Слова на букву axio-buck (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву axio-buck (6389)

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betray
verb Etymology: Middle English, from be- + trayen to betray, from Anglo-French trahir, from Latin tradere — more at traitor Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. to lead ...
betrayal
noun see betray
betrayer
noun see betray
betroth
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from be- + trouthe truth, troth Date: 14th century 1. to promise to marry 2. to give in marriage
betrothal
noun Date: 1831 1. the act of betrothing or fact of being betrothed 2. a mutual promise or contract for a future marriage
betrothed
noun Date: 1588 the person to whom one is betrothed
betta
noun Etymology: New Latin, probably from Javanese waděr, a freshwater fish Date: 1927 any of a genus (Betta of the family Anabantidae) of small brilliantly colored ...
Bettelheim
biographical name Bruno 1903-1990 American (Austrian-born) psychologist
Bettendorf
geographical name city E Iowa E of Davenport population 31,275
better
I. adjective, comparative of good Etymology: Middle English bettre, from Old English betera; akin to Old English bōt remedy, Sanskrit bhadra fortunate Date: before 12th ...
better half
noun Date: 1580 spouse
better-off
adjective Date: circa 1859 1. being in comfortable economic circumstances 2. being in a more advantageous position
betterment
noun Date: 1598 1. a making or becoming better 2. an improvement that adds to the value of a property or facility
Betterton
biographical name Thomas circa 1635-1710 English actor
betting shop
noun Date: 1852 British a shop where bets are taken
bettor
or better noun Date: 1609 one that bets
between
I. preposition Etymology: Middle English betwene, preposition & adverb, from Old English betwēonum, from be- + -twēonum (dative plural) (akin to Gothic tweihnai two each); ...
between a rock and a hard place
also between the rock and the hard place phrasal in a difficult or uncomfortable position with no attractive way out
between Scylla and Charybdis
phrasal between two equally hazardous alternatives
between the devil and the deep blue sea
phrasal faced with two equally objectionable alternatives
between the lines
phrasal 1. by implication ; in an indirect way 2. by way of inference
between the rock and the hard place
phrasal see between a rock and a hard place
betweenness
noun Date: 1884 the quality or state of being between two others in an ordered mathematical set
betweentimes
adverb Date: 1580 at or during intervals
betweenwhiles
adverb Date: 1656 betweentimes
betwixt
adverb or preposition Etymology: Middle English, from Old English betwux, from be- + -twux (akin to Gothic tweihnai two each) — more at between Date: before 12th century ...
betwixt and between
adverb or adjective Date: 1789 in a midway position ; neither one thing nor the other
Beulah
noun Date: 1684 an idyllic land near the end of life's journey in Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress
beurre blanc
noun Etymology: French, literally, white butter Date: 1931 a seasoned butter sauce (as for fish) flavored with white wine, shallots, and vinegar or lemon juice
beurre manié
noun Etymology: French, literally, handled butter Date: 1939 flour and butter kneaded together used as a thickener in sauces
beurre noir
noun Etymology: French, literally, black butter Date: 1830 butter heated until brown or black and often flavored with vinegar or lemon juice
Beuthen
geographical name — see Bytom
BeV
abbreviation billion electron volts
BEV
abbreviation Black English vernacular
bevel
I. adjective Date: circa 1600 oblique, beveled II. noun Etymology: Middle French *bevel, from Old French *baivel, from baïf with open mouth, from baer to yawn — more at ...
bevel gear
noun Date: circa 1790 either of a pair of toothed wheels whose working surfaces are inclined to nonparallel axes
beverage
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from beivre to drink, from Latin bibere — more at potable Date: 14th century a drinkable liquid
Beveridge
I. biographical name Albert Jeremiah 1862-1927 American politician & historian II. biographical name William Henry 1879-1963 1st Baron Beveridge of Tuggal English economist
Beverley
geographical name town N England NNW of Hull population 109,500
Beverly
geographical name city NE Massachusetts population 39,862
Beverly Hills
geographical name city SW California within city of Los Angeles population 33,784
Bevin
biographical name Ernest 1881-1951 British labor leader & politician
bevy
noun (plural bevies) Etymology: Middle English bevey Date: 15th century 1. a large group or collection 2. a group of animals and especially quail
bewail
transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. to wail over 2. to express deep sorrow for usually by wailing and lamentation Synonyms: see deplore
beware
verb Etymology: Middle English been war, from been to be + war careful — more at be, ware Date: 14th century intransitive verb to be on one's guard transitive verb 1. ...
