Слова на букву buck-cobl (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву buck-cobl (6389)

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chromomere
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1896 one of the small bead-shaped and heavily staining masses of coiled chromatin that are linearly arranged along ...
chromomeric
adjective see chromomere
chromonema
noun (plural chromonemata) Etymology: New Latin, from chrom- + Greek nēmat-, nēma thread — more at nemat- Date: circa 1925 the coiled filamentous core of a chromatid • ...
chromonematic
adjective see chromonema
chromophil
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1899 staining readily with dyes
chromophobe
adjective Date: circa 1909 resisting staining with dyes
chromophore
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1879 a chemical group (as an azo group) that absorbs light at a specific frequency and so imparts color to a ...
chromophoric
adjective see chromophore
chromoplast
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1885 a colored plastid usually containing red or yellow pigment (as carotene)
chromoprotein
noun Date: 1924 any of various proteins (as hemoglobins, carotenoids, or flavoproteins) having a pigment as a prosthetic group
chromosomal
adjective see chromosome
chromosomally
adverb see chromosome
chromosome
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1889 any of the rod-shaped or threadlike DNA-containing structures of cellular organisms that are located in the ...
chromosome number
noun Date: 1910 the usually constant number of chromosomes characteristic of a particular kind of animal or plant
chromosphere
noun Date: 1868 the region of the atmosphere of a star (as the sun) between the star's photosphere and its corona • chromospheric adjective
chromospheric
adjective see chromosphere
chromous
adjective Date: 1830 of, relating to, or derived from chromium especially with a valence of two
chron
abbreviation 1. chronicle 2. chronological; chronology
Chron
abbreviation Chronicles
chron-
or chrono- combining form Etymology: Greek, from chronos time
chronaxie
also chronaxy noun Etymology: French chronaxie, from chron- + Greek axia value, from axios worthy — more at axiom Date: 1922 the minimum time required for excitation of a ...
chronaxy
noun see chronaxie
chronic
adjective Etymology: French chronique, from Greek chronikos of time, from chronos Date: 1601 1. a. marked by long duration or frequent recurrence ; not acute b. ...
chronic fatigue syndrome
noun Date: 1947 a disorder of unknown cause that is characterized by persistent profound fatigue usually accompanied by other symptoms (as headache and tender lymph nodes) ...
chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
noun Date: 1967 pulmonary disease (as emphysema or chronic bronchitis) that is characterized by chronic typically irreversible airway obstruction resulting in a slowed rate of ...
chronically
adverb see chronic
chronicity
noun see chronic
chronicle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cronicle, from Anglo-French, alteration of chronike, from Latin chronica, from Greek chronika, from neuter plural of chronikos Date: 14th ...
chronicle play
noun Date: 1863 a play with a theme from history consisting usually of rather loosely connected episodes chronologically arranged
chronicler
noun see chronicle II
Chronicles
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1535 either of two historical books of canonical Jewish and Christian Scripture — called also Paralipomenon — see bible table
chrono-
combining form see chron-
chronobiologic
adjective see chronobiology
chronobiological
adjective see chronobiology
chronobiologist
noun see chronobiology
chronobiology
noun Date: 1969 the study of biological rhythms • chronobiologic or chronobiological adjective • chronobiologist noun
chronogram
noun Date: 1621 an inscription, sentence, or phrase in which certain letters express a date or epoch
chronograph
noun Date: 1851 an instrument for measuring and recording time intervals: as a. an instrument having a revolving drum on which a stylus makes marks b. stopwatch; also a ...
chronographic
adjective see chronograph
chronography
noun see chronograph
chronologer
noun Date: circa 1572 chronologist
chronologic
adjective see chronological
chronological
also chronologic adjective Date: 1614 of, relating to, or arranged in or according to the order of time ; also reckoned in units of time • chronologically adverb
chronologically
adverb see chronological
chronologist
noun Date: 1611 an expert in chronology
chronology
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: New Latin chronologia, from chron- + -logia -logy Date: 1585 1. the science that deals with measuring time by regular divisions and that assigns ...
