able or apt to vary ; subject to variation ...
variable rate mortgage
noun Date: 1975 adjustable rate mortgage
variable star
noun Date: 1788 a star whose brightness changes usually in more or less regular periods
variableness
noun see variable I
variably
adverb see variable I
variae lectiones
foreign term see varia lectio
variance
noun Date: 14th century 1. the fact, quality, or state of being variable or variant ; difference, variation 2. the fact or state of being in disagreement ; dissension, ...
variant
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. obsolete variable 2. manifesting variety, deviation, or disagreement 3. varying usually slightly from the standard form II. noun ...
variate
noun Date: 1909 random variable
variation
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the act or process of varying ; the state or fact of being varied b. an instance of varying c. the extent to which or the range in ...
variational
adjective see variation
variationally
adverb see variation
varicella
noun Etymology: New Latin, irregular diminutive of variola Date: 1771 chicken pox
varicocele
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin varic-, varix + New Latin -o- + -cele Date: 1736 a varicose enlargement of the veins of the spermatic cord
varicolored
adjective Date: 1665 having various colors ; variegated ; also of various colors
varicose
also varicosed adjective Etymology: Latin varicosus full of dilated veins, from varic-, varix dilated vein Date: circa 1730 1. abnormally swollen or dilated 2. affected ...
varicosed
adjective see varicose
varicosity
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1842 1. varix 2. the quality or state of being abnormally or markedly swollen or dilated
varied
adjective Date: 1588 1. various, diverse 2. variegated 1 • variedly adverb
variedly
adverb see varied
variegate
transitive verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Latin variegatus, past participle of variegare, from varius various + -egare (akin to Latin agere to drive) — more at agent Date: ...
variegated
adjective Date: 1661 1. having discrete markings of different colors 2. varied 1
variegated cutworm
noun Date: 1922 a widespread noctuid moth (Peridroma saucia) whose larva is destructive to crops
variegation
noun Date: 1646 the act of variegating ; the state of being variegated; especially diversity of colors
variegator
noun see variegate
varier
noun Date: 1860 one that varies
varietal
I. adjective Date: 1866 1. of, relating to, or characterizing a variety ; also being a variety in distinction from an individual or species 2. of, relating to, or ...
variety
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French varieté, from Latin varietat-, varietas, from varius various Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state ...
variety meat
noun Date: circa 1946 an edible part (as the liver or tongue) of a slaughter animal other than skeletal muscle
variety show
noun Date: 1882 a theatrical entertainment of successive separate performances (as of songs, dances, skits, and acrobatic feats)
variety store
noun Date: 1768 a retail store that carries a wide variety of merchandise especially of low unit value
vario-
— see vari-
variola
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Medieval Latin, pustule, pox, from Late Latin, pustule, probably from varius various Date: 1543 smallpox; also the virus that is the ...
variometer
noun Date: circa 1889 1. an instrument for measuring magnetic declination 2. an aeronautical instrument for indicating rate of climb
variorum
I. noun Etymology: Latin variorum of various persons (genitive plural masculine of varius), in the phrase cum notis variorum with the notes of various persons Date: 1728 1. ...
various
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, probably from Medieval Latin *variosus, from Latin varius Date: 15th century 1. archaic variable, inconstant 2. varicolored 3. ...
variously
adverb Date: 1627 1. in various ways ; at various times 2. by various designations
variousness
noun see various I
varisized
adjective Date: 1936 of various sizes
varistor
noun Etymology: vari- + resistor Date: 1937 an electrical resistor whose resistance depends on the applied voltage
varium et mutabile semper femina
foreign term Etymology: Latin woman is ever a fickle and changeable thing
varix
noun (plural varices) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin varic-, varix Date: 14th century an abnormally dilated and lengthened vein, artery, or lymph vessel; especially a ...
varlet
noun Etymology: Middle English valet, vadlet, varlet servant, boy — more at valet Date: 15th century 1. a. attendant, menial b. a knight's page 2. a base ...
varletry
noun Date: 1606 archaic rabble
varmint
noun Etymology: alteration of vermin Date: circa 1539 1. an animal considered a pest; specifically one classed as vermin and unprotected by game law 2. a contemptible ...