bewhiskered
adjective Date: 1820 having whiskers
bewigged
adjective Date: 1774 wearing a wig
bewilder
transitive verb (-wildered; bewildering) Date: 1684 1. to cause to lose one's bearings 2. to perplex or confuse especially by a complexity, variety, or multitude of objects ...
bewilderedly
adverb see bewilder
bewilderedness
noun see bewilder
bewilderingly
adverb see bewilder
bewilderment
noun Date: 1811 1. the quality or state of being bewildered 2. a bewildering tangle or confusion
bewitch
verb Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. a. to influence or affect especially injuriously by witchcraft b. to cast a spell over 2. to attract as if by the power ...
bewitchery
noun see bewitch
bewitchingly
adverb see bewitch
bewitchment
noun Date: 1607 1. a. the act or power of bewitching b. a spell that bewitches 2. the state of being bewitched
bewray
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from be- + wreyen to accuse, from Old English wrēgan; akin to Old High German ruogen to accuse Date: 13th century archaic divulge, ...
Bexley
geographical name borough of E Greater London, England population 211,200
bey
noun Etymology: Turkish, gentleman, chief Date: 1537 1. a. a provincial governor in the Ottoman Empire b. the former native ruler of Tunis or Tunisia 2. — used as a ...
Beyle
biographical name Marie-Henri — see Stendhal
Beyoglu
or formerly Pera geographical name section of Istanbul, Turkey comprising area N of the Golden Horn
beyond
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English, preposition & adverb, from Old English begeondan, from be- + geondan beyond, from geond yond — more at yond Date: before 12th century 1. ...
beyond one's depth
or out of one's depth phrasal beyond the limits of one's capabilities
bezant
noun Etymology: Middle English besant, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin Byzantius Byzantine, from Byzantium, ancient name of Istanbul Date: 13th century 1. solidus 1 2. ...
bezel
noun Etymology: probably from dialect form of French biseau bezel, from Middle French Date: 1611 1. a rim that holds a transparent covering (as on a watch, clock, or ...
Béziers
geographical name city S France SW of Montpellier population 72,362
bezique
noun Etymology: French bésique Date: 1861 a card game similar to pinochle that is played with a pack of 64 cards
bezoar
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Medieval Latin, from Arabic dialect bezuwār, from Arabic bāzahr, from Persian pād-zahr, from pād protecting (against) + zahr poison Date: ...
bezoar stone
noun see bezoar
Bezwada
geographical name — see Vijayawada
bf
abbreviation boldface
BF
abbreviation 1. bachelor of forestry 2. board foot 3. brought forward
BFA
abbreviation bachelor of fine arts
bg
abbreviation 1. background 2. bag 3. beige 4. being
BG
or B Gen abbreviation brigadier general
BGH
abbreviation bovine growth hormone
BGS
abbreviation bachelor of general studies
Bh
symbol bohrium
BH
abbreviation 1. bill of health 2. Brinell hardness
BHA
noun Etymology: butylated hydroxyanisole Date: 1950 a phenolic antioxidant C11H16O2 used especially to preserve fats and oils in food
Bhagalpur
geographical name city E India on the Ganges in E Bihar population 254,993
Bhagavad Gita
noun Etymology: Sanskrit Bhagavadgītā, literally, song of the blessed one (Krishna) Date: circa 1785 a Hindu devotional work in poetic form
Bhakra Dam
geographical name hydroelectric & irrigation dam 740 feet (226 meters) N India in Punjab NW of Bilaspur in gorge of the Sutlej
bhakti
noun Etymology: Sanskrit, literally, portion Date: 1832 devotion to a deity constituting a way to salvation in Hinduism
Bhamo
geographical name city N Myanmar on the upper Irrawaddy population 13,767
bhang
noun Etymology: Hindi bhāṅg & Urdu bhang hemp Date: 1563 a mildly intoxicating preparation of the leaves and flowering tops of uncultivated hemp; also hemp 1a, c — ...