chronometer
noun Date: circa 1735 timepiece; especially one designed to keep time with great accuracy
chronometric
also chronometrical adjective Date: 1830 of or relating to a chronometer or chronometry • chronometrically adverb
chronometrical
adjective see chronometric
chronometrically
adverb see chronometric
chronometry
noun Date: 1833 the measuring of time
chronotherapy
noun Date: 1973 treatment of a sleep disorder (as insomnia) by changing sleeping and waking times in an attempt to reset the patient's biological clock
chrys-
or chryso- combining form Etymology: Greek, from chrysos gold ; yellow
chrysalid
noun Date: 1777 chrysalis • chrysalid adjective
chrysalis
noun (plural chrysalides or chrysalises) Etymology: Latin chrysallid-, chrysallis gold-colored pupa of butterflies, from Greek, from chrysos gold, of Semitic origin; akin to ...
chrysanthemum
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek chrysanthemon, from chrys- + anthemon flower; akin to Greek anthos flower Date: 1548 1. any of various composite plants (genus Chrysanthemum) ...
chrysarobin
noun Etymology: chrys- + araroba, powder found in the wood of a Brazilian tree (Andira araroba) + 1-in Date: 1887 a powder derived from the wood of a tropical tree used to ...
Chryseis
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Chrysēis Date: 1567 a daughter of a priest of Apollo in the Iliad narrative taken at Troy by Agamemnon but later restored to her father
chryso-
combining form see chrys-
chrysoberyl
noun Etymology: Latin chrysoberyllus, from Greek chrysobēryllos, from chrys- + bēryllos beryl Date: 1661 1. obsolete a yellowish beryl 2. a hard usually yellow or green ...
chrysolite
noun Etymology: Middle English crisolite, from Anglo-French, from Latin chrysolithos, from Greek, from chrys- + -lithos -lite Date: 13th century olivine
chrysomelid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek chrysomēlolonthē golden cockchafer Date: circa 1904 any of a large family (Chrysomelidae) of small, usually oval and smooth, shining, ...
chrysophyte
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek chrysos + phyton plant — more at phyt- Date: 1959 golden-brown alga
chrysoprase
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English crisopace, from Anglo-French, from Latin chrysoprasus, from Greek chrysoprasos, from chrys- + prason leek; akin to Latin porrum leek ...
Chrysostom
biographical name Saint John circa 347-407 church father & patriarch of Constantinople
chrysotile
noun Etymology: German Chrysotil, from chrys- + -til fiber, from Greek tillein to pluck Date: 1850 a mineral consisting of a fibrous silky variety of serpentine and ...
chthonian
adjective see chthonic
chthonic
also chthonian adjective Etymology: Greek chthon-, chthōn earth — more at humble Date: 1882 of or relating to the underworld ; infernal
Chu
I. biographical name Steven 1948- American physicist II. geographical name 1. — see Zhu 2. river over 1000 miles (1609 kilometers) SE Kazakhstan flowing E into Issyk Kul
Chu Hsi
biographical name 1130-1200 Chinese philosopher
Chu Teh
biographical name 1886-1976 Chinese general
Chu-chou
geographical name see Zhuzhou
Chu-chou, Chuchow
geographical name — see Zhuzhou
Chuanchow
geographical name see Quanzhou
chub
noun (plural chub or chubs) Etymology: Middle English chubbe Date: 15th century 1. any of numerous freshwater cyprinid fishes (as of the genera Gila and Nocomis) 2. any of ...
Chubb Crater
geographical name — see New Quebec Crater
chubbily
adverb Date: 1909 in the manner of one that is chubby
chubbiness
noun see chubby
chubby
adjective (chubbier; -est) Etymology: chub Date: 1722 plump • chubbiness noun
Chubut
geographical name river 500 miles (805 kilometers) S Argentina flowing E across Patagonia into the Atlantic
Chuchow
geographical name see Zhuzhou
chuck
I. verb Etymology: Middle English chukken, of imitative origin Date: 14th century cluck II. noun Etymology: perhaps from chuck chicken Date: 1595 — used as an ...
chuck wagon
noun Etymology: 5chuck Date: 1887 1. a wagon carrying supplies and provisions for cooking (as on a ranch) 2. (usually chuckwagon) chiefly West an informal buffet — often ...
