Слова на букву buck-cobl (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву buck-cobl (6389)

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civvy street
noun Usage: often capitalized C&S Date: 1943 British civilian life
CIWS
abbreviation close-in weapons system
CJ
abbreviation chief justice
CJD
abbreviation Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease
ck
abbreviation 1. cask 2. check
cl
abbreviation 1. centiliter 2. claiming 3. class 4. clause 5. close 6. closet 7. cloth
Cl
symbol chlorine
CL
abbreviation 1. carload 2. centerline 3. civil law 4. common law
clabber
noun Etymology: short for bonnyclabber Date: 1634 chiefly dialect sour milk that has thickened or curdled
clabbered
adjective Date: 1873 of milk or cream having thickened or curdled
clachan
noun Etymology: Middle English (Scots), from Scottish Gaelic Date: 15th century Scottish & Irish hamlet
clack
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, of imitative origin Date: 13th century intransitive verb 1. chatter, prattle 2. to make an abrupt striking sound or series of sounds ...
clacker
noun see clack I
Clackmannan
or Clackmannanshire geographical name administrative area central Scotland bordering on the Forth area 61 square miles (157 square kilometers)
Clackmannanshire
geographical name see Clackmannan
Clacton
or Clacton-on-Sea geographical name town SE England in Essex on North Sea population 43,571
Clacton-on-Sea
geographical name see Clacton
Clactonian
adjective Etymology: Clacton-on-Sea, England Date: 1932 of or relating to a Lower Paleolithic culture usually characterized by stone flakes with a half cone at the point of ...
clad
I. past and past participle of clothe II. adjective Etymology: Middle English, past participle of clothen to clothe Date: 14th century 1. being covered or clothed 2. of ...
clad-
or clado- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek klad-, klado-, from klados branch, shoot of a tree; akin to Old English holt woods — more at holt slip ; sprout
cladding
noun Date: 1936 something that covers or overlays; specifically metal coating bonded to a metal core
clade
noun Etymology: Greek klados Date: 1911 a group of biological taxa (as species) that includes all descendants of one common ancestor
cladist
noun see cladistics
cladistic
adjective see cladistics
cladistically
adverb see cladistics
cladistics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1965 a system of biological taxonomy that defines taxa uniquely by shared characteristics not found in ancestral groups and ...
clado-
combining form see clad-
cladoceran
noun Etymology: New Latin Cladocera, from clad- + Greek keras horn — more at horn Date: 1909 any of an order (Cladocera) of minute chiefly freshwater branchiopod crustaceans ...
cladode
noun Etymology: New Latin cladodium, from Greek klados Date: 1870 cladophyll • cladodial adjective
cladodial
adjective see cladode
cladogenesis
noun Date: 1953 evolutionary change characterized by treelike branching of taxa — compare anagenesis • cladogenetic adjective • cladogenetically adverb
cladogenetic
adjective see cladogenesis
cladogenetically
adverb see cladogenesis
cladogram
noun Date: 1965 a branching diagrammatic tree used in cladistic classification to illustrate phylogenetic relationships
cladophyll
noun Date: 1879 a flattened photosynthetic branch assuming the form of and closely resembling an ordinary foliage leaf
claim
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French claimer, clamer, from Latin clamare to cry out, shout; akin to Latin calare to call — more at low Date: 14th ...
claimable
adjective see claim I
claimant
noun Date: 15th century one that asserts a right or title ; also claimer 1
claimer
noun Date: 15th century 1. one that claims 2. a. claiming race b. a horse running in a claiming race
claiming race
noun Date: 1935 a horse race in which each entry is offered for sale for a specified price that must be deposited before the race
clairaudience
noun Etymology: clair- (as in clairvoyance) + audience (act of hearing) Date: 1864 the power or faculty of hearing something not present to the ear but regarded as having ...
clairaudient
adjective see clairaudience
clairaudiently
adverb see clairaudience
clairvoyance
noun Date: 1838 1. the power or faculty of discerning objects not present to the senses 2. ability to perceive matters beyond the range of ordinary perception ; penetration
clairvoyant
I. adjective Etymology: French, from clair clear (from Latin clarus) + voyant, present participle of voir to see, from Latin vidēre — more at wit Date: 1844 1. having ...
clairvoyantly
adverb see clairvoyant I
clam
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English clamm bond, fetter; akin to Old High German klamma constriction and perhaps to Latin glomus ball Date: before 12th century ...
