Слова на букву buck-cobl (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву buck-cobl (6389)

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chart
I. noun Etymology: Middle French charte, from Latin charta piece of papyrus, document — more at card Date: 1571 1. map: as a. an outline map exhibiting something (as ...
charter
I. noun Etymology: Middle English chartre, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin chartula, from Latin, diminutive of charta Date: 13th century 1. a written instrument or ...
charter member
noun Date: circa 1909 an original member of a group (as a society or corporation) • charter membership noun
charter membership
noun see charter member
charter school
noun Date: 1992 a tax-supported school established by a charter between a granting body (as a school board) and an outside group (as of teachers and parents) which operates the ...
chartered accountant
noun Date: 1855 British a member of a chartered institute of accountants
charterer
noun see charter II
Chartism
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin charta charter, from Latin, document Date: 1839 the principles and practices of a body of 19th century English political reformers advocating ...
chartist
noun Date: 1919 1. an analyst of market action whose predictions of market courses are based on study of graphic presentations of past market performance 2. cartographer
Chartist
noun or adjective see Chartism
Chartres
geographical name city N central France SW of Paris population 41,850
chartreuse
noun Etymology: Chartreuse Date: 1884 a variable color averaging a brilliant yellow green
Chartreuse
trademark — used for a usually green or yellow liqueur
chartulary
noun (plural -laries) Etymology: Medieval Latin chartularium Date: 1571 cartulary
charwoman
noun Etymology: chare + woman Date: 1596 a cleaning woman especially in a large building
chary
adjective (charier; -est) Etymology: Middle English, sorrowful, dear, from Old English cearig sorrowful, from caru sorrow — more at care Date: 15th century 1. archaic ...
Charybdis
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Date: 1511 a whirlpool off the coast of Sicily personified in Greek mythology as a female monster — compare Scylla
Chase
I. biographical name Mary Ellen 1887-1973 American educator & author II. biographical name Salmon Portland 1808-1873 American statesman; chief justice United States Supreme ...
chase
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French chace, from chacer Date: 13th century 1. a. the hunting of wild animals — used with the b. the act of chasing ; ...
chaser
I. noun Date: 13th century 1. one that chases 2. a mild drink (as beer) taken after hard liquor II. noun Date: 1707 1. a skilled worker who produces ornamental chasing ...
Chasid
or Chassid noun (plural Chasidim or Chassidim) variant of Hasid
Chasidic
adjective see Hasid
chasm
noun Etymology: Latin chasma, from Greek; akin to Latin hiare to yawn — more at yawn Date: 1596 1. a deep cleft in the surface of a planet (as the earth) ; gorge 2. a ...
chassé
I. intransitive verb (chasséd; chasséing) Date: 1803 1. to make a chassé 2. sashay II. noun Etymology: French, from past participle of chasser to chase Date: 1828 a ...
chassepot
noun Etymology: French, from Antoine A. Chassepot died 1905 French inventor Date: 1869 a bolt-action rifle firing a paper cartridge
chasseur
noun Etymology: French, from Old French chaceur, from chacier to hunt, chase, from Vulgar Latin *captiare — more at catch Date: 1795 1. hunter, huntsman 2. one of a body ...
Chassid
I. noun see Chasid II. noun see Hasid
Chassidic
adjective see Hasid
chassis
noun (plural chassis) Etymology: French châssis, from Middle French chaciz, from chasse Date: circa 1864 the supporting frame of a structure (as an automobile or television); ...
chaste
adjective (chaster; chastest) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin castus pure Date: 13th century 1. innocent of unlawful sexual intercourse 2. ...
chastely
adverb see chaste
chasten
transitive verb (chastened; chastening) Etymology: alteration of obsolete English chaste to chasten, from Middle English, from Anglo-French chastier, from Latin castigare, from ...
chastener
noun see chasten
chasteness
noun see chaste
chastise
transitive verb (chastised; chastising) Etymology: Middle English chastisen, alteration of chasten Date: 14th century 1. to inflict punishment on (as by whipping) 2. to ...