chuck-will's-widow
noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1791 a nightjar (Caprimulgus carolinensis) of the southeastern United States
chuckawalla
noun see chuckwalla
chuckhole
noun Etymology: perhaps from 3chuck + hole Date: 1836 a hole or rut in a road ; pothole
chuckle
intransitive verb (chuckled; chuckling) Etymology: probably frequentative of 1chuck Date: circa 1770 1. to laugh inwardly or quietly 2. to make a continuous gentle sound ...
chucklehead
noun Etymology: chuckle lumpish + head Date: 1748 blockhead • chuckleheaded adjective
chuckleheaded
adjective see chucklehead
chucklesome
adjective see chuckle
chucklingly
adverb see chuckle
chuckwagon
noun see chuck wagon 2
chuckwalla
or chuckawalla noun Etymology: American Spanish chacahuala, from Cahuilla (Uto-Aztecan language of southeast California) čáxwal Date: 1893 a large herbivorous lizard ...
Chudskoe
geographical name — see Peipus
chuff
I. noun Etymology: Middle English chuffe Date: 15th century boor, churl II. intransitive verb Etymology: imitative Date: 1914 to produce noisy exhaust or exhalations ; ...
chuffed
adjective Etymology: English dialect chuff pleased, puffed with fat Date: 1957 British quite pleased ; delighted
chug
I. noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1866 a dull explosive sound made by or as if by a laboring engine II. intransitive verb (chugged; chugging) Date: 1848 to move or go ...
Chugach Mountains
geographical name mountains S Alaska extending along coast from Cook Inlet to St. Elias Range; highest 13,176 feet (4016 meters)
chugalug
verb (-lugged; -lugging) Etymology: imitative Date: circa 1936 transitive verb to drink a container of (as beer) without pause; also guzzle 1 intransitive verb to drink ...
chugger
noun see chug II
chukar
noun Etymology: Hindi cakor & Urdu chakor Date: 1814 a grayish-brown Eurasian partridge (Alectoris chukar) introduced as a game bird into arid mountainous regions of the ...
chukar partridge
noun see chukar
Chukchi
noun (plural Chukchi or Chukchis) Etymology: Russian chukcha (plural chukchi), probably ultimately from Chukchi čavčəv reindeer breeder Date: 1780 1. a member of a Siberian ...
Chukchi Peninsula
geographical name peninsula NE Russia in Asia between Bering & Chukchi seas
Chukchi Sea
geographical name sea of the Arctic Ocean N of Bering Strait
chukka
noun Etymology: chukka, alteration of chukker; from a similar polo player's boot Date: 1948 a usually ankle-high leather boot with two or three pairs of eyelets or a buckle ...
chukker
also chukka noun Etymology: Hindi cakkar & Urdu chakkar circular course, from Sanskrit cakra wheel, circle — more at wheel Date: 1898 a playing period of a polo game
Chula Vista
geographical name city SW California S of San Diego population 173,556
Chulim
geographical name see Chulym
Chulym
or Chulim geographical name river Russia in Asia flowing W into the Ob'
chum
I. noun Etymology: perhaps by shortening & alteration from chamber fellow roommate Date: 1684 a close friend ; pal • chumship noun II. intransitive verb (chummed; ...
chum salmon
noun Etymology: 5chum Date: 1907 a salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) of the northern Pacific — called also chum
Chumash
noun (plural Chumash) Etymology: from Tcú-mac, name in a coastal Chumash language for the inhabitants of Santa Rosa Island Date: 1891 1. a member of an American Indian people ...
chummily
adverb see chummy
chumminess
noun see chummy
chummy
adjective (chummier; -est) Date: 1884 quite friendly • chummily adverb • chumminess noun
chump
noun Etymology: perhaps blend of chunk and lump Date: 1876 fool, dupe
chump change
noun Date: 1967 a relatively small or insignificant amount of money
chumship
noun see chum I
Chun Doo-Hwan
biographical name 1931- president of South Korea (1980-88)
Chungking
geographical name see Chongqing
chunk
I. noun Etymology: perhaps alteration of chuck short piece of wood Date: 1691 1. a short thick piece or lump (as of wood or coal) 2. a large noteworthy quantity or part ...
