Слова на букву axio-buck (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву axio-buck (6389)

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birdlife
noun Date: 1860 avifauna
birdlike
adjective see bird I
birdlime
noun Date: 15th century 1. a sticky substance usually made from the bark of a holly (Ilex aquifolium) that is smeared on twigs to snare small birds 2. something that ...
birdman
noun Date: 1697 1. a person who deals with birds 2. a person who flies (as in an aircraft)
birdseed
noun Date: 1840 a mixture of seeds (as of hemp, millet, and sunflowers) used for feeding caged and wild birds
birdsong
noun Date: 1896 the song of one or more birds
birefringence
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary 1bi- + refringent refracting, from Latin refringent-, refringens, present participle of refringere to break up — more at ...
birefringent
adjective see birefringence
bireme
noun Etymology: Latin biremis, from bi- + remus oar — more at row Date: 1662 a galley with two banks of oars used especially by the ancient Greeks and Phoenicians
biretta
noun Etymology: Italian berretta, from Old Occitan berret cap, from Medieval Latin birretum, from Late Latin birrus cloak with a hood, perhaps of Celtic origin; akin to Middle ...
birk
noun Etymology: Middle English birch, birk Date: 14th century chiefly Scottish birch
Birkbeck
biographical name George 1776-1841 English physician
Birkenhead
I. biographical name 1st Earl of 1872-1930 Frederick Edwin Smith English jurist & statesman II. geographical name borough NW England in Merseyside on the Mersey estuary ...
birkie
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1724 1. Scottish a lively smart assertive person 2. Scottish fellow, boy
birl
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English byrelian; probably akin to Old English beran to carry — more at bear Date: circa 1585 chiefly Scottish ...
birler
noun see birl II
Birman
noun Etymology: variant of Burman Date: 1973 a long-haired domestic cat of a breed originating in Burma (Myanmar) and resembling the Siamese in eye color and coat pattern but ...
Birmingham
geographical name 1. city N central Alabama population 242,820 2. city W central England capital of West Midlands population 934,900
Biro
trademark — used for a ballpoint pen
Birobidzhan
geographical name city Russia in Asia capital of Jewish Autonomous Oblast population 86,300
Biron
biographical name Ernst Johann 1690-1772 originally Bühren Duke of Kurland German politician in Russia
birr
noun (plural birr) Etymology: Amharic bərr, literally, silver Date: circa 1978 — see money table
birse
noun Etymology: Middle English *birst, from Old English byrst — more at bristle Date: before 12th century 1. chiefly Scottish a bristle or tuft of bristles 2. chiefly ...
birth
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse byrth; akin to Old English beran Date: 13th century 1. a. the emergence of a new individual ...
birth canal
noun Date: 1927 the channel formed by the cervix, vagina, and vulva through which the fetus passes during birth
birth certificate
noun Date: 1860 a copy of an official record of a person's date and place of birth and parentage
birth control
noun Date: 1914 1. control of the number of children born especially by preventing or lessening the frequency of conception ; contraception 2. contraceptive devices or ...
birth control pill
noun Date: 1966 any of various preparations that usually contain a combination of a progestin (as norethindrone) and an estrogen (as ethinyl estradiol), are taken orally ...
birth defect
noun Date: 1971 a physical or biochemical defect that is present at birth and may be inherited or environmentally induced
birth pang
noun Date: 1721 1. one of the regularly recurrent pains that are characteristic of childbirth — usually used in plural 2. plural disorder and distress incident especially ...
birthday
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the day of a person's birth b. a day of origin 2. an anniversary of a birth
birthday suit
noun Date: 1753 unclothed skin ; nakedness
birthing room
noun Date: 1978 a comfortably furnished hospital room where both labor and delivery take place and in which the baby usually remains during the hospital stay
birthmark
noun Date: 1580 an unusual mark or blemish on the skin at birth ; nevus
birthplace
noun Date: 1607 place of birth or origin
birthrate
noun Date: 1859 the ratio between births and individuals in a specified population and time
birthright
noun Date: 1530 a right, privilege, or possession to which a person is entitled by birth
birthroot
noun Date: 1822 any of several trilliums with astringent roots used in folk medicine
birthstone
noun Date: 1907 a gemstone associated symbolically with the month of one's birth
birthwort
noun Date: 1551 any of several herbs or woody vines (genus Aristolochia of the family Aristolochiaceae, the birthwort family) with aromatic roots used in folk medicine to aid ...
