Слова на букву axio-buck (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву axio-buck (6389)

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>
backcountry
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1746 a remote undeveloped rural area
backcourt
noun Date: 1890 1. the area near or nearest the back boundary lines or back wall of the playing area in a net or court game 2. a. a basketball team's defensive half of the ...
backcourtman
noun Date: 1954 a guard on a basketball team
backcross
I. transitive verb Date: 1904 to cross (a first-generation hybrid) with one of the parental types II. noun Date: 1918 a mating that involves backcrossing; also an ...
backdate
transitive verb Date: 1944 to put a date earlier than the actual one on ; also to make retroactive
backdoor
adjective Date: 1805 1. indirect, devious 2. involving or being a play in basketball in which a player moves behind the defense and toward the basket to receive a quick pass
backdrop
noun Date: 1913 1. a painted cloth hung across the rear of a stage 2. background • backdrop transitive verb
backed
adjective see back I
backer
noun see back IV
backfield
noun Date: 1903 the football players whose positions are behind the line of scrimmage; also the positions themselves
backfill
verb Date: 1908 transitive verb to refill (as an excavation) usually with excavated material intransitive verb to backfill an excavation • backfill noun
backfire
I. noun Date: 1839 1. a fire started to check an advancing fire by clearing an area 2. a loud noise caused by the improperly timed explosion of fuel mixture in the cylinder ...
backfit
transitive verb Date: 1967 retrofit • backfit noun
backflip
noun Date: 1935 a backward somersault especially in the air
backflow
noun Date: 1878 a flowing back or returning especially toward a source
backgammon
noun Etymology: perhaps from 3back + Middle English gamen, game game Date: circa 1645 a board game played with dice and counters in which players try to be the first to gather ...
background
I. noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1672 1. a. the scenery or ground behind something b. the part of a painting representing what lies behind objects in the ...
background music
noun Date: 1928 music to accompany the dialogue or action of a motion picture or radio or television drama
background radiation
noun Date: 1968 the microwave radiation pervading the universe that exhibits a corresponding blackbody temperature of 2.7 K and that is the principal evidence supporting the ...
backgrounder
noun Date: 1960 an off-the-record briefing for reporters
backhand
I. noun Date: 1657 1. a. a stroke (as in tennis) made with the back of the hand turned in the direction of movement; also the side on which such strokes are made b. a ...
backhanded
adjective Date: 1800 1. indirect, devious; especially sarcastic 2. using or made with a backhand • backhandedly adverb
backhandedly
adverb see backhanded
backhander
noun Date: 1960 1. British bribe 2. a backhand shot
backhoe
noun Date: 1928 an excavating machine having a bucket that is attached to a rigid bar hinged to a boom and that is drawn toward the machine in operation
backhouse
noun Date: 1836 privy 1a
backing
noun Date: 1793 1. something forming a back 2. a. support, aid b. endorsement especially of a warrant by a magistrate
backland
noun Date: 1681 backcountry, hinterland — usually used in plural
backlash
noun Date: 1815 1. a. a sudden violent backward movement or reaction b. the play between adjacent movable parts (as in a series of gears); also the jar caused by this ...
backlasher
noun see backlash
backless
adjective see back I
backlight
noun Date: circa 1846 illumination from behind; also the source of such illumination • backlight transitive verb
backlist
noun Date: 1964 a list of books kept in print as distinguished from books newly published
backlog
I. noun Date: 1684 1. a large log at the back of a hearth fire 2. an accumulation of tasks unperformed or materials not processed II. verb Date: 1963 accumulate
backpack
I. noun Date: 1914 1. a. a load carried on the back b. a camping pack (as of canvas or nylon) supported by a usually aluminum frame and carried on the back c. ...
backpacker
noun see backpack II
backpedal
intransitive verb Date: 1901 to retreat or move backward
backrest
noun Date: 1859 a rest for the back
backroom
adjective Date: 1940 made or operating in an inconspicuous way ; behind-the-scenes
backsaw
noun Date: circa 1876 a saw with a metal rib along its back
backscatter
also backscattering noun Date: 1940 the scattering of radiation or particles in a direction opposite to that of the incident radiation due to reflection from particles of the ...
backscattering
noun see backscatter
backseat
noun Date: 1780 1. a seat in the back (as of an automobile) 2. an inferior position
backset
noun Date: 1721 setback
backside
noun Date: circa 1500 buttocks — often used in plural
backslap
verb Date: 1777 transitive verb to display excessive or effusive goodwill for intransitive verb to display excessive cordiality or goodwill • backslap noun • ...
