Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389)

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cryptographic
adjective Date: 1824 of, relating to, or using cryptography • cryptographically adverb
cryptographically
adverb see cryptographic
cryptography
noun Etymology: New Latin cryptographia, from crypt- + -graphia -graphy Date: 1658 1. secret writing 2. the enciphering and deciphering of messages in secret code or cipher; ...
cryptologic
adjective see cryptology
cryptological
adjective see cryptology
cryptologist
noun see cryptology
cryptology
noun Date: 1935 the scientific study of cryptography and cryptanalysis • cryptological or cryptologic adjective • cryptologist noun
cryptomeria
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from crypt- + Greek meros part — more at merit Date: 1841 an evergreen tree (Cryptomeria japonica) of the bald cypress family that is ...
cryptonym
noun Date: 1876 a secret name
cryptorchid
noun Etymology: New Latin cryptorchid-, cryptorchis, from crypt- + orchid-, orchis testicle, from Greek orchis — more at orchis Date: 1874 one affected with cryptorchidism ...
cryptorchidism
also cryptorchism noun Date: circa 1882 a condition in which one or both testes fail to descend normally
cryptorchism
noun see cryptorchidism
cryptosporidiosis
noun (plural cryptosporidioses) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1982 infection with or disease caused by cryptosporidia
cryptosporidium
noun (plural cryptosporidia) Etymology: New Latin, from crypt- + spora spore + -idium Date: 1982 any of a genus (Cryptosporidium of the order Coccidia) of protozoans parasitic ...
cryptosystem
noun Date: 1955 a method for encoding and decoding messages
cryptozoological
adjective see cryptozoology
cryptozoologist
noun see cryptozoology
cryptozoology
noun Date: 1969 the study of and search for animals and especially legendary animals (as Sasquatch) usually in order to evaluate the possibility of their existence • ...
cryst
abbreviation crystalline; crystallized
Crystal
geographical name city SE Minnesota N of Minneapolis population 22,698
crystal
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cristal, from Anglo-French, from Latin crystallum, from Greek krystallos — more at crust Date: 13th century 1. quartz that is transparent ...
crystal ball
noun Date: 1848 1. a sphere especially of quartz crystal traditionally used by fortune-tellers 2. a means or method of predicting future events
crystal clear
adjective Date: 1815 perfectly or transparently clear
crystal gazer
noun see crystal gazing
crystal gazing
noun Date: 1889 1. the art or practice of concentrating on a glass or crystal globe with the aim of inducing a psychic state in which divination can be performed 2. the ...
Crystal Lake
geographical name city N Illinois population 38,000
crystal meth
noun Etymology: meth short for methamphetamine Date: 1984 crystal 7
crystal pleat
noun Date: 1976 any of a series of narrow sharply pressed pleats all turned in one direction • crystal pleated adjective
crystal pleated
adjective see crystal pleat
crystal violet
noun Date: circa 1893 a triphenylmethane dye found in gentian violet
crystalize
verb see crystallize
crystall-
or crystallo- combining form Etymology: Greek krystallos crystal
crystalline
adjective Etymology: Middle English cristallin, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin crystallinus, from Greek krystallinos, from krystallos Date: 15th century 1. ...
crystalline lens
noun Date: 1794 the lens of the eye in vertebrates
crystallinity
noun see crystalline
crystallise
British variant of crystallize
crystallite
noun Etymology: German Kristallit, from Greek krystallos Date: 1805 1. a. a minute mineral form (as in glassy volcanic rocks) that marks the beginning of crystallization ...
crystallizable
adjective see crystallize
crystallization
noun see crystallize
crystallize
also crystalize verb (-lized; -lizing) Date: 1598 transitive verb 1. to cause to form crystals or assume crystalline form 2. to cause to take a definite form 3. to ...
crystallizer
noun see crystallize
crystallo-
combining form see crystall-
crystallographer
noun see crystallography
crystallographic
adjective Date: 1804 of or relating to crystals or crystallography • crystallographically adverb
crystallographically
adverb see crystallographic
crystallography
noun Date: 1802 a science that deals with the forms and structures of crystals • crystallographer noun
crystalloid
noun Date: 1861 a substance that forms a true solution and is capable of being crystallized • crystalloid or crystalloidal adjective
crystalloidal
adjective see crystalloid
cs
abbreviation 1. case; cases 2. census 3. consciousness 4. consul
CS
I. noun Etymology: Ben B. Corson died 1987 and Roger W. Staughton died 1957 American chemists Date: 1960 a potent tear gas C10H5ClN2 used especially for riot control II. ...