Varmus
biographical name Harold Elliot 1939- American microbiologist
Varna
or formerly Stalin geographical name city & port E Bulgaria on Black Sea population 314,913
varnish
I. noun Etymology: Middle English vernisch, from Anglo-French vernis, from Old Italian or Medieval Latin; Old Italian vernice, from Medieval Latin veronic-, veronix sandarac ...
varnish tree
noun Date: 1758 any of various trees yielding a milky juice from which in some cases varnish or lacquer is prepared; especially an Asian tree (Rhus verniciflua syn. ...
varnisher
noun see varnish II
varnishy
adjective see varnish I
Varro
biographical name Marcus Terentius 116-27 B.C. Roman scholar
varroa mite
noun Etymology: New Latin Varrou, from Marcus Terentius Varro Date: 1985 an Asian mite (Varroa jacobsoni syn. V. destructor) that is a serious bloodsucking parasite of ...
varsity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: by shortening & alteration from university Date: 1646 1. British university 2. a. the principal squad representing a university, college, ...
Varsovian
noun Etymology: French varsovien, from Varsovie Warsaw Date: 1764 a native or resident of Warsaw, Poland
Varuna
noun Etymology: Sanskrit Varuṇa a chief Vedic god responsible for natural and moral order in the cosmos
varus
adjective Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, bent inward, bow-legged Date: 1945 1. of, relating to, or being a deformity in which an anatomical part is turned inward toward ...
varve
noun Etymology: Swedish varv turn, layer; akin to Old Norse hvarf ring, Old English hweorfan to turn — more at wharf Date: 1912 a pair of layers of alternately finer and ...
varved
adjective see varve
vary
verb (varied; varying) Etymology: Middle English varien, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French varier, from Latin variare, from varius various Date: 14th century transitive ...
varying hare
noun Date: 1781 snowshoe hare
varyingly
adverb see vary
vas
noun (plural vasa) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, vessel Date: 1651 an anatomical vessel ; duct • vasal adjective
vas deferens
noun (plural vasa deferentia) Etymology: New Latin, literally, deferent vessel Date: 1578 a sperm-carrying duct especially of a higher vertebrate that in the human male is a ...
vas-
or vaso- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Latin vas 1. vessel: as a. blood vessel b. vas deferens 2. vascular and 3. vasomotor
Vasa
geographical name see Vaasa
vasal
adjective see vas
Vasari
biographical name Giorgio 1511-1574 Italian artist & art historian
Vasco da Gama
biographical name — see gama
vascular
adjective Etymology: New Latin vascularis, from Latin vasculum small vessel, diminutive of vas Date: circa 1673 1. of or relating to a channel for the conveyance of a body ...
vascular bundle
noun Date: 1842 a strand of specialized vascular tissue of higher plants consisting mostly of xylem and phloem
vascular cylinder
noun Date: circa 1889 stele
vascular plant
noun Date: 1861 a plant having a specialized conducting system that includes xylem and phloem ; tracheophyte
vascular ray
noun Date: circa 1673 a band of usually parenchymatous cells partly in the xylem and partly in the phloem of a plant root or stem that conducts fluids radially and appears in ...
vascular tissue
noun Date: 1842 plant tissue concerned mainly with conduction; especially the specialized tissue of higher plants consisting essentially of phloem and xylem
vascularity
noun see vascular
vascularization
noun Date: 1818 the process of becoming vascular; also abnormal or excessive formation of blood vessels (as in the retina or on the cornea)
vasculature
noun Etymology: Latin vasculum vessel + English -ature (as in musculature) Date: circa 1927 the blood vessels or arrangement of blood vessels in an organ or part
vasculitis
noun (plural vasculitides) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin vasculum vessel Date: circa 1900 inflammation of a blood or lymph vessel
vasculum
noun (plural vascula) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, small vessel Date: 1782 a usually metal and commonly cylindrical or flattened covered box used in collecting plants
vase
noun Etymology: French, from Latin vas vessel Date: 1629 a usually round vessel of greater depth than width used chiefly as an ornament or for holding flowers • vaselike ...
