Слова на букву axio-buck (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву axio-buck (6389)

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bedeck
transitive verb Date: 1565 1. to clothe with finery ; deck 2. decorate 2
bedevil
transitive verb Date: 1574 1. to possess with or as if with a devil 2. to cause distress ; trouble 3. to change for the worse ; spoil 4. to confuse utterly ; bewilder ...
bedevilment
noun see bedevil
bedew
transitive verb Date: 14th century to wet with or as if with dew
bedfast
adjective Date: 1560 bedridden
bedfellow
noun Date: 15th century 1. one who shares a bed with another 2. associate, ally
Bedford
I. biographical name Duke of — see John of Lancaster II. geographical name 1. city N Texas population 47,152 2. town SE central England capital of Bedfordshire population ...
Bedford cord
noun Etymology: perhaps from New Bedford, Massachusetts Date: 1862 a clothing fabric with lengthwise ribs that resembles corduroy; also the weave used in making this fabric
Bedfordshire
or Bedford geographical name county SE central England area 494 square miles (1279 square kilometers), population 514,200
bedight
transitive verb (bedighted or bedight; bedighting) Date: 14th century archaic equip, array
bedim
transitive verb Date: 1565 1. to make less bright 2. to make indistinct ; obscure
Bedivere
noun Date: 1765 a knight of the Round Table
bedizen
transitive verb Date: 1661 to dress or adorn gaudily • bedizenment noun
bedizenment
noun see bedizen
bedlam
noun Etymology: Bedlam, popular name for the Hospital of Saint Mary of Bethlehem, London, an insane asylum, from Middle English Bedlem Bethlehem Date: 1522 1. obsolete madman, ...
bedlamite
noun Date: 1589 madman, lunatic • bedlamite adjective
Bedlington
noun see Bedlington terrier
Bedlington terrier
noun Etymology: Bedlington, parish in Northumberland, England Date: 1867 a swift lightly built terrier of English origin with a long narrow head, arched back, and usually ...
Bedloe's Island
geographical name — see Liberty Island
bedmate
noun Date: 1583 one who shares one's bed; especially a sexual partner
Bednorz
biographical name Johannes Georg 1950- German physicist
bedouin
also beduin noun (plural bedouin or bedouins; also beduin or beduins) Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Middle English Bedoyne, from Middle French bedoïn, from Arabic badawī ...
bedpan
noun Date: 1678 a shallow vessel used by a bedridden person for urination or defecation
bedplate
noun Date: 1846 a plate or framing used as a support
bedpost
noun Date: 1598 the usually turned or carved post of a bed
bedraggle
transitive verb Date: 1727 to wet thoroughly
bedraggled
adjective Date: 1727 1. left wet and limp by or as if by rain 2. soiled and stained by or as if by trailing in mud 3. dilapidated
bedrid
adjective see bedridden
bedridden
also bedrid adjective Etymology: alteration of Middle English bedrede, bedreden, from Old English bedreda, from bedreda one confined to bed, from bedd bed + -rida, -reda, from ...
bedrock
I. noun Date: 1850 1. the solid rock underlying unconsolidated surface materials (as soil) 2. a. lowest point ; nadir b. basis II. adjective Date: 1894 solidly ...
bedroll
noun Date: 1867 bedding rolled up for carrying
bedroom
I. noun Date: 1616 a room furnished with a bed and intended primarily for sleeping • bedroomed adjective II. adjective Date: 1915 1. dealing with, suggestive of, or ...
bedroomed
adjective see bedroom I
Beds
abbreviation Bedfordshire
bedsheet
noun Date: 15th century an oblong piece of usually cotton or linen cloth used as an article of bedding
bedside
I. noun Date: 14th century the side of a bed ; a place beside a bed II. adjective Date: 1837 1. of, relating to, or conducted at the bedside 2. suitable for reading in ...
bedside manner
noun Date: 1869 the manner that a physician assumes toward patients
bedsit
noun see bed-sitter
bedsore
noun Date: 1861 an ulceration of tissue deprived of adequate blood supply by prolonged pressure — called also decubitus ulcer
bedspread
noun Date: 1835 a usually ornamental cloth cover for a bed
bedspring
noun Date: 1885 a spring supporting a mattress
bedstead
noun Etymology: Middle English bedstede, from bed + stede stead, place — more at stead Date: 15th century the framework of a bed
bedstraw
noun Etymology: from its use for mattresses Date: 1527 any of a genus (Galium) of herbs of the madder family having squarish stems, whorled leaves, and small flowers
bedtime
noun Date: 13th century a time for going to bed
bedtime story
noun Date: 1874 a story read or recounted to someone (as a child) at bedtime
bedu
noun (plural bedu) Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Arabic badw desert, desert dwellers Date: 1912 bedouin
beduin
noun see bedouin
Będzin
geographical name commune S Poland in Silesia population 75,800
BEE
abbreviation bachelor of electrical engineering
bee
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English bēo; akin to Old High German bīa bee, Old Irish bech, Lithuanian bitis Date: before 12th century 1. honeybee; broadly ...
