Слова на букву buck-cobl (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву buck-cobl (6389)

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closely
adverb see close IV
closely held
adjective Date: 1946 having most stock shares and voting rights in the hands of a few
closemouthed
adjective Date: 1881 cautious in speaking ; uncommunicative; also secretive
closeness
noun see close IV
closeout
noun Date: 1925 1. a clearing out by a sale usually at reduced prices of the whole remaining stock (as of a business) 2. an article offered or bought at a closeout
closer
noun Date: 1607 one that closes; especially a relief pitcher who specializes in finishing games
closestool
noun Date: 15th century a stool holding a chamber pot
closet
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French closett, diminutive of clos enclosure — more at close Date: 14th century 1. a. an apartment or small room for ...
closet drama
noun Date: 1922 drama suited primarily for reading rather than production
closet queen
noun Date: 1967 often disparaging one who secretly engages in homosexual activities while leading an ostensibly heterosexual life
closeted
adjective Date: 1763 closet 3
closetful
noun see closet I
closing
noun Date: 1596 1. a concluding part (as of a speech) 2. a closable gap (as in an article of clothing) 3. a meeting of parties to a real-estate deal for formally ...
clostridial
adjective see clostridium
clostridium
noun (plural clostridia) Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek klōstēr spindle, from klōthein to spin Date: 1884 any of a genus (Clostridium) of spore-forming ...
closure
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin clausura, from clausus, past participle of claudere to close — more at close Date: 14th century 1. archaic ...
clot
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English clott; akin to Middle High German klōz lump, ball — more at clout Date: before 12th century 1. a portion of a substance ...
clot-buster
noun Date: 1984 a drug (as streptokinase) used to dissolve blood clots • clot-busting adjective
clot-busting
adjective see clot-buster
cloth
noun (plural cloths) Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Old English clāth cloth, garment; akin to Middle High German kleit garment Date: before 12th ...
cloth yard
noun Date: 15th century a yard especially for measuring cloth; specifically a unit of 37 inches equal to the Scottish ell and used also as a length for arrows
clothbound
adjective Date: 1860 of a book bound in stiff boards covered with cloth
clothe
transitive verb (clothed or clad; clothing) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English clāthian, from clāth Date: before 12th century 1. a. to cover with or as if with ...
clothes
noun plural Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Old English clāthas, plural of clāth Date: before 12th century 1. clothing 2. bedclothes 3. all the ...
clothes moth
noun Date: 1753 any of several small yellowish or buff-colored moths (especially Tinea pellionella and Tineola bisselliella of the family Tineidae) whose larvae eat wool, fur, ...
clothes-peg
noun Date: 1825 British clothespin
clotheshorse
noun Date: 1775 1. a frame on which to hang clothes 2. a conspicuously dressy person
clothesline
I. noun Date: 1830 a line (as of cord) on which clothes may be hung to dry II. transitive verb Date: 1964 to knock down (as a football player) by catching by the neck with ...
clothespin
noun Date: 1833 a forked piece of wood or plastic or a small spring clamp used for fastening clothes on a clothesline
clothespress
noun Date: 1713 a receptacle for clothes
clothier
noun Etymology: Middle English, alteration of clother, from cloth Date: 14th century one who makes or sells clothing
clothing
noun Date: 13th century garments in general; also covering
clotrimazole
noun Etymology: probably from International Scientific Vocabulary chlor- + tri- + imidazole Date: 1970 an antifungal agent C22H17ClN2
clotted cream
noun Date: 1542 a thick cream made chiefly in England by slowly heating whole milk on which the cream has been allowed to rise and then skimming the cooled cream from the top ...
clotting factor
noun Date: 1960 any of several plasma components (as fibrinogen, prothrombin, and thromboplastin) that are involved in the clotting of blood — compare factor VIII
cloture
noun Etymology: French clôture, literally, closure, alteration of Middle French closure Date: 1871 the closing or limitation of debate in a legislative body especially by ...
cloud
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, rock, cloud, from Old English clūd; perhaps akin to Greek gloutos buttock Date: 14th century 1. a visible mass ...
cloud chamber
noun Date: 1897 a vessel containing air saturated with water vapor whose sudden expansion reveals the passage of an ionizing particle by a trail of visible droplets
cloud ear
noun Date: 1970 wood ear
cloud forest
noun Date: 1922 a wet tropical mountain forest at an altitude usually between 3000 and 8000 feet (1000 and 2500 meters) that is characterized by a profusion of epiphytes and ...