clam up
intransitive verb Date: 1916 to become silent
clam worm
noun Date: 1885 any of several large burrowing polychaete worms (as a nereid) often used as bait
clamant
adjective Etymology: Latin clamant-, clamans, present participle of clamare to cry out Date: 1639 1. clamorous, blatant 2. demanding attention ; urgent • clamantly adverb
clamantly
adverb see clamant
clambake
noun Date: 1835 1. a. an outdoor party; especially a seashore outing where food is usually cooked on heated rocks covered by seaweed b. the food served at a clambake 2. ...
clamber
intransitive verb (clambered; clambering) Etymology: Middle English clambren; akin to Old English climban to climb Date: 14th century to climb awkwardly (as by scrambling) ...
clamberer
noun see clamber
clammer
noun see clam III
clammily
adverb see clammy
clamminess
noun see clammy
clammy
adjective (clammier; -est) Etymology: Middle English, probably from clammen to smear, stick, from Old English clǣman; akin to Old English clǣg clay Date: 14th century 1. ...
clamor
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French clamour, from Latin clamor, from clamare to cry out — more at claim Date: 14th century 1. a. noisy shouting b. a ...
clamorous
adjective Date: 15th century 1. marked by confused din or outcry ; tumultuous 2. noisily insistent Synonyms: see vociferous • clamorously adverb • clamorousness noun
clamorously
adverb see clamorous
clamorousness
noun see clamorous
clamour
chiefly British variant of clamor
clamp
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, probably from Middle Dutch *klampe; akin to Old English clamm bond, fetter — more at clam Date: 14th century 1. a device designed to bind ...
clamp down
intransitive verb Date: 1938 to impose restrictions ; crack down
clampdown
noun Date: 1940 the act or action of making regulations and restrictions more stringent
clams casino
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Usage: often capitalized 2d C Date: 1952 clams on the half shell usually topped with green pepper and baked or broiled
clamshell
noun Date: circa 1520 1. the shell of a clam 2. a. a bucket or grapple (as on a dredge) having two hinged jaws b. an excavating machine having a clamshell c. either ...
clan
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Scottish Gaelic clann offspring, clan, from Old Irish cland plant, offspring, from Latin planta plant Date: 15th century 1. a. a Celtic ...
clandestine
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French clandestin, from Latin clandestinus, from clam secretly; akin to Latin celare to hide — more at hell Date: circa ...
clandestinely
adverb see clandestine
clandestineness
noun see clandestine
clandestinity
noun see clandestine
clang
I. verb Etymology: Latin clangere; akin to Greek klazein to scream, bark, Old English hliehhan to laugh Date: 1576 intransitive verb 1. a. to make a loud metallic ...
clanger
noun Date: 1948 British a conspicuous blunder — often used in the phrase drop a clanger
clangor
I. noun Etymology: Latin clangor, from clangere Date: 1593 a resounding clang or medley of clangs • clangorous adjective • clangorously adverb II. intransitive verb ...
clangorous
adjective see clangor I
clangorously
adverb see clangor I
clangour
chiefly British variant of clangor
clank
I. verb Etymology: probably imitative Date: 1656 intransitive verb 1. to make a clank or series of clanks 2. to go with or as if with a clank transitive verb to ...
clankingly
adverb see clank I
clannish
adjective Date: 1776 1. of or relating to a clan 2. tending to associate only with a select group of similar background or status • clannishly adverb • clannishness ...
clannishly
adverb see clannish
clannishness
noun see clannish
clansman
noun Date: 1810 a member of a clan
clap
I. verb (clapped; also clapt; clapping) Etymology: Middle English clappen, from Old English clæppan to throb; akin to Old High German klaphōn to beat Date: 14th century ...
clapboard
noun Etymology: part translation of Dutch klaphout stave wood Date: circa 1520 1. archaic a size of board for making staves and wainscoting 2. a narrow board usually ...
clapped-out
adjective Date: 1946 chiefly British worn-out; also tired
clapper
noun Date: 14th century one that claps: as a. the tongue of a bell b. a mechanical device that makes noise especially by the banging of one part against another c. a ...
clapper board
noun see clapboard
clapper rail
noun Etymology: from its rattle-like call Date: 1813 a grayish-brown long-billed American rail (Rallus longirostris) that inhabits coastal marshes
clapperclaw
transitive verb Etymology: perhaps from clapper + claw (v.) Date: 1590 1. dialect England to claw with the nails 2. dialect England scold, revile
claptrap
I. noun Etymology: 2clap; from its attempt to win applause Date: 1799 pretentious nonsense ; trash II. adjective Date: 1815 characterized by or suggestive of claptrap; ...
claque
noun Etymology: French, from claquer to clap, of imitative origin Date: 1848 1. a group hired to applaud at a performance 2. a group of sycophants
claqueur
noun Etymology: French, from claquer to clap Date: 1837 a member of a claque
Clare
I. biographical name John 1793-1864 English poet II. geographical name county W Ireland in Munster capital Ennis area 1231 square miles (3201 square kilometers), population ...