bee balm
noun Date: 1840 1. any of several monardas; especially Oswego tea 2. lemon balm
bee fly
noun Date: 1753 any of a family (Bombyliidae) of dipteran flies many of which resemble bees
bee in one's bonnet
phrasal bee I,2
bee tree
noun Date: 1773 a hollow tree in which honeybees nest
bee's knees
noun Date: 1923 a highly admired person or thing ; cat's meow
bee-eater
noun Date: 1668 any of a family (Meropidae) of brightly colored slender-billed insectivorous chiefly tropical Old World birds
bee-stung
adjective Date: 1933 having a red puffy appearance as if from being stung by a bee
Beebe
biographical name Charles William 1877-1962 American naturalist & explorer
beebread
noun Date: 1657 bitter yellowish-brown pollen stored up in honeycomb cells and used mixed with honey by bees as food
beech
noun (plural beeches or beech) Etymology: Middle English beche, from Old English bēce; akin to Old English bōc beech, Old High German buohha, Latin fagus, Greek phēgos oak ...
Beecham
biographical name Sir Thomas 1879-1961 English conductor
beechdrops
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1815 a plant (Epifagus virginiana) of the broomrape family parasitic on the roots of beeches
beechen
adjective see beech
Beecher
I. biographical name Henry Ward 1813-1887 American clergyman II. biographical name Lyman 1775-1863 father of H.W. & of Harriet Beecher Stowe American Presbyterian clergyman
beechnut
noun Date: 1739 the nut of the beech
beef
I. noun (plural beefs or beeves) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French beof, bef ox, beef, from Latin bov-, bos head of cattle — more at cow Date: 14th century 1. ...
beef cattle
noun plural Date: 1758 cattle developed primarily for the efficient production of meat and marked by capacity for rapid growth, heavy well-fleshed body, and stocky build
beef Stroganoff
noun Etymology: probably from Stroganov, surname of a prominent line of Russian nobility Date: 1932 beef sliced thin and cooked in a sour-cream sauce
beef Wellington
noun Etymology: probably from the name Wellington Date: 1951 a fillet of beef covered with pâté de foie gras and baked in a casing of pastry
beefalo
noun (plural -los or -loes) Etymology: blend of 1beef and buffalo Date: 1973 any of a breed of beef cattle developed in the United States that is genetically 3/8 North ...
beefcake
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1949 a usually photographic display of muscular male physiques; also a man of the type featured in such a display or such men in general ...
beefeater
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1671 yeoman of the guard
beefsteak
noun Date: circa 1706 a steak of beef usually from the hindquarter
beefsteak tomato
noun Date: 1968 a very large globe-shaped red tomato with dense flesh
beefwood
noun Date: 1805 1. the hard heavy reddish wood of any of various chiefly tropical trees (as the Australian pine) 2. Australian pine
beefy
adjective (beefier; -est) Date: 1743 1. a. heavily and powerfully built b. substantial, sturdy 2. a. of or suggesting beef b. full of beef
beehive
noun Date: 14th century 1. hive 1 2. something resembling a hive for bees: as a. a scene of crowded activity b. a woman's hairdo that is conical in shape • beehive ...
beehive oven
noun Date: circa 1881 an arched oven used especially for baking food and formerly for coking coal
beekeeper
noun Date: 1817 a person who raises bees • beekeeping noun
beekeeping
noun see beekeeper
beelike
adjective see bee I
beeline
I. noun Etymology: from the belief that nectar-laden bees return to their hives in a direct line Date: 1830 a straight direct course II. intransitive verb Date: 1940 to go ...