backslapper
noun see backslap
backslash
noun Date: 1982 a mark used especially in computer programming
backslide
intransitive verb (backslid; -slid or backslidden; backsliding) Date: 1552 1. to lapse morally or in the practice of religion 2. to revert to a worse condition ; retrogress ...
backslider
noun see backslide
backspace
I. intransitive verb Date: 1911 to move back a space in a text with the press of a key II. noun Date: 1983 an instance of backspacing; also the key pressed in backspacing
backspin
noun Date: circa 1909 a backward rotary motion of a ball
backsplash
noun Date: 1947 a vertical surface (as of tiles) designed to protect the wall behind a stove or countertop
backstab
verb see backstabbing
backstabber
noun see backstabbing
backstabbing
noun Date: 1946 betrayal (as by a verbal attack against one not present) especially by a false friend • backstab verb • backstabber noun
backstage
I. adjective Date: 1916 1. of, relating to, or occurring in the area behind the stage and especially in the dressing rooms 2. of or relating to the private lives of theater ...
backstairs
adjective Date: 1663 1. secret, furtive 2. sordid, scandalous
backstay
noun Date: 1626 1. a stay extending aft from a masthead 2. a strengthening or supporting device at the back (as of a carriage or a shoe)
backstitch
noun Date: 1611 a stitch sewn one stitch length backward on the front side and two stitch lengths forward on the reverse side to form a solid line of stitching on both ...
backstop
I. noun Date: 1851 1. something at the back serving as a stop: as a. a screen or fence for keeping a ball from leaving the field of play b. a stop (as a pawl) that ...
backstory
noun Date: 1984 a story that tells what led up to the main story or plot (as of a film)
backstreet
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 15th century a street away from the main thoroughfares
backstretch
noun Date: 1839 the side opposite the homestretch on a racecourse
backstroke
noun Date: 1879 a swimming stroke executed on the back and usually consisting of alternating circular arm pulls and a flutter kick • backstroker noun
backstroker
noun see backstroke
backswept
adjective Date: circa 1918 swept or slanting backward
backswimmer
noun Date: 1862 an aquatic bug (family Notonectidae) that swims on its back
backswing
noun Date: 1892 the movement of a club, racket, bat, or arm backward to a position from which the forward or downward swing is made
backsword
noun Date: 1597 a single-edged sword
backtrack
intransitive verb Date: 1904 1. a. to retrace one's course b. to go back to an earlier point in a sequence 2. to reverse a position
backup
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1951 1. a. one that serves as a substitute or support b. musical accompaniment c. additional personnel who provide assistance ...
backward
I. adverb or backwards Date: 14th century 1. a. toward the back b. with the back foremost 2. a. in a reverse or contrary direction or way b. toward the past c. ...
backwardly
adverb see backward II
backwardness
noun see backward II
backwards
adverb see backward I
backwash
noun Date: 1869 1. a backward flow or movement (as of water or air) produced especially by a propelling force; also the fluid that is moving backward 2. consequence, ...
backwater
noun Date: 1629 1. a. water backed up in its course by an obstruction, an opposing current, or the tide b. a body of water (as an inlet or tributary) that is out of the ...
backwoods
I. noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1709 1. wooded or partly cleared areas far from cities 2. a remote or culturally backward area • backwoodsy ...
backwoodsman
noun Date: 1774 a person who lives in or is a native of the backwoods
backwoodsy
adjective see backwoods I
backwrap
noun Date: 1951 a wraparound garment (as a skirt) that fastens in the back
backyard
I. noun Date: 1659 1. an area at the rear of a house 2. a nearby area ; neighborhood II. adjective Date: 1740 located or occurring in a backyard ; also lacking ...
baclofen
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1978 a gamma-aminobutyric acid analog C10H12ClNO2 used as a relaxant of skeletal muscle especially in treating spasticity (as in multiple ...
Bacolod
geographical name city Philippines on Negros Island population 364,000
bacon
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German bahho side of bacon, bah back — more at back Date: 14th century 1. a side of a ...
Bacon
I. biographical name Francis 1561-1626 1st Baron Verulam Viscount Saint Albans English philosopher II. biographical name Francis 1909-1992 British (Irish-born) ...