Clare of Assisi
biographical name Saint 1194-1253 Italian religious
Claremont
geographical name city SW California E of Los Angeles population 33,998
Clarendon
biographical name Earl of — see Edward Hyde
claret
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French (vin) claret clear wine, from claret clear, from cler clear Date: 1578 1. a red Bordeaux wine; also a similar wine produced ...
clarification
noun see clarify
clarifier
noun see clarify
clarify
verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English clarifien, from Anglo-French clarifier, from Late Latin clarificare, from Latin clarus clear — more at clear Date: 14th century ...
clarinet
noun Etymology: French clarinette, probably ultimately from Medieval Latin clarion-, clario Date: 1733 a single-reed woodwind instrument having a cylindrical tube with a ...
clarinetist
noun see clarinet
clarinettist
noun see clarinet
Clarington
geographical name town Canada in SE Ontario ENE of Toronto population 69,834
clarion
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French & Medieval Latin; Middle French clairon, from Medieval Latin clarion-, clario, from Latin clarus Date: 14th century 1. a ...
clarity
noun Etymology: Middle English clarite, from Latin claritat-, claritas, from clarus Date: 1616 the quality or state of being clear ; lucidity
Clark
I. biographical name Champ 1850-1921 James Beauchamp Clark American politician II. biographical name George Rogers 1752-1818 American soldier & frontiersman III. ...
Clark Fork
geographical name river 300 miles (483 kilometers) W Montana & N Idaho flowing NW into Pend Oreille Lake
Clark's nutcracker
noun Etymology: William Clark Date: 1924 a grayish-white bird (Nucifraga columbiana) of western North America with black-and-white wings and tail
Clarke
biographical name Charles Cowden 1787-1877 & his wife Mary Victoria Cowden-Clarke 1809-1898 English Shakespearean scholars
clarkia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from William Clark Date: 1827 any of a genus (Clarkia) of showy annual herbs of the evening-primrose family that are native to western North America ...
Clarksville
geographical name city N Tennessee NW of Nashville population 103,455
claro
noun (plural claros) Etymology: Spanish, from claro light, from Latin clarus Date: 1889 a light-colored usually mild cigar
clary
noun see clary sage
clary sage
noun Etymology: Middle English clarie, from Anglo-French sclaree, from Medieval Latin sclareia Date: 14th century an aromatic mint (Salvia sclarea) of southern Europe that is ...
clash
I. verb Etymology: imitative Date: circa 1500 intransitive verb 1. to make a clash 2. to come into conflict ; also to be incompatible transitive verb to cause ...
clasher
noun see clash I
clasp
I. noun Etymology: Middle English claspe Date: 14th century 1. a. a device (as a hook) for holding objects or parts together b. a device (as a bar) attached to a ...
clasp knife
noun Date: 1734 pocketknife; especially a large one-bladed folding knife having a catch to hold the blade open
clasper
noun Date: circa 1847 a male copulatory structure: a. one of a pair of external anal processes of an insect that are used to grasp a female b. one of a pair of organs ...
class
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French classe, from Latin classis group called to military service, fleet, class; perhaps akin to Latin calare to call — more at ...
class act
noun Date: 1976 an example of outstanding quality or prestige
class action
noun Date: 1952 a legal action undertaken by one or more plaintiffs on behalf of themselves and all other persons having an identical interest in the alleged wrong
class consciousness
noun see class-conscious
class interval
noun Date: 1929 class 3b; also its numerical width
class-conscious
adjective Date: 1903 1. actively aware of one's common status with others in a particular economic or social level of society 2. believing in class struggle • class ...
classic
I. adjective Etymology: French or Latin; French classique, from Latin classicus of the highest class of Roman citizens, of the first rank, from classis Date: circa 1604 1. ...
classical
adjective Etymology: Latin classicus Date: 1599 1. standard, classic 2. a. of or relating to the ancient Greek and Roman world and especially to its literature, art, ...