bis
adverb Etymology: Latin, from Old Latin dvis; akin to Old High German zwiro twice, Latin duo two — more at two Date: 1609 1. again — used in music as a direction to ...
bis dat qui cito dat
foreign term Etymology: Latin he gives twice who gives promptly
Bisayan
variant of Visayan
Biscay
or Biscaya geographical name — see Vizcaya • Biscayan adjective or noun
Biscay, Bay of
geographical name inlet of the Atlantic between W coast of France & N coast of Spain
Biscaya
I. geographical name see Biscay II. geographical name see Vizcaya
Biscayan
adjective or noun see Biscay
Biscayne Bay
geographical name inlet of the Atlantic SE Florida; S part forms Biscayne National Park
biscotto
noun (plural biscotti) Etymology: Italian, biscuit, cookie, from (pane) biscotto, literally, bread baked twice Date: 1953 a crisp cookie or biscuit of Italian origin that is ...
biscuit
noun (plural biscuits; also biscuit) Etymology: Middle English bisquite, from Anglo-French besquit, from (pain) besquit twice-cooked bread Date: 14th century 1. a. any of ...
biscuity
adjective see biscuit
bisect
verb Etymology: 1bi- + intersect Date: circa 1645 transitive verb to divide into two usually equal parts intransitive verb cross, intersect • bisection noun • ...
bisection
noun see bisect
bisectional
adjective see bisect
bisectionally
adverb see bisect
bisector
noun Date: 1864 one that bisects; especially a straight line that bisects an angle or a line segment
bisexual
adjective Date: 1824 1. a. possessing characters of both sexes ; hermaphroditic b. of, relating to, or characterized by a tendency to direct sexual desire toward both ...
bisexuality
noun see bisexual
bisexually
adverb see bisexual
Bishkek
or 1926-91 Frunze geographical name city on Chu River capital of Kyrgyzstan population 641,400
Bisho
geographical name town S Republic of South Africa; formerly capital of Ciskei
bishop
noun Etymology: Middle English bisshop, from Old English bisceop, from Late Latin episcopus, from Greek episkopos, literally, overseer, from epi- + skeptesthai to look — more ...
Bishop
I. biographical name Elizabeth 1911-1979 American poet II. biographical name John Michael 1936- American microbiologist
bishopric
noun Etymology: Middle English bisshopriche, from Old English bisceoprīce, from bisceop + rīce kingdom — more at rich Date: before 12th century 1. diocese 2. the office ...
Bishops' Bible
noun Date: 1835 an officially commissioned English translation of the Bible published in 1568
Bisitun
or Behistun or Bisutun geographical name ruined town W Iran E of Kermanshah
Biskra
geographical name city NE Algeria at an oasis on S edge of Atlas Mountains population 128,747
Bismarck
I. biographical name Prince Otto Eduard Leopold von 1815-1898 in full Bismarck- Schönhausen 1st chancellor of German Empire (1871-90) • Bismarckian adjective II. ...
Bismarck Archipelago
geographical name archipelago W Pacific N of E end of New Guinea area 19,173 square miles (49,658 square kilometers)
Bismarck Range
geographical name mountain range Papua New Guinea NW of Owen Stanley Range; highest peak Mt. Wilhelm
Bismarck Sea
geographical name sea comprising the part of the W Pacific enclosed by the islands of the Bismarck Archipelago
Bismarckian
adjective see Bismarck I
bismuth
noun Etymology: New Latin bismuthum, modification of German Wismut Date: 1668 a heavy brittle grayish-white chiefly trivalent metallic element that is chemically like arsenic ...
bismuth subsalicylate
noun Date: 1941 a drug C7H5BiO4 taken orally to relieve diarrhea, nausea, and indigestion
bismuthic
adjective see bismuth
bison
noun (plural bison) Etymology: Latin bisont-, bison, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German wisant aurochs; akin to Old Prussian wissambrs aurochs Date: circa 1611 any of ...
bisontine
adjective see bison
bisque
I. noun Etymology: French Date: 1647 1. a. a thick cream soup made with shellfish or game b. a cream soup of pureed vegetables 2. ice cream containing powdered nuts ...
