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Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389)

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courtesy
I. noun (plural -sies) Etymology: Middle English corteisie, from Anglo-French curteisie, from curteis Date: 13th century 1. a. courteous behavior b. a courteous act or ...
courtesy card
noun Date: 1934 a card entitling its holder to some special privilege
courtesy title
noun Date: 1865 1. a title (as “Lord” added to the Christian name of a peer's younger son) used in addressing certain lineal relatives of British peers 2. a title (as ...
courthouse
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. a building in which courts of law are regularly held b. the principal building in which county offices are housed 2. county seat
courtier
noun Date: 14th century 1. one in attendance at a royal court 2. one who practices flattery
courtliness
noun see courtly I
courtly
I. adjective (courtlier; -est) Date: 15th century 1. a. of a quality befitting the court ; elegant b. insincerely flattering 2. favoring the policy or party of the ...
courtly love
noun Date: 1702 a late medieval conventionalized code prescribing conduct and emotions of ladies and their lovers
Courtrai
geographical name — see Kortrijk
courtroom
noun Date: 1677 a room in which a court of law is held
courtship
noun Date: 1596 the act, process, or period of courting
courtside
noun Date: 1969 the area at the edge of a court (as for tennis or basketball)
courtyard
noun Date: 1552 a court or enclosure adjacent to a building (as a house or palace)
couscous
noun Etymology: French couscous, couscoussou, from Arabic kuskus, kuskusū Date: 1738 a North African dish of steamed semolina usually served with meat or vegetables; also ...
cousin
noun Etymology: Middle English cosin, from Anglo-French cusin, cosin, from Latin consobrinus, from com- + sobrinus second cousin, from soror sister — more at sister Date: 13th ...
Cousin
biographical name Victor 1792-1867 French philosopher
Cousin Jack
noun Date: 1890 Cornishman; especially a Cornish miner
cousin-german
noun (plural cousins-german) Etymology: Middle English cosin germain, from Middle French, from Old French, from cosin + germain german Date: 14th century cousin 1a
cousinage
noun Date: 14th century 1. relationship of cousins ; kinship 2. a collection of cousins ; kinfolk
cousinhood
noun see cousin
cousinly
adjective see cousin
Cousins
biographical name Norman 1912-1990 American editor & essayist
cousinship
noun see cousin
Cousteau
biographical name Jacques-Yves 1910-1997 French marine explorer
coûte que coûte
foreign term Etymology: French cost what it may
couth
I. adjective Etymology: back-formation from uncouth Date: 1896 sophisticated, polished II. noun Date: 1947 polish, refinement
couthie
adjective Etymology: Middle English couth familiar, from Old English cūth — more at uncouth Date: 1719 chiefly Scottish pleasant, kindly
couture
noun Etymology: French, from Old French cousture sewing, from Vulgar Latin *consutura, from Latin consutus, past participle of consuere to sew together, from com- + suere to sew ...
couturier
noun Etymology: French, dressmaker, from Old French cousturier tailor's assistant, from cousture Date: 1899 an establishment engaged in couture; also the proprietor of or ...
couturiere
noun Etymology: French couturière, from Old French cousturiere, feminine of cousturier Date: 1818 a woman who is a couturier
couvade
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, cowardly inactivity, from cover to sit on, brood over — more at covey Date: 1865 a custom in some cultures in which when a child ...
covalence
noun Date: 1919 valence characterized by the sharing of electrons
covalency
noun Date: 1919 covalence
covalent
adjective Date: circa 1926 of, relating to, or characterized by covalent bonds • covalently adverb
covalent bond
noun Date: 1939 a chemical bond formed between atoms by the sharing of electrons
covalently
adverb see covalent
covariance
noun Date: 1931 1. the expected value of the product of the deviations of two random variables from their respective means 2. the arithmetic mean of the products of the ...
covariant
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1893 varying with something else so as to preserve certain mathematical interrelations
covariate
noun Date: 1965 any of two or more random variables exhibiting correlated variation
covariation
noun Date: 1906 correlated variation of two or more variables
Covarrubias
biographical name Miguel 1904-1957 Mexican artist
covary
intransitive verb (-varied; -varying) Date: 1950 to exhibit covariation
cove
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, den, from Old English cofa; akin to Old High German chubisi hut Date: before 12th century 1. a recessed place ; concavity: as a. an ...