classical conditioning
noun Date: 1949 conditioning in which the conditioned stimulus (as the sound of a bell) is paired with and precedes the unconditioned stimulus (as the sight of food) until ...
classicality
noun Date: 1819 1. the quality or state of being classic 2. classical scholarship
classically
adverb Date: 1772 1. in a classic or classical manner 2. a. in classic or traditional circumstances ; typically b. as a classic example
classicism
noun Date: 1830 1. a. the principles or style embodied in the literature, art, or architecture of ancient Greece and Rome b. classical scholarship c. a classical idiom ...
classicist
noun Date: 1830 1. an advocate or follower of classicism 2. a classical scholar • classicistic adjective
classicistic
adjective see classicist
classicize
verb (-cized; -cizing) Date: 1854 transitive verb to make classic or classical intransitive verb to follow classic style
classico
adjective Etymology: Italian, from Latin classicus Date: 1968 produced in a delimited area of Italy known for its standards of quality
classifiable
adjective see classify
classification
noun Date: 1790 1. the act or process of classifying 2. a. systematic arrangement in groups or categories according to established criteria; specifically taxonomy b. ...
classificatory
adjective see classification
classified
I. adjective Date: 1889 1. divided into classes or placed in a class 2. withheld from general circulation for reasons of national security II. noun Date: 1952 an ...
classifier
noun Date: 1819 1. one that classifies; specifically a machine for sorting out the constituents of a substance (as ore) 2. a word or morpheme used with numerals or with ...
classify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Date: 1799 1. to arrange in classes 2. to assign (as a document) to a category • classifiable adjective
classiness
noun see classy
classis
noun (plural classes) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, class Date: 1593 1. a governing body in some Reformed churches (as in the former Reformed Church in the United States) ...
classism
noun Date: 1842 prejudice or discrimination based on class • classist adjective
classist
adjective see classism
classless
adjective Date: 1878 1. belonging to no particular social class 2. free from distinctions of social class 3. crass, boorish • classlessness noun
classlessness
noun see classless
classmate
noun Date: 1713 a member of the same class in a school or college
classroom
noun Date: 1811 a place where classes meet
classy
adjective (classier; -est) Date: 1891 having or showing class: as a. elegant, stylish b. having or reflecting high standards of personal behavior c. admirably ...
clast
noun Etymology: Greek klastos broken, from klan to break; perhaps akin to Latin clades disaster Date: 1952 a fragment of rock
clastic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1877 made up of fragments of preexisting rocks • clastic noun
clathrate
adjective Etymology: Latin clathratus, furnished with a lattice, from clathri (plural) lattice, from Greek klēithron bar, from kleiein to close — more at clavicle Date: 1906 ...
clatter
I. verb Etymology: Middle English clatren, from Old English *clatrian; of imitative origin Date: 13th century intransitive verb 1. to make a rattling sound 2. to talk ...
clatterer
noun see clatter I
clatteringly
adverb see clatter I
clattery
adjective see clatter II
Claude
biographical name Albert 1898-1983 Belgian physiologist in U.S.
Claude Lorrain
biographical name 1600-1682 pseudonym of Claude Gellée French painter
claudication
noun Etymology: Latin claudication-, claudicatio, from claudicare to limp, from claudus lame Date: 15th century the quality or state of being lame ; limping
Claudius
biographical name Roman generals including: Appius Claudius Crassus consul (471 & 451 B.C.) & decemvir (451-450 B.C.); Appius Claudius Caecus censor (312-307 B.C.), consul ...
Claudius I
biographical name 10 b.c.-a.d. 54 Tiberius Claudius Drusus Nero Germanicus Roman emperor (41-54)
Claudius II
biographical name A.D. 214-270 Marcus Aurelius Claudius Gothicus Roman emperor (268-270)
clausal
adjective Date: 1904 relating to or of the nature of a clause
clause
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin clausa close of a rhetorical period, from Latin, feminine of clausus, past participle of claudere to close ...