Bissau
geographical name city & port capital of Guinea-Bissau population 125,000
bistate
adjective Date: 1928 of or relating to two states
bister
or bistre noun Etymology: French bistre Date: circa 1751 1. a yellowish-brown to dark brown pigment used in art 2. a grayish to yellowish brown • bistered adjective
bistered
adjective see bister
bistort
noun Etymology: Middle French bistorte, from Medieval Latin *bistorta, from Latin bis + torta, feminine of tortus, past participle of torquēre to twist — more at torture ...
bistre
noun see bister
bistro
noun (plural bistros) Etymology: French Date: 1921 1. a small or unpretentious restaurant 2. a. a small bar or tavern b. nightclub
bisulfate
noun Date: 1814 an acid sulfate
bisulfide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1863 disulfide
bisulfite
noun Etymology: French, from bi- + sulfite Date: circa 1846 an acid sulfite
Bisutun
geographical name see Bisitun
bit
I. noun Etymology: Middle English bitt, from Old English bite act of biting; akin to Old English bītan bite Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) the biting or cutting edge or ...
bit by bit
phrasal by degrees ; little by little
bitartrate
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1827 an acid tartrate
bitch
I. noun Etymology: Middle English bicche, from Old English bicce Date: before 12th century 1. the female of the dog or some other carnivorous mammals 2. a. a lewd or ...
bitch goddess
noun Date: 1906 success; especially material or worldly success
bitchery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1936 malicious, spiteful, or overbearing behavior; also an instance of such behavior
bitchily
adverb see bitchy
bitchin'
adjective Etymology: probably short for sonofabitching, from son of a bitch + 3-ing Date: 1957 1. slang remarkably bad ; detestable
bitchiness
noun see bitchy
bitchy
adjective (bitchier; -est) Date: 1937 characterized by malicious, spiteful, or arrogant behavior • bitchily adverb • bitchiness noun
bite
I. verb (bit; bitten; also bit; biting) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English bītan; akin to Old High German bīzan to bite, Latin findere to split Date: before 12th ...
bite off more than one can chew
phrasal to undertake more than one can handle
bite one's tongue
phrasal to hold back (as from a reluctance to offend) a remark one would like to make
bite plate
noun Date: circa 1922 a removable usually plastic dental appliance used in orthodontics and prosthodontics: as a. a device worn in the upper or lower jaw and used especially ...
bite the bullet
phrasal to enter with resignation upon a difficult or distressing course of action
bite the dust
phrasal 1. to fall dead especially in battle 2. a. to suffer humiliation or defeat b. to come to an end
bite the hand that feeds one
phrasal to injure a benefactor maliciously
bite-size
also bite-sized adjective Date: 1947 1. of a size that can be eaten in one bite 2. being or made small or brief especially so as to be easily manageable
bite-sized
adjective see bite-size
biter
noun see bite I
bitewing
noun Date: 1938 a dental X-ray film designed to show the crowns of the upper and lower teeth simultaneously
Bithynia
geographical name ancient country NW Asia Minor bordering on the Sea of Marmara & Black Sea • Bithynian adjective or noun
Bithynian
adjective or noun see Bithynia
biting
adjective Date: 14th century having the power to bite ; especially able to grip and impress deeply • bitingly adverb
biting louse
noun Date: 1896 any of numerous wingless insects (order Mallophaga) that are parasitic especially on birds — called also bird louse
biting midge
noun Date: 1945 any of a family (Ceratopogonidae) of tiny biting dipteran flies of which some are vectors of filarial worms
bitingly
adverb see biting
bitmap
noun Date: 1982 1. an array of binary data representing a bitmapped image or display; also a file containing such data 2. a bitmapped image or display
bitmapped
adjective Date: 1978 of, relating to, or being a digital image or display for which an array of binary data specifies the value of each pixel
Bitola
or Bitolj or Monastir geographical name city S Macedonia population 122,173
Bitolj
geographical name see Bitola
bitstock
noun Date: 1869 brace 3
bitsy
adjective Etymology: itsy-bitsy Date: 1905 tiny
bitt
I. noun Etymology: probably from Middle French bitte, ultimately from Old Norse biti beam Date: 1593 1. a post or pair of posts fixed on the deck of a ship for securing ...