chastisement
noun see chastise
chastiser
noun see chastise
chastity
noun Date: 13th century 1. the quality or state of being chaste: as a. abstention from unlawful sexual intercourse b. abstention from all sexual intercourse c. purity ...
chastity belt
noun Date: 1931 a belt device (as of medieval times) designed to prevent sexual intercourse on the part of the woman wearing it
chasuble
noun Etymology: Middle English chesible, from Anglo-French chesible, chasuble, from Late Latin casubla hooded garment Date: 14th century a sleeveless outer vestment worn by ...
chat
I. verb (chatted; chatting) Etymology: Middle English chatten, short for chatteren Date: 15th century intransitive verb 1. chatter, prattle 2. a. to talk in an ...
chat room
noun Date: 1986 a real-time online interactive discussion group
chat show
noun Date: 1969 chiefly British talk show
château
noun (plural châteaus or châteaux) Etymology: French, from Old French chastel, Latin castellum fortress Date: 1720 1. a feudal castle or fortress in France 2. a large ...
château en Espagne
foreign term Etymology: French castle in Spain ; a visionary project
Château-Thierry
geographical name town N France on the Marne SW of Reims population 15,830
chateaubriand
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: François René de Chateaubriand Date: 1877 a large tenderloin steak usually grilled or broiled and served with a sauce (as ...
Chateaubriand
biographical name Vicomte François-Auguste-René de 1768-1848 French author
Châteauguay
geographical name town Canada in S Quebec SW of Montreal population 41,003
Châteauroux
geographical name commune central France S of Orléans population 35,691
chatelain
noun Etymology: Middle English chateleyn, from Middle French chatelaine, from Old French chastelein, castelain Date: 15th century castellan
chatelaine
noun Etymology: French châtelaine, feminine of châtelain Date: 1845 1. a. the wife of a castellan ; the mistress of a château b. the mistress of a household or of a ...
Chatham
I. biographical name 1st Earl of — see William Pitt II. geographical name 1. — see San Cristobal 1 2. town SE England in Kent population 43,557
Chatham Island
geographical name see San Cristóbal 1
Chatham Islands
geographical name islands S Pacific belonging to New Zealand & comprising two islands (Chatham & Pitt) area 372 square miles (967 square kilometers)
Chatham Strait
geographical name strait SE Alaska between Admiralty Island & Kuiu Island on E & Baranof Island & Chichagof Island on W
Chatham-Kent
geographical name city Canada in SE Ontario E of Lake Saint Clair population 107,341
chatoyance
noun Date: 1910 chatoyancy
chatoyancy
noun Date: 1894 the quality or state of being chatoyant
chatoyant
I. adjective Etymology: French, from present participle of chatoyer to shine like a cat's eyes Date: 1816 having a changeable luster or color with an undulating narrow band ...
Chatrian
biographical name Alexandre — see Erckmann-Chatrian
Chattahoochee
geographical name river 436 miles (702 kilometers) SE United States rising in N Georgia flowing SW & S along Alabama-Georgia boundary into Lake Seminole
Chattanooga
geographical name city SE Tennessee on Tennessee River population 155,554
chattel
noun Etymology: Middle English chatel property, from Anglo-French — more at cattle Date: 14th century 1. an item of tangible movable or immovable property except real ...
chatter
I. verb Etymology: Middle English chatteren, of imitative origin Date: 13th century intransitive verb 1. to utter rapid short sounds suggestive of language but inarticulate ...
chatter mark
noun Date: 1888 1. a fine undulation formed on the surface of work by a chattering tool 2. one of a series of short curved cracks on a glaciated rock surface transverse to ...
chatterbox
noun Date: 1774 one who engages in much idle talk
chatterer
noun see chatter I
Chatterjee
biographical name Bankim Chandra 1838-1894 Indian novelist
Chatterton
biographical name Thomas 1752-1770 English poet
chattery
adjective see chatter I
chattily
adverb see chatty
chattiness
noun see chatty
Chattisgarh
geographical name state central India capital Raipur area 56,510 square miles (146,361 square kilometers), population 17,620,000
chatty
adjective (chattier; -est) Date: 1756 1. fond of chatting ; talkative 2. having the style and manner of light familiar conversation • chattily adverb • chattiness ...