cloud nine
noun Date: 1959 a feeling of well-being or elation — usually used with on
Cloud Peak
geographical name mountain 13,165 feet (4013 meters) N Wyoming; highest in Bighorn Mountains
cloud street
noun Date: 1943 a row of cumulus clouds
cloud-cuckoo-land
noun Etymology: translation of Greek nephelokokkygia Date: 1899 a realm of fantasy or of whimsical or foolish behavior
cloudberry
noun Date: 1597 a creeping herbaceous raspberry (Rubus chamaemorus) of north temperate regions; also its pale amber-colored edible fruit
cloudburst
noun Date: 1869 1. a sudden copious rainfall 2. a sudden outpouring ; deluge
clouded leopard
noun Date: 1910 a medium-sized often arboreal cat (Neofelis nebulosa) that occurs from Nepal to southeast China and Indonesia and is grayish to yellowish with darker irregular ...
cloudily
adverb see cloudy
cloudiness
noun see cloudy
cloudland
noun Date: 1817 1. the region of the clouds 2. the realm of visionary speculation or poetic imagination
cloudless
adjective Date: 14th century free from clouds ; clear • cloudlessly adverb • cloudlessness noun
cloudlessly
adverb see cloudless
cloudlessness
noun see cloudless
cloudlet
noun Date: 1788 a small cloud
cloudscape
noun Date: 1880 a view or pictorial representation of a cloud formation
cloudy
adjective (cloudier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, or resembling cloud 2. darkened by gloom or anxiety 3. a. overcast with clouds b. having a ...
Clough
biographical name Arthur Hugh 1819-1861 English poet
clout
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English clūt; akin to Middle High German klōz lump, Russian gluda Date: before 12th century 1. dialect chiefly British a piece ...
clove
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English clufu; akin to Old English clēofan to cleave Date: before 12th century one of the small bulbs (as in garlic) developed in ...
clove hitch
noun Etymology: Middle English cloven, clove divided, from past participle of clevien to cleave Date: circa 1769 a knot securing a rope temporarily to an object (as a post or ...
clove pink
noun Date: 1804 carnation 2
cloven
past participle of cleave
cloven foot
noun Date: 13th century cloven hoof • cloven-footed adjective
cloven hoof
noun Date: 1665 1. a foot (as of a sheep) divided into two parts at its distal extremity 2. [from the traditional representation of Satan as cloven-hoofed] the sign of ...
cloven-footed
adjective see cloven foot
cloven-hoofed
adjective see cloven hoof
clover
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English clāfre; akin to Old High German klēo clover Date: before 12th century 1. any of a genus (Trifolium) of low leguminous herbs ...
cloverleaf
I. adjective Date: 1915 resembling a clover leaf in shape II. noun (plural cloverleafs or cloverleaves) Date: 1931 an interchange between two major highways that allows ...
Clovis
I. adjective Etymology: Clovis, New Mexico Date: 1956 of or relating to a widely distributed prehistoric culture of North America characterized by leaf-shaped flint ...
Clovis I
German Chlodwig biographical name circa 466-511 king of the Salian Franks (481-511)
clown
I. noun Etymology: probably of Low German origin; akin to Frisian klönne clumsy fellow, Old English clyne lump of metal Date: 1563 1. farmer, countryman 2. a rude ill-bred ...
clown fish
noun Date: 1957 any of various small tropical fishes (genera Amphiprion and Premnas) of the Indian and Pacific oceans that are related to the damselfishes, are bright orange ...
clownery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1589 clownish behavior or an instance of clownishness ; buffoonery
clownish
adjective Date: 1563 resembling or befitting a clown (as in ignorance and lack of sophistication) Synonyms: see boorish • clownishly adverb • clownishness noun
clownishly
adverb see clownish
clownishness
noun see clownish
cloxacillin
noun Etymology: chlor- + oxacillin Date: 1963 a semisynthetic oral penicillin C19H17ClN3NaO5S effective especially against staphylococci which secrete beta-lactamase
cloy
verb Etymology: Middle English, to hinder, lame, alteration of acloyen to harm, maim, modification of Anglo-French encloer to nail, prick a horse with a nail in shoeing, from ...