bitter
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English biter; akin to Old High German bittar bitter, Old English bītan to bite — more at bite Date: before 12th century 1. ...
bitter almond
noun Date: 1601 an almond with a bitter taste that contains amygdalin; also a tree (Prunus dulcis amara) producing bitter almonds
bitter cress
noun Date: circa 1890 any of a genus (Cardamine) of herbs of the mustard family that produce flat pods and wingless seeds
bitter end
I. noun Etymology: perhaps from 2bitter end Date: 1827 the last extremity however painful or calamitous • bitter-ender noun II. noun Etymology: bitter (a turn of cable ...
Bitter Lakes
geographical name two lakes (Great Bitter Lake & Little Bitter Lake) in NE Egypt N of Suez connected & traversed by the Suez Canal
bitter-ender
noun see bitter end I
bitterbrush
noun Date: 1910 a much-branched shrub (Purshia tridentata) of the rose family that grows in arid western North America, that has 3-lobed leaves and yellow flowers, and is ...
bitterish
adjective see bitter I
bitterly
adverb see bitter I
bittern
I. noun Etymology: Middle English bitoure, from Anglo-French butor, from Vulgar Latin *butitaurus, from Latin buteo hawk + taurus bull Date: 1515 any of various small or ...
bitterness
noun see bitter I
bitterroot
noun Date: 1838 a succulent herb (Lewisia rediviva) of the purslane family that grows in western North America and has starchy roots and pink or white flowers
Bitterroot Range
geographical name range of the Rocky Mountains on Idaho-Montana boundary — see Beaverhead Mountains, Garfield Mountain
bittersweet
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. something that is bittersweet; especially pleasure alloyed with pain 2. a. a poisonous Eurasian woody vine (Solanum dulcamara) of the ...
bittersweetly
adverb see bittersweet II
bittersweetness
noun see bittersweet II
bitterweed
noun Date: 1819 any of several American plants containing a bitter substance: as a. either of two ragweeds: (1) a low-growing common ragweed (Ambrosia artemissiifolia) ...
bittock
noun Date: circa 1802 chiefly Scottish a little bit
bitty
I. adjective Date: 1892 chiefly British made up of or containing bits; especially not cohesive or flowing II. adjective Date: 1905 small, tiny
bitumen
noun Etymology: Middle English bithumen mineral pitch, from Latin bitumin-, bitumen Date: 15th century 1. an asphalt of Asia Minor used in ancient times as a cement and ...
bituminization
noun see bitumen
bituminize
transitive verb see bitumen
bituminous
adjective Date: 1620 1. containing or impregnated with bitumen 2. of or relating to bituminous coal
bituminous coal
noun Date: 1827 a coal that when heated yields considerable volatile bituminous matter — called also soft coal
biunique
adjective Date: 1941 being a correspondence between two sets that is one-to-one in both directions • biuniqueness noun
biuniqueness
noun see biunique
bivalent
I. adjective Date: 1869 1. divalent 2. associated in pairs in synapsis II. noun Date: circa 1934 a pair of synaptic chromosomes
bivalve
I. adjective Date: 1661 being or having a shell composed of two valves II. noun Date: 1683 any of a class (Bivalvia syn. Pelecypoda) of typically marine mollusks (as clams, ...
bivariate
adjective Date: 1920 of, relating to, or involving two variables
bivouac
I. noun Etymology: French, from Low German biwacht, from bi by + wacht guard Date: 1819 1. a usually temporary encampment under little or no shelter 2. a. encampment ...