Beelzebub
noun Etymology: Beelzebub, prince of devils, from Latin, from Greek Beelzeboub, from Hebrew Ba‘al zĕbhūbh, a Philistine god, literally, lord of flies Date: before 12th ...
been
past participle of be
been around
phrasal gone through many varied experiences ; become worldly-wise
beep
I. noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1929 a short usually high-pitched sound (as from a horn or an electronic device) that serves as a signal or warning II. verb Date: 1936 ...
beeper
noun Date: 1970 pager; specifically one that beeps
beer
noun Etymology: Middle English ber, from Old English bēor; akin to Old High German bior beer Date: before 12th century 1. an alcoholic beverage usually made from malted ...
beer and skittles
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1857 a situation of agreeable ease
beer belly
noun Date: 1951 potbelly • beer-bellied adjective
beer-bellied
adjective see beer belly
Beerbohm
biographical name Sir Max 1872-1956 English critic & caricaturist
Beersheba
geographical name town S Israel in N Negev; in biblical times marked extreme S limit of Palestine population 128,400
beery
adjective (beerier; -est) Date: 1845 1. smelling or tasting of beer 2. affected or caused by beer
beestings
or beastings noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Middle English bestynge, from Old English bȳsting, from bēost beestings; akin to Old High German ...
beeswax
noun Date: 1664 wax 1
beet
noun Etymology: Middle English bete, from Old English bēte, from Latin beta Date: before 12th century a biennial garden plant (Beta vulgaris) of the goosefoot family that ...
beet armyworm
noun Date: 1902 an armyworm (Spodoptera exigua) that typically eats the foliage of beets, alfalfa, and vegetables
beet leafhopper
noun Date: 1919 a leafhopper (Circulifer tenellus) that transmits curly top virus to sugar beets and other garden plants
Beethoven
biographical name Ludwig van 1770-1827 German composer • Beethovenian adjective
Beethovenian
adjective see Beethoven
beetle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English betylle, from Old English bitula; akin to bītan to bite Date: before 12th century 1. any of an order (Coleoptera) of insects having four ...
beetroot
noun Date: 1579 chiefly British a beet grown for its edible usually red root; also the root
beeves
plural of beef
beeyard
noun Date: 15th century apiary
bef
abbreviation before
BEF
abbreviation British Expeditionary Force
befall
verb (befell; befallen) Date: 13th century intransitive verb to happen especially as if by fate transitive verb to happen to
befit
transitive verb (befitted; befitting) Date: 15th century to be proper or becoming to
befitting
adjective Date: 1564 1. suitable, appropriate 2. proper, decent • befittingly adverb
befittingly
adverb see befitting
befog
transitive verb Date: 1601 1. confuse 2. fog, obscure
befool
transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. to make a fool of 2. delude, deceive
before
I. adverb or adjective Etymology: Middle English, adverb & preposition, from Old English beforan, from be- + foran before, from fore Date: before 12th century 1. in advance ; ...
before long
adverb Date: 1619 in the near future ; soon
before the mast
phrasal 1. forward of the foremast 2. as a common sailor
before the wind
phrasal in the same direction as the main force of the wind
beforehand
adverb or adjective Date: 13th century 1. a. in anticipation b. in advance 2. ahead of time ; early
beforetime
adverb Date: 14th century archaic formerly
befoul
transitive verb Date: before 12th century 1. to make foul (as with dirt or waste) 2. sully, soil, besmirch
befriend
transitive verb Date: 1559 to become or act as a friend to
befuddle
transitive verb Date: 1832 1. to muddle or stupefy with or as if with drink 2. confuse, perplex • befuddlement noun
befuddlement
noun see befuddle
beg
I. verb (begged; begging) Etymology: Middle English beggen Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. to ask for as a charity 2. a. to ask earnestly for ; entreat b. ...
beg off
verb Date: 1827 intransitive verb to ask to be excused from something transitive verb to ask or gain permission to be excused from • beg-off noun
beg the question
phrasal 1. to pass over or ignore a question by assuming it to be established or settled 2. to elicit a question logically as a reaction or response
beg-off
noun see beg off
beget
transitive verb (begot; also begat; begotten or -got; -getting) Etymology: Middle English begeten, alteration of beyeten, from Old English bigietan — more at get Date: 13th ...
begetter
noun see beget
beggar
I. noun Etymology: Middle English beggere, beggare, from beggen to beg + -ere, -are 2-er Date: 13th century 1. one that begs; especially a person who lives by asking for ...
beggar's-lice
or beggar-lice noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1837 any of various plants (as of the genera Hackelia and Cynoglossum of the borage family) with prickly ...