cloying
adjective Date: 1594 disgusting or distasteful by reason of excess ; also excessively sweet or sentimental • cloyingly adverb
cloyingly
adverb see cloying
clozapine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary chlor- + -zapine, alteration of -azepine (as in benzodiazepine) Date: 1970 an antipsychotic drug C18H19ClN4 used in the ...
cloze
adjective Etymology: by shortening & alteration from closure Date: 1953 of, relating to, or being a test of reading comprehension that involves having the person being tested ...
clr
abbreviation clear; clearance
CLU
abbreviation chartered life underwriter
club
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English clubbe, from Old Norse klubba; akin to Old High German kolbo club Date: 13th century 1. a. a heavy usually ...
club car
noun Date: 1886 a railroad passenger car with facilities for serving refreshments and drinks — called also bar car, lounge car
club chair
noun Date: 1919 a deep low thickly upholstered easy chair often with rather low back and heavy sides and arms
club cheese
noun Date: 1916 a process cheese made by grinding cheddar and other cheeses usually with added condiments and seasoning
club fungus
noun Date: 1899 any of various basidiomycetes (family Clavariaceae) with a simple or branched often club-shaped sporophore
club moss
noun Date: 1597 any of an order (Lycopodiales) of primitive vascular plants (as ground pine) often with the sporangia borne in club-shaped strobili
club sandwich
noun Date: 1889 a sandwich of three slices of bread with two layers of meat (as turkey) and lettuce, tomato, and mayonnaise
club soda
noun Date: 1877 soda water 2a
club steak
noun Date: 1915 a small steak cut from the end of the short loin — see beef illustration
clubable
adjective see clubbable
clubbability
noun see clubbable
clubbable
also clubable adjective Date: 1783 sociable • clubbability noun
clubbed
adjective Date: 14th century shaped like a club
clubber
noun Date: 1633 a member or patron of a club
clubbiness
noun see clubby
clubbish
adjective see club I
clubby
adjective (clubbier; -est) Date: 1859 characteristic of a club or club members: as a. displaying friendliness especially to other members of the same social group ; ...
clubface
noun Date: 1878 the forward striking surface of a clubhead
clubfoot
noun Date: 1538 a congenitally misshapen foot twisted out of position; also this deformity • clubfooted adjective
clubfooted
adjective see clubfoot
clubhead
noun Date: 1857 the part of a golf club that strikes the ball
clubhouse
noun Date: 1746 1. a house occupied by a club or used for club activities 2. locker rooms used by an athletic team 3. a building at a golf course typically housing a locker ...
clubman
noun Date: 1836 a usually wealthy man given to club life
clubroot
noun Date: 1846 a disease of cruciferous plants (as cabbage) caused by a slime mold (Plasmodiophora brassicae) producing swellings or distortions of the root
cluck
I. verb Etymology: imitative Date: 15th century intransitive verb 1. to make a cluck 2. to make a clicking sound with the tongue 3. to express interest or concern ...
clue
I. noun Etymology: alteration of clew Date: 1596 1. something that guides through an intricate procedure or maze of difficulties; specifically a piece of evidence that leads ...
clueless
adjective Date: 1743 1. having or providing no clue 2. completely or hopelessly bewildered, unaware, ignorant, or foolish
Cluj-Napoca
geographical name city NW central Romania in Transylvania population 317,914
clumber spaniel
noun Usage: often capitalized C Etymology: Clumber, estate in Nottinghamshire, England Date: 1883 any of a breed of large massive heavyset spaniels with a dense silky largely ...
clump
I. noun Etymology: probably from Low German klump Date: circa 1586 1. a group of things clustered together 2. a compact mass 3. a heavy tramping sound • clumpy ...
clumpy
adjective see clump I
clumsily
adverb see clumsy
clumsiness
noun see clumsy
clumsy
adjective (clumsier; -est) Etymology: probably from obsolete English clumse benumbed with cold Date: circa 1598 1. a. lacking dexterity, nimbleness, or grace b. ...
clung
past and past participle of cling
clunk
I. verb Etymology: imitative Date: circa 1796 intransitive verb 1. to make a clunk 2. to hit something with a clunk transitive verb to strike or hit with a clunk II. ...