Cs
I. abbreviation cirrostratus II. symbol cesium
CSA
abbreviation Confederate States of America
csc
abbreviation cosecant
CSC
abbreviation Civil Service Commission
CSF
abbreviation cerebrospinal fluid
CSM
abbreviation command sergeant major
CST
abbreviation central standard time
ct
abbreviation 1. carat 2. cent 3. count 4. county 5. court
CT
abbreviation 1. central time 2. certificated teacher; certified teacher 3. computed tomography; computerized tomography 4. Connecticut
CT scan
noun Etymology: computerized tomography Date: 1974 CAT scan • CT scanner noun
CT scanner
noun see CT scan
ctenoid
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek ktenoeidēs, from kten-, kteis comb — more at pectinate Date: 1872 having the margin toothed ; also ...
ctenophoran
noun or adjective see ctenophore
ctenophore
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek kten-, kteis + pherein to carry — more at bear Date: circa 1882 any of a phylum (Ctenophora) of marine animals superficially ...
Ctesiphon
geographical name ancient city central Iraq on the Tigris opposite Seleucia capital of Parthia & of later Sassanid empire
ctf
abbreviation certificate
ctn
abbreviation 1. carton 2. cotangent
ctr
abbreviation 1. center 2. counter
cu
abbreviation 1. cubic 2. cumulative
CU
abbreviation close-up
Cu
I. abbreviation cumulus II. symbol Etymology: Latin cuprum copper
cuadrilla
noun Etymology: Spanish, diminutive of cuadra square, from Latin quadra Date: 1893 the team assisting the matador in the bullring
Cuanza
or Kwanza geographical name river 600 miles (965 kilometers) SW Africa in central Angola flowing NW into the Atlantic
cub
noun Etymology: probably akin to Middle English cobbe leader of a group, head — more at cob Date: 1530 1. a. a young carnivorous mammal (as a bear, fox, or lion) b. a ...
Cub Scout
noun Date: circa 1935 a member of the scouting program of the Boy Scouts for boys in the first through fifth grades in school
Cuba
geographical name 1. island in the West Indies N of Caribbean Sea area 41,620 square miles (107,800 square kilometers) 2. country largely coextensive with island; a republic ...
Cuba libre
noun Etymology: Spanish, literally, free Cuba Date: 1937 a cocktail made with rum, lime juice, and cola
cubage
noun Date: 1840 cubic content, volume, or displacement
Cuban
adjective or noun see Cuba
Cuban heel
noun Etymology: Cuba, West Indies Date: 1908 a broad medium-high heel with a moderately curved back
Cuban sandwich
noun Date: 1950 a usually grilled and pressed sandwich in Cuban-American cuisine served on a long split roll and typically containing roasted meats, cheese, and pickles; ...
Cubango
geographical name — see Okavango
cubby
noun (plural cubbies) Etymology: obsolete English cub pen, from Dutch kub fish basket; akin to Old English cofa den Date: circa 1859 cubbyhole
cubbyhole
noun Date: circa 1842 a small snug place (as for hiding or storage); also a cramped space
cube
I. noun Etymology: Latin cubus, from Greek kybos die, cube Date: 1551 1. a. the regular solid of six equal square sides — see volume table b. something shaped like a ...
cubé
noun see cube IV
cube root
noun Date: 1679 a number whose cube is a given number
cube steak
noun Date: 1930 a thin slice of beef that has been cubed
cubeb
noun Etymology: Middle English quibibe, cubebe, from Anglo-French quibibe, cubibe, from Medieval Latin cubeba, from dialect Arabic kubāba Date: 14th century the dried unripe ...
cuber
noun see cube III
cubic
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. having the form of a cube ; cubical 2. a. relating to the cube considered as a crystal form b. isometric 1 3. a. ...