Chaucer
biographical name Geoffrey circa 1342-1400 English poet • Chaucerian adjective
Chaucerian
adjective see Chaucer
chauffeur
I. noun Etymology: French, literally, stoker, from chauffer to heat, from Old French chaufer — more at chafe Date: 1899 a person employed to drive a motor vehicle II. ...
chaulmoogra
noun Etymology: Bengali cālmugrā Date: circa 1815 any of several East Indian trees (family Flacourtiaceae) that yield an acrid oil used especially formerly in treating ...
chaunt
archaic variant of chant
chaunter
archaic variant of chanter
chaussure
noun (plural chaussures) Etymology: Middle English chaucer, from Anglo-French chausure, from Old French chaucier to put on footwear, from Latin calceare, from calceus shoe — ...
chautauqua
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Chautauqua Lake Date: 1873 any of various traveling shows and local assemblies that flourished in the United States in the late 19th ...
Chautauqua
geographical name lake 18 miles (29 kilometers) long SW New York
Chautemps
biographical name Camille 1885-1963 French lawyer & politician; premier (1930; 1933-34; 1937-38)
chauvinism
noun Etymology: French chauvinisme, from Nicolas Chauvin, character noted for his excessive patriotism and devotion to Napoleon in Théodore and Hippolyte Cogniard's play La ...
chauvinist
noun or adjective see chauvinism
chauvinistic
adjective see chauvinism
chauvinistically
adverb see chauvinism
Chavannes, de
biographical name — see Puvis de Chavannes
Chávez
biographical name Carlos 1899-1978 Mexican conductor & composer
Chávez (Frías)
biographical name Hugo Rafael 1954- president of Venezuela (1999- )
chaw
I. verb Etymology: by alteration Date: 1506 chew 1 II. noun Date: 1709 a chew especially of tobacco
chawbacon
noun Etymology: 1chaw + bacon Date: 1537 bumpkin, hick
chayote
noun Etymology: Spanish, from Nahuatl chayohtli Date: 1887 the pear-shaped fruit of a West Indian annual vine (Sechium edule) of the gourd family that is widely cultivated as ...
chayote squash
noun see chayote
CHD
abbreviation coronary heart disease
che sarà, sarà
foreign term Etymology: Italian what will be, will be
cheap
I. noun Etymology: Middle English chep, from Old English cēap trade; akin to Old High German kouf trade; both ultimately from Latin caupo tradesman Date: before 12th century ...
cheap shot
noun Date: 1971 1. an act of deliberate roughness against a defenseless opponent especially in a contact sport 2. a critical statement that takes unfair advantage of a ...
cheap-shot
transitive verb see cheap shot
cheapen
verb (cheapened; cheapening) Date: 1562 transitive verb 1. [obsolete English cheap to price, bid for] archaic a. to ask the price of b. to bid or bargain for 2. ...
cheapie
noun Date: circa 1898 one that is cheap; especially an inexpensively produced motion picture • cheapie adjective
cheapish
adjective see cheap II
cheapishly
adverb see cheap II
cheapjack
I. noun Etymology: cheap + the name Jack Date: 1851 1. a haggling huckster 2. a dealer in cheap merchandise II. adjective Date: 1865 1. being inferior, cheap, or ...
cheaply
adverb see cheap II
cheapness
noun see cheap II
cheapo
adjective Date: 1967 cheap
cheapskate
noun Date: 1896 a miserly or stingy person; especially one who tries to avoid paying a fair share of costs or expenses
cheat
I. verb Etymology: 2cheat Date: 1590 transitive verb 1. to deprive of something valuable by the use of deceit or fraud 2. to influence or lead by deceit, trick, or ...