Biwa
geographical name lake 40 miles (64 kilometers) long Japan on W central Honshu
biweekly
I. adjective Date: 1832 1. occurring twice a week 2. occurring every two weeks ; fortnightly Usage: see bi- • biweekly adverb II. noun Date: circa 1890 1. a ...
biyearly
adjective Date: circa 1909 1. biannual 1 2. biennial 1
Biysk
geographical name city Russia in Asia, in E Altai territory population 235,000
biz
noun Date: 1861 business
bizarre
I. adjective Etymology: French, from Italian bizzarro Date: circa 1648 strikingly out of the ordinary: as a. odd, extravagant, or eccentric in style or mode b. ...
bizarrely
adverb see bizarre I
bizarreness
noun see bizarre I
bizarrerie
noun Etymology: French Date: 1747 1. a bizarre quality 2. something bizarre
bizarro
adjective Etymology: alteration of bizarre Date: 1971 characterized by a bizarre, fantastic, or unconventional approach ; outlandish • bizarro noun
Bizerta
geographical name see Bizerte
Bizerte
or Bizerta geographical name city & port N Tunisia on Lake Bizerte (a deep lagoon) population 62,856
Bizet
biographical name Alexandre-César-Léopold 1838-1875 called Georges French composer
bizonal
adjective Date: 1946 of or relating to the affairs of a zone governed or administered by two powers acting together • bizone noun
bizone
noun see bizonal
BJ
abbreviation bachelor of journalism
Bjørnson
biographical name Bjørnstjerne Martinius 1832-1910 Norwegian poet, dramatist, & novelist
bk
abbreviation 1. bank 2. book 3. break 4. brook
Bk
symbol berkelium
bkg
abbreviation 1. banking 2. bookkeeping
bkgd
abbreviation background
bkt
abbreviation 1. basket 2. bracket
bl
abbreviation 1. bale 2. barrel 3. black 4. block 5. blue
BL
abbreviation 1. bachelor of letters 2. baseline 3. bill of lading 4. breadth-length
blab
I. noun Etymology: Middle English blabbe; akin to Middle English blaberen Date: 14th century 1. archaic one that blabs ; tattletale 2. idle or excessive talk ; chatter • ...
blabber
I. verb (blabbered; blabbering) Etymology: Middle English blaberen Date: 14th century intransitive verb to talk foolishly or excessively transitive verb to say ...
blabbermouth
noun Date: 1936 a person who talks too much; especially tattletale
blabby
adjective see blab I
Black
I. biographical name Hugo LaFayette 1886-1971 American jurist & politician II. biographical name Sir James Whyte 1924- British pharmacologist III. geographical name or in ...
black
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English blak, from Old English blæc; akin to Old High German blah black, and probably to Latin flagrare to burn, Greek phlegein Date: before ...
black alder
noun Date: 1805 winterberry 1
black and tan
noun Date: 1870 1. a black-and-tan animal (as a dog) 2. chiefly British a drink consisting of a dark beer (as stout or porter) and ale or beer of a paler color 3. ...
black and white
noun Date: 1571 1. writing, print 2. a drawing or print done in black and white or in monochrome 3. monochrome reproduction of visual images (as by photography or ...
Black Angus
noun Date: 1948 Angus
black bass
noun Date: 1815 any of a genus (Micropterus) of freshwater sunfishes native to eastern and central North America and including the largemouth bass and smallmouth bass
black bean
noun Date: 1668 1. a black kidney bean commonly used in Latin American cuisine 2. a black soybean commonly used usually fermented in East Asian cuisine
black bear
noun Date: 1705 the common North American bear (Ursus americanus) ranging in color from brown or typical black to white
black beast
noun Date: 1862 bete noire
black belt
I. noun Date: 1870 1. an area characterized by rich black soil 2. often capitalized both Bs an area densely populated by blacks II. noun Date: 1939 one who holds the ...
black bile
noun Date: 1681 a humor of medieval physiology believed to be secreted by the kidneys or spleen and to cause melancholy
black birch
noun Date: 1674 sweet birch
black book
noun Date: 1592 a book containing a blacklist
black box
noun Date: circa 1945 1. a usually complicated electronic device that functions and is packaged as a unit and whose internal mechanism is usually hidden from or mysterious to ...
