Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389)

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cognize
transitive verb (cognized; cognizing) Etymology: back-formation from cognizance Date: circa 1837 know, understand • cognizer noun
cognizer
noun see cognize
cognomen
noun (plural cognomens or cognomina) Etymology: Latin, irregular from co- + nomen name — more at name Date: 1691 1. surname; especially the third of usually three names ...
cognominal
adjective see cognomen
cognoscente
noun (plural cognoscenti) Etymology: obsolete Italian (now conoscente), from cognoscente, adjective, wise, from Latin cognoscent-, cognoscens, present participle of cognoscere ...
cognoscible
adjective Etymology: Late Latin cognoscibilis, from Latin cognoscere Date: circa 1644 cognizable, knowable
cogon
noun Etymology: Spanish cogón, from Tagalog & Visayan kugon Date: 1898 any of several tall grasses (genus Imperata, especially I. cylindrica) of southeastern Asia used ...
cogwheel
noun Date: 14th century a wheel with cogs ; gear 6a(2)
cohabit
intransitive verb Etymology: Late Latin cohabitare, from Latin co- + habitare to inhabit, from frequentative of habēre to have — more at give Date: circa 1530 1. to live ...
cohabitant
noun see cohabit
cohabitation
noun see cohabit
Cohan
biographical name George Michael 1878-1942 American actor, dramatist, & producer
Cohen
I. biographical name Stanley 1922- American biochemist II. biographical name William Sebastian 1940- United States secretary of defense (1997-2001)
Cohen-Tannoudji
biographical name Claude 1933- French (Algerian-born) physicist
cohere
verb (cohered; cohering) Etymology: Latin cohaerēre, from co- + haerēre to stick Date: 1598 intransitive verb 1. a. to hold together firmly as parts of the same mass; ...
coherence
noun Date: circa 1580 1. the quality or state of cohering: as a. systematic or logical connection or consistency b. integration of diverse elements, relationships, or ...
coherency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1603 coherence
coherent
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French cohérent, from Latin cohaerent-, cohaerens, present participle of cohaerēre Date: circa 1555 1. a. logically or ...
coherently
adverb see coherent
coherer
noun Date: 1894 a radio detector in which an imperfectly conducting contact between pieces of conductive material loosely resting against each other is materially improved in ...
cohesion
noun Etymology: Latin cohaesus, past participle of cohaerēre Date: 1660 1. the act or state of sticking together tightly; especially unity 2. union between similar ...
cohesionless
adjective see cohesion
cohesive
adjective Date: circa 1731 exhibiting or producing cohesion or coherence • cohesively adverb • cohesiveness noun
cohesively
adverb see cohesive
cohesiveness
noun see cohesive
Cohn
biographical name Ferdinand Julius 1828-1898 German botanist
coho
noun (plural cohos or coho) Etymology: Halkomelem (Salishan language of southwest British Columbia) k̓wə́xwəθ Date: 1869 a rather small Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus ...
coho salmon
noun see coho
cohomological
adjective see cohomology
cohomology
noun Date: circa 1959 a part of the theory of topology in which groups are used to study the properties of topological spaces and which is related in a complementary way to ...
cohomology theory
noun see cohomology
cohort
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin cohort-, cohors — more at court Date: 15th century 1. a. one of 10 divisions of an ancient Roman legion b. a group of ...
cohosh
noun Etymology: Eastern Abenaki kkwὰhas Date: 1789 any of several North American medicinal or poisonous plants: as a. black cohosh b. blue cohosh c. baneberry
cohousing
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1988 semi-communal housing consisting of a cluster of private homes and a shared community space (as for cooking or laundry facilities)
coif
I. noun Etymology: Middle English coife, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin cofea Date: 14th century 1. a close-fitting cap: as a. a hoodlike cap worn under a veil by ...
coiffeur
noun Etymology: French, from coiffer Date: 1824 a man who is a hairdresser
coiffeuse
noun Etymology: French, feminine of coiffeur Date: 1864 a woman who is a hairdresser
coiffure
noun Etymology: French, from coiffer to cover with a coif, arrange (hair), from coife, from Old French Date: circa 1631 a style or manner of arranging the hair
coiffured
adjective Date: 1875 1. being dressed 2. having the hair brushed, combed, and curled
coign of vantage
Etymology: coign, earlier spelling of 1coin (corner) Date: 1605 an advantageous position
coil
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1567 1. turmoil 2. trouble; also everyday cares and worries II. verb Etymology: French coillir, cuillir to gather — more at ...