chunkily
adverb see chunky
chunky
adjective (chunkier; -est) Date: 1733 1. a. heavy, solid, and thick or bulky ; especially stocky b. plump, chubby 2. filled with chunks • chunkily adverb
chunter
intransitive verb Etymology: probably of imitative origin Date: 1599 British to talk in a low inarticulate way ; mutter
chuppa
noun see chuppah
chuppah
or huppah; also chuppa noun Etymology: Yiddish & Hebrew; Yiddish khupe, from Hebrew ḥuppāh Date: 1876 a canopy under which the bride and groom stand during a Jewish ...
Chur
or French Coire geographical name commune E Switzerland capital of Graubünden canton population 31,078
Chur
or French Coire geographical name commune E Switzerland capital of Graubünden canton population 31,078
Church
biographical name Frederic Edwin 1826-1900 American painter
church
I. noun Etymology: Middle English chirche, from Old English cirice, ultimately from Late Greek kyriakon, from Greek, neuter of kyriakos of the lord, from kyrios lord, master; ...
church father
noun Usage: often capitalized C&F Date: 1842 father 4
church key
noun Date: circa 1953 an implement with a triangular pointed head at one end for piercing the tops of cans and often with a rounded head at the other end for opening bottles
church mode
noun Date: circa 1864 one of eight scales prevalent in medieval music each utilizing a different pattern of intervals and beginning on a different tone
Church of England
Date: 1534 the established episcopal church of England
church register
noun Date: 1606 a parish register of baptisms, marriages, and deaths
church school
noun Date: 1862 1. a school providing a general education but supported by a particular church in contrast to a public school or a nondenominational private school 2. an ...
Church Slavic
noun see Church Slavonic
Church Slavonic
noun Date: 1853 any of several Slavic literary and liturgical languages that continue Old Church Slavonic but vary regionally under influence of vernacular languages — ...
churched
adjective Date: 14th century affiliated with a church
churchgoer
noun Date: 1687 one who habitually attends church • churchgoing adjective or noun
churchgoing
adjective or noun see churchgoer
churchianity
noun Etymology: church + -ianity (as in Christianity) Date: 1837 a usually excessive or narrowly sectarian attachment to the practices and interests of a particular church
Churchill
I. biographical name John 1650-1722 1st Duke of Marlborough English general II. biographical name Randolph Henry Spencer 1849-1895 Lord Randolph Churchill British ...
Churchill Falls
or formerly Grand Falls geographical name waterfall 245 feet (75 meters) high Canada in W Labrador in Churchill River
Churchillian
adjective see Churchill III
churching
noun Date: 15th century the administration or reception of a rite of the church; specifically a ceremony in some churches by which women after childbirth are received in the ...
churchless
adjective Date: 1641 not affiliated with a church
churchliness
noun see churchly
churchly
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. of or relating to a church 2. suitable to or suggestive of a church 3. adhering to a church 4. churchy 1 • churchliness ...
churchman
noun Date: 14th century 1. clergyman 2. a member of a church
churchmanship
noun Date: circa 1680 the attitude, belief, or practice of a churchman
churchwarden
noun Date: 15th century 1. one of two lay parish officers in Anglican churches with responsibility especially for parish property and alms 2. a long-stemmed clay pipe
churchwoman
noun Date: 1681 a woman who is a member of a church
churchy
adjective Date: 1843 1. marked by strict conformity or zealous adherence to the forms or beliefs of a church 2. of or suggestive of a church or church services
churchyard
noun Date: 12th century a yard that belongs to a church and is often used as a burial ground
churl
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ceorl man, ceorl; akin to Old Norse karl man, husband Date: before 12th century 1. ceorl 2. a medieval peasant 3. rustic, ...
churlish
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. of, resembling, or characteristic of a churl ; vulgar 2. marked by a lack of civility or graciousness ; surly 3. difficult to work ...