Baconian
adjective Date: 1812 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of Francis Bacon or his doctrines 2. of or relating to those who believe that Francis Bacon wrote the works usually ...
bact
abbreviation 1. bacterial 2. bacteriology 3. bacterium
bacteremia
noun Etymology: New Latin, alteration of bacteriemia, from bacteri- + -emia Date: circa 1890 the usually transient presence of bacteria in the blood • bacteremic adjective
bacteremic
adjective see bacteremia
bacteri-
or bacterio- combining form Etymology: New Latin bacterium bacteria
bacteria
noun (plural bacteria; also -rias) Etymology: plural of bacterium Date: 1881 bacterium — not usually used technically Usage: Bacteria is regularly a plural in ...
bacterial
adjective Date: 1871 of, relating to, or caused by bacteria • bacterially adverb
bacterial vaginosis
noun Date: 1985 vaginitis that is marked by a grayish vaginal discharge usually of foul odor and that is associated with the presence of excessive amounts of some bacteria ...
bacterially
adverb see bacterial
bactericidal
also bacteriocidal adjective Date: 1877 destroying bacteria • bactericide also bacteriocide noun
bactericide
noun see bactericidal
bacterin
noun Date: circa 1912 a suspension of killed or attenuated bacteria for use as a vaccine
bacterio-
combining form see bacteri-
bacteriochlorophyll
noun Date: 1938 a pyrrole derivative in photosynthetic bacteria related to the chlorophyll of higher plants
bacteriocidal
adjective see bactericidal
bacteriocide
noun see bactericidal
bacteriocin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary bacteri- + -cin (as in colicin) Date: 1954 an antibiotic (as colicin) produced by bacteria
bacteriologic
adjective see bacteriology
bacteriological
adjective see bacteriology
bacteriologically
adverb see bacteriology
bacteriologist
noun see bacteriology
bacteriology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1884 1. a science that deals with bacteria and their relations to medicine, industry, and agriculture 2. bacterial ...
bacteriolysis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1900 destruction or dissolution of bacterial cells • bacteriolytic adjective
bacteriolytic
adjective see bacteriolysis
bacteriophage
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1920 a virus that infects bacteria • bacteriophagy noun
bacteriophagy
noun see bacteriophage
bacteriorhodopsin
noun Date: 1971 a purple-pigmented protein that is found in the outer membrane of a bacterium (Halobacterium salinarium syn. H. halobium) and that converts light energy into ...
bacteriostasis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1920 inhibition of the growth of bacteria without destruction
bacteriostat
noun Date: 1920 an agent that causes bacteriostasis • bacteriostatic adjective
bacteriostatic
adjective see bacteriostat
bacterium
noun (plural bacteria) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek baktērion staff Date: circa 1849 any of a domain (Bacteria) of prokaryotic round, spiral, or rod-shaped single-celled ...
bacteriuria
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1900 the presence of bacteria in the urine
bacterization
noun see bacterize
bacterize
transitive verb (-rized; -rizing) Date: 1914 to subject to bacterial action • bacterization noun
bacteroid
noun Date: 1878 an irregularly shaped form of a nitrogen-fixing bacterium (as a rhizobium) found especially in root nodules of legumes
Bactra
geographical name — see Balkh 2
Bactria
geographical name ancient country SW Asia between Hindu Kush & Oxus River capital Bactra — see Balkh • Bactrian adjective or noun
Bactrian
adjective or noun see Bactria
Bactrian camel
noun Date: 1609 camel 1b
bad
I. adjective (worse; worst) Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century 1. a. failing to reach an acceptable standard ; poor b. unfavorable c. not fresh ; ...
bad blood
noun Date: 1825 ill feeling ; bitterness
bad boy
noun Date: 1945 a person who flouts convention
bad cholesterol
noun Date: 1980 LDL
Bad Ems
geographical name — see Ems
Bad Godesberg
geographical name — see Godesberg
Bad Homburg
geographical name city SW central Germany N of Frankfurt am Main population 51,663
Bad Mergentheim
geographical name — see Mergentheim
bad news
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1917 one that is troublesome, unwelcome, or dangerous
bad-mouth
transitive verb Date: 1941 to criticize severely
Badajoz
geographical name 1. province SW Spain in valley of the Guadiana area 8362 square miles (21,658 square kilometers), population 650,388 2. city, its capital population 122,225
Badalona
geographical name city & port NE Spain on the Mediterranean NE of Barcelona population 218,725
badass
I. adjective Date: 1955 1. often vulgar ready to cause or get into trouble ; mean 2. often vulgar of formidable strength or skill
baddie
or baddy noun (plural baddies) Date: 1937 one that is bad; especially an opponent of the hero (as in fiction or motion pictures)
baddy
noun see baddie
bade
past and past participle of bid
Baden
geographical name 1. region SW Germany bordering on Switzerland & France; formerly a grand duchy (1805-1918), a state of the Weimar Republic (1918-33), an administrative ...