coilability
noun see coil II
Coimbatore
geographical name city S India in W Tamil Nadu on S slope of Nilgiri Hills population 816,321
Coimbra
geographical name city W central Portugal population 145,724
coin
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French coing wedge, corner, from Latin cuneus wedge Date: 14th century 1. archaic a. corner, cornerstone, quoin b. ...
coin money
phrasal to get rich quickly
coin of the realm
Date: 1816 1. the legal money of a country 2. something valued or used as if it were money in a particular sphere
coin-op
noun Date: 1961 a self-service laundry where the machines are operated by coins
coinage
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of coining 2. a. coins b. something (as a word) made up or invented
coincide
intransitive verb (-cided; -ciding) Etymology: Medieval Latin coincidere, from Latin co- + incidere to fall on, from in- + cadere to fall — more at chance Date: 1719 1. a. ...
coincidence
noun Date: 1605 1. the act or condition of coinciding ; correspondence 2. the occurrence of events that happen at the same time by accident but seem to have some connection; ...
coincident
adjective Etymology: French coincident, from Medieval Latin coincident-, coincidens, present participle of coincidere Date: circa 1587 1. of similar nature ; harmonious 2. ...
coincidental
adjective Date: circa 1800 1. resulting from a coincidence 2. occurring or existing at the same time
coincidentally
adverb Date: 1837 1. in a coincidental manner ; by coincidence 2. it is or seems coincidental that
coincidently
adverb see coincident
coiner
noun see coin II
coinfect
transitive verb see coinfection
coinfection
noun Date: 1974 concurrent infection of a cell or organism with two organisms • coinfect transitive verb
coinsurance
noun Date: circa 1889 1. joint assumption of risk (as by two underwriters) with another 2. insurance (as fire insurance) in which the insured is obligated to maintain ...
coinsure
transitive verb Date: 1886 to insure jointly • coinsurer noun
coinsurer
noun see coinsure
coir
noun Etymology: Tamil kayi{rudia}u rope Date: 1582 a stiff coarse fiber from the outer husk of a coconut
Coire
geographical name — see Chur
coistrel
noun Etymology: Middle French coustillier soldier carrying a short sword, from coustille short sword, ultimately from Latin cultellus knife — more at cutlass Date: 1575 ...
coital
adjective see coitus
coitally
adverb see coitus
coition
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Latin coition-, coitio a coming together, from coire to come together, from co- + ire to go — more at issue Date: 1615 coitus • coitional ...
coitional
adjective see coition
coitus
noun Etymology: Latin, from coire Date: 1845 physical union of male and female genitalia accompanied by rhythmic movements ; sexual intercourse 1 — compare orgasm • ...
coitus interruptus
noun Etymology: New Latin, interrupted coitus Date: 1900 coitus in which the penis is withdrawn prior to ejaculation to prevent the deposit of sperm into the vagina
cojones
noun plural Etymology: Spanish, literally, testicles Date: 1932 1. slang nerve 3 2. slang testes
Coke
I. trademark — used for a cola drink II. biographical name Sir Edward 1552-1634 Lord Coke English jurist
coke
I. noun Etymology: perhaps from dialect coke, colk core, from Middle English; akin to Swedish kälk pith Date: 1669 the residue of coal left after destructive distillation ...
cokehead
noun Date: 1922 a person who uses cocaine compulsively
Col
abbreviation 1. colonel 2. Colorado 3. Colossians
COL
abbreviation 1. colonel 2. cost of living
col
I. noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, neck, from Latin collum Date: 1853 saddle 3 II. abbreviation 1. colonial 2. colony 3. color; colored 4. column 5. ...
col-
I. — see com- II. combining form or coli- or colo- Etymology: New Latin, from Latin colon 1. colon 2. [New Latin Escherichia coli, species of colon bacillus] E. coli ...