bhangra
noun Etymology: Panjabi bhaṁgṛā, a kind of folk dance Date: 1965 popular dance music originating chiefly in England that combines traditional Punjabi music with elements ...
bharal
noun Etymology: Hindi Date: 1838 any of a genus (Pseudois) of goatlike bovid mammals of the Himalayas and western China having a bluish-gray coat
Bhatpara
geographical name city E India in West Bengal population 315,976
Bhaunagar
geographical name see Bhavnagar
Bhavnagar
or Bhaunagar geographical name city & port W India in S Gujarat on Gulf of Khambhat population 402,338
BHC
noun Etymology: benzene hexachloride Date: 1946 1. any of several stereoisomeric chlorine derivatives C6H6Cl6 of cyclohexane in which the chlorine atoms are all attached to ...
bhd
abbreviation bulkhead
BHL
abbreviation 1. bachelor of Hebrew letters 2. bachelor of Hebrew literature
BHN
abbreviation Brinell hardness number
Bhojpuri
noun Etymology: Hindi bhojpurī, from Bhojpur, village in Bihar Date: 1884 an Indo-Aryan language spoken in western Bihar and eastern Uttar Pradesh, India
Bhopal
geographical name 1. former state N central India in & N of Vindhya Mountains capital Bhopal; now part of Madhya Pradesh 2. city N central India NW of Nagpur capital of ...
bhp
abbreviation bishop
BHT
noun Etymology: butylated hydroxytoluene Date: 1961 a phenolic antioxidant C15H24O used especially to preserve fats and oils in food
Bhubaneshwar
geographical name see Bhubaneswar
Bhubaneswar
or Bhubaneshwar geographical name city E India S of Cuttack capital of Orissa population 411,542
Bhumibol Adulyadej
biographical name 1927- king of Thailand (1946- )
Bhutan
geographical name country Asia in Himalayas on NE border of India; a monarchy capital Thimphu area 18,000 square miles (46,800 square kilometers), population 1,546,000 • ...
Bhutanese
adjective or noun see Bhutan
Bhutto
biographical name Benazir 1953- prime minister of Pakistan (1988-90; 1993-96)
bi
noun or adjective Date: 1956 bisexual
Bi
symbol bismuth
bi-
I. prefix Etymology: Middle English, from Latin — more at twi- 1. a. two b. coming or occurring every two c. into two parts 2. a. twice ; doubly ; on ...
bi-level
I. adjective Date: 1960 1. having two levels of freight or passenger space 2. having two floors with a ground-level entry situated between the floors II. noun Date: 1966 ...
bi-swing
adjective Etymology: 1bi- + swing; perhaps from the freedom of movement allowed by this jacket Date: 1937 made with a pleat or gusset at the back of the arms
BIA
abbreviation 1. bachelor of industrial administration 2. Bureau of Indian Affairs
Biafra
geographical name former secessionist state (1967-70) in SE Nigeria • Biafran adjective or noun
Biafra, Bight of
or Bight of Bonny geographical name the E section of Gulf of Guinea W Africa
Biafran
adjective or noun see Biafra
Biak
geographical name island off W New Guinea; largest of the Schoutens
bialy
noun (plural bialys) Etymology: Yiddish, short for bialystoker, from bialystoker of Bialystok, city in Poland Date: 1965 a flat breakfast roll that has a depressed center and ...
biannual
adjective Date: 1877 1. occurring twice a year 2. biennial 1 Usage: see bi- • biannually adverb
biannually
adverb see biannual
Biarritz
geographical name commune SW France on Bay of Biscay population 28,887
Bias
geographical name — see Beas
bias
I. noun Etymology: Middle French biais Date: 1530 1. a line diagonal to the grain of a fabric; especially a line at a 45 degree angle to the selvage often utilized in the ...
bias crime
noun Date: 1982 hate crime
bias tape
noun Date: 1915 a narrow strip of cloth cut on the bias, folded, and used for finishing or decorating clothing
bias-belted tire
noun Date: 1968 a pneumatic tire with a belt (as of steel or fiberglass) to help prevent punctures that is under the tread and on top of the plies of cords which form the ...
bias-ply tire
noun Date: 1968 a pneumatic tire having crossed plies of cords set diagonally to the center line of the tread
biased
adjective Date: 1649 1. exhibiting or characterized by bias; especially prejudiced 2. tending to yield one outcome more frequently than others in a statistical experiment ...