churlishly
adverb see churlish
churlishness
noun see churlish
churn
I. noun Etymology: Middle English chyrne, from Old English cyrin; akin to Old Norse kjarni churn Date: before 12th century a vessel for making butter in which milk or cream ...
churn out
transitive verb Date: 1876 to produce mechanically or copiously ; grind out
churr
intransitive verb Etymology: imitative Date: 1555 to make a vibrant or whirring noise like that made by some insects (as the cockchafer) or some birds (as the partridge) • ...
churrigueresque
adjective Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Spanish churrigueresco, from José Churriguera died 1725 Spanish architect Date: 1845 of or relating to a Spanish baroque ...
churro
noun Etymology: Spanish Date: 1952 a Spanish and Mexican pastry resembling a doughnut or cruller and made from deep-fried unsweetened dough and sprinkled with sugar
chute
I. noun also shute Etymology: French, from Old French, from cheoir to fall, from Latin cadere — more at chance Date: 1805 1. a. fall 6b b. a quick descent (as in a ...
chutist
noun Date: 1920 parachutist
chutney
noun (plural chutneys) Etymology: Hindi caṭnī & Urdu chaṭnī Date: 1813 a thick sauce of Indian origin that contains fruits, vinegar, sugar, and spices and is used as a ...
chutzpa
noun see chutzpah
chutzpah
also chutzpa or hutzpah or hutzpa noun Etymology: Yiddish khutspe, from Late Hebrew ḥuṣpāh Date: 1883 supreme self-confidence ; nerve, gall Synonyms: see temerity
Chuuk
or Truk geographical name islands central Carolines, part of Federated States of Micronesia
Chuvash Republic
geographical name autonomous republic E central Russia in Europe S of the Volga capital Cheboksary area 7066 square miles (18,301 square kilometers), population 1,393,000
Chuzenji
geographical name lake Japan in central Honshu
chyle
noun Etymology: Late Latin chylus, from Greek chylos juice, chyle; akin to Greek chein to pour — more at found Date: 1541 lymph that is milky from emulsified fats, ...
chylomicron
noun Etymology: Greek chylos + mikron, neuter of mikros small — more at micro- Date: 1921 a lipoprotein rich in triglyceride and common in the blood during fat digestion ...
chylous
adjective see chyle
chyme
noun Etymology: New Latin chymus, from Late Latin, chyle, from Greek chymos juice; akin to Greek chein Date: 1607 the semifluid mass of partly digested food expelled by the ...
chymotrypsin
noun Etymology: chyme + -o- + trypsin Date: 1933 a protease that hydrolyzes peptide bonds and is formed in the intestine from chymotrypsinogen • chymotryptic adjective
chymotrypsinogen
noun Date: 1933 a zymogen that is secreted by the pancreas and is converted by trypsin to chymotrypsin
chymotryptic
adjective see chymotrypsin
Ci
abbreviation 1. cirrus 2. curie
CI
abbreviation 1. cast iron 2. certificate of insurance 3. Channel Islands
ci-devant
adjective Etymology: French, literally, formerly Date: 1790 former
ci-gît
foreign term Etymology: French here lies — used preceding a name on a tombstone
cía
abbreviation Etymology: S compañía company
CIA
abbreviation 1. Central Intelligence Agency 2. certified internal auditor
CIAA
abbreviation Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association
Ciano
biographical name Galeazzo 1903-1944 Conte di Cortellazzo Italian statesman
ciao
interjection Etymology: Italian, from Italian dialect, literally, (I am your) slave, from Medieval Latin sclavus — more at slave Date: 1929 — used conventionally as an ...
Ciardi
biographical name John 1916-1986 American poet
Cibber
biographical name Colley 1671-1757 English dramatist & actor; poet laureate (1730-57)
Cíbola
geographical name historical region in present N New Mexico including seven pueblos (the Seven Cities of Cíbola) believed by early Spanish explorers to contain vast ...
ciborium
noun (plural ciboria) Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin, cup, from Greek kibōrion Date: 1651 1. a goblet-shaped vessel for holding eucharistic bread 2. baldachin; ...
