Слова на букву axio-buck (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву axio-buck (6389)

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boycott
transitive verb Etymology: Charles C. Boycott died 1897 English land agent in Ireland who was ostracized for refusing to reduce rents Date: 1880 to engage in a concerted ...
boycotter
noun see boycott
Boyden
biographical name Seth 1788-1870 American inventor
Boyer
biographical name Paul Delos 1918- American chemist
boyfriend
noun Date: 1845 1. a male friend 2. a frequent or regular male companion in a romantic or sexual relationship
boyhood
noun see boy
boyish
adjective see boy
boyishly
adverb see boy
boyishness
noun see boy
Boyle
I. biographical name Kay 1902-1992 American author II. biographical name Robert 1627-1691 British physicist & chemist
Boyle's law
noun Etymology: Robert Boyle Date: circa 1860 a statement in physics: the volume of a gas at constant temperature varies inversely with the pressure exerted on it
Boyne
geographical name river 70 miles (113 kilometers) E Ireland in Leinster flowing to Irish Sea S of Drogheda
Boynton Beach
geographical name city SE Florida population 60,389
boyo
noun (plural boyos) Etymology: boy + 1-o Date: circa 1870 Irish boy, lad
Boyoma Falls
or formerly Stanley Falls geographical name series of seven cataracts NE Democratic Republic of the Congo in the Lualaba near head of Congo River with total fall of about 200 ...
boysenberry
noun Etymology: Rudolph Boysen died 1950 American horticulturist + English berry Date: 1935 a large reddish black fruit with a raspberry flavor; also the trailing hybrid ...
Bozcaada
or ancient Tenedos geographical name island Turkey in NE Aegean Sea S of the Dardanelles
Bozeman
geographical name city SW Montana population 27,509
bozo
noun (plural bozos) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1916 a foolish or incompetent person
bp
abbreviation 1. baptized 2. base pair 3. birthplace 4. bishop
BP
abbreviation 1. batting practice 2. beautiful people 3. before the present 4. bills payable 5. blood pressure 6. blueprint 7. boiling point
bpd
abbreviation barrels per day
BPE
abbreviation bachelor of physical education
BPh
abbreviation bachelor of philosophy
BPH
abbreviation benign prostatic hyperplasia; benign prostatic hypertrophy
BPharm
abbreviation bachelor of pharmacy
bpi
abbreviation bits per inch; bytes per inch
bpl
abbreviation birthplace
bpm
abbreviation beats per minute
BPOE
abbreviation Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks
bps
abbreviation bits per second
BPW
abbreviation 1. Board of Public Works 2. Business and Professional Women's Clubs
br
abbreviation 1. branch 2. brass 3. brown
BR
abbreviation 1. bedroom 2. bills receivable
Br
I. abbreviation Britain; British II. symbol bromine
bra
noun Date: 1936 brassiere • braless adjective
Brabant
geographical name 1. old duchy of W Europe including region now forming North Brabant province of Netherlands & Brabant & Antwerp provinces of Belgium 2. province central ...
brabble
intransitive verb (brabbled; brabbling) Etymology: perhaps from Middle Dutch brabbelen, of imitative origin Date: circa 1530 squabble • brabble noun
brace
I. verb (braced; bracing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French bracer to embrace, from brace Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. archaic to fasten tightly ; ...
brace root
noun Date: 1885 prop root
bracelet
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, diminutive of bras arm, from Latin bracchium Date: 15th century 1. an ornamental band or chain worn around the wrist 2. ...
bracer
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French *bracer, from braz arm, from Latin bracchium Date: 14th century an arm or wrist protector especially for use by an ...
bracero
noun (plural -ros) Etymology: Spanish, laborer, from brazo arm, from Latin bracchium Date: 1920 a Mexican laborer admitted to the United States especially for seasonal ...
brachi-
or brachio- combining form Etymology: Latin bracchium, brachium 1. arm 2. brachial and
brachial
adjective Date: 1578 of, relating to, or situated in the arm or an armlike process
brachial plexus
noun Date: circa 1860 a network of nerves lying mostly in the armpit and supplying nerves to the chest, shoulder, and arm
brachiate
intransitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1928 to progress by swinging from hold to hold by the arms • brachiation noun • brachiator noun
brachiation
noun see brachiate
brachiator
noun see brachiate
brachio-
combining form see brachi-
brachiocephalic artery
noun Date: circa 1839 a short artery that arises from the arch of the aorta and divides into the carotid and subclavian arteries of the right side — called also innominate ...