biasness
noun see bias II
biathlete
noun Etymology: blend of athlete and biathlon Date: 1968 an athlete who competes in a biathlon
biathlon
noun Etymology: 1bi- + -athlon (as in decathlon) Date: 1958 a composite athletic contest consisting of cross-country skiing and rifle sharpshooting
biaxial
adjective Date: 1854 having or relating to two axes or optic axes • biaxially adverb
biaxially
adverb see biaxial
Białystok
geographical name city NE Poland population 268,085
bib
I. verb (bibbed; bibbing) Etymology: Middle English bibben Date: 14th century drink II. noun Date: 1580 1. a cloth or plastic shield tied under the chin to protect the ...
bib and tucker
noun Date: 1747 an outfit of clothing — usually used in the phrase best bib and tucker
Bibb
noun see Bibb lettuce
Bibb lettuce
noun Etymology: Major John Bibb, 19th century American grower Date: 1961 a butter lettuce of a variety that has a small head and dark green color — called also Bibb
bibbed
adjective see bib II
bibber
noun Date: 1536 a person who regularly drinks alcoholic beverages • bibbery noun
bibbery
noun see bibber
bibelot
noun (plural bibelots) Etymology: French Date: 1873 a small household ornament or decorative object ; trinket
bible
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin biblia, from Greek, plural of biblion book, diminutive of byblos papyrus, book, from Byblos, ancient ...
Bible Belt
noun Date: 1925 an area chiefly in the southern United States whose inhabitants are believed to hold uncritical allegiance to the literal accuracy of the Bible; broadly an ...
Bible paper
noun Date: 1903 India paper 2
Bible-thumper
noun Date: circa 1923 an overzealous advocate of Christian fundamentalism • Bible-thumping adjective
Bible-thumping
adjective see Bible-thumper
bibless
adjective see bib II
bibli-
or biblio- combining form Etymology: Middle French, from Latin, from Greek, from biblion book
biblical
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin biblicus, from biblia Date: 1756 1. of, relating to, or being in accord with the Bible 2. suggestive of the Bible or Bible times • ...
biblically
adverb see biblical
biblicism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1850 adherence to the letter of the Bible • biblicist noun, often capitalized
biblicist
noun see biblicism
biblio-
combining form see bibli-
bibliographer
noun Date: 1775 1. an expert in bibliography 2. a compiler of bibliographies
bibliographic
adjective see bibliography
bibliographical
adjective see bibliography
bibliographically
adverb see bibliography
bibliography
noun (plural -phies) Etymology: probably from New Latin bibliographia, from Greek, the copying of books, from bibli- + -graphia -graphy Date: 1802 1. the history, ...
bibliolater
noun Date: 1847 1. one having excessive reverence for the letter of the Bible 2. one overly devoted to books • bibliolatrous adjective • bibliolatry noun
bibliolatrous
adjective see bibliolater
bibliolatry
noun see bibliolater
bibliology
noun Date: 1806 1. the history and science of books as physical objects ; bibliography 2. often capitalized the study of the theological doctrine of the Bible
bibliomania
noun Etymology: French bibliomanie, from bibli- + manie mania, from Late Latin mania Date: 1734 extreme preoccupation with collecting books • bibliomaniac noun or ...
bibliomaniac
noun or adjective see bibliomania
bibliomaniacal
adjective see bibliomania
bibliopegic
adjective see bibliopegy
bibliopegist
noun see bibliopegy
bibliopegy
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek bibli- + pēgnynai to fasten together — more at pact Date: circa 1859 the art of binding books • bibliopegic adjective • ...
bibliophile
noun Etymology: French, from bibli- + -phile Date: 1824 a lover of books especially for qualities of format; also a book collector • bibliophilic adjective • ...
bibliophilic
adjective see bibliophile
bibliophilism
noun see bibliophile
bibliophily
noun see bibliophile
bibliopole
or bibliopolist noun Etymology: Latin bibliopola bookseller, from Greek bibliopōlēs, from bibli- + pōlein to sell Date: 1775 a dealer especially in rare or curious books
bibliopolist
noun see bibliopole
bibliotheca
noun (plural -cas or bibliothecae) Etymology: Latin, from Greek bibliothēkē, from bibli- + thēkē case; akin to Greek tithenai to put, place — more at do Date: circa 1824 ...