cubic equation
noun Date: circa 1751 a polynomial equation in which the highest sum of exponents of variables in any term is three
cubic measure
noun Date: 1660 a unit (as cubic inch or cubic centimeter) for measuring volume — see metric system table, weight table
cubic zirconia
also cubic zirconium noun Date: 1979 a synthetic gemstone of zirconia resembling a diamond
cubic zirconium
noun see cubic zirconia
cubical
adjective Date: 15th century 1. cubic; especially shaped like a cube 2. relating to volume • cubically adverb
cubically
adverb see cubical
cubicle
noun Etymology: Latin cubiculum, from cubare to lie, recline Date: 15th century 1. a sleeping compartment partitioned off from a large room 2. a. a small partitioned ...
cubism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1911 a style of art that stresses abstract structure at the expense of other pictorial elements especially by displaying several aspects of ...
cubist
noun or adjective see cubism
cubistic
adjective see cubism
cubit
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin cubitum elbow, cubit Date: 14th century any of various ancient units of length based on the length of the forearm from the elbow to ...
cuboid
I. adjective Date: circa 1828 1. approximately cubical in shape 2. relating to or being the cuboid II. noun Date: 1839 the outermost bone in the distal row of tarsal ...
cuboidal
adjective Date: 1803 1. somewhat cubical 2. composed of nearly cubical elements
cucking stool
noun Etymology: Middle English cucking stol, literally, defecating chair Date: 12th century a chair formerly used for punishing offenders (as dishonest tradesmen) by public ...
cuckold
noun Etymology: Middle English cokewold Date: 13th century a man whose wife is unfaithful • cuckold transitive verb
cuckoldry
noun Date: 1529 1. the practice of making cuckolds 2. the state of being a cuckold
cuckoo
I. noun (plural cuckoos) Etymology: Middle English cuccu, of imitative origin Date: 13th century 1. a largely grayish-brown European bird (Cuculus canorus) that is a parasite ...
cuckoo clock
noun Date: 1789 a wall or shelf clock that announces the hours by sounds resembling a cuckoo's call
cuckoo spit
noun Date: 1592 1. a frothy secretion exuded on plants by the nymphs of spittle insects 2. spittlebug
cuckooflower
noun Date: 1578 1. a bitter cress (Cardamine pratensis) of Eurasia and North America 2. ragged robin
cuckoopint
noun Etymology: Middle English cuccupintel, from cuccu + pintel pintle Date: 1551 a European arum (Arum maculatum) with erect spathe and short purple spadix
cucullate
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin cucullatus, from Latin cucullus hood Date: 1794 having the shape of a hood
cucumber
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French cucumbre, from Latin cucumer-, cucumis Date: 14th century the fruit of a vine (Cucumis sativus) of the gourd family ...
cucumber mosaic
noun Date: 1916 a plant disease especially of cucumbers that is caused by a single-stranded RNA virus (species Cucumber mosaic virus of the genus Cucumovirus, family ...
cucumber tree
noun Date: circa 1782 a magnolia (Magnolia acuminata) of the eastern United States having fruit resembling a small cucumber
cucurbit
noun Etymology: Middle English cucurbite, from Anglo-French, from Latin cucurbita gourd Date: 14th century 1. a vessel or flask for distillation used with or forming part of ...
Cúcuta
geographical name city N Colombia near Venezuela border population 450,300
cud
noun Etymology: Middle English cudde, from Old English cwudu; akin to Old High German kuti glue, Sanskrit jatu gum Date: before 12th century 1. food brought up into the mouth ...
Cudahy
geographical name city SW California NW of Downey population 24,208
cudbear
noun Etymology: irregular from Dr. Cuthbert Gordon, 18th century Scottish chemist Date: 1764 a reddish coloring matter from lichens
cuddie
noun see cuddy II
cuddle
I. verb (cuddled; cuddling) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1520 transitive verb to hold close for warmth or comfort or in affection intransitive verb to lie close or ...
cuddler
noun see cuddle I
cuddlesome
adjective Date: 1876 cuddly
cuddly
adjective (cuddlier; -est) Date: 1863 fit for or inviting cuddling
cuddy
I. noun (plural cuddies) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1660 1. a usually small cabin or shelter (as on a sailboat) 2. a small room or cupboard II. noun or cuddie (plural ...
cudgel
I. noun Etymology: Middle English kuggel, from Old English cycgel; perhaps akin to Middle High German kugele ball Date: before 12th century a short heavy club II. transitive ...