Baden-Baden
or Baden geographical name city & spa SW Germany in Baden-Württemberg SSW of Karlsruhe population 52,524
Baden-Powell
biographical name Robert Stephenson Smyth 1857-1941 1st Baron of Gilwell British founder of Boy Scout movement
Baden-Württemberg
geographical name state SW Germany W of Bavaria; formed 1951 from former Baden, Württemberg-Baden, & Württemberg-Hohenzollern states capital Stuttgart area 13,803 square ...
badge
noun Etymology: Middle English bage, bagge Date: 14th century 1. a device or token especially of membership in a society or group 2. a characteristic mark 3. an emblem ...
badger
I. noun Etymology: probably from badge; from the white mark on its forehead Date: 1523 1. a. any of various burrowing mammals (especially Taxidea taxus and Meles meles) ...
badinage
noun Etymology: French Date: circa 1658 playful repartee ; banter
badland
noun Date: 1851 a region marked by intricate erosional sculpturing, scanty vegetation, and fantastically formed hills — usually used in plural
Badlands National Park
geographical name reservation SW South Dakota E of Black Hills comprising an area of badlands topography
badly
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in a bad manner 2. to a great or intense degree
badminton
noun Etymology: Badminton, residence of the Duke of Beaufort, England Date: 1874 a court game played with light long-handled rackets and a shuttlecock volleyed over a net
badness
noun see bad I
Badoglio
biographical name Pietro 1871-1956 Italian general; prime minister (1943-44)
BAE
abbreviation 1. bachelor of aeronautical engineering 2. bachelor of agricultural engineering 3. bachelor of architectural engineering 4. bachelor of art education 5. ...
BAEd
abbreviation bachelor of arts in education
Baeda
biographical name see Bede
Baedeker
noun Etymology: Karl Baedeker died 1859 German publisher of guidebooks Date: 1924 guidebook
BAeE
abbreviation bachelor of aeronautical engineering
BAEE
abbreviation bachelor of arts in elementary education
Baerum
geographical name city SE Norway, a suburb of Oslo population 89,221
Baeyer, von
biographical name Adolf 1835-1917 German chemist
Baffin
biographical name William circa 1584-1622 English navigator
Baffin Bay
geographical name inlet of the Atlantic between W Greenland & E Baffin Island
Baffin Island
geographical name island NE Canada N of Hudson Strait; largest in Arctic Archipelago area 183,810 square miles (477,906 square kilometers)
baffle
I. transitive verb (baffled; baffling) Etymology: probably alteration of Middle English (Scots) bawchillen to denounce, discredit publicly Date: 1675 1. to defeat or check ...
baffled
adjective see baffle II
bafflegab
noun Date: 1952 gobbledygook
bafflement
noun see baffle I
baffler
noun see baffle I
bafflingly
adverb see baffle I
Bafing
geographical name river 350 miles (560 kilometers) W Africa in W Mali & Guinea; the upper course of the Senegal
BAg
abbreviation bachelor of agriculture
bag
I. noun Etymology: Middle English bagge, from Old Norse baggi Date: 13th century 1. a usually flexible container that may be closed for holding, storing, or carrying ...
bag lady
noun Date: 1972 a homeless woman who roams the streets of a city carrying her possessions in shopping bags
bag of waters
Date: circa 1881 the double-walled fluid-filled sac that encloses and protects the fetus in the womb and that breaks releasing its fluid during the birth process
bagasse
noun Etymology: French Date: circa 1826 plant residue (as of sugarcane or grapes) left after a product (as juice) has been extracted
bagatelle
noun Etymology: French, from Italian bagattella Date: 1633 1. trifle 1 2. any of various games involving the rolling of balls into scoring areas 3. a short literary or ...