cheat sheet
noun Date: circa 1957 1. a sheet containing information (as test answers) used secretly for cheating 2. a written or graphic aid (as a sheet of notes) that can be referred to ...
cheater
noun see cheat I
cheatgrass
noun Date: 1866 an annual weedy Eurasian bromegrass (Bromus tectorum) naturalized in North America
Cheboksary
geographical name city Russia in Europe capital of Chuvash Republic WNW of Kazan' population 442,000
Chechen Republic
geographical name see Chechnya
Chechenia
geographical name see Chechnya
Checheno-Ingush Republic
geographical name former autonomous republic Union of Soviet Socialist Republics on N slopes of Caucasus Mountains; split into republics of Chechnya and Ingushetia within ...
Chechenya
geographical name see Chechnya
Chechnya
or Chechenya or Chechenia or Chechen Republic geographical name republic SE Russia in Europe on N slopes of Caucasus Mountains capital Grozny
check
I. noun Etymology: Middle English chek, from Anglo-French eschec, from Arabic shāh, from Persian, literally, king; akin to Greek ktasthai to acquire, Sanskrit kṣatra ...
check in
verb Date: 1918 intransitive verb 1. to register at a hotel 2. to report one's presence or arrival transitive verb to satisfy all requirements in returning
check into
phrasal 1. to check in at 2. investigate
check mark
noun Date: 1917 check 10 • checkmark transitive verb
check off
verb Date: 1884 transitive verb 1. to eliminate from further consideration 2. to deduct (union dues) from a worker's paycheck intransitive verb to change a play at the ...
check out
verb Date: 1921 intransitive verb 1. to vacate and pay for one's lodging (as at a hotel) 2. die transitive verb 1. to satisfy all requirements in taking away 2. ...
check up on
phrasal investigate
check valve
noun Date: circa 1877 a valve that permits flow in one direction only
check-in
noun Date: 1927 an act or instance of checking in
checkable
adjective Date: 1877 1. capable of being checked 2. held in or being a bank account on which checks can be drawn
checkbook
noun Date: circa 1846 a book containing blank checks to be drawn on a bank
checkbook journalism
noun Date: 1963 the practice of paying someone for a news story and especially for granting an interview
checker
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cheker, from Anglo-French checker, escheker, from eschec — more at check Date: 14th century 1. archaic chessboard 2. a square or spot ...
checkerberry
noun Etymology: checker wild service tree + berry Date: 1776 1. the spicy red berrylike fruit of a North American wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens) 2. a plant producing ...
checkerboard
noun Date: 1775 1. a board used in various games (as checkers) with usually 64 squares in 2 alternating colors 2. something that has a pattern or arrangement like a ...
checkered
adjective Date: 1656 marked by alternation or contrast of fortune ; especially marked by many problems or failures
checkers
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1712 a checkerboard game for 2 players each with 12 pieces
checking account
noun Date: circa 1909 a bank account against which the depositor can draw checks
checkless
adjective see check I
checklist
noun Date: 1853 a list of things to be checked or done
checkmark
transitive verb see check mark
checkmate
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English chekmaten, from chekmate, interjection used to announce checkmate, from Anglo-French eschec mat, from Arabic shāh māt, from ...
checkoff
noun Date: 1911 1. a. the deduction of union dues from a worker's paycheck by the employer b. designation on an income tax return of a small amount of money to be applied ...
checkout
noun Date: 1933 1. the action or an instance of checking out 2. the time at which a lodger must vacate a room (as in a hotel) or be charged for retaining it 3. a counter ...
checkpoint
noun Date: 1926 a point at which a check is performed
checkrein
noun Date: 1786 1. a short rein looped over a hook on the saddle of a harness to prevent a horse from lowering its head 2. a branch rein connecting the driving rein of one ...