CIC
abbreviation 1. combat information center 2. counterintelligence corps
cicada
noun (plural -das; also cicadae) Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Latin, cicada Date: 14th century any of a family (Cicadidae) of homopterous insects which have a stout ...
cicala
noun Etymology: Italian, from Medieval Latin, alteration of Latin cicada Date: 1794 cicada
cicatricial
adjective Date: 1881 of or relating to a cicatrix
cicatrix
noun (plural cicatrices) Etymology: Latin cicatric-, cicatrix Date: 1623 1. a scar resulting from formation and contraction of fibrous tissue in a wound 2. a mark resembling ...
cicatrization
noun Date: 15th century scar formation at the site of a healing wound • cicatrize transitive verb
cicatrize
transitive verb see cicatrization
Cicero
I. biographical name Marcus Tullius 106-43 B.C. Roman statesman, orator, & author • Ciceronian adjective II. geographical name town NE Illinois W of Chicago population ...
cicerone
noun (plural ciceroni) Etymology: Italian, from Cicerone Cicero Date: 1726 1. a guide who conducts sightseers 2. mentor, tutor
Ciceronian
adjective see Cicero I
cichlid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek kichlē thrush, a kind of wrasse; perhaps akin to Greek chelidōn swallow Date: 1884 any of a family (Cichlidae) of mostly tropical ...
cicisbeism
noun see cicisbeo
cicisbeo
noun (plural cicisbei) Etymology: Italian Date: 1718 lover, gallant • cicisbeism noun
cid
abbreviation cubic inch displacement
CID
abbreviation 1. civil investigative demand 2. Criminal Investigation Department
Cid, El
biographical name circa 1043-1099 Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar Spanish soldier & hero
cider
noun Etymology: Middle English sidre, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin sicera strong drink, from Greek (Septuagint) sikera, from Hebrew shēkhār Date: 13th century 1. ...
cider vinegar
noun Date: 1851 vinegar made from fermented cider
Cidra
geographical name city E central Puerto Rico population 42,753
cie
abbreviation Etymology: French compagnie company
Cienfuegos
geographical name city & port W central Cuba on S coast on Cienfuegos Bay population 123,600
Cieszyn
or German Teschen geographical name region central Europe in Silesia; once an Austrian duchy; divided 1920 between Poland & Czechoslovakia (now the Czech Republic)
CIF
abbreviation 1. central information file 2. cost, insurance, and freight
cig
noun Date: 1889 slang cigarette
cigar
noun Etymology: Spanish cigarro Date: 1730 a small roll of tobacco leaf for smoking
cigaret
noun see cigarette
cigarette
also cigaret noun Etymology: French cigarette, diminutive of cigare cigar, from Spanish cigarro Date: 1835 a slender roll of cut tobacco enclosed in paper and meant to be ...
cigarillo
noun (plural -los) Etymology: Spanish cigarrillo cigarette, diminutive of cigarro cigar Date: 1832 1. a very small cigar 2. a cigarette wrapped in tobacco rather than paper
ciguatera
noun Etymology: American Spanish, from ciguato person ill with ciguatera, perhaps from cigua sea snail Date: 1862 poisoning caused by the ingestion of various normally edible ...
Cilacap
or Tjilatjap geographical name city & port Indonesia in S Java ESE of Bandung
cilantro
noun Etymology: Spanish, coriander, from Medieval Latin celiandrum, alteration of Latin coriandrum — more at coriander Date: 1903 leaves of coriander used as a flavoring or ...
ciliary
adjective Date: 1691 1. of, relating to, or being the annular suspension of the lens of the eye 2. of or relating to cilia
ciliate
noun Date: 1916 any of a phylum or subphylum (Ciliophora) of ciliated protozoans (as paramecia)
ciliated
or ciliate adjective Date: 1753 possessing cilia • ciliation noun
ciliation
noun see ciliated
Cilicia
geographical name ancient country SE Asia Minor extending along Mediterranean coast S of Taurus Mountains — see Little Armenia • Cilician adjective or noun
Cilician
adjective or noun see Cilicia
Cilician Gates
geographical name mountain pass S Turkey in Taurus Mountains
cilium
noun (plural cilia) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, eyelid; akin to Latin celare to conceal — more at hell Date: 1794 1. a minute short hairlike process often forming part ...