Bagehot
biographical name Walter 1826-1877 English economist & journalist
bagel
noun Etymology: Yiddish beygl, from Middle High German *böugel ring, from bouc ring, from Old High German; akin to Old English bēag ring, būgan to bend — more at bow Date: ...
bagful
noun Date: 15th century 1. as much or as many as a bag will hold 2. a large number or amount
baggage
I. noun Etymology: Middle English bagage, from Middle French, from bagues belongings, baggage Date: 15th century 1. suitcases, trunks, and personal belongings of travelers ; ...
bagger
noun see bag II
baggies
noun plural Date: 1963 baggy pants or shorts
Baggies
trademark — used for transparent plastic bags
baggily
adverb see baggy
bagginess
noun see baggy
bagging
noun Date: 1732 material (as cloth) for bags
baggy
adjective (baggier; -est) Date: 1831 1. loose, puffed out, or hanging like a bag 2. loosely constructed and inflated with inessential elements • baggily adverb • ...
Baghdad
geographical name city capital of Iraq on the middle Tigris population 3,841,268 • Baghdadi noun
Baghdadi
noun see Baghdad
baghouse
noun Date: 1914 a device or facility in which particulates are removed from a stream of exhaust gases (as from a blast furnace) as the stream passes through a large cloth bag; ...
bagman
noun Date: 1765 1. chiefly British traveling salesman 2. a person who on behalf of another collects or distributes illicitly gained money; broadly an intermediary in an ...
bagnio
noun (plural bagnios) Etymology: Italian bagno, literally, public baths (from the Turks' use of Roman baths at Constantinople as prisons), from Latin balneum, from Greek ...
bagpipe
noun Date: 14th century a wind instrument consisting of a reed melody pipe and from one to five drones with air supplied continuously either by a bag with valve-stopped mouth ...
bagpiper
noun see bagpipe
Bagration
biographical name Prince Pyotr Ivanovich 1765-1812 Russian general
baguette
noun Etymology: French, literally, rod, from Middle French, from Italian bacchetta, ultimately from Latin baculum staff Date: 1926 1. a gem having the shape of a narrow ...
Baguio
geographical name city Philippines in NW central Luzon; formerly the nation's summer capital population 183,000
bagwig
noun Date: 1717 an 18th century wig with the back hair enclosed in a small silk bag
bagworm
noun Date: 1862 any of a family (Psychidae) of moths with wingless females and plant-feeding larvae that live in a silk case covered with plant debris; especially one ...
Bahā' Allāh
or Bahaullah biographical name Mīrzā Ḥoseyn Alī Nūrī 1817-1892 Persian founder of the Bahā'ī faith
Baha'i
noun (plural Baha'is) Etymology: Persian bahā'ī, literally, follower of Bahā' Allāh (from Arabic, splendor of God) Date: 1889 an adherent of a religious movement ...
Bahaism
noun see Baha'i
Bahaist
noun or adjective see Baha'i
Bahamas
geographical name islands in the Atlantic SE of Florida; an independent member of the Commonwealth of Nations since 1973 capital Nassau area 4404 square miles (11,450 square ...
Bahamian
adjective or noun see Bahamas
Bahasa Indonesia
noun Etymology: Indonesian bahasa indonésia, literally, Indonesian language Date: 1952 Indonesian 2b
Bahaullah
biographical name see Bahā' Allāh
Bahawalpur
geographical name region Pakistan in SW Punjab; until 1947 a princely state of India
Bahia
geographical name 1. (or formerly Baía) state E Brazil capital Salvador area 216,612 square miles (561,025 square kilometers), population 11,801,810 2. — see Salvador • ...
Bahía Blanca
geographical name city & port E Argentina SW of Buenos Aires population 271,467
Bahía de Cochinos
geographical name see Pigs, Bay of
Bahia grass
noun Etymology: Bahia, state in Brazil Date: circa 1927 a perennial tropical American grass (Paspalum notatum) used in the southern United States as a lawn grass
Bahian
adjective or noun see Bahia
Bahnasa, El
geographical name — see Oxyrhynchus
Bahr al-Ghazal
geographical name river 445 miles (716 kilometers) SW Sudan flowing E to unite with the Bahr el Jebel forming the White Nile
Bahrain
also Bahrein geographical name 1. islands in Persian Gulf off coast of Arabia 2. an independent sultanate capital Manama (on Bahrain Island) area 255 square miles (661 ...