brachiocephalic vein
noun Date: circa 1852 either of two large veins that occur one on each side of the neck, receive blood from the head and neck, and unite to form the superior vena cava — ...
brachiopod
noun Etymology: ultimately from Latin bracchium + Greek pod-, pous foot — more at foot Date: 1836 any of a phylum (Brachiopoda) of marine invertebrates with bivalve shells ...
brachiosaur
noun Etymology: New Latin Brachiosaurs, from brachi- + Greek sauros lizard Date: 1903 any of a genus (Brachiosaurus) of very large sauropod dinosaurs of the late Jurassic ...
brachy-
combining form Etymology: Greek, from brachys — more at brief short
brachycephalic
adjective Etymology: New Latin brachycephalus, from Greek brachy- + kephalē head — more at cephalic Date: circa 1852 short-headed or broad-headed with a cephalic index of ...
brachycephaly
noun see brachycephalic
brachypterous
adjective Etymology: Greek brachypteros, from brachy- + pteron wing — more at feather Date: 1842 having rudimentary or abnormally small wings
brachytherapy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1954 radiotherapy in which the source of radiation is placed (as by implantation) in or close to the area being ...
bracing
adjective Date: 1750 giving strength, vigor, or freshness • bracingly adverb
bracingly
adverb see bracing
braciola
or braciole noun Etymology: Italian, literally, slice of meat roasted over coals, from brace live coals, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Swedish brasa fire Date: circa ...
braciole
noun see braciola
bracken
noun Etymology: Middle English braken, probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Swedish brækne fern Date: 14th century 1. a large coarse fern; especially a nearly ...
bracket
I. noun Etymology: perhaps from Middle French braguette codpiece, from diminutive of brague breeches, from Old Occitan braga, from Latin braca, of Celtic origin — more at ...
bracket creep
noun Date: 1978 movement into a higher tax bracket as a result of income rises intended to offset the effects of inflation
bracket fungus
noun Date: 1899 a basidiomycete that forms shelflike sporophores
bracketed
adjective Date: 1885 of a serif joined to the stroke by a curved line
brackish
adjective Etymology: Dutch brac salty; akin to Middle Low German brac salty Date: 1538 1. somewhat salty 2. a. not appealing to the taste b. repulsive • ...
brackishness
noun see brackish
braconid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek brachys Date: circa 1893 any of a large family (Braconidae) of ichneumon flies • braconid adjective
bract
noun Etymology: New Latin bractea, from Latin, thin metal plate Date: 1770 1. a leaf from the axil of which a flower or floral axis arises 2. a leaf borne on a floral axis; ...
bracteal
adjective see bract
bracteate
adjective see bract
bracted
adjective see bract
bracteole
noun Etymology: New Latin bracteola, from Latin, diminutive of bractea Date: circa 1828 a small bract especially on a floral axis
brad
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse broddr spike; perhaps akin to Old English byrst bristle — more at bristle Date: 13th century 1. a thin nail of the same ...
bradawl
noun Date: 1823 an awl with chisel edge used to make holes for brads or screws
Bradbury
biographical name Ray Douglas 1920- American writer
Braddock
biographical name Edward 1695-1755 British general in America
Bradenton
geographical name city & port W Florida N of Sarasota population 49,504
Bradford
I. biographical name Gamaliel 1863-1932 American biographer II. biographical name William 1590-1657 Pilgrim father; 2d governor of Plymouth colony III. biographical name ...
Bradleian
adjective see Bradley I
Bradley
I. biographical name Francis Herbert 1846-1924 English philosopher • Bradleian also Bradleyan adjective II. biographical name Henry 1845-1923 English philologist & ...
Bradleyan
adjective see Bradley I
Bradstreet
I. biographical name Anne circa 1612-1672 née Dudley; wife of Simon American poet II. biographical name Simon 1603-1697 colonial governor of Massachusetts
Brady
biographical name Mathew B. 1823?-1896 American photographer
brady-
combining form Etymology: Greek bradys slow
bradycardia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1890 relatively slow heart action — compare tachycardia
bradykinin
noun Date: 1949 a kinin that is formed locally in injured tissue, acts in vasodilation of small arterioles, is considered to play a part in inflammatory processes, and is ...
brae
noun Etymology: Middle English bra, from Old Norse brā eyelid; akin to Old English brǣw eyebrow, and probably to Old English bregdan to move quickly — more at braid Date: ...
brag
I. noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century 1. a pompous or boastful statement 2. arrogant talk or manner ; cockiness 3. braggart II. verb (bragged; bragging) ...