vasectomize
transitive verb (-mized; -mizing) Date: 1900 to perform a vasectomy on
vasectomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1899 surgical division or resection of all or part of the vas deferens usually to induce sterility
vaselike
adjective see vase
Vaseline
trademark — used for petroleum jelly
vaso-
combining form see vas-
vasoactive
adjective Date: circa 1921 affecting the blood vessels especially in respect to the degree of their relaxation or contraction • vasoactivity noun
vasoactivity
noun see vasoactive
vasoconstriction
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1899 narrowing of the lumen of blood vessels
vasoconstrictive
adjective Date: 1890 inducing vasoconstriction
vasoconstrictor
noun Date: 1877 an agent (as a sympathetic nerve fiber or a drug) that induces or initiates vasoconstriction
vasodilatation
noun see vasodilation
vasodilation
or vasodilatation noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1896 widening of the lumen of blood vessels
vasodilator
noun Date: 1881 an agent (as a parasympathetic nerve fiber or a drug) that induces or initiates vasodilation
vasomotor
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1865 of, relating to, or being nerves or centers controlling the size of blood vessels
vasopressin
noun Etymology: from Vasopressin, a trademark Date: 1927 a polypeptide hormone secreted by the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland or obtained synthetically that increases ...
vasopressor
adjective Date: 1928 causing a rise in blood pressure by exerting a vasoconstrictor effect • vasopressor noun
vasospasm
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1902 sharp and often persistent contraction of a blood vessel reducing its lumen and blood flow • vasospastic ...
vasospastic
adjective see vasospasm
vasotocin
noun Etymology: vaso- + oxytocin Date: circa 1963 a polypeptide pituitary hormone of most vertebrates below mammals that has properties similar to oxytocin and vasopressin
vasovagal
adjective Date: 1907 relating to, involving, or caused by action of the vagus nerve on blood vessel dilation and heart rate
vassal
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin vassallus, from vassus servant, vassal, of Celtic origin; akin to Welsh gwas young man, servant Date: ...
vassalage
noun Date: 15th century 1. a position of subordination or submission (as to a political power) 2. the state of being a vassal 3. the homage, fealty, or services due ...
vast
I. adjective Etymology: Latin vastus; akin to Old High German wuosti empty, desolate, Old Irish fás Date: 1585 very great in size, amount, degree, intensity, or especially ...
Västerås
geographical name city E Sweden on Mälaren Lake NW of Stockholm population 120,889
vastitude
noun Etymology: Latin vastitudo, from vastus Date: 1623 immensity, vastness
vastly
adverb see vast I
vastness
noun see vast I
vasty
adjective Date: 1596 vast
VAT
abbreviation value-added tax
vat
I. noun Etymology: Middle English fat, vat, from Old English fæt; akin to Old High German vaz vessel, Lithuanian puodas pot Date: 12th century 1. a large vessel (as a ...
vat color
noun see vat dye
vat dye
noun Date: 1903 a water-insoluble generally fast dye used in the form of a vat liquor — called also vat color
vat-dyed
adjective Date: 1946 dyed with one or more vat dyes
Vaté
geographical name — see Efate
vatic
adjective Etymology: Latin vates seer, prophet; akin to Old English wōth poetry, Old High German wuot madness, Old Irish fáith seer, poet Date: 1603 prophetic, oracular
Vatican
noun Etymology: Latin Vaticanus Vatican Hill (in Rome) Date: 1555 1. the papal headquarters in Rome 2. the papal government • Vatican adjective
Vatican City
or Italian Città del Vaticano geographical name independent papal state within commune of Rome, Italy; created February 11, 1929 area 109 acres (43 hectares), population 771
vaticinal
adjective Etymology: Latin vaticinus, from vaticinari to foretell, prophesy Date: 1586 prophetic
vaticinate
verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Latin vaticinatus, past participle of vaticinari, from vates + -cinari (akin to Latin canere to sing) — more at chant Date: circa 1623 ...
vaticination
noun Date: 1603 1. prediction 2. the act of prophesying
vaticinator
noun see vaticinate
Vättern
geographical name lake S Sweden area 738 square miles (1911 square kilometers)
vatu
noun (plural vatu) Etymology: probably alteration of Vanuatu Date: 1981 — see money table
Vatutin
biographical name Nikolay Fyodorovich 1900-1944 Soviet general
Vauban
biographical name Sébastien Le Prestre de 1633-1707 French military engineer; marshal of France
Vaud
or German Waadt geographical name canton W Switzerland N of Lake Geneva capital Lausanne area 1240 square miles (3212 square kilometers), population 576,319
vaudeville
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, popular satirical song, alteration of vaudevire, from vau-de-Vire valley of Vire, town in northwest France where such songs were ...
vaudevillian
noun or adjective see vaudeville
Vaudois
noun plural Etymology: Middle French, from Medieval Latin Valdenses Date: 1560 Waldenses
Vaughan
I. biographical name Henry 1621?-1695 British poet II. biographical name Sarah Lois 1924-1990 American singer III. geographical name city Canada in SE Ontario N of Toronto ...