beggar's-ticks
noun plural but singular or plural in construction see beggar-ticks
beggar-lice
noun plural but singular or plural in construction see beggar's-lice
beggar-my-neighbour
adjective Date: 1943 chiefly British beggar-thy-neighbor
beggar-thy-neighbor
adjective Date: 1969 relating to or being an action or policy that produces gains for one group at the expense of another
beggar-ticks
also beggar's-ticks noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: circa 1818 1. bur marigold; also its prickly achenes 2. beggar's-lice
beggarliness
noun see beggarly
beggarly
adjective Date: 1526 1. contemptibly mean, scant, petty, or paltry 2. befitting or resembling a beggar; especially marked by extreme poverty • beggarliness noun
beggarweed
noun Date: circa 1809 1. any of various plants (as knotgrass or dodder) that grow in waste ground 2. any of several tick trefoils (genus Desmodium); especially a West ...
beggary
noun Date: 14th century 1. poverty, penury 2. the class of beggars 3. the practice of begging
begin
verb (began; begun; beginning) Etymology: Middle English beginnen, from Old English beginnan; akin to Old High German biginnan to begin, Old English onginnan Date: before 12th ...
Begin
biographical name Menachem 1913-1992 prime minister of Israel (1977-83)
beginner
noun Date: 14th century one that begins something; especially an inexperienced person
beginning
I. noun Date: 12th century 1. the point at which something begins ; start 2. the first part 3. origin, source 4. a rudimentary stage or early period — usually used in ...
beginning rhyme
noun Date: 1913 1. rhyme at the beginning of successive lines of verse 2. alliteration
begird
transitive verb (begirt; also -girded; -girding) Date: before 12th century 1. gird 1a 2. surround, encompass
beglamor
transitive verb see beglamour
beglamour
also beglamor transitive verb Date: 1822 to impress or deceive with glamour
begoggled
adjective Date: 1903 wearing goggles
begone
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from be gone (imperative) Date: 14th century to go away ; depart — used especially in the imperative
begonia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Michel Bégon died 1710 French governor of Santo Domingo Date: 1751 any of a large genus (Begonia of the family Begoniaceae, the begonia ...
begorra
interjection Etymology: euphemism for by God Date: 1715 Irish — used as a mild usually jocular oath
begrime
transitive verb (begrimed; begriming) Date: circa 1553 1. to make dirty with grime 2. sully, corrupt
begrudge
transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. to give or concede reluctantly or with displeasure 2. to look upon with disapproval
begrudger
noun see begrudge
begrudgingly
adverb see begrudge
beguile
verb (beguiled; beguiling) Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. to lead by deception 2. hoodwink 3. to while away especially by some agreeable occupation; also divert ...
beguilement
noun see beguile
beguiler
noun see beguile
beguilingly
adverb see beguile
beguine
I. noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Middle French Date: 15th century a member of one of various ascetic and philanthropic communities of women not under vows founded ...
begum
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu begam Date: 1617 a Muslim woman of high rank (as in India or Pakistan)
behalf
noun Etymology: Middle English, from by + half half, side Date: 14th century interest, benefit; also support, defense Usage: A body of opinion favors in with the ...
Behan
biographical name Brendan Francis 1923-1964 Irish dramatist
behave
verb (behaved; behaving) Etymology: Middle English behaven, from be- + haven to have, hold Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to manage the actions of (oneself) in a ...
behaver
noun see behave
behavior
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English behavour, from behaven Date: 15th century 1. a. the manner of conducting oneself b. anything that an organism does involving ...
behavior modification
noun Date: 1970 psychotherapy that is concerned with the treatment (as by desensitization or aversion therapy) of observable behaviors rather than underlying psychological ...
behavior therapy
noun see behavior modification
behavioral
adjective see behavior
behavioral science
noun Date: 1951 a branch of science (as psychology, sociology, or anthropology) that deals primarily with human action and often seeks to generalize about human behavior in ...
behavioral scientist
noun see behavioral science
behavioral therapy
noun see behavior modification
behaviorally
adverb see behavior
behaviorism
noun Date: 1913 a school of psychology that takes the objective evidence of behavior (as measured responses to stimuli) as the only concern of its research and the only basis ...
behaviorist
noun Date: 1913 1. a person who advocates or practices behaviorism 2. a person who specializes in the study of behavior • behaviorist adjective
behavioristic
adjective see behaviorism
behaviour
chiefly British variant of behavior
behaviourism
chiefly British variant of behaviorism
behaviourist
chiefly British variant of behaviorist
behead
transitive verb Date: before 12th century to cut off the head of ; decapitate
behemoth
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, from Hebrew bĕhēmōth Date: 14th century 1. often capitalized a mighty animal described in Job ...