checkroom
noun Date: 1900 a room at which baggage, parcels, or clothing can be left for safekeeping
checks and balances
noun plural Date: 1787 a system that allows each branch of a government to amend or veto acts of another branch so as to prevent any one branch from exerting too much power
checksum
noun Date: 1940 a sum derived from the bits of a segment of computer data that is calculated before and after transmission or storage to assure that the data is free from ...
checkup
noun Date: 1921 examination; especially a general physical examination
cheddar
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Cheddar, village in Somersetshire, England Date: 1646 a hard white, yellow, or orange smooth-textured cheese with a flavor that ...
cheddar cheese
noun see cheddar
cheder
variant of heder
Cheduba
geographical name island W Myanmar area 202 square miles (523 square kilometers), population 2635
cheechako
noun (plural -kos) Etymology: Chinook Jargon, from chee new (from Lower Chinook čxi right away) + chako come, from Nootka čokwa• come, imperative Date: 1897 tenderfoot 1 ...
cheek
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cheke, from Old English cēace; akin to Middle Low German kāke jawbone Date: before 12th century 1. the fleshy side of the face below the ...
cheek by jowl
adverb Date: 1577 side by side
cheek tooth
noun Date: 14th century any of the molar or premolar teeth
cheekbone
noun Date: 15th century the prominence below the eye that is formed by the zygomatic bone; also zygomatic bone
cheeked
adjective Date: 1580 having cheeks of a specified nature — used in combination
cheekful
noun see cheek I
cheekily
adverb see cheeky
cheekiness
noun see cheeky
cheeky
adjective (cheekier; -est) Date: 1846 insolently bold ; impudent • cheekily adverb • cheekiness noun
cheep
intransitive verb Etymology: imitative Date: 1513 1. to utter faint shrill sounds ; peep 2. to utter a single word or sound • cheep noun
cheer
I. noun Etymology: Middle English chere face, cheer, from Anglo-French, face, from Medieval Latin cara, probably from Greek kara head, face — more at cerebral Date: 13th ...
cheerer
noun see cheer II
cheerful
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. full of good spirits ; merry b. ungrudging 2. conducive to cheer ; likely to dispel gloom or worry • cheerfully adverb • ...
cheerfully
adverb see cheerful
cheerfulness
noun see cheerful
cheerily
adverb see cheery
cheeriness
noun see cheery
cheerio
interjection Etymology: cheery + -o Date: 1910 chiefly British — usually used as a farewell and sometimes as a greeting or toast
cheerlead
transitive verb see cheerleader
cheerleader
noun Date: 1903 one that calls for and directs organized cheering (as at a football game) • cheerlead transitive verb • cheerleading noun
cheerleading
noun see cheerleader
cheerless
adjective Date: 1579 lacking qualities that cheer ; bleak, joyless Synonyms: see dismal • cheerlessly adverb • cheerlessness noun
cheerlessly
adverb see cheerless
cheerlessness
noun see cheerless
cheerly
adverb Date: 1558 in a cheerful manner
cheers
interjection Date: 1919 — used as a toast
cheery
adjective (cheerier; -est) Date: 15th century 1. marked by cheerfulness or good spirits 2. causing or suggesting cheerfulness • cheerily adverb • cheeriness noun
cheese
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English chese, from Old English cēse, from Latin caseus cheese Date: before 12th century 1. a. a food consisting of ...
cheese it
phrasal — used in the imperative as a warning of danger
cheeseburger
noun Etymology: cheese + hamburger Date: 1928 a hamburger topped with a slice of cheese
cheesecake
noun Date: 15th century 1. a dessert consisting of a creamy filling usually containing cheese baked in a pastry or pressed-crumb shell 2. a photographic display of shapely ...
cheesecloth
noun Etymology: from its use in the making of cheese Date: 14th century a very lightweight unsized cotton gauze
cheesed off
adjective Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1942 chiefly British angry, irritated
cheeseparing
noun Date: 1597 1. something worthless or insignificant 2. miserly economizing • cheeseparing adjective
cheesesteak
noun Date: 1977 a sandwich consisting of thinly sliced beef topped with melted cheese and condiments (as fried onions or peppers)
cheesiness
noun see cheesy
cheesy
adjective (cheesier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. a. resembling or suggesting cheese especially in consistency or odor b. containing cheese 2. shabby 3c, cheap • ...
cheetah
noun (plural cheetahs; also cheetah) Etymology: Hindi cītā & Urdu chītā leopard, from Sanskrit citraka, from citra bright, variegated; akin to Old High German heitar bright ...