Braga
geographical name commune NW Portugal NNE of Porto population 63,033
Bragança
geographical name commune NE Portugal near Spanish border population 14,181
Bragg
I. biographical name Braxton 1817-1876 American Confederate general II. biographical name Sir (William) Lawrence 1890-1971 son of W.H. English physicist III. biographical ...
braggadocio
noun (plural -cios) Etymology: Braggadochio, personification of boasting in Faerie Queene by Edmund Spenser Date: 1594 1. braggart 2. a. empty boasting b. arrogant ...
braggart
noun Date: circa 1577 a loud arrogant boaster • braggart adjective
bragger
noun see brag II
bragging rights
noun Date: 1977 entitlement to boast about one's status, superiority, or achievement
braggy
adjective see brag II
Brahe
biographical name Tycho 1546-1601 Danish astronomer
Brahma
I. noun Etymology: Sanskrit brahman Date: 1690 1. the creator god of the Hindu sacred triad — compare Shiva, Vishnu 2. the ultimate ground of all being in Hinduism II. ...
Brahman
or Brahmin noun Etymology: Middle English Bragman inhabitant of India, from Latin Bracmanus, from Greek Brachman, from Sanskrit brāhmaṇa of the Brahman caste, from brahman ...
Brahmanic
adjective see Brahman
Brahmanical
adjective see Brahman
Brahmanism
noun Date: 1816 orthodox Hinduism adhering to the pantheism of the Vedas and to the ancient sacrifices and family ceremonies
Brahmaputra
geographical name river about 1800 miles (2900 kilometers) S Asia flowing from the Himalayas in Tibet to the Ganges Delta in E India (subcontinent) — see Jamuna, Tsangpo
Brahmin
noun see Brahman
Brahms
biographical name Johannes 1833-1897 German composer & pianist • Brahmsian adjective
Brahmsian
adjective see Brahms
braid
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English breyden to move suddenly, snatch, plait, from Old English bregdan; akin to Old High German brettan to draw (a sword) Date: before ...
braided
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. made by intertwining three or more strands b. ornamented with braid 2. forming an interlacing network of channels
braider
noun see braid I
braiding
noun Date: 15th century something made of braided material
brail
I. noun Etymology: Middle English brayle, from Anglo-French braiel, belt, strap, brail, alteration of Old French braiuel belt, probably ultimately from Latin braca pants — ...
Braila
geographical name city E Romania on the Danube population 242,595
braille
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Louis Braille Date: 1853 a system of writing for the blind that uses characters made up of raised dots • braille transitive verb ...
Braille
biographical name Louis 1809-1852 French blind teacher of the blind
braillewriter
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1942 a machine for writing braille
braillist
noun see braille
brain
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English brægen; akin to Middle Low German bregen brain, and perhaps to Greek brechmos front part of the head Date: before 12th ...
brain coral
noun Date: circa 1711 a massive reef-building coral (as genus Diploria) having the surface covered by ridges and furrows
brain death
noun Date: 1964 final cessation of activity in the central nervous system especially as indicated by a flat electroencephalogram for a predetermined length of time
brain drain
noun Date: 1963 the departure of educated or professional people from one country, economic sector, or field for another usually for better pay or living conditions
brain hormone
noun Date: 1957 1. a hormone that is secreted by neurosecretory cells of the insect brain and that stimulates the prothoracic glands to secrete ecdysone 2. any of various ...
brain stem
noun Date: 1879 the part of the brain composed of the midbrain, pons, and medulla oblongata and connecting the spinal cord with the forebrain and cerebrum
brain trust
noun Date: 1910 a group of official or unofficial advisers concerned especially with planning and strategy • brain truster noun
brain truster
noun see brain trust
brain wave
noun Date: 1890 1. brainstorm 2a 2. a. rhythmic fluctuations of voltage between parts of the brain resulting in the flow of an electric current b. a current produced ...