clunker
noun Date: 1943 1. an old or badly working piece of machinery; especially a dilapidated automobile 2. someone or something notably unsuccessful
clunky
adjective (clunkier; -est) Date: 1965 clumsy in style, form, or execution
Cluny
geographical name town E central France NNW of Lyon population 4724
clupeid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Latin clupea, a small river fish Date: 1942 herring 2
Clusium
geographical name — see Chiusi
cluster
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English clyster; akin to Old English clott clot Date: before 12th century a number of similar things that occur together: as a. ...
cluster analysis
noun Date: 1948 a statistical classification technique for discovering whether the individuals of a population fall into different groups by making quantitative comparisons of ...
cluster bomb
noun Date: 1967 a canister of small individual bombs that is dropped from an aircraft
cluster headache
noun Date: 1953 a headache that is characterized by severe pain in the eye or temple and tends to recur in a series of attacks
clustery
adjective see cluster I
clutch
I. verb Etymology: Middle English clucchen, from Old English clyccan Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. to grasp or hold with or as if with the hand or claws ...
clutch bag
noun Date: 1949 a woman's small usually strapless handbag
Clutha
geographical name river 210 miles (338 kilometers) New Zealand in SE South Island flowing SE into the Pacific
clutter
I. verb Etymology: Middle English clotteren to clot, from clot Date: 1556 intransitive verb chiefly dialect to run in disorder transitive verb to fill or cover with ...
Clyde
I. noun Date: 1894 Clydesdale II. biographical name Baron — see Colin Campbell III. geographical name river 106 miles (171 kilometers) SW Scotland flowing NW into Firth ...
Clydebank
geographical name burgh W central Scotland on Clyde River population 46,920
Clydesdale
I. noun Date: 1786 any of a breed of heavy draft horses originally from Clydesdale, Scotland with long silky hair on the legs II. geographical name valley of the upper Clyde ...
clypeus
noun (plural clypei) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, round shield Date: 1834 a plate on the anterior median aspect of an insect's head
clyster
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French clistere, from Latin clyster, from Greek klystēr, from klyzein to wash out; akin to Welsh clir pure, ...
Clytemnestra
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Klytaimnēstra Date: 15th century the wife and murderess of Agamemnon
cm
abbreviation 1. centimeter 2. cumulative
Cm
symbol curium
CM
abbreviation 1. common meter 2. Congregation of the Mission
CMA
abbreviation 1. calcium magnesium acetate 2. certified medical assistant
cmd
abbreviation command
Cmdr
abbreviation commander
CMG
abbreviation Companion of the Order of St. Michael and St. George
cml
abbreviation commercial
CMOS
abbreviation complementary metal-oxide semiconductor
CMSgt
abbreviation chief master sergeant
CMV
abbreviation cytomegalovirus
CN
abbreviation credit note
CNA
abbreviation certified nurse's aid
CNC
abbreviation computer numerical control
CNG
abbreviation compressed natural gas
cnidarian
noun Etymology: ultimately from New Latin cnida nematocyst, from Greek knidē nettle Date: circa 1909 coelenterate • cnidarian adjective
Cnidus
geographical name ancient town SW Asia Minor in Caria
CNM
abbreviation certified nurse-midwife
CNMI
abbreviation Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
CNN
abbreviation Cable News Network
CNO
abbreviation chief of naval operations
Cnossus
geographical name — see Knossos
CNS
abbreviation central nervous system
Cnut
biographical name variant of Canute
co
abbreviation 1. company 2. county
Co
symbol cobalt
CO
abbreviation 1. cash order 2. Colorado 3. commanding officer 4. conscientious objector 5. corrections officer
co-
prefix Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from com-; akin to Old English ge-, perfective and collective prefix, Old Irish com- with 1. with ; together ; joint ; jointly ...
co-brand
transitive verb Date: 1982 to market or issue (as a credit card) in conjunction with another company so that the product bears the name of both
co-edition
noun Date: 1964 an edition of a book published simultaneously by more than one publisher usually in different countries and in different languages
co-op
noun Date: 1861 cooperative
co-opt
transitive verb Etymology: Latin cooptare, from co- + optare to choose Date: 1651 1. a. to choose or elect as a member b. to appoint as a colleague or assistant 2. ...