Bahraini
adjective or noun see Bahrain
Bahrein
geographical name see Bahrain
Bahreini
adjective or noun see Bahrain
baht
noun (plural baht; also bahts) Etymology: Thai bàad Date: 1828 — see money table
Baía
geographical name see Bahia 1
Baia-Mare
geographical name city NW Romania population 150,456
Baie-Comeau
geographical name town Canada in SE Quebec population 23,079
Baikal, Lake
or Lake Baykal geographical name lake Russia in Asia; 5715 feet (1742 meters) deep, about 395 miles (636 kilometers) long
bail
I. noun Etymology: Middle English baille, from Anglo-French, bucket, from Medieval Latin bajula water vessel, from feminine of Latin bajulus porter, carrier Date: 14th century ...
bail out
intransitive verb Date: 1930 1. to parachute from an aircraft 2. to abandon a harmful or difficult situation; also leave, depart
bailable
adjective see bail IV
Baile Atha Cliath
geographical name 1. — see Dublin 3 2. — see Dublin 4
bailee
noun Date: 1528 the person to whom personal property is bailed
bailer
I. noun see bailor II. noun see bail II
bailey
noun (plural baileys) Etymology: Middle English bailli, palisade, bailey, from Anglo-French baille, balie Date: 13th century 1. the outer wall of a castle or any of several ...
Bailey
I. biographical name Liberty Hyde 1858-1954 American botanist II. biographical name Nathan or Nathaniel died 1742 English lexicographer III. biographical name Pearl Mae ...
bailie
noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century 1. chiefly dialect bailiff 2. a Scottish municipal magistrate corresponding to an English alderman
bailiff
noun Etymology: Middle English baillif, bailie, from Anglo-French baillif, from bail power, authority, office, from baillier to govern, administer, from Medieval Latin bajulare ...
bailiffship
noun see bailiff
bailiwick
noun Etymology: Middle English baillifwik, from baillif + wik dwelling place, village, from Old English wīc, from Latin vicus village — more at vicinity Date: 15th century ...
Baillie
biographical name Joanna 1762-1851 Scottish dramatist & poet
bailment
noun Date: 1554 the act of bailing a person or personal property
bailor
or bailer noun Date: 1602 a person who delivers personal property to another in trust
bailout
noun Date: 1951 a rescue from financial distress
bailsman
noun Date: 1862 one who gives bail for another
Bain
biographical name Alexander 1818-1903 Scottish psychologist
bain-marie
noun (plural bains-marie) Etymology: French, from Middle French, translation of Medieval Latin balneum Mariae, literally, Mary's bath, after Maria Hebraea, Mary the Jewess, ...
Baird
biographical name John Logie 1888-1946 Scottish inventor
bairn
noun Etymology: Middle English bern, barn, from Old English bearn & Old Norse barn; akin to Old High German barn child Date: before 12th century chiefly Scottish child
Bairnsfather
biographical name Bruce 1888-1959 English cartoonist
bait
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse beita; akin to Old English bǣtan to bait, bītan to bite — more at bite Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. a. to ...
bait and switch
noun Date: 1967 1. a sales tactic in which a customer is attracted by the advertisement of a low-priced item but is then encouraged to buy a higher-priced one 2. the ploy of ...
baiter
noun see bait I
baitfish
noun Date: 1820 a small fish (as a golden shiner or menhaden) that attracts and is a food source for a larger game fish; also a fish used for bait
baiza
noun (plural baiza or baizas) Etymology: Arabic baisa, probably from Gujarati paisɔ, from Hindi paisā quarter-anna coin — more at paisa Date: 1970 — see rial at money ...
baize
noun Etymology: Middle French baies, plural of baie baize, from feminine of bai bay-colored — more at bay Date: 1578 a coarse woolen or cotton fabric napped to imitate felt
Baja California
geographical name peninsula 760 miles (1216 kilometers) long NW Mexico between the Pacific & Gulf of California; divided into the states of Baja California (to the N capital ...
Bakan
geographical name — see Shimonoseki
bake
I. verb (baked; baking) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English bacan; akin to Old High German bahhan to bake, Greek phōgein to roast Date: before 12th century transitive ...
bake sale
noun Date: 1919 a fund-raising event at which usually homemade foods (as cakes and cookies) are sold
Bakelite
trademark — used for any of various synthetic resins and plastics
Baker
I. biographical name James Addison 1930- United States secretary of treasury (1985-88); secretary of state (1989-92) II. biographical name Newton Diehl 1871-1937 American ...
baker
noun see bake I
Baker Island
geographical name atoll central Pacific near the equator at 176°31′W; belongs to United States
Baker Lake
geographical name — see Dubawnt

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.088 c;