brain-dead
adjective Date: 1974 1. characterized by brain death 2. lacking intelligence or vitality
brain-picker
noun see brain-picking
brain-picking
noun Date: 1954 the act of gathering information from another's mind • brain-picker noun
braincase
noun Date: 1741 the cranium enclosing the brain
brainchild
noun Date: 1628 a product of one's creative imagination
brained
adjective Date: 15th century having a brain of a specified kind — used in combination
brainiac
noun Etymology: probably from Brainiac, superintelligent villain in the Superman comic-book series Date: 1982 a very intelligent person
braininess
noun see brainy
brainish
adjective Date: circa 1530 archaic impetuous, hotheaded
brainless
adjective Date: 15th century devoid of intelligence ; stupid • brainlessly adverb • brainlessness noun
brainlessly
adverb see brainless
brainlessness
noun see brainless
brainpan
noun Date: 14th century braincase
brainpower
noun Date: 1853 1. intellectual ability 2. people with developed intellectual ability
brains trust
noun Date: 1934 chiefly British brain trust
brainsick
adjective Date: 15th century 1. mentally disordered 2. arising from mental disorder • brainsickly adverb
brainsickly
adverb see brainsick
brainstorm
noun Date: circa 1894 1. a violent transient fit of insanity 2. a. a sudden bright idea b. a harebrained idea
brainstormer
noun see brainstorming
brainstorming
noun Date: 1953 a group problem-solving technique that involves the spontaneous contribution of ideas from all members of the group; also the mulling over of ideas by one or ...
brainteaser
noun Date: 1923 something (as a puzzle) that demands mental effort and acuity for its solution
Braintree
geographical name town E Massachusetts S of Boston population 33,828
brainwash
I. transitive verb see brainwashing II. noun see brainwashing
brainwasher
noun see brainwashing
brainwashing
noun Etymology: translation of Chinese (Beijing) xǐnaˇo Date: 1950 1. a forcible indoctrination to induce someone to give up basic political, social, or religious beliefs ...
brainy
adjective (brainier; -est) Date: 1867 having or showing a well-developed intellect ; intelligent • braininess noun
braise
I. transitive verb (braised; braising) Etymology: French braiser, from braise live coals, from Old French breze, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Swedish brasa fire Date: ...
brake
I. archaic past of break II. noun Etymology: Middle English, fern, probably back-formation from braken bracken Date: 14th century the common bracken fern (Pteridium ...
brakeless
adjective see brake V
brakeman
noun Date: 1833 1. a freight or passenger train crew member who inspects the train and assists the conductor 2. the member of a bobsled team who operates the brake
Brakpan
geographical name city NE Republic of South Africa in Gauteng on the Witwatersrand S of Johannesburg population 85,044
braky
adjective see brake IV
braless
adjective see bra
Bramante
biographical name Donato 1444-1514 originally Donato d'Agnolo or d'Angelo Italian architect
bramble
noun Etymology: Middle English brembel, from Old English brēmel; akin to Old English brōm broom Date: before 12th century 1. any of a genus (Rubus) of usually prickly shrubs ...
brambly
adjective see bramble
Brampton
geographical name city Canada in SE Ontario W of Toronto population 325,428
bran
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French bren, bran Date: 14th century the edible broken seed coats of cereal grain separated from the flour or meal by sifting or ...
branch
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French branche, from Late Latin branca paw Date: 14th century 1. a natural subdivision of a plant ...
branch water
noun Etymology: 1branch (creek) Date: 1835 plain water
branched
adjective see branch I
branchial
adjective Etymology: Greek branchia gills Date: 1801 of, relating to, or supplying the gills or associated structures or their embryonic precursors
branchiopod
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek branchia gills + pod-, pous foot — more at foot Date: 1836 any of a group (Branchiopoda) of small usually freshwater crustaceans (as ...
branchless
adjective see branch I
branchlet
noun Date: circa 1731 a small usually terminal branch
branchline
noun Date: 1845 a secondary line usually of a railroad
branchy
adjective see branch I
Branco, Rio
geographical name river 350 miles (563 kilometers) N Brazil flowing S into Negro River
Brancusi
biographical name Constantin 1876-1957 French (Romanian-born) sculptor
brand
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, torch, sword, from Old English; akin to Old English bærnan to burn Date: before 12th century 1. a. a charred piece of wood b. ...
brand name
noun Date: 1922 1. an arbitrarily adopted name that is given by a manufacturer or merchant to an article or service to distinguish it as produced or sold by that manufacturer ...
brand-name
adjective Date: 1949 1. of or relating to a brand name 2. having a well-known and usually highly regarded or marketable name
brand-new
adjective Etymology: 1brand Date: circa 1570 conspicuously new and unused; also recently introduced
branded
adjective Date: 1897 having a brand name
Brandeis
biographical name Louis Dembitz 1856-1941 American jurist
Brandenburg
geographical name 1. region & former province NE central Germany 2. state of E Germany capital Potsdam area 11,219 square miles (29,057 square kilometers), population ...
brander
noun see brand II
Brandes
biographical name Georg Morris 1842-1927 Danish literary critic
branding
noun Date: 1970 the promoting of a product or service by identifying it with a particular brand
brandish
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English braundisshen, from Anglo-French brandiss-, stem of brandir, from brant, braund sword, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English brand ...