behest
noun Etymology: Middle English, promise, command, from Old English behǣs promise, from behātan to promise, from be- + hātan to command, promise — more at hight Date: 12th ...
behind
I. adverb or adjective Etymology: Middle English behinde, from Old English behindan, from be- + hindan from behind; akin to Old English hinder behind — more at hind Date: ...
behind bars
phrasal in jail
behind one's back
phrasal without one's knowledge ; in secret
behind the eight ball
phrasal in a highly disadvantageous position
behind the scenes
phrasal 1. out of public view; also in secret 2. in a position to see the hidden workings
behind-the-scenes
adjective Date: 1850 1. being or working out of public view or in secret 2. revealing or reporting the hidden workings
behindhand
adjective Date: 1535 1. being in arrears 2. a. being in an inferior position b. being behind schedule
Behistun
geographical name — see Bisitun
behold
verb (beheld; -holding) Etymology: Middle English, to keep, behold, from Old English behealdan, from be- + healdan to hold Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. to ...
beholden
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from past participle of beholden Date: 14th century being under obligation for a favor or gift ; indebted
beholder
noun see behold
behoof
noun Etymology: Middle English behof, from Old English behōf profit, need; akin to Old English hebban to raise — more at heave Date: before 12th century advantage, profit
behoove
verb (behooved; behooving) Etymology: Middle English behoven, from Old English behōfian, from behōf Date: before 12th century transitive verb to be necessary, proper, or ...
behove
chiefly British variant of behoove
Behring
biographical name Emil von 1854-1917 German bacteriologist
Behrman
biographical name Samuel Nathaniel 1893-1973 American dramatist
beige
I. noun Etymology: French Date: circa 1858 1. cloth made of natural undyed wool 2. a. a variable color averaging light grayish-yellowish brown b. a pale to grayish ...
beignet
noun Etymology: American French & French; American French, from French, from Middle French bignet, from buyne bump, bruise Date: 1835 1. fritter 2. a light square doughnut ...
beigy
adjective see beige I
Beijing
or Peking or formerly Peiping geographical name municipality NE China, its capital population 10,819,407 • Beijinger noun
Beijinger
noun see Beijing
being
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the quality or state of having existence b. (1) something conceivable as existing (2) something that actually exists (3) the ...
Beira
geographical name town & port SE Mozambique; chief port for central Mozambique & landlocked Zimbabwe & Malawi population 298,847
Beirut
or ancient Berytus geographical name city & port capital of Lebanon • Beiruti noun
Beiruti
noun see Beirut
Beja
noun (plural Beja) Etymology: Arabic dialect beja, bega, probably ultimately from Geez bega Date: 1819 1. a member of a pastoral people living between the Nile and the Red ...
bejabbers
or bejeebers interjection Etymology: euphemism for by Jesus Date: 1890 bejesus
Bejaïa
or formerly Bougie geographical name city & port NE Algeria population 89,500
bejeebers
interjection see bejabbers
bejeezus
interjection see bejesus
bejesus
also bejeezus interjection Etymology: alteration of by Jesus Date: 1861 — used as a mild oath; used as a noun for emphasis
bejeweled
or bejewelled adjective Date: 1557 ornamented with or as if with jewels
bejewelled
adjective see bejeweled
Bekaa
or Al Biqa‘ or ancient Coele-Syria geographical name valley Lebanon between Lebanon & Anti-Lebanon ranges
bel
noun Etymology: Alexander Graham Bell Date: 1929 ten decibels
bel canto
noun Etymology: Italian, literally, beautiful singing Date: 1893 operatic singing originating in 17th century and 18th century Italy and stressing ease, purity, and evenness ...
belabor
transitive verb Date: 1596 1. a. to attack verbally b. to beat soundly 2. to explain or insist on excessively
belabour
chiefly British variant of belabor
Belarus
geographical name country N central Europe; a constituent republic ( Belorussia (or Byelorussia) of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics 1919-91 capital Minsk area 80,154 ...
Belarusan
I. noun see Belarusian II. adjective see Belarusian III. adjective or noun see Belarus
Belarusian
or Belarussian; also Belarusan noun Date: 1993 1. a native or inhabitant of Belarus 2. the Slavic language of the Belarusians • Belarusian or Belarussian also Belarusan ...