Cheever
biographical name John 1912-1982 American writer
chef
noun Etymology: French, short for chef de cuisine head of the kitchen Date: 1840 1. a skilled cook who manages the kitchen (as of a restaurant) 2. cook • chef ...
chef d'oeuvre
noun (plural chefs d'oeuvre) Etymology: French chef-d'oeuvre, literally, leading work Date: 1619 a masterpiece especially in art or literature
chefdom
noun see chef
Chefoo
geographical name — see Yantai
Cheju
or Jeju or formerly Quelpart geographical name island South Korea in N East China Sea area 706 square miles (1829 square kilometers)
Chekhov
also Chekov biographical name Anton Pavlovich 1860-1904 Russian dramatist & writer • Chekhovian adjective
Chekhovian
adjective see Chekhov
Chekiang
geographical name — see Zhejiang
Chekov
biographical name see Chekhov
chela
noun (plural chelae) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek chēlē claw Date: 1635 a pincerlike organ or claw borne by a limb of a crustacean or arachnid
Chelan, Lake
geographical name lake about 55 miles (88 kilometers) long N central Washington
chelatable
adjective see chelate II
chelate
I. adjective Date: 1826 1. resembling or having chelae 2. [from the pincerlike way in which the metal ion is held] of, relating to, or being a chelate II. verb (chelated; ...
chelation
noun Date: 1932 1. the process of chelating or the quality or state of being chelated 2. chelation therapy
chelation therapy
noun Date: 1976 the use of a chelator (as EDTA) to bind with a metal (as lead or iron) in the body to form a chelate so that the metal loses its chemical effect (as toxicity ...
chelator
noun Date: 1957 one that chelates; especially a binding agent that suppresses chemical activity by forming chelates
chelicera
noun (plural chelicerae) Etymology: New Latin, from French chélicère, from Greek chēlē + keras horn — more at horn Date: 1835 one of the anterior pair of appendages of ...
cheliceral
adjective see chelicera
cheliped
noun Etymology: Greek chēlē claw + English -i- + -ped Date: 1869 one of the pair of legs that bears the large chelae in decapod crustaceans
Chellean
or Chellian adjective Etymology: French chelléen, from Chelles, France Date: 1893 Abbevillian
Chellian
adjective see Chellean
Chelmsford
geographical name 1. town NE Massachusetts population 33,858 2. town SE England capital of Essex population 150,000
chelonian
noun Etymology: Greek chelōnē tortoise Date: 1828 turtle • chelonian adjective
Chelsea
geographical name 1. city E Massachusetts NE of Boston population 35,080 2. former metropolitan borough SW London, England, on N bank of Thames River, now part of Kensington ...
Cheltenham
geographical name borough SW central England in Gloucestershire population 85,900
Chelyabinsk
geographical name city W Russia in Asia population 1,143,000
Chelyuskin, Cape
geographical name headland Russia in Asia on Taymyr Peninsula; northernmost point of Asian mainland, at 77°35′N, 105°E
chem
abbreviation chemical; chemist; chemistry
chem-
or chemo-; also chemi- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Late Greek chēmeia alchemy — more at alchemy 1. chemical ; chemistry 2. chemically
chemi-
combining form see chem-
chemic
adjective Etymology: New Latin chimicus alchemist, from Medieval Latin alchimicus, from alchymia alchemy Date: 1576 1. archaic alchemic 2. chemical
chemical
I. adjective Date: 1576 1. of, relating to, used in, or produced by chemistry or the phenomena of chemistry 2. a. acting or operated or produced by chemicals b. ...