Çiller
biographical name Tansu 1946- prime minister of Turkey (1993-96)
Cimabue
biographical name Giovanni circa 1251-1302 originally Bencivieni di Pepo Florentine painter
Cimarron
geographical name river flowing E from NE New Mexico through SW Kansas into Arkansas River in NE Oklahoma
Cimbrian Chersonese, Cimbric Chersonese
geographical name — see Chersonese
cimetidine
noun Etymology: ci- (alteration of cyan-) + methyl + -idine Date: 1975 a histamine analog C10H16N6S that inhibits gastric acid secretion and is used especially in the ...
Cimmerian
I. adjective Date: 1580 very dark or gloomy II. noun Etymology: Latin Cimmerii, a mythical people, from Greek Kimmerioi Date: 1584 any of a mythical people described by ...
Cimmerian Bosporus
geographical name Kerch Strait
Cimon
biographical name circa 570-circa 451 B.C. Athenian general & statesman
cinch
I. noun Etymology: Spanish cincha, from Latin cingula girdle, girth, from cingere — more at cincture Date: 1859 1. a girth for a pack or saddle 2. a tight grip 3. a. ...
cinchona
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from the countess of Chinchón died 1641 wife of the Peruvian viceroy Date: 1786 1. any of a genus (Cinchona) of South American trees ...
cinchonine
noun Date: 1825 a bitter white crystalline alkaloid C19H22N2O found especially in cinchona bark and used like quinine
cinchonism
noun Date: 1857 a disorder due to excessive or prolonged use of cinchona or its alkaloids and marked by temporary deafness, ringing in the ears, headache, dizziness, and rash
Cincinnati
geographical name city SW Ohio on Ohio River population 331,285 • Cincinnatian noun
Cincinnatian
noun see Cincinnati
Cincinnatus
biographical name Lucius Quinctius born circa 519 B.C. Roman general & statesman
Cinco de Mayo
noun Etymology: Spanish, fifth of May Date: 1931 a Mexican and Mexican-American celebration held on May 5 in commemoration of the Mexican victory over the French at Puebla in ...
cincture
noun Etymology: Latin cinctura girdle, from cinctus, past participle of cingere to gird; probably akin to Sanskrit kāñcī girdle Date: 1587 1. the act of encircling 2. ...
cinder
noun Etymology: Middle English sinder, from Old English; akin to Old High German sintar dross, slag, Serbian & Croatian sedra calcium carbonate Date: before 12th century 1. ...
cinder block
noun Date: 1926 a hollow rectangular building block made of cement and coal cinders
cinder cone
noun Date: 1849 a conical hill formed by the accumulation of volcanic debris around a vent
Cinderella
noun Etymology: after Cinderella, fairy-tale heroine who is used as a drudge by her stepmother but ends up married to a prince Date: 1840 one resembling the fairy-tale ...
cindery
adjective see cinder
cine
noun Etymology: probably from French ciné, short for cinéma cinema Date: 1920 motion picture
cineast
or cineaste or cinéaste noun Etymology: French cinéaste, from ciné + -aste (as in enthousiaste enthusiast) Date: 1926 a devotee of motion pictures; also moviemaker
cineaste
noun see cineast
cinéaste
noun see cineast
cinema
noun Etymology: short for cinematograph Date: 1909 1. a. motion picture — usually used attributively b. a motion-picture theater 2. a. movies; especially the ...
cinema verité
noun Etymology: French cinéma-vérité, literally, cinema-truth, translation of Russian kinopravda Date: 1963 the art or technique of filming a motion picture so as to convey ...
cinemagoer
noun Date: 1920 moviegoer
cinematheque
noun Etymology: French cinémathèque film library, from cinéma + -thèque (as in bibliothèque library) Date: 1966 a small movie house specializing in avant-garde films
cinematic
adjective Date: 1916 1. of, relating to, suggestive of, or suitable for motion pictures or the filming of motion pictures 2. filmed and presented as a motion picture • ...
cinematically
adverb see cinematic
cinematize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1916 to make a motion picture of (as a novel) ; adapt for motion pictures

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