covelline
noun see covellite
covellite
also covelline noun Etymology: French covelline, from Niccolò Covelli died 1829 Italian chemist Date: 1850 a usually blue mineral consisting of a sulfide of copper
coven
noun Etymology: Middle English covin agreement, confederacy, from Anglo-French covine, from Medieval Latin convenium agreement, from Latin convenire to agree — more at ...
covenant
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from present participle of covenir to be fitting, from Latin convenire Date: 14th century 1. a usually formal, solemn, ...
covenantal
adjective see covenant I
covenantee
noun Date: 1649 the person to whom a promise in the form of a covenant is made
covenanter
noun Date: 1638 1. capitalized a signer or adherent of the Scottish National Covenant of 1638 2. one that makes a covenant
covenantor
noun Date: 1649 a party bound by a covenant
Coventry
I. noun Etymology: Coventry, England Date: 1765 a state of ostracism or exclusion II. geographical name 1. town W Rhode Island population 33,668 2. city central England ...
cover
I. verb (covered; covering) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French coverir, covrir, from Latin cooperire, from co- + operire to close, cover Date: 13th century ...
cover charge
noun Date: 1921 a charge made by a restaurant or nightclub in addition to the charge for food and drink
cover crop
noun Date: 1899 a crop planted to prevent soil erosion and to provide humus
cover girl
noun Date: 1915 an attractive young woman whose picture appears on a magazine cover
cover glass
noun Date: 1881 a piece of very thin glass or plastic used to cover material on a microscope slide
cover ground
phrasal see cover the ground
cover one's tracks
phrasal to conceal traces in order to elude pursuers or escape detection
cover story
noun Date: 1948 a story accompanying a magazine-cover illustration
cover the ground
or cover ground phrasal to deal with a subject or assignment in a particular manner
cover-all
adjective Date: 1895 comprehensive
cover-up
noun Date: 1927 1. a. a device or stratagem for masking or concealing b. a usually concerted effort to keep an illegal or unethical act or situation from being made ...
coverable
adjective see cover I
coverage
noun Date: 1912 1. something that covers: as a. inclusion within the scope of an insurance policy or protective plan ; insurance b. the amount available to meet ...
coverall
noun Date: 1824 a one-piece outer garment worn to protect other garments — usually used in plural • coveralled adjective
coveralled
adjective see coverall
Coverdale
biographical name Miles 1488?-1569 English Bible translator
covered bridge
noun Date: 1809 a bridge that has its roadway protected by a roof and enclosing sides
covered smut
noun Date: 1900 a smut disease of grains in which the spore masses are held together by the persistent grain membrane and glumes
covered wagon
noun Date: 1719 a wagon with a canvas top supported by bowed strips of wood or metal
coverer
noun see cover I
covering
I. noun Date: 14th century something that covers or conceals II. adjective Date: 1887 containing explanation of or additional information about an accompanying ...
coverless
adjective see cover II
coverlet
noun Etymology: Middle English, alteration of coverlite, from Anglo-French coverlit, from covre (it) covers + lit bed, from Latin lectus — more at lie Date: 14th century ...
coverslip
noun Date: 1875 cover glass
covert
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, past participle of coverir to cover Date: 14th century 1. not openly shown, engaged in, or avowed ; veiled 2. ...
covertly
adverb see covert I
covertness
noun see covert I
coverture
noun Date: 13th century 1. a. covering b. shelter 2. the status a woman acquires upon marriage under common law
covet
verb Etymology: Middle English coveiten, from Anglo-French coveiter, from Vulgar Latin *cupidietare, from Latin cupiditat-, cupiditas desire, from cupidus desirous, from cupere ...
covetable
adjective see covet
coveter
noun see covet
covetingly
adverb see covet
covetous
adjective Date: 13th century 1. marked by inordinate desire for wealth or possessions or for another's possessions 2. having a craving for possession • covetously ...
covetously
adverb see covetous
covetousness
noun see covetous
covey
noun (plural coveys) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French covee sitting (of hen), from cover to sit on, brood over, from Latin cubare to lie Date: 14th century 1. a ...