bibliothecal
adjective see bibliotheca
bibliotherapy
noun Date: 1919 the use of reading materials for help in solving personal problems or for psychiatric therapy; also the reading materials so used
bibulous
adjective Etymology: Latin bibulus, from bibere to drink — more at potable Date: 1675 1. highly absorbent 2. a. fond of alcoholic beverages b. of, relating to, or ...
bibulously
adverb see bibulous
bibulousness
noun see bibulous
bicameral
adjective Etymology: 1bi- + Late Latin camera chamber — more at chamber Date: 1856 having, consisting of, or based on two legislative chambers • bicameralism noun
bicameralism
noun see bicameral
bicarb
noun Date: 1922 sodium bicarbonate
bicarbonate
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1814 an acid carbonate
bicarbonate of soda
Date: 1814 sodium bicarbonate
bicentenary
noun Date: 1872 bicentennial • bicentenary adjective
bicentennial
noun Date: 1883 a 200th anniversary or its celebration • bicentennial adjective
bicep
noun Etymology: back-formation from biceps Date: 1939 biceps a
biceps
noun (plural biceps; also bicepses) Etymology: New Latin bicipit-, biceps, from Latin, two-headed, from bi- + capit-, caput head — more at head Date: 1634 a muscle having ...
biceps brachii
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, biceps of the arm Date: circa 1860 biceps a
biceps femoris
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, biceps of the femur Date: circa 1860 biceps b
bichloride of mercury
Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1810 mercuric chloride
bichon frise
noun (plural bichons frises) Etymology: modification of French bichon à poil frisé curly-haired lapdog Date: 1966 any of a breed of small sturdy dogs of Mediterranean ...
bichromate
noun Date: 1836 a dichromate especially of sodium or potassium • bichromated adjective
bichromated
adjective see bichromate
bichrome
adjective Date: 1921 two-colored
bicipital
adjective Date: 1646 of, relating to, or being a biceps
bicker
I. noun Etymology: Middle English biker Date: 14th century 1. petulant quarreling ; altercation 2. a sound of or as if of bickering II. intransitive verb (bickered; ...
bickerer
noun see bicker II
bicoastal
adjective Date: 1972 of or relating to or living or working on both the east and west coasts of the United States
bicolor
I. adjective see bicolored II. noun see bicolored
bicolored
or bicolor adjective Etymology: Latin bicolor, from bi- + color Date: circa 1843 two-colored • bicolor noun
bicomponent
adjective Date: 1962 being a fiber made of two polymers having slightly different physical properties so that the fiber has a permanent crimp and fabrics made from it have ...
biconcave
adjective Date: 1833 concave on both sides • biconcavity noun
biconcavity
noun see biconcave
biconditional
noun Date: 1940 a relation between two propositions that is true only when both propositions are simultaneously true or false — see truth table table
biconvex
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1852 convex on both sides • biconvexity noun
biconvexity
noun see biconvex
bicorne
noun Etymology: French, from Latin bicornis two-horned, from bi- + cornu horn — more at horn Date: 1936 cocked hat 2
bicultural
adjective Date: 1940 of, relating to, or including two distinct cultures • biculturalism noun
biculturalism
noun see bicultural
bicuspid
I. adjective Etymology: New Latin bicuspid-, bicuspis, from bi- + Latin cuspid-, cuspis point Date: circa 1839 having or ending in two points II. noun Date: 1852 a human ...
bicuspid valve
noun Date: circa 1903 mitral valve
bicycle
I. noun Etymology: French, from bi- + -cycle (as in tricycle) Date: 1863 a vehicle with two wheels tandem, handlebars for steering, a saddle seat, and pedals by which it is ...
bicycle shorts
noun plural Date: 1982 tight-fitting shorts made usually of spandex and worn chiefly by bicyclists
bicycler
noun see bicycle II
bicyclic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1909 1. consisting of or arranged in two cycles 2. containing two usually fused rings in the structure ...
bicyclist
noun see bicycle II
BID
abbreviation bachelor of industrial design
bid
I. verb (bade or bid; bidden or bid; also bade; bidding) Etymology: partly from Middle English bidden, from Old English biddan; akin to Old High German bitten to entreat, and ...