COLA
abbreviation 1. cost-of-living adjustment 2. cost-of-living allowance
cola
I. plural of colon II. noun Etymology: from Coca-Cola, a trademark Date: 1920 a carbonated soft drink colored usually with caramel and flavored usually with extracts from ...
cola nut
variant of kola nut
cola tree
variant of kola tree
colander
noun Etymology: Middle English colyndore, probably modification of Old Occitan colador, from Medieval Latin colatorium, from Latin colare to sieve, from colum sieve Date: 14th ...
colatitude
noun Date: 1790 the complement of the latitude
Colbert
biographical name Jean-Baptiste 1619-1683 French statesman & financier
Colby
noun Etymology: Colby, Wis. Date: 1932 a moist mild cheese similar to cheddar
colcannon
noun Etymology: Irish cál ceannan, literally, white-speckled cabbage Date: circa 1785 potatoes and cabbage boiled and mashed together with butter and seasoning
Colchester
geographical name town SE England in Essex population 141,100
Colchian
adjective or noun see Colchis
colchicine
noun Date: circa 1847 a poisonous alkaloid C22H25NO6 that inhibits mitosis, is extracted from the corms or seeds of the autumn crocus (Colchicum autumnale), and is used ...
colchicum
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Latin, a kind of plant with a poisonous root, from Greek kolchikon, literally, product of Colchis Date: 1597 1. any of a genus ...
Colchis
geographical name ancient country bordering on Black Sea S of Caucasus Mountains; area now constitutes W part of Republic of Georgia • Colchian adjective or noun
cold
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ceald, cald; akin to Old High German kalt cold, Latin gelu frost, gelare to freeze Date: before 12th century 1. a. ...
cold call
noun Date: 1966 a telephone call soliciting business made directly to a potential customer without prior contact or without a lead • cold-call verb
cold cash
noun Date: 1925 money in hand
cold chisel
noun Date: 1699 a chisel made of tool steel of a strength, shape, and temper suitable for chipping or cutting cold metal
cold comfort
noun Date: 14th century quite limited sympathy, consolation, or encouragement
cold cream
noun Date: 1693 a soothing and cleansing cosmetic
cold cuts
noun plural Date: 1859 sliced assorted cold cooked meats
cold duck
noun Etymology: translation of German Kalte Ente Date: 1969 a beverage that consists of a blend of sparkling burgundy and champagne
cold feet
noun plural Date: 1893 apprehension or doubt strong enough to prevent a planned course of action
cold fish
noun Date: 1924 a cold aloof person
cold frame
noun Date: 1851 a usually glass- or plastic-covered frame without artificial heat used to protect plants and seedlings outdoors
cold front
noun Date: 1921 an advancing edge of a cold air mass
cold shoulder
noun Date: 1816 intentionally cold or unsympathetic treatment • cold-shoulder transitive verb
cold sore
noun Date: 1870 a group of fluid-filled blisters appearing about or within the mouth that are caused by a herpes simplex virus and upon rupturing form crusts — called also ...
cold storage
noun Date: 1877 1. storage (as of food) in a cold place for preservation 2. a condition of being held or continued without being acted on ; abeyance
cold store
noun Date: 1895 a building for cold storage
cold sweat
noun Date: 1582 concurrent perspiration and chill usually associated with fear, pain, or shock
cold turkey
I. noun Date: 1921 1. abrupt complete cessation of the use of an addictive drug; also the symptoms experienced by a person undergoing withdrawal from a drug 2. unrelieved ...
cold type
noun Date: 1949 composition or typesetting (as photocomposition) done without the casting of metal; specifically such composition produced directly on paper by a typewriter ...
cold war
noun Date: 1945 1. a conflict over ideological differences carried on by methods short of sustained overt military action and usually without breaking off diplomatic relations; ...
cold warrior
noun Date: 1949 one that supports or is engaged in a cold war
cold water
noun Date: 1808 depreciation of something as being ill-advised, unwarranted, or worthless
cold wave
noun Date: 1876 1. an unusually large and rapid drop in temperature over a short period of time (as 24 hours) 2. a permanent wave set by a chemical preparation without the ...
cold-blooded
adjective Date: 1595 1. a. done or acting without consideration, compunction, or clemency b. matter-of-fact, emotionless 2. having cold blood; specifically having ...
cold-bloodedly
adverb see cold-blooded
cold-bloodedness
noun see cold-blooded
cold-call
verb see cold call
cold-eyed
adjective Date: 1819 cold in manner or appearance; especially coolly dispassionate
cold-press
transitive verb Date: 1893 to press (as olives) without applying heat from an external source; also to extract (oil) by cold-pressing
cold-shoulder
transitive verb see cold shoulder
cold-turkey
transitive verb see cold turkey I
cold-water
adjective Date: 1942 having only running water without heat or utility services provided
coldblood
adjective see cold-blooded 3
coldcock
transitive verb Etymology: perhaps 2cock Date: circa 1918 to knock unconscious
coldhearted
adjective Date: 1606 marked by lack of sympathy, interest, or sensitivity • coldheartedly adverb • coldheartedness noun
coldheartedly
adverb see coldhearted
coldheartedness
noun see coldhearted
coldish
adjective see cold I
coldly
adverb see cold I
coldness
noun see cold I
cole
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cāl, from Latin caulis stem, cabbage; akin to Greek kaulos stem, Latvian kauls Date: before 12th century any of several ...