Covina
geographical name city SW California E of Los Angeles population 46,837
Covington
geographical name city N Kentucky population 43,370
cow
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cou, from Old English cū; akin to Old High German kuo cow, Latin bos head of cattle, Greek bous, Sanskrit go Date: before 12th century 1. ...
cow college
noun Date: circa 1915 1. a college that specializes in agriculture 2. a provincial college or university that lacks culture, sophistication, and tradition
cow horse
noun Date: 1853 cow pony
cow parsnip
noun Date: 1548 a tall perennial North American plant (Heracleum lanatum) of the carrot family with large compound leaves and broad umbels of white or purplish flowers; also a ...
cow pie
noun Date: 1951 a dropping of cow dung
cow pony
noun Date: 1874 a strong and agile saddle horse trained for herding cattle
cow town
noun Date: 1885 1. a town or city that serves as a market center or shipping point for cattle 2. a usually small unsophisticated town within a cattle-raising area
cowage
noun see cowhage
coward
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French cuard, from cue, coe tail, from Latin cauda Date: 13th century one who shows disgraceful fear or timidity • coward ...
Coward
biographical name Sir Noël Peirce 1899-1973 English actor & dramatist
cowardice
noun Etymology: Middle English cowardise, from Anglo-French coardise, from cuard Date: 14th century lack of courage or resolution
cowardliness
noun see cowardly II
cowardly
I. adverb Date: 14th century in a cowardly manner II. adjective Date: 1551 being, resembling, or befitting a coward • cowardliness noun Synonyms: cowardly, ...
cowbane
noun Date: 1776 any of several poisonous plants (as a water hemlock) of the carrot family
cowbell
noun Date: 1625 a bell hung around the neck of a cow to make a sound by which the cow can be located
cowberry
noun Date: 1800 mountain cranberry; also its fruit
cowbird
noun Date: 1810 any of a genus (Molothrus of the family Icteridae) of New World blackbirds that lay their eggs in the nests of other birds; especially one (M. ater) ...
cowboy
I. noun Date: 1623 1. one who tends cattle or horses; especially a usually mounted cattle-ranch hand 2. a rodeo performer 3. one having qualities (as recklessness, ...
cowboy boot
noun Date: 1895 a boot made with a high arch, a high Cuban heel, and usually fancy stitching
cowboy hat
noun Date: 1895 a wide-brimmed hat with a large soft crown — called also ten-gallon hat
cowcatcher
noun Date: 1838 an inclined frame on the front of a railroad locomotive for throwing obstacles off the track
cowedly
adverb see cow II
Cowell
biographical name Henry Dixon 1887-1965 American composer
cower
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English couren, probably from Middle Low German kūren Date: 14th century to shrink away or crouch especially for shelter from something ...
Cowes
geographical name town S England on Isle of Wight population 19,663
cowfish
noun Date: 1870 any of various small bright-colored bony fishes (family Ostraciidae) with hornlike projections over the eyes
cowgirl
noun Date: 1884 1. a girl or woman who tends cattle or horses 2. a girl or woman who is a rodeo performer
cowhage
also cowage noun Etymology: Hindi kavẵc, kevẵc Date: 1640 a tropical woody vine (Mucuna pruriens) of the legume family with crooked pods covered with barbed hairs that ...
cowhand
noun Date: 1852 cowboy 1
cowherd
noun Date: before 12th century one who tends cows
cowhide
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. the hide of a cow; also leather made from this hide 2. a coarse whip of rawhide or braided leather II. transitive verb (cowhided; cowhiding) ...
Cowl
biographical name Jane 1883-1950 originally Grace Bailey American actress
cowl
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cowle, from Old English cugele, from Late Latin cuculla monk's hood, from Latin cucullus hood Date: before 12th century 1. a. a hood or ...
cowl-neck
noun Date: 1978 a high loose-fitting turnover collar used especially for sweaters • cowl-necked adjective
cowl-necked
adjective see cowl-neck
Cowley
I. biographical name Abraham 1618-1667 English poet II. biographical name Malcolm 1898-1989 American literary critic
cowlick
noun Date: 1598 a lock or tuft of hair growing in a different direction from the rest of the hair
cowling
noun Date: 1917 a removable metal covering that houses the engine and sometimes a part of the fuselage or nacelle of an airplane; also a metal cover for an engine
Cowlitz
geographical name river 130 miles (209 kilometers) SW Washington flowing into Columbia River
cowlstaff
noun Etymology: Middle English cuvelstaff, from cuvel vessel (from Old English cūfel, ultimately from Late Latin cupella, diminutive of Latin cūpa tub) + 1staff — more at ...
cowman
noun Date: 1677 1. cowherd, cowboy 2. a cattle owner or rancher
cowpat
noun Date: 1937 chiefly British cow pie
cowpea
noun Date: 1776 a sprawling herb (Vigna unguiculata syn. V. sinensis) of the legume family related to the bean and widely cultivated in the southern United States especially ...