Clausewitz
biographical name Carl von 1780-1831 Prussian general & military strategist • Clausewitzian adjective
Clausewitzian
adjective see Clausewitz
claustral
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin claustralis, from claustrum cloister, from Latin, bar, bolt, confining space, from claudere Date: 15th century ...
claustrophobe
noun see claustrophobia
claustrophobia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin claustrum + New Latin -phobia Date: 1879 abnormal dread of being in closed or narrow spaces • claustrophobe noun
claustrophobic
adjective Date: circa 1889 1. affected with or inclined to claustrophobia 2. inducing or suggesting claustrophobia • claustrophobically adverb
claustrophobically
adverb see claustrophobic
claustrum
noun (plural claustra) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, bar Date: 1848 the one of the four basal ganglia in each cerebral hemisphere that consists of a thin lamina of gray ...
clavate
adjective Etymology: New Latin clavatus, from Latin clava club, from clavus nail, knot in wood Date: 1813 thickened near the distal end ; club-shaped
clave
I. past of cleave II. noun Etymology: American Spanish, from Spanish, keystone, clef, from Latin clavis Date: 1928 one of a pair of cylindrical hardwood sticks that are ...
claver
intransitive verb Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1605 chiefly Scottish prate, gossip • claver noun, chiefly Scottish
clavichord
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin clavichordium, from Latin clavis key + chorda string — more at cord Date: 15th century an early keyboard instrument having strings struck by ...
clavichordist
noun see clavichord
clavicle
noun Etymology: French clavicule, from New Latin clavicula, from Latin, diminutive of Latin clavis; akin to Greek kleid-, kleis key, kleiein to close Date: 1615 a bone of the ...
clavicular
adjective see clavicle
clavier
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, key bearer, from Latin clavis Date: 1694 1. the keyboard of a musical instrument 2. [German Klavier, from French clavier] an early ...
clavierist
noun see clavier
clavieristic
adjective see clavier
claw
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English clawe, from Old English clawu hoof, claw; akin to Old Norse klō claw, and probably to Old English cliewen ball — ...
claw back
transitive verb Date: 1953 chiefly British to get back (as money) by strenuous or forceful means (as taxation) • clawback noun
claw hammer
noun Date: circa 1769 1. a hammer with one end of the head forked for pulling out nails 2. tailcoat
claw-foot
noun Date: 1792 a foot (as on a bathtub or piece of furniture) in the shape of a claw
clawback
noun see claw back
clawed
adjective see claw I
clawhammer
adjective Date: 1964 of, relating to, or being a style of banjo playing using the thumb and one or more fingers picking or strumming in a downward direction
clawlike
adjective see claw I
clay
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Old English clǣg; akin to Old High German klīwa bran, Latin gluten glue, Middle Greek glia Date: before 12th ...
Clay
I. biographical name Henry 1777-1852 American statesman & orator II. biographical name Lucius Du Bignon 1897-1978 American general
clay court
noun Date: 1885 a tennis court with a clay surface or a synthetic surface that resembles clay
clay feet
noun plural Date: 1862 feet of clay
clay loam
noun Date: circa 1889 a loam containing from 20 to 30 percent clay
clay mineral
noun Date: 1937 any of a group of hydrous silicates of aluminum and sometimes other metals formed chiefly in weathering processes and occurring especially in clay and shale
clay pigeon
noun Date: 1888 a saucer-shaped target usually made of baked clay or limestone and pitch and thrown from a trap in skeet and trapshooting
claybank
noun Date: 1851 a horse of yellowish color
clayey
adjective see clay
clayish
adjective see clay
claylike
adjective see clay
Claymation
service mark — used for animation that features images of clay figures
claymore
noun Etymology: Scottish Gaelic claidheamh mór, literally, great sword Date: 1527 a large 2-edged sword formerly used by Scottish Highlanders; also their basket-hilted ...
claymore mine
noun Etymology: probably from claymore Date: 1961 a usually electrically fired land mine containing steel fragments that are discharged in a predetermined direction
claypan
noun Date: 1837 1. hardpan consisting mainly of clay 2. Australian a shallow depression in which water collects after rain
clayware
noun Date: 1896 articles made of fired clay
cld
abbreviation called; cleared
clean
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English clene, from Old English clǣne; akin to Old High German kleini delicate, dainty Date: before 12th century 1. a. free from dirt or ...
clean and jerk
noun Date: 1913 a lift in weight lifting in which the weight is raised to shoulder height, held momentarily, and then quickly thrust overhead usually with a lunge or a spring ...