Brandon
geographical name city Canada in SW Manitoba population 39,716
Brandt
biographical name Willy 1913-1992 originally Herbert Ernst Karl Frahm West German politician; chancellor of West Germany (1969-74)
brandy
I. noun (plural brandies) Etymology: short for brandywine, from Dutch brandewijn, from Middle Dutch brantwijn, from brant distilled + wijn wine Date: 1657 an alcoholic ...
Brandywine
geographical name creek about 20 miles (32 kilometers) SE Pennsylvania & N Delaware flowing SE to Wilmington, Delaware
Branford
geographical name town S Connecticut E of New Haven population 28,683
brannigan
noun Etymology: probably from the name Brannigan Date: 1927 1. a drinking spree 2. squabble
brant
noun (plural brant or brants) Etymology: Middle English brand gos Date: 14th century a small goose (Branta bernicla) about the size of a mallard having a black head, neck, and ...
Brant
biographical name Joseph 1742-1807 Thayendanegea Mohawk Indian chief
Brantford
geographical name city Canada in SE Ontario population 86,417
Branting
biographical name Karl Hjalmar 1860-1925 Swedish statesman & socialist leader
Braque
biographical name Georges 1882-1963 French painter
Bras d'Or Lake
geographical name tidal lake about 50 miles (80 kilometers) long Canada in Nova Scotia on Cape Breton Island
brash
I. adjective Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1566 1. brittle 2. a. heedless of the consequences ; audacious b. done in haste without regard for consequences ; ...
brashly
adverb see brash I
brashness
noun see brash I
Brasil
geographical name see Brazil
Brasília
geographical name city capital of Brazil in Federal District metropolitan area population 1,803,478
Brasov
or formerly Stalin geographical name city central Romania in foothills of Transylvanian Alps population 352,640
brass
noun Etymology: Middle English bras, from Old English bræs; akin to Middle Low German bras metal Date: before 12th century 1. an alloy consisting essentially of copper and ...
brass band
noun Date: 1834 a band consisting chiefly or solely of brass and percussion instruments
brass collar Democrat
noun Date: 1951 a conservative Democrat especially in the south who votes the straight Democratic ticket
brass hat
noun Etymology: from the gold braid worn on the cap Date: 1893 a member of the brass
brass instrument
noun Date: 1843 any of a group of wind instruments (as a French horn, trombone, trumpet, or tuba) that is usually characterized by a long cylindrical or conical metal tube ...
brass knuckles
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1855 knuckle 4
brass ring
noun Date: 1950 a rich opportunity ; prize
brass tacks
noun plural Date: 1895 details of immediate practical importance — usually used in the phrase get down to brass tacks
brassard
noun Etymology: French brassard, from Middle French brassal, from Old Italian bracciale, from braccio arm, from Latin bracchium — more at brace Date: 1830 1. armor for ...
brassbound
adjective Date: 1767 1. having trim made of brass or a metal resembling brass 2. a. (1) tradition-bound and opinionated (2) making no concessions ; inflexible b. ...
brasserie
noun Etymology: French, literally, brewery, from Middle French brasser to brew, from Old French bracier, from Vulgar Latin *braciare, of Celtic origin; akin to Welsh brag malt ...
brassica
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Latin, cabbage Date: 1727 any of a large genus (Brassica) of Old World temperate-zone herbs (as broccoli and cabbage) of the ...
brassiere
noun Etymology: obsolete French brassière bodice, from Old French braciere arm protector, from bras arm — more at bracelet Date: 1911 a woman's undergarment to cover and ...
brassily
adverb see brassy
brassiness
noun see brassy
brassy
adjective (brassier; -est) Date: 1576 1. a. shamelessly bold b. obstreperous 2. resembling brass especially in color 3. resembling the sound of a brass instrument ...
brat
noun Etymology: perhaps from English dialect brat coarse garment Date: circa 1505 1. a. child; specifically an ill-mannered annoying child b. an ill-mannered immature ...