Cole
biographical name Thomas 1801-1848 American (English-born) painter
colemanite
noun Etymology: William T. Coleman died 1893 American businessman and mine owner Date: 1884 a colorless or white mineral consisting of a hydrous calcium borate occurring in ...
coleoptera
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, ultimately from Greek koleon sheath + pteron wing — more at feather Date: 1771 insects that are beetles • coleopterist noun • ...
coleopteran
noun Date: circa 1847 beetle I,1 • coleopteran adjective
coleopterist
noun see coleoptera
coleopterous
adjective see coleoptera
coleoptile
noun Etymology: New Latin coleoptilum, from Greek koleon + ptilon down; akin to Greek pteron Date: circa 1866 the first leaf of a monocotyledon forming a protective sheath ...
coleorhiza
noun (plural coleorhizae) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek koleon + New Latin -rhiza Date: circa 1866 the sheath investing the radicle in some monocotyledonous plants through ...
Colepeper
or Culpeper biographical name Thomas 1635-1689 2d Baron Colepeper English colonial administrator; governor of Virginia
Coleraine
geographical name district N Northern Ireland, established 1974 area 187 square miles (484 square kilometers), population 51,062
Coleridge
biographical name Samuel Taylor 1772-1834 English poet • Coleridgean also Coleridgian adjective
Coleridgean
adjective see Coleridge
Coleridgian
adjective see Coleridge
coleslaw
noun Etymology: Dutch koolsla, from kool cabbage + sla salad Date: 1794 a salad made of raw sliced or chopped cabbage
Colet
biographical name John 1466(or 1467)-1519 English theologian & scholar
Colette
biographical name Sidonie-Gabrielle 1873-1954 French author
coleus
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek koleos, koleon sheath Date: 1885 any of a large genus (Coleus) of Old World herbs of the mint family including ones ...
colewort
noun Date: 14th century cole; especially one (as kale) that forms no head
Colfax
biographical name Schuyler 1823-1885 vice president of the United States (1869-73)
coli-
— see col-
colic
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin colica (passio) intestinal (suffering), from Late Latin colicus of the colon, colicky, from Greek kōlikos, from kōlon, ...
colicin
also colicine noun Etymology: French colicine, from col- + -cine (as in streptomycine streptomycin) Date: 1946 any of various antibacterial substances produced by strains of ...
colicine
noun see colicin
colicky
adjective Date: 1742 1. relating to or associated with colic 2. suffering from colic
colicroot
noun Date: 1833 any of several plants having roots used in folk medicine to treat colic; especially either of two bitter herbs (Aletris farinosa and A. aurea) of the lily ...
coliform
adjective Date: 1906 of, relating to, or being gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria (as E. coli) normally present in the intestine • coliform noun
Coligny
biographical name Gaspard II de 1519-1572 Seigneur de Châtillon French admiral & Huguenot leader
Colima
geographical name 1. volcano SW Mexico in S Jalisco 2. state SW Mexico bordering on the Pacific area 2106 square miles (5454 square kilometers), population 428,510 3. ...
colinear
adjective Date: 1927 1. collinear 2. having corresponding parts arranged in the same linear order • colinearity noun
colinearity
noun see colinear
coliphage
noun Date: 1944 any bacteriophage active against E. coli
coliseum
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin Colosseum, Colisseum Date: circa 1715 1. capitalized colosseum 1 2. a large sports stadium or building designed like the Colosseum for public ...
colistin
noun Etymology: New Latin colistinus, specific epithet of the bacterium producing it Date: 1951 a polymyxin produced by a bacterium (Bacillus polymyxa var. colistinus) from ...
colitis
noun Date: circa 1860 inflammation of the colon
coll
abbreviation see col III
coll-
or collo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek koll-, kollo-, from kolla — more at protocol 1. glue 2. colloid
collaborate
intransitive verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Late Latin collaboratus, past participle of collaborare to labor together, from Latin com- + laborare to labor — more at labor ...