Vaughan Williams
biographical name Ralph 1872-1958 English composer
vault
I. noun Etymology: Middle English vaute, voute, from Anglo-French voute, from Vulgar Latin *volvita turn, vault, from feminine of *volvitus, alteration of Latin volutus, past ...
vaulted
adjective Date: 14th century 1. built in the form of a vault ; arched 2. covered with a vault
vaulter
noun Date: circa 1552 one that vaults; especially an athlete who competes in the pole vault
vaulting
I. noun Date: 1512 vaulted construction II. adjective Date: 1593 1. reaching or stretching for the heights 2. designed for use in vaulting or in gymnastic exercises ...
vaulting horse
noun Date: circa 1875 1. a gymnastics apparatus used in vaulting that consists of a padded rectangular or cylindrical form supported in a horizontal position above the floor ...
vaultingly
adverb see vaulting II
vaulty
adjective see vault I
vaunt
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French vanter, from Late Latin vanitare, frequentative of Latin *vanare, from vanus vain Date: 15th century intransitive verb ...
vaunt-courier
noun Etymology: Middle French avant-courrier, literally, advance courier Date: 1560 archaic forerunner
vaunted
adjective Date: 1567 highly or widely praised or boasted about
vaunter
noun see vaunt I
vauntful
adjective Date: 1590 vainglorious, boastful
vauntingly
adverb see vaunt I
vaunty
adjective Date: 1724 Scottish proud, boastful, vain
Vaupés
geographical name — see uaupes
vav
variant of waw
vavasor
or vavasour noun Etymology: Middle English vavasour, from Anglo-French vavassur, probably from Medieval Latin vassus vassorum vassal of vassals Date: 14th century a feudal ...
vavasour
noun see vavasor
vaward
noun Etymology: Middle English vauntwarde, vanwarde, vaward, from Anglo-French *vantwarde, vantgarde vanguard Date: 14th century archaic the foremost part ; forefront
VC
abbreviation 1. venture capital; venture capitalist 2. Victoria Cross 3. Vietcong
VCR
noun Etymology: videocassette recorder Date: 1971 a device that uses videocassettes for recording and playing back videotapes
VD
abbreviation 1. various dates 2. venereal disease
VDT
abbreviation video display terminal
VDU
abbreviation visual display unit
Veadar
noun Etymology: Hebrew wĕ-Adhār, literally, and Adar (i.e., the second Adar) Date: circa 1648 Adar Sheni
veal
I. noun Etymology: Middle English veel, from Anglo-French, calf, veal, from Latin vitellus small calf, diminutive of vitulus calf — more at wether Date: 14th century 1. the ...
vealer
noun Date: circa 1895 a calf grown for or suitable for veal
vealy
adjective Date: 1769 1. resembling or suggesting veal or a calf 2. immature
Veblen
biographical name Thorstein Bunde 1857-1929 American sociologist & economist • Veblenian adjective
Veblenian
adjective see Veblen
vector
I. noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, carrier, from vehere to carry — more at way Date: 1846 1. a. a quantity that has magnitude and direction and that is commonly ...
vector field
noun Date: circa 1922 a set of vectors that is defined in relation to a function such that each point of the function is associated with a vector from the set
vector product
noun Date: 1878 a vector c whose length is the product of the lengths of two vectors a and b and the sine of their included angle, whose direction is perpendicular to their ...
vector space
noun Date: 1937 a set of vectors along with operations of addition and multiplication such that the set is a commutative group under addition, it includes a multiplicative ...
vector sum
noun Date: circa 1890 the sum of a number of vectors that for the sum of two vectors is geometrically represented by the diagonal of a parallelogram whose sides represent the ...

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