chemical engineer
noun see chemical engineering
chemical engineering
noun Date: 1869 engineering dealing with the industrial application of chemistry • chemical engineer noun
chemical peel
noun Date: 1978 a cosmetic procedure for the removal of facial blemishes and wrinkles involving the application of a caustic chemical and especially an acid (as ...
chemical warfare
noun Date: 1917 tactical warfare using incendiary mixtures, smokes, or irritant, burning, poisonous, or asphyxiating gases
chemical weapon
noun Date: 1920 a weapon used in chemical warfare
chemically
adverb see chemical I
chemiluminescence
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1889 luminescence (as bioluminescence) due to chemical reaction • chemiluminescent adjective
chemiluminescent
adjective see chemiluminescence
chemin de fer
noun (plural chemins de fer) Etymology: French, literally, railroad Date: 1891 a card game in which two hands are dealt, any number of players may bet against the dealer, and ...
chemiosmotic
adjective Date: 1957 relating to or being a theory that seeks to explain the mechanism of ATP formation in oxidative phosphorylation by mitochondria and chloroplasts without ...
chemise
noun Etymology: Middle English, shirt, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin camisia Date: 13th century 1. a woman's one-piece undergarment 2. a loose straight-hanging dress
chemisette
noun Etymology: French, diminutive of chemise Date: 1796 a woman's garment; especially one (as of lace) to fill the open front of a dress
chemisorb
transitive verb Etymology: chem- + -sorb (as in adsorb) Date: 1935 to take up and hold usually irreversibly by chemical forces • chemisorption noun
chemisorption
noun see chemisorb
chemist
noun Etymology: New Latin chimista, short for Medieval Latin alchimista Date: 1562 1. a. obsolete alchemist b. one trained in chemistry 2. British pharmacist
chemistry
noun (plural -tries) Date: 1646 1. a science that deals with the composition, structure, and properties of substances and with the transformations that they undergo 2. a. ...
Chemnitz
or 1953-90 Karl-Marx-Stadt geographical name city E Germany SE of Leipzig population 287,511
chemo
noun Date: 1977 chemotherapy
chemo-
combining form see chem-
chemoautotrophic
adjective Date: 1941 being autotrophic and oxidizing an inorganic compound as a source of energy • chemoautotrophy noun
chemoautotrophy
noun see chemoautotrophic
chemokine
noun Etymology: chem- + -kine (as in cytokine) Date: 1992 any of a group of cytokines produced by various cells (as at sites of inflammation) that stimulate chemotaxis in ...
chemoprevention
noun Date: 1980 the use of chemical agents to prevent or slow the development of cancer • chemopreventive adjective
chemopreventive
adjective see chemoprevention
chemoprophylactic
adjective see chemoprophylaxis
chemoprophylaxis
noun Date: 1936 the prevention of infectious disease by the use of chemical agents • chemoprophylactic adjective
chemoreception
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1919 the physiological reception of chemical stimuli • chemoreceptive adjective
chemoreceptive
adjective see chemoreception
chemoreceptor
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1906 a sense organ (as a taste bud) responding to chemical stimuli
chemosurgery
noun Date: circa 1944 chemical removal of diseased or unwanted tissue • chemosurgical adjective
chemosurgical
adjective see chemosurgery
chemosynthesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1901 synthesis of organic compounds (as in living cells) by energy derived from inorganic chemical reactions • chemosynthetic adjective
chemosynthetic
adjective see chemosynthesis
chemotactic
adjective Date: 1893 involving, inducing, or exhibiting chemotaxis • chemotactically adverb
chemotactically
adverb see chemotactic
chemotaxis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1887 orientation or movement of an organism or cell in relation to chemical agents
chemotaxonomic
adjective see chemotaxonomy
chemotaxonomist
noun see chemotaxonomy
chemotaxonomy
noun Date: 1963 the classification of plants and animals based on similarities and differences in biochemical composition • chemotaxonomic adjective • chemotaxonomist noun

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