Belarussian
I. noun see Belarusian II. adjective see Belarusian III. adjective or noun see Belarus
Belasco
biographical name David 1853-1931 American dramatist & producer
belated
adjective Etymology: past participle of belate (to make late) Date: 1670 1. delayed beyond the usual time 2. existing or appearing past the normal or proper time • ...
belatedly
adverb see belated
belatedness
noun see belated
Belau
geographical name — see Palau
belaud
transitive verb Date: circa 1849 to praise usually to excess
Belawan
geographical name town & port Indonesia in NE Sumatra
belay
I. verb (belayed; belaying) Etymology: Middle English beleggen to beset, from Old English belecgan, from be- + lecgan to lay Date: 1549 transitive verb 1. a. to secure ...
Belaya
geographical name river Russia in Europe rising in the S Urals & flowing S, W, & NW to the Kama
belayer
noun see belay I
belch
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English bealcan Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. to expel gas suddenly from the stomach through the mouth 2. to ...
beldam
or beldame noun Etymology: Middle English beldam grandmother, from Anglo-French bel beautiful + Middle English dam Date: 1520 an old woman
beldame
noun see beldam
beleaguer
transitive verb (-guered; beleaguering) Etymology: Dutch belegeren, from be- (akin to Old English be-) + leger camp; akin to Old High German legar bed — more at lair Date: ...
beleaguerment
noun see beleaguer
Belém
or Pará geographical name city N Brazil capital of Pará state on Pará River population 1,200,000
belemnite
noun Etymology: New Latin belemnites, from Greek belemnon dart; akin to Greek ballein to throw — more at devil Date: 1646 any of various extinct cephalopods (order ...
Belfast
geographical name 1. district E Northern Ireland, established 1974 area 54 square miles (140 square kilometers), population 283,746 2. city & port capital of Northern Ireland ...
Belfort
geographical name commune E France commanding Belfort Gap (wide pass between Vosges & Jura mountains) population 51,913
belfry
noun (plural belfries) Etymology: Middle English belfrey, berfrey, bell tower, siege tower, from Anglo-French *berfrei, *belfrei, of Germanic origin (akin to Middle High German ...
Belg
abbreviation Belgian; Belgium
Belgae
noun plural Etymology: Latin, plural of Belga Date: 1627 a people occupying parts of northern Gaul and Britain in Caesar's time • Belgic adjective
Belgian
noun Date: circa 1623 1. a native or inhabitant of Belgium 2. any of a breed of heavy muscular usually roan or chestnut draft horses developed in Belgium • Belgian ...
Belgian Congo
geographical name — see Congo 2
Belgian East Africa
geographical name — see Ruanda-Urundi
Belgian endive
noun Date: 1931 the developing crown of chicory when blanched for use as a vegetable or in salads by growing in darkness or semidarkness — called also endive, witloof
Belgian hare
noun Date: 1885 any of a breed of slender chestnut-colored domestic rabbits
Belgian Malinois
noun (plural Belgian Malinois) Date: 1968 any of a breed of working dogs closely related to the Belgian sheepdog and having relatively short straight fawn or reddish-brown hair ...
Belgian sheepdog
noun Date: 1929 any of a breed of hardy dogs developed in Belgium especially for herding sheep and having abundant long straight black hair with a dense undercoat
Belgian Tervuren
noun Etymology: Tervuren, commune in Brabant, Belgium Date: 1964 any of a breed of working dogs closely related to the Belgian sheepdog and having abundant long straight fawn ...
Belgian waffle
noun Date: 1969 a waffle having large depressions that is usually topped with fruit and whipped cream
Belgic
adjective see Belgae
België
geographical name see Belgium
Belgique
geographical name see Belgium
Belgium
or French Belgique or Flemish België geographical name country W Europe bordering on North Sea; a constitutional monarchy capital Brussels area 11,781 square miles (30,513 ...
Belgorod-Dnestrovski
or Belgorod-Dnestrovskiy or formerly Turkish & Russian Akkerman geographical name city SW Ukraine on the Dniester estuary population 29,000
Belgorod-Dnestrovskiy
geographical name see Belgorod-Dnestrovski
Belgrade
or Beograd geographical name city capital of Serbia & of Serbia and Montenegro population 1,553,854
Belgravia
geographical name district of W central London, England, in Kensington and Chelsea borough S of Hyde Park
Belial
noun Etymology: Greek, from Hebrew bĕlīya‘al worthlessness Date: 13th century 1. — a biblical name of the devil or one of the fiends 2. one of the fallen angels in ...

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