Bratislava
or German Pressburg or Hungarian Pozsony geographical name city SW Slovakia, its capital, on the Danube population 441,453
Bratsk
geographical name city Russia in Asia, NNE of Irkutsk near site of Bratsk Dam (in the Angara) population 259,000
Brattain
biographical name Walter Houser 1902-1987 American physicist
brattice
noun Etymology: Middle English bretais parapet, from Anglo-French bretesche, from Medieval Latin breteschia Date: circa 1846 an often temporary partition of planks or cloth ...
brattiness
noun see brat
brattish
adjective see brat
brattle
I. noun Etymology: probably imitative Date: circa 1500 chiefly Scottish clatter, scamper II. intransitive verb (brattled; brattling) Date: 1513 chiefly Scottish to make ...
bratty
adjective see brat
bratwurst
noun Etymology: German, from Old High German brātwurst, from brāt meat without waste + wurst sausage Date: 1854 fresh pork sausage for frying
Brauchitsch
biographical name (Heinrich Alfred) Walther von 1881-1948 German general
Braun
I. biographical name Karl Ferdinand 1850-1918 German physicist II. biographical name Wernher von 1912-1977 American (German-born) engineer
Braunschweig
geographical name 1. — see Brunswick 2 2. — see Brunswick 3
braunschweiger
noun Etymology: German Braunschweiger (Wurst), literally, Brunswick sausage Date: 1934 smoked liverwurst
brava
noun Etymology: Italian, feminine of bravo Date: 1741 bravo — used interjectionally in applauding a woman
bravado
noun (plural -does or -dos) Etymology: Middle French bravade & Old Spanish bravata, from Old Italian bravata, from bravare to challenge, show off, from bravo Date: circa 1580 ...
brave
I. adjective (braver; bravest) Etymology: Middle French, from Old Italian & Old Spanish bravo courageous, wild, probably from Latin barbarus barbarous Date: 15th century 1. ...
brave new world
noun Etymology: from the dystopian novel Brave New World (1932) by Aldous Huxley Date: 1933 a future world, situation, or development; also a recent development or recently ...
bravely
adverb see brave I
braver
noun see brave II
bravery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1548 1. the quality or state of being brave ; courage 2. a. fine clothes b. showy display
Bravo
Date: 1952 — a communications code word for the letter b
bravo
I. noun (plural bravos or bravoes) Etymology: Italian, from bravo brave Date: 1597 villain, desperado; especially a hired assassin II. noun (plural bravos) Date: 1761 a ...
Bravo, Río
geographical name — see Rio Grande 1
bravura
I. noun Etymology: Italian, literally, bravery, from bravare to show off — more at bravado Date: 1757 1. a musical passage requiring exceptional agility and technical skill ...
braw
adjective Etymology: modification of Middle French brave Date: circa 1565 1. chiefly Scottish good, fine 2. chiefly Scottish well dressed
brawl
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century 1. to quarrel or fight noisily ; wrangle 2. to make a loud confused noise • brawler noun II. noun ...
brawler
noun see brawl I
brawly
adjective (brawlier; -est) Date: 1940 1. inclined to brawl 2. characterized by brawls or brawling
brawn
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French braon flesh, muscle, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English brǣd flesh Date: 13th century 1. a. British the flesh of a ...
brawnily
adverb see brawny
brawniness
noun see brawny
brawny
adjective (brawnier; -est) Date: 1581 1. muscular; also strong, powerful 2. being swollen and hard • brawnily adverb • brawniness noun
Bray
geographical name town & port E Ireland population 25,101
bray
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French braire to cry, bellow, roar, from Vulgar Latin *bragere, of Celtic origin; akin to Old Irish braigid he breaks wind Date: ...
brayer
noun Date: 1683 a printer's hand inking roller
Braz
abbreviation Brazil; Brazilian
Braz
abbreviation Brazil; Brazilian
braze
I. transitive verb (brazed; brazing) Etymology: irregular from brass Date: 1602 archaic harden II. transitive verb (brazed; brazing) Etymology: French braser, from Old ...
brazen
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English brasen, from Old English bræsen, from bræs brass Date: before 12th century 1. made of brass 2. a. sounding harsh and loud like ...
brazen-faced
adjective Date: 1567 marked by insolence and bold disrespect
brazenly
adverb see brazen I

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