Black Canyon
geographical name 1. canyon of Colorado River between Arizona & Nevada S of Hoover Dam 2. canyon of the Gunnison SW central Colorado partly in Black Canyon of the Gunnison ...
Black Carib
noun Date: 1901 Garifuna
black cherry
noun Date: 1720 1. a large cherry (Prunus serotina) of eastern and central North America having drooping clusters of small white flowers and astringent black or dark purple ...
black cod
noun Date: 1887 a large gray to blackish bony fish (Anoplopoma fimbria of the family Anoplomatidae) of the Pacific coast that is an important food fish and has a liver rich in ...
black cohosh
noun Date: 1828 a bugbane (Cimicifuga racemosa) of the eastern United States
black crappie
noun Date: circa 1827 a silvery black-mottled sunfish (Pomoxis nigromaculatus) of eastern and central North America having seven or eight protruding spines on the dorsal fins
black currant
noun Date: 1629 a European perennial currant (Ribes nigrum) bearing aromatic edible black berries that are used especially in flavoring liqueur (as cassis); also the fruit
black damp
noun Date: 1836 a carbon dioxide mixture occurring as a mine gas and incapable of supporting life or flame
black death
noun Usage: often capitalized B&D Etymology: from the black patches formed on the skin of its victims Date: 1758 1. plague 2b 2. a severe epidemic of plague and especially ...
black diamond
noun Date: 1763 1. dense black hematite 2. plural coal 3a 3. carbonado III
black duck
noun Date: 1637 any of several ducks that are dark in color; especially a common brown duck (Anas rubripes) of eastern North America
black dwarf
noun (plural black dwarfs) Date: 1945 a very small cooled remnant of white dwarf that emits no detectable light
Black English
noun Date: 1969 a nonstandard variety of English spoken by some Afro-Americans — called also Black English vernacular
Black English vernacular
noun see Black English
black eye
noun Date: 1604 1. a discoloration of the skin around the eye from bruising 2. a. defeat, setback b. a bad reputation
black flag
noun Date: 1720 a pirate's flag usually bearing a skull and crossbones
Black Forest
or German Schwarzwald geographical name forested mountain region SW Germany along the upper Rhine between the Neckar River & Swiss border
black gold
noun Date: 1910 petroleum
black grouse
noun Date: 1678 a large grouse (Tetrao tetrix syn. Lyrurus tetrix) of western Asia and Europe of which the male is black with white wing patches and the female is barred and ...
black gum
noun Date: 1709 a tupelo (Nyssa sylvatica) of the eastern United States with light and soft but tough wood
black hand
noun Usage: often capitalized B&H Etymology: Black Hand, a Sicilian and Italian-American secret society of the late 19th and 20th centuries Date: 1904 a lawless secret ...
Black Hawk
biographical name 1767-1838 Ma-ka-ta-i-me-she-kia-kiak Sauk Indian chief
Black Hills
geographical name mountains W South Dakota & NE Wyoming — see Harney Peak
black hole
noun Date: 1968 1. a celestial object that has a gravitational field so strong that light cannot escape it and that is believed to be created especially in the collapse of a ...
black ice
noun Date: 1961 a nearly transparent film of ice on a dark surface (as a paved road or a body of water) that is difficult to see
black letter
noun Date: circa 1644 a heavy angular condensed typeface used especially by the earliest European printers and based on handwriting used chiefly in the 13th to 15th centuries; ...
black light
noun Date: 1927 1. invisible ultraviolet light 2. a lamp that radiates black light
black locust
noun Date: 1787 a tall tree (Robinia pseudoacacia) of eastern North America with pinnately compound leaves, drooping racemes of fragrant white flowers, and strong stiff wood
black lung
noun Date: 1837 pneumoconiosis caused by habitual inhalation of coal dust
Black Maria
noun Date: 1843 paddy wagon
black market
noun Date: 1931 illicit trade in goods or commodities in violation of official regulations; also a place where such trade is carried on
black marketeer
noun see black-market
black marketeering
noun see black-market
black marketer
noun see black-market
Black Mass
noun Date: 1820 a travesty of the Christian Mass ascribed to worshipers of Satan
Black Mountains
geographical name mountains W North Carolina, a range of the Blue Ridge Mountains — see Mitchell (Mount)
Black Muslim
noun Date: 1960 a member of a chiefly black group that professes Islamic religious belief
black nationalism
noun see black nationalist
black nationalist
noun Usage: often capitalized B&N Date: 1963 a member of a group of militant blacks who advocate separatism from the whites and the formation of self-governing black ...
black out
verb Date: 1890 transitive verb 1. a. to suppress by censorship b. blot out, erase 2. to envelop in darkness 3. to make inoperative (as by a power ...