clean house
phrasal 1. to clean a house and its furniture 2. to make sweeping reforms or changes (as of personnel)
clean one's clock
phrasal to beat one badly in a fight or competition
clean room
noun Date: 1963 a room for the manufacture or assembly of objects (as precision parts) that is maintained at a high level of cleanliness by special means
clean up
intransitive verb Date: 1920 to make a spectacular profit in a business enterprise or a killing in speculation or gambling
clean up one's act
phrasal to behave in a more acceptable manner
clean-and-jerk
verb see clean and jerk
clean-cut
adjective Date: 1843 1. cut so that the surface or edge is smooth and even 2. sharply defined 3. of wholesome appearance
clean-limbed
adjective Date: 15th century well proportioned ; trim
cleanability
noun see clean III
cleanable
adjective see clean III
cleaner
noun Date: 1720 1. a. one whose work is cleaning b. dry cleaner; also a dry-cleaning shop — usually used in plural 2. a preparation for cleaning 3. an implement or ...
cleanhanded
adjective Date: 1728 innocent of wrongdoing
cleanliness
noun see cleanly II
cleanly
I. adverb Date: 13th century in a clean manner II. adjective (cleanlier; -est) Date: circa 1500 1. careful to keep clean ; fastidious 2. habitually kept clean • ...
cleanness
noun see clean I
cleanse
verb (cleansed; cleansing) Etymology: Middle English clensen, from Old English clǣnsian to purify, from clǣne clean Date: before 12th century clean; especially to rid of ...
cleanser
noun Date: before 12th century 1. one that cleanses 2. a preparation (as a scouring powder or a skin cream) used for cleaning
Cleanthes
biographical name circa 331-circa 232 B.C. Greek Stoic philosopher
cleanup
I. noun Date: 1872 1. an act or instance of cleaning 2. an exceptionally large profit ; killing II. adjective Date: 1937 being in the fourth position in the batting order ...
clear
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English clere, from Anglo-French cler, from Latin clarus clear, bright; akin to Latin calare to call — more at low Date: 13th century 1. a. ...
clear off
intransitive verb Date: 1722 chiefly British to go away ; depart
clear out
verb Date: 1792 intransitive verb depart transitive verb to drive out or away usually forcibly
clear the air
also clear the atmosphere phrasal to remove elements of hostility, tension, confusion, or uncertainty
clear the atmosphere
phrasal see clear the air
clear the decks
phrasal to make sweeping preparations for action
clear-air turbulence
noun Date: 1955 sudden severe turbulence occurring in cloudless regions that causes violent jarring or buffeting of aircraft
clear-cut
I. adjective Date: 1849 1. sharply outlined ; distinct 2. free from ambiguity or uncertainty ; unambiguous II. noun Date: circa 1958 an area of forest which has been ...
clear-cutting
noun Date: 1922 removal of all the trees in a stand of timber • clear-cut verb
clear-eyed
adjective Date: 1530 clear-sighted
clear-fell
verb see clear-felling
clear-felling
noun Date: 1922 chiefly British clear-cutting • clear-fell verb
clear-sighted
adjective Date: 1586 1. having clear vision 2. discerning • clear-sightedly adverb • clear-sightedness noun
clear-sightedly
adverb see clear-sighted
clear-sightedness
noun see clear-sighted
clearable
adjective see clear III
clearance
noun Date: 1540 1. an act or process of clearing: as a. the removal of buildings from an area (as a city slum) b. the act of clearing a ship at the customhouse; also the ...
Clearchus
biographical name 5th century B.C. Greek soldier; governor of Byzantium
clearer
noun see clear III
Clearfield
geographical name city N Utah S of Ogden population 25,974
clearheaded
adjective Date: 1709 1. having or showing a clear understanding ; perceptive 2. able to think clearly • clearheadedly adverb • clearheadedness noun
clearheadedly
adverb see clearheaded
clearheadedness
noun see clearheaded
clearing
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of making or becoming clear 2. a tract of land cleared of wood and brush 3. the settlement of accounts or exchange of ...
clearinghouse
noun Date: 1792 1. an establishment maintained by banks for settling mutual claims and accounts 2. a central agency for the collection, classification, and distribution ...
clearly
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in a clear manner 2. it is clear Usage: see hopefully
clearness
noun see clear I
clearstory
variant of clerestory
Clearwater
geographical name city W Florida NW of St. Petersburg on Gulf of Mexico population 108,787
Clearwater Mountains
geographical name mountains N central Idaho; highest about 8000 feet (2438 meters)
clearwing
noun Date: 1867 a moth (as of the families Aegeriidae or Sphingidae) having the wings largely transparent and devoid of scales
cleat
I. noun Etymology: Middle English clete wedge, from Old English *clēat; akin to Middle High German klōz lump — more at clout Date: 14th century 1. a. a wedge-shaped ...

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