collaboration
noun see collaborate
collaborationism
noun Date: 1923 the advocacy or practice of collaboration with an enemy • collaborationist adjective or noun
collaborationist
adjective or noun see collaborationism
collaborative
adjective or noun see collaborate
collaboratively
adverb see collaborate
collaborator
noun see collaborate
collage
noun Etymology: French, literally, gluing, from coller to glue, from colle glue, from Vulgar Latin *colla, from Greek kolla Date: 1919 1. a. an artistic composition made of ...
collagen
noun Etymology: Greek kolla + International Scientific Vocabulary -gen Date: circa 1865 any of a group of fibrous proteins that occur in vertebrates as the chief constituent ...
collagenase
noun Date: 1926 any of a group of proteolytic enzymes that decompose collagen and gelatin
collagenous
adjective see collagen
collagist
noun see collage
collapse
I. verb (collapsed; collapsing) Etymology: Latin collapsus, past participle of collabi, from com- + labi to fall, slide — more at sleep Date: 1732 intransitive verb 1. to ...
collapsibility
noun see collapse I
collapsible
adjective see collapse I
collar
I. noun Etymology: Middle English coler, from Anglo-French, from Latin collare, from collum neck; akin to Old English heals neck, and probably to Old English hwēol wheel — ...
collar cell
noun Date: circa 1889 a flagellated endodermal cell that lines the cavity of a sponge and has a contractile protoplasmic cup surrounding the flagellum — called also ...
collarbone
noun Date: 15th century clavicle
collard
noun Etymology: alteration of colewort Date: 1755 a cabbage (Brassica oleracea acephala) related to kale and having a loose head of stalked smooth leaves; also its leaves ...
collard greens
noun see collard
collared
adjective see collar I
collarless
adjective see collar I
collat
abbreviation collateral
collate
transitive verb (collated; collating) Etymology: back-formation from collation Date: 1612 1. a. to compare critically b. to collect, compare carefully in order to ...
collateral
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin collateralis, from Latin com- + lateralis lateral Date: 14th century 1. a. accompanying as ...
collateral damage
noun Date: 1972 injury inflicted on something other than an intended target; specifically civilian casualties of a military operation
collaterality
noun see collateral I
collateralize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1941 1. to make (a loan) secure with collateral 2. to use (as securities) for collateral
collaterally
adverb see collateral I
collation
noun Date: 14th century 1. [Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin collation-, collatio, from Late Latin, conference, from Latin, bringing together, comparison, ...
collator
noun see collate
colleague
noun Etymology: Middle French collegue, from Latin collega, from com- + legare to depute — more at legate Date: circa 1533 an associate in a profession or in a civil or ...
colleagueship
noun see colleague
collect
I. noun Etymology: Middle English collecte, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin collecta (short for oratio ad collectam prayer upon assembly), from Late Latin, assembly, from ...
collectability
noun see collectible I
collectable
I. adjective see collectible I II. noun see collectible II
collectanea
noun plural Etymology: Latin, neuter plural of collectaneus collected, from collectus, past participle Date: 1791 collected writings; also literary items forming a collection
collected
adjective Date: circa 1548 1. gathered together 2. possessed of calmness and composure often through concentrated effort 3. of a horse's gait performed slowly and ...
collectedly
adverb see collected
collectedness
noun see collected
collectibility
noun see collectible I
collectible
I. adjective or collectable Date: 1660 1. suitable for being collected 2. due for present payment ; payable • collectibility or collectability noun II. noun or ...
collection
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of collecting 2. a. something collected; especially an accumulation of objects gathered for study, comparison, or exhibition ...
collective
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. denoting a number of persons or things considered as one group or whole 2. a. formed by collecting ; aggregated b. of a fruit ...
collective bargaining
noun Date: 1891 negotiation between an employer and a labor union usually on wages, hours, and working conditions
collective farm
noun Date: 1925 a farm especially in a Communist country formed from many small holdings collected into a single unit for joint operation under governmental supervision
collective mark
noun Date: 1938 a trademark or a service mark of a group (as a cooperative association)
collective security
noun Date: 1934 the maintenance by common action of the security of all members of an association of nations
collective unconscious
noun Date: 1917 the inherited part of the unconscious that especially in the psychoanalytic theory of C. G. Jung occurs in and is shared by all the members of a people or race
collectively
adverb see collective I
collectivise
chiefly British variant of collectivize
collectivism
noun Date: 1857 1. a political or economic theory advocating collective control especially over production and distribution; also a system marked by such control 2. emphasis ...