Cowper
biographical name William 1731-1800 English poet
Cowper's gland
noun Etymology: William Cowper died 1709 English surgeon Date: 1738 either of two small glands lying on either side of the male urethra below the prostate gland and ...
cowpoke
noun Date: circa 1881 cowboy 1
cowpox
noun Date: 1798 a mild eruptive disease of the cow that is caused by a poxvirus (species Cowpox virus of the genus Orthopoxvirus) and that when communicated to humans protects ...
cowpuncher
noun Date: 1878 cowboy 1
cowrie
also cowry noun (plural cowries) Etymology: Hindi & Urdu kauṛī Date: 1662 any of various marine gastropods (family Cypraeidae) that are widely distributed in warm seas and ...
cowry
noun see cowrie
cowshed
noun Date: 1763 a shed for the housing of cows
cowslip
noun Etymology: Middle English cowslyppe, from Old English cūslyppe, literally, cow dung, from cū cow + slypa, slyppe paste Date: before 12th century 1. a common European ...
cowy
adjective see cow I
COX
noun Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1990 cyclooxygenase — often used with the number 1 or 2 to indicate one of the two variants of the enzyme
cox
I. noun Date: 1869 coxswain • coxed adjective • coxless adjective II. verb Date: 1881 coxswain
COX-2 inhibitor
noun Date: 1994 any of a class of drugs used to treat the pain and inflammation of arthritis by selectively blocking the variant of cyclooxygenase causing these symptoms
coxa
noun (plural coxae) Etymology: Latin, hip; akin to Old High German hāhsina hock, Sanskrit kakṣa armpit Date: 1826 the basal segment of a limb of various arthropods (as an ...
coxal
adjective see coxa
coxcomb
noun Etymology: Middle English cokkes comb, literally, cock's comb Date: 1573 1. a. a jester's cap adorned with a strip of red b. archaic pate, head 2. a. obsolete ...
coxcombical
adjective see coxcomb
coxcombry
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1770 behavior that is characteristic of a coxcomb ; foppery
coxed
adjective see cox I
Coxey
biographical name Jacob Sechler 1854-1951 American politician reformer
coxless
adjective see cox I
Coxsackie virus
noun Etymology: Coxsackie, N.Y. Date: 1949 any of numerous enteroviruses associated with human diseases (as meningitis)
coxswain
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cokswayne, from cok cockboat (a small boat) + swain servant Date: 15th century 1. a sailor who has charge of a ship's boat and its crew and ...
coy
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, quiet, shy, from Anglo-French quoi, quei, koi quiet, from Latin quietus Date: 14th century 1. a. shrinking from contact or ...
coydog
noun Etymology: coyote + dog Date: 1950 a hybrid between a coyote and a feral dog
coyly
adverb see coy I
coyness
noun see coy I
coyote
noun (plural coyotes or coyote) Etymology: Mexican Spanish, from Nahuatl coyōtl Date: 1759 1. a buff-gray to reddish-gray North American canid (Canis latrans) closely related ...
coyotillo
noun Etymology: Mexican Spanish, diminutive of coyote Date: circa 1892 a shrub (Karwinskia humboldtiana) of the buckthorn family of the southwestern United States and Mexico ...
coypu
noun Etymology: American Spanish coipú, from Mapuche coipu Date: 1793 nutria
coz
noun Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1559 cousin
cozen
transitive verb (cozened; cozening) Etymology: perhaps from obsolete Italian cozzonare, from Italian cozzone horse trader, from Latin cocion-, cocio trader Date: 1573 1. to ...
cozenage
noun Date: 1583 1. the art or practice of cozening ; fraud 2. an act or an instance of cozening
cozener
noun see cozen
cozily
adverb see cozy I
coziness
noun see cozy I
Cozumel
geographical name island SE Mexico off Quintana Roo
cozy
I. adjective (cozier; -est) Etymology: perhaps of Scandinavian origin; akin to Norwegian koselig cozy Date: 1709 1. a. enjoying or affording warmth and ease ; snug b. ...
cozy up
intransitive verb Date: 1965 to attain or try to attain familiarity, friendship, or intimacy ; ingratiate oneself
Cozzens
biographical name James Gould 1903-1978 American author
cp
abbreviation 1. compare 2. coupon
CP
abbreviation 1. candlepower 2. center of pressure 3. cerebral palsy 4. charter party 5. chemically pure 6. command post 7. Communist party 8. Congregation of the ...