Black Panther
noun Date: 1965 a member of an organization of militant American blacks
black pepper
noun Date: before 12th century a spice that consists of the dried berry of an Indian vine ground with the black husk still on; also the plant (Piper nigrum) that yields black ...
black powder
noun Date: 1861 an explosive mixture of potassium nitrate or sodium nitrate, charcoal, and sulfur used especially in fireworks and as a propellant in antique firearms — ...
black power
noun Usage: often capitalized B&P Date: 1966 the mobilization of the political and economic power of American blacks especially to compel respect for their rights and improve ...
black pudding
noun Date: 1568 chiefly British blood sausage
black racer
noun Date: 1836 either of two common black colubrid snakes of the U.S.: a. a snake (Coluber constrictor constrictor) chiefly of the eastern United States b. a snake (C. ...
black raspberry
noun Date: circa 1782 a raspberry (Rubus occidentalis) of eastern North America that has a purplish-black fruit and is the source of several cultivated varieties — called ...
black rhino
noun see black rhinoceros
black rhinoceros
noun Date: 1848 a rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) of sub-Saharan Africa having a prehensile upper lip that protrudes in the middle — called also black rhino
Black Rod
noun Date: circa 1607 the principal usher of the House of Lords
black rot
noun Date: 1849 a bacterial or fungal rot of plants marked by dark brown discoloration
Black Sea
or ancient Pontus Euxinus or Pontus geographical name sea between Europe & Asia connected with Aegean Sea through the Bosporus, Sea of Marmara, & Dardanelles area more than ...
black sheep
noun Date: 1657 a disfavored or disreputable member of a group
black smoker
noun Date: 1980 a vent in a geologically active region of the sea floor from which issues superheated water laden with minerals (as sulfide precipitates); also a rock ...
black spot
noun Date: circa 1889 any of several bacterial or fungal diseases of plants characterized by black spots or blotches especially on the leaves
black spruce
noun Date: 1744 a widely distributed spruce (Picea mariana) of northern North America that grows chiefly in moist soils and bogs
black swallowtail
noun Date: 1889 a usually dark-colored New World swallowtail (Papilio polyxenes) having yellow spots on the wing margins and a black spot centered within a larger orange spot ...
black tea
noun Date: 1789 tea that is dark in color from complete fermentation of the leaf before firing
black tie
noun Date: 1951 semiformal clothing
Black Volta
geographical name — see Volta
black walnut
noun Date: 1612 a walnut (Juglans nigra) of eastern North America with hard strong heavy dark brown wood and oily edible nuts; also its wood or nut
Black Warrior
geographical name river 178 miles (286 kilometers) central Alabama flowing into the Tombigbee
black widow
noun Date: 1915 a venomous New World spider (Latrodectus mactans) the female of which is black with an hourglass-shaped red mark on the underside of the abdomen
black-a-vised
adjective Etymology: black + French à vis as to face Date: circa 1758 having a dark complexion
black-and-blue
adjective Date: 14th century darkly discolored from blood effused by bruising
black-and-tan
adjective Date: 1850 1. having a predominantly black color pattern with deep red or rusty tan usually on the feet, breeching, and cheek patches, above the eyes, and inside the ...
black-and-tan coonhound
noun Date: 1948 any of a breed of strong vigorous coonhounds of United States origin with black-and-tan markings
black-and-white
I. adjective Date: 1612 1. partly black and partly white in color 2. being in writing or print 3. executed in dark pigment on a light background or in light pigment on a ...
black-capped
adjective Date: 1781 of a bird having the top of the head black

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