co-optation
noun see co-opt
co-optative
adjective see co-opt
co-option
noun see co-opt
co-optive
adjective see co-opt
co-pay
noun Date: 1966 co-payment
co-payment
noun Date: 1975 a fixed fee required by a health insurer (as an HMO) to be paid by the patient at the time of each office visit, outpatient service, or filling of a prescription
coacervate
noun Etymology: Latin coacervatus, past participle of coacervare to heap up, from co- + acervus heap Date: 1929 an aggregate of colloidal droplets held together by ...
coacervation
noun see coacervate
coach
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English coche, from Middle French, from German Kutsche, from Hungarian kocsi (szekér), literally, wagon from Kocs, Hungary ...
coach dog
noun Date: 1764 dalmatian
coachable
adjective see coach II
Coachella
geographical name city S California population 22,724
Coachella Valley
geographical name valley SE California between Salton Sea & San Bernardino Mountains
coacher
noun see coach II
coachman
noun Date: 1579 a man who drives a coach or carriage
coachwork
noun Date: 1906 an automobile body ; bodywork
coadaptation
noun see coadapted
coadapted
adjective Date: 1836 mutually adapted especially by natural selection • coadaptation noun
coadjutor
noun Etymology: Middle English coadjutour, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin coadjutor, from Latin co- + adjutor helper, from adjuvare to help — more at aid Date: 15th ...
coadjutrix
noun (plural coadjutrices) Etymology: New Latin, feminine of coadjutor Date: 1646 a woman who is a coadjutor
coagulability
noun see coagulate II
coagulable
adjective see coagulate II
coagulant
noun Date: 1770 something that produces coagulation
coagulase
noun Date: 1914 any of several enzymes that cause coagulation (as of blood)
coagulate
I. adjective Date: 14th century archaic being clotted or congealed II. verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin coagulatus, past participle of coagulare to curdle, from ...
coagulation
noun see coagulate II
coagulum
noun (plural coagula or -ulums) Etymology: Latin Date: 1658 a coagulated mass or substance ; clot
Coahuila
geographical name state N Mexico bordering on the United States capital Saltillo area 58,522 square miles (151,572 square kilometers), population 1,972,340
coal
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English col, from Old English; akin to Old High German & Old Norse kol burning ember, Middle Irish gúal coal Date: before ...
coal gas
noun Date: 1809 gas made from coal: as a. the mixture of gases thrown off by burning coal b. gas made by carbonizing bituminous coal in retorts and used for heating and ...
coal measures
noun plural Date: 1829 beds of coal with the associated rocks
coal oil
noun Date: 1851 1. petroleum or a refined oil prepared from it 2. kerosene
coal seam
noun Date: 1811 a bed of coal usually thick enough to be profitably mined
coal tar
noun Date: 1785 tar obtained by distillation of bituminous coal and used especially as an industrial fuel, in making dyes, and in the topical treatment of skin disorders
coalesce
verb (coalesced; coalescing) Etymology: Latin coalescere, from co- + alescere to grow — more at old Date: circa 1656 intransitive verb 1. to grow together 2. a. to ...
coalescence
noun see coalesce
coalescent
adjective see coalesce
coalfield
noun Date: 1805 a region rich in coal deposits
coalfish
noun Date: 1603 any of several blackish or dark-backed fishes (as a pollack, cobia, or sablefish)
coalhole
noun Date: circa 1662 British a compartment for storing coal
coalification
noun Date: 1911 a process in which vegetable matter becomes converted into coal of increasingly higher rank with anthracite as the final product • coalify transitive verb
coalify
transitive verb see coalification
coalition
noun Etymology: French, from Latin coalescere Date: 1604 1. a. the act of coalescing ; union b. a body formed by the coalescing of originally distinct elements ; ...
coalitionist
noun see coalition
coaming
also combing noun Etymology: probably irregular from comb Date: 1611 a raised frame (as around a hatchway in the deck of a ship) to keep out water
Coamo
geographical name city SE central Puerto Rico population 37,597
coapt
transitive verb Etymology: Late Latin coaptare, from Latin co- + aptus fastened, fit — more at apt Date: 1570 to fit together and make fast • coaptation noun
coaptation
noun see coapt
coarctation
noun Etymology: Latin coarctation-, coarctatio tightening, from coarctare, coartare to constrict, from co- + artare to fix firmly, from artus close, tight; akin to Latin artus ...