CPA
abbreviation certified public accountant
CPB
abbreviation Corporation for Public Broadcasting
CPCU
abbreviation chartered property casualty underwriter
cpd
abbreviation compound
CPFF
abbreviation cost plus fixed fee
cpi
abbreviation characters per inch
CPI
abbreviation consumer price index
cpl
abbreviation 1. complete 2. compline
Cpl
abbreviation corporal
CPM
abbreviation Etymology: Latin mille thousand cost per thousand
CPO
abbreviation chief petty officer
CPR
abbreviation cardiopulmonary resuscitation
CPS
abbreviation 1. cards per second 2. certified professional secretary 3. characters per second 4. cycles per second
CPSC
abbreviation Consumer Product Safety Commission
CPT
abbreviation captain
cpu
noun Usage: often capitalized C&P&U Etymology: central processing unit Date: 1962 the component of a computer system that performs the basic operations (as processing data) ...
CQ
I. Etymology: call to quarters Date: 1924 — communications code letters used at the beginning of messages of general information or safety notices or by shortwave amateurs ...
cr
abbreviation 1. center 2. circular 3. commander 4. cream 5. creased 6. credit; creditor 7. creek 8. crescendo
Cr
symbol chromium
CR
abbreviation 1. carrier's risk 2. cathode ray 3. conditioned reflex; conditioned response 4. consciousness-raising 5. current rate
crab
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English crabbe, from Old English crabba; akin to Old High German krebiz crab and perhaps to Old English ceorfan to carve — ...
crab apple
noun Etymology: 3crab Date: 1680 any of various wild or cultivated trees (genus Malus) that are cultivars or relatives of the cultivated apple and that produce small sour ...
crab louse
noun Date: 1547 a sucking louse (Phthirus pubis) infesting the pubic region of the human body
crab spider
noun Date: 1861 any of a family (Thomisidae) of spiders that resemble crabs in shape and in being able to walk forward, backward, and sideways
Crabbe
biographical name George 1754-1832 English poet
crabbed
adjective Etymology: Middle English, partly from crabbe crustacean, partly from crabbe crab apple Date: 14th century 1. marked by a forbidding moroseness 2. difficult to ...
crabbedness
noun see crabbed
crabber
I. noun see crab II II. noun see crab V
crabby
adjective (crabbier; -est) Etymology: 4crab Date: 1599 cross, ill-natured
crabeater
noun see crabeater seal
crabeater seal
noun Date: 1913 an Antarctic hair seal (Lobodon carcinophaga) that feeds on krill and lives and breeds on pack ice — called also crabeater
crabgrass
noun Date: 1743 a grass (especially Digitaria sanguinalis) that has creeping or decumbent stems which root freely at the nodes and that is often a pest in turf or cultivated ...
crabmeat
noun Date: 1876 the edible part of a crab
crabstick
noun Date: 1636 1. a stick, cane, or cudgel of crab apple tree wood 2. a crabbed ill-natured person
crabwise
adverb Date: 1863 1. sideways 2. in a sidling or cautiously indirect manner
crack
I. verb Etymology: Middle English crakken, from Old English cracian; akin to Old High German chrahhōn to resound Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. to make a ...
crack baby
noun Date: 1986 an infant born physiologically addicted to crack as a result of exposure to the drug in the mother's womb
crack cocaine
noun see crack II
crack down
intransitive verb Date: 1939 to take positive regulatory or disciplinary action
crack house
noun Date: 1985 a house or apartment where crack is made, sold, or used
crack the whip
phrasal to adopt or apply an authoritative, tyrannical, or threatening approach or policy (as in demanding harder work from employees)
crack up
verb Date: 1829 transitive verb 1. praise, tout 4
crack wise
phrasal to make a wisecrack
crack-up
noun Date: circa 1926 1. crash, wreck 2. a. a mental collapse ; nervous breakdown
crackajack
noun see crackerjack
crackback
noun Date: 1967 a blind-side block on a defensive back in football by a pass receiver who starts downfield and then cuts back to the middle of the line
crackbrain
noun Date: circa 1570 an erratic person ; crackpot • crackbrained adjective
crackbrained
adjective see crackbrain
crackdown
noun Date: 1935 an act or instance of cracking down
cracked
adjective Date: 1503 1. a. broken (as by a sharp blow) so that the surface is fissured b. broken into coarse particles c. marked by harshness, dissonance, or ...
cracker
noun Date: 15th century 1. chiefly dialect a bragging liar ; boaster 2. something that makes a cracking or snapping noise: as a. firecracker b. the snapping end of a ...