bid fair
phrasal to seem likely
bid up
transitive verb Date: 1864 to raise the price of (as property at auction) by a succession of offers
Bidault
biographical name Georges 1899-1983 French statesman
biddability
noun see biddable
biddable
adjective Date: circa 1768 1. easily led, taught, or controlled ; docile 2. capable of being bid • biddability noun • biddably adverb
biddably
adverb see biddable
bidder
noun see bid I
Biddle
I. biographical name John 1615-1662 founder of English Unitarianism II. biographical name Nicholas 1786-1844 American financier
biddy
I. noun (plural biddies) Etymology: perhaps imitative Date: 1601 hen 1a; also a young chicken II. noun (plural biddies) Etymology: diminutive of the name Bridget Date: ...
bide
verb (bode or bided; bided; biding) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English bīdan; akin to Old High German bītan to wait, Latin fidere to trust, Greek peithesthai to ...
bider
noun see bide
bidet
noun Etymology: French, small horse, bidet, from Middle French, from bider to trot Date: 1766 a bathroom fixture used especially for bathing the external genitals and the ...
bidi
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu bīṛī hand-rolled cigarette with a leaf wrapper Date: circa 1885 a small hand-rolled often flavored cigarette made chiefly in India
bidialectal
adjective see bidialectalism
bidialectalism
noun Date: 1958 facility in using two dialects of the same language; also the teaching of Standard English to pupils who normally use a nonstandard dialect • bidialectal ...
bidirectional
adjective Date: 1928 involving, moving, or taking place in two usually opposite directions • bidirectionally adverb
bidirectionally
adverb see bidirectional
bidonville
noun Etymology: French, from bidon metal can or drum + ville city Date: 1952 a settlement of jerry-built dwellings on the outskirts of a city (as in France or North Africa)
BIE
abbreviation bachelor of industrial engineering
Biedermeier
adjective Etymology: after Gottlieb Biedermeier, satirical name for an uninspired German bourgeois Date: 1905 of a style of unostentatious furniture and interior decoration ...
Biel
or French Bienne geographical name commune NW Switzerland in Bern canton population 52,670
Bielefeld
geographical name city W central Germany E of Münster population 322,132
Bielsko-Biała
geographical name city S Poland population 179,879
bien entendu
foreign term Etymology: French well understood ; of course
bien vu
foreign term Etymology: French well regarded
bien-pensant
foreign term Etymology: French right-minded ; one who holds orthodox views
Bienne
geographical name see Biel
biennial
adjective Date: 1562 1. occurring every two years 2. continuing or lasting for two years; specifically growing vegetatively during the first year and fruiting and dying ...
biennially
adverb see biennial
biennium
noun (plural -niums or biennia) Etymology: Latin, from bi- + annus year — more at annual Date: 1899 a period of two years
bienséance
foreign term Etymology: French propriety
Bienville
biographical name Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, sieur de 1680-1768 French colonial governor of Louisiana
bier
noun Etymology: Middle English bere, from Old English bǣr; akin to Old English beran to carry — more at bear Date: before 12th century 1. archaic a framework for carrying ...
Bierce
biographical name Ambrose Gwinnett 1842-?1914 American author
Bierstadt
biographical name Albert 1830-1902 American (German-born) painter
biface
noun Date: 1934 a bifacial stone tool
bifacial
adjective Date: circa 1847 having opposite sides or faces worked on to form an edge for cutting or scraping • bifacially adverb
bifacially
adverb see bifacial
biff
noun Etymology: probably imitative Date: circa 1887 whack, blow • biff transitive verb
bifid
adjective Etymology: Latin bifidus, from bi- + -fidus -fid Date: 1661 divided into two equal lobes or parts by a median cleft
bifilar
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary bi- + Latin filum thread — more at file Date: 1846 1. involving two threads or wires 2. involving a single ...
bifilarly
adverb see bifilar
biflagellate
adjective Date: 1856 having two flagella
bifocal
I. adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1888 1. having two focal lengths 2. having one part that corrects for near vision and one for distant ...
bifold
adjective Date: 1929 designed to fold twice
bifunctional
adjective Date: 1929 having two functions; especially difunctional

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