coarse
adjective (coarser; coarsest) Etymology: Middle English cors, perhaps from course, noun Date: 14th century 1. of ordinary or inferior quality or value ; common 2. a. ...
coarse fish
noun Date: 1857 1. rough fish 2. chiefly British a freshwater fish other than a salmonid
coarse-grained
adjective Date: circa 1774 1. having a coarse grain 2. crude
coarsely
adverb see coarse
coarsen
verb (coarsened; coarsening) Date: 1805 transitive verb to make coarse intransitive verb to become coarse
coarseness
noun see coarse
Coase
biographical name Ronald Harry 1910- American (British-born) economist
coast
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cost, from Anglo-French coste, from Latin costa rib, side; akin to Old Church Slavic kostĭ bone Date: 14th century 1. the land near a shore ...
coast guard
noun Date: 1833 1. a military or naval force employed in guarding a coast or responsible for the safety, order, and operation of maritime traffic in neighboring waters 2. ...
Coast Mountains
geographical name mountains Canada in W British Columbia; N continuation of Cascade Range
Coast Ranges
geographical name mountain ranges W North America extending along Pacific coast W of Sierra Nevada & Cascade Range & N through Vancouver Island, British Columbia, to Kenai ...
coast redwood
noun Date: circa 1897 redwood 3a
coast-to-coast
adjective Date: 1911 1. extending or airing across an entire nation or continent 2. extending from one end of a playing surface (as a basketball court) to the other ; ...
coastal
adjective see coast I
coaster
noun Date: 1574 1. one that coasts: as a. a person engaged in coastal traffic or commerce b. a ship sailing along a coast or engaged in trade between ports of the same ...
coaster brake
noun Date: 1899 a brake in the hub of the rear wheel of a bicycle operated by reverse pressure on the pedals
coaster wagon
noun Date: 1911 a child's toy wagon often used for coasting
coastguard
noun see coast guard 2
coastguardman
noun see coastguardsman
coastguardsman
or coastguardman noun Date: 1848 a member of a coast guard
coastland
noun Date: 1852 land bordering the sea
coastline
noun Date: 1856 1. a line that forms the boundary between the land and the ocean or a lake 2. the outline of a coast
coastward
or coastwards adverb Date: 1840 toward the coast • coastward adjective
coastwards
adverb see coastward
coastwise
adverb or adjective see coast I
coat
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English cote, from Anglo-French, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German kozza coarse wool mantle Date: 14th century 1. ...
coat hanger
noun Date: 1895 a device which is shaped like the outline of a person's shoulders and over which garments may be hung
coat of arms
Etymology: Middle English cote of armes, translation of Middle French cote d'armes Date: 14th century 1. a tabard or surcoat embroidered with armorial bearings 2. a. ...
coat of mail
Date: 15th century a garment of metal scales or chain mail worn as armor
Coatbridge
geographical name burgh S central Scotland E of Glasgow population 50,866
coatdress
noun Date: 1854 a dress styled like a coat usually with a front buttoning from neckline to hemline
coated
adjective see coat I
coater
noun see coat II
Coates
biographical name Joseph Gordon 1878-1943 New Zealand statesman
coati
noun Etymology: Portuguese quati, coati, from Tupi kwáti Date: 1676 either of two tropical American mammals (Nasua nasua and N. narica) related to the raccoon but with a ...
coatimundi
noun Etymology: Portuguese quatimundé, from Tupi kwatimúnde, older male coati not with a band, from kwáti coati + múnde snare, trap Date: 1676 coati
coating
noun Date: 1768 1. cloth for coats 2. coat, covering
coatless
adjective see coat I
coatrack
noun Date: 1915 a stand or rack fitted with pegs, hooks, or hangers and used for the temporary storage of garments
coatroom
noun Date: 1870 cloakroom, checkroom
Coats Land
geographical name section of Antarctica SE of Weddell Sea
coattail
noun Date: circa 1600 1. the rear flap of a man's coat 2. plural the skirts of a dress coat, cutaway, or frock coat 3. plural the influence or pulling power of a popular ...
coax
I. transitive verb Etymology: earlier cokes, from cokes simpleton Date: 1581 1. obsolete fondle, pet 2. to influence or gently urge by caressing or flattering ; wheedle ...
coax cable
noun see coaxial cable

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