Cracker Jack
trademark — used for a candied popcorn confection
cracker-barrel
adjective Etymology: from the cracker barrel in country stores around which customers lounged for informal conversation Date: 1916 suggestive of the friendly homespun ...
crackerjack
also crackajack noun Etymology: probably alteration of 3crack + jack (man) Date: 1895 a person or thing of marked excellence • crackerjack adjective
crackers
adjective Etymology: probably from cracked + -ers (as in starkers) Date: 1928 crazy
crackhead
noun Date: 1986 one who smokes crack
cracking
I. adjective Date: 1830 very impressive or effective ; great II. adverb Date: 1903 very, extremely III. noun Date: 1868 a process in which relatively heavy ...
crackle
I. verb (crackled; crackling) Etymology: frequentative of 1crack Date: circa 1560 intransitive verb 1. a. to make small sharp sudden repeated noises b. to show ...
crackleware
noun Date: 1881 ceramic ware with a decorative crazed glaze
crackling
noun Date: 1599 1. a series of small sharp cracks or reports 2. the crisp residue left after the rendering of lard from fat or the frying or roasting of the skin (as of ...
cracklingly
adverb see crackle I
crackly
adjective Date: 1732 inclined to crackle ; crisp
cracknel
noun Etymology: Middle English krakenelle Date: 14th century 1. a hard brittle biscuit 2. crackling 2 — usually used in plural
crackpot
noun Date: 1883 one given to eccentric or lunatic notions • crackpot adjective
cracksman
noun Date: circa 1812 burglar; also safecracker
Cracow
geographical name — see krakow
cradle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cradel, from Old English cradol; perhaps akin to Old High German kratto basket, Sanskrit grantha knot Date: before 12th century 1. a. a ...
cradle cap
noun Date: circa 1890 a seborrheic condition in infants that usually affects the scalp and is characterized by greasy gray or dark brown adherent scaly crusts
cradlesong
noun Date: 14th century lullaby
craft
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, strength, skill, from Old English cræft; akin to Old High German kraft strength Date: before 12th century 1. skill in planning, making, or ...
craft union
noun Date: 1922 a labor union with membership limited to workers of the same craft — compare industrial union
crafter
noun see craft II
craftily
adverb see crafty
craftiness
noun see crafty
craftsman
noun Date: 13th century 1. a worker who practices a trade or handicraft 2. one who creates or performs with skill or dexterity especially in the manual arts • ...
craftsmanlike
adjective see craftsman
craftsmanly
adjective see craftsman
craftsmanship
noun see craftsman
craftspeople
noun plural Date: 1953 workers who practice a trade or craft
craftsperson
noun Date: 1920 a craftsman or craftswoman
craftswoman
noun Date: 1886 1. a woman who is an artisan 2. a woman who is skilled in a craft
crafty
adjective (craftier; -est) Date: before 12th century 1. skillful, clever 2. a. adept in the use of subtlety and cunning b. marked by subtlety and guile Synonyms: ...
crag
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, of Celtic origin; akin to Welsh craig rock Date: 14th century 1. a steep rugged rock or cliff 2. archaic a sharp detached fragment of ...
cragged
adjective see crag I
craggily
adverb see craggy
cragginess
noun see craggy
craggy
adjective (craggier; -est) Date: 15th century 1. full of crags 2. rough, rugged • craggily adverb • cragginess noun
cragsman
noun Date: 1816 one who is expert in climbing crags or cliffs
Craigavon
I. biographical name 1st Viscount 1871-1940 James Craig British statesman; 1st prime minister of Northern Ireland (1921-40) II. geographical name district central Northern ...
Craigie
biographical name Sir William Alexander 1867-1957 British philologist & lexicographer

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