collectivist
adjective or noun see collectivism
collectivistic
adjective see collectivism
collectivistically
adverb see collectivism
collectivity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1862 1. the quality or state of being collective 2. a collective whole; especially the people as a body
collectivization
noun see collectivize
collectivize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1893 to organize by collectivism • collectivization noun
collector
noun Date: 14th century one that collects: as a. an official who collects funds or moneys b. a person who makes a collection c. an object or device that collects ...
collector's item
noun Date: 1932 an item whose rarity or excellence makes it especially worth collecting; broadly collectible
collectorship
noun see collector
colleen
noun Etymology: Irish cailín Date: 1828 an Irish girl
college
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin collegium society, from collega colleague — more at colleague Date: 14th century 1. a ...
College Board
service mark — used for administration of tests of aptitude and achievement considered by some colleges in determining admission and placement of students
College Park
geographical name city SW Maryland NE of Washington, D.C. population 24,657
College Station
geographical name city E central Texas SE of Bryan population 67,890
college try
noun Etymology: from the phrase “give it the old college try” Date: 1927 a zealous all-out effort
collegial
adjective Date: 14th century 1. collegiate 2 2. a. marked by power or authority vested equally in each of a number of colleagues b. characterized by equal sharing of ...
collegiality
noun Date: 1887 the cooperative relationship of colleagues; specifically the participation of bishops in the government of the Roman Catholic Church in collaboration with the ...
collegially
adverb see collegial
collegian
noun Date: 15th century a student or recent graduate of a college
collegiate
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin collegiatus, from Latin collegium Date: 15th century 1. of or relating to a collegiate church 2. ...
collegiate church
noun Date: 15th century 1. a church other than a cathedral that has a chapter of canons 2. a church or corporate group of churches under the joint pastorate of two or more ...
collegiately
adverb see collegiate
collegium
noun (plural collegia or -giums) Etymology: modification of Russian kollegiya, from Latin collegium Date: 1917 a group in which each member has approximately equal power and ...
collembolan
noun Etymology: ultimately from coll- + Greek embolos wedge, stopper — more at embolus Date: 1873 springtail • collembolan or collembolous adjective
collembolous
adjective see collembolan
collenchyma
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1857 a plant tissue that consists of living usually elongated cells with unevenly thickened walls and acts as support especially in areas of ...
collenchymatous
adjective see collenchyma
collet
noun Etymology: Middle French, diminutive of col collar, from Latin collum neck — more at collar Date: 1528 a metal band, collar, ferrule, or flange: as a. a casing or ...
collide
intransitive verb (collided; colliding) Etymology: Latin collidere, from com- + laedere to injure by striking Date: 1700 1. to come together with solid or direct impact 2. ...
collider
noun Date: 1979 a particle accelerator in which two beams of particles moving in opposite directions are made to collide
collie
noun Etymology: probably from English dialect colly black Date: circa 1651 any of a breed of large dogs developed in Scotland that occur in rough-coated and smooth-coated ...
collier
noun Etymology: Middle English colier, from col coal Date: 13th century 1. one that produces charcoal 2. a coal miner 3. a ship for transporting coal
Collier
I. biographical name Jeremy 1650-1726 English clergyman II. biographical name John Payne 1789-1883 English editor III. biographical name Peter Fenelon 1849-1909 American ...
Collierville
geographical name town SW Tennessee E of Memphis population 31,872
colliery
noun (plural -lieries) Date: 1635 a coal mine and its connected buildings
collieshangie
noun Etymology: perhaps from collie + shang kind of meal Date: 1737 Scottish squabble, brawl
colligate
verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Latin colligatus, past participle of colligare, from com- + ligare to tie — more at ligature Date: 1545 transitive verb 1. to bind, ...
colligation
noun see colligate
colligative
adjective Date: 1901 depending on the number of particles (as molecules) and not on the nature of the particles
collimate
transitive verb (-mated; -mating) Etymology: Latin collimatus, past participle of collimare, manuscript variant of collineare to make straight, from com- + linea line Date: ...
collimation
noun see collimate
collimator
noun Date: 1865 1. a device for producing a beam of parallel rays (as of light) or for forming an infinitely distant virtual image that can be viewed without parallax 2. a ...
collinear
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1863 1. lying on or passing through the same straight line 2. having axes lying end to end in a straight line ...
collinearity
noun see collinear

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