cudgel one's brains
phrasal to think hard (as for a solution to a problem)
cudweed
noun Date: 1548 any of several composite plants (as of the genus Gnaphalium) with silky or woolly foliage
Cudworth
biographical name Ralph 1617-1688 English philosopher
cue
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cu half a farthing (spelled form of q, abbreviation for Latin quadrans quarter of an as) Date: circa 1755 the letter q II. noun Etymology: ...
cue ball
noun Date: 1881 the ball a player strikes with the cue in billiards and pool
Cuenca
geographical name 1. city S Ecuador population 194,981 2. province E central Spain area 6587 square miles (17,060 square kilometers), population 205,198 3. commune, its ...
Cuernavaca
geographical name city S central Mexico S of Mexico City capital of Morelos population 281,752
cuesta
noun Etymology: Spanish, from Latin costa side, rib — more at coast Date: 1818 a hill or ridge with a steep face on one side and a gentle slope on the other
cuff
I. noun Etymology: Middle English coffe, cuffe mitten Date: 1522 1. something (as a part of a sleeve or glove) encircling the wrist 2. the turned-back hem of a trouser ...
cuff link
noun Date: 1897 a usually ornamental device consisting of two parts joined by a shank, chain, or bar for passing through buttonholes to fasten shirt cuffs — usually used in ...
cuffless
adjective see cuff I
cui bono
noun Etymology: Latin, to whose advantage? Date: 1604 1. a principle that probable responsibility for an act or event lies with one having something to gain 2. usefulness ...
Cuijp
biographical name see Cuyp
cuirass
noun Etymology: Middle English curas, from Middle French cuirasse, probably from Old Occitan coirassa, from Late Latin coreacea, feminine of coreaceus leathern, from Latin corium ...
cuirassed
adjective see cuirass
cuirassier
noun Date: 1625 a mounted soldier wearing a cuirass
Cuisenaire rod
noun Etymology: from Cuisenaire, a trademark Date: 1954 any of a set of colored rods usually of 1 centimeter cross section and of 10 lengths from 1 to 10 centimeters that are ...
cuish
noun see cuisse
cuisine
noun Etymology: French, literally, kitchen, from Old French, from Late Latin coquina — more at kitchen Date: 1786 manner of preparing food ; style of cooking; also the food ...
cuisse
also cuish noun Etymology: Middle English cusseis, plural, from Anglo-French quisez, plural of quissel, from quisse thigh, from Latin coxa hip — more at coxa Date: 15th ...
cujus regio, ejus religio
foreign term Etymology: Latin whose region, his or her religion ; subjects are to accept the religion of their ruler
cuke
noun Date: 1903 cucumber
cul-de-sac
noun (plural culs-de-sac; also cul-de-sacs) Etymology: French, literally, bottom of the bag Date: 1738 1. a blind diverticulum or pouch 2. a street or passage closed at one ...
culch
noun see cultch
culet
noun Etymology: French, from diminutive of cul backside, from Latin culus; akin to Old Irish cúl back Date: 1678 1. the small flat facet at the bottom of a brilliant parallel ...
culex
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, gnat; akin to Old Irish cuil fly Date: 15th century any of a large cosmopolitan genus (Culex) of mosquitoes that includes the common ...
Culiacán
geographical name 1. river 175 miles (282 kilometers) NW Mexico flowing SW into the Pacific at mouth of Gulf of California 2. city NW Mexico on the Culiacán capital of ...
culinarian
noun Date: 1949 cook, chef
culinarily
adverb see culinary
culinary
adjective Etymology: Latin culinarius, from culina kitchen — more at kiln Date: 1638 of or relating to the kitchen or cookery • culinarily adverb
cull
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French culier, coillir, from Latin colligere to bind together — more at collect Date: 13th century 1. to select ...
cullender
archaic variant of colander
culler
noun see cull I
cullet
noun Etymology: perhaps from French cueillette act of gathering, from Latin collecta, from feminine of collectus, past participle of colligere Date: 1817 broken or refuse ...
cullion
noun Etymology: Middle English coillon testicle, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *coleon-, coleo, from Latin coleus scrotum Date: 1575 archaic a mean or base fellow
Culloden Moor
geographical name moorland N Scotland in N Highland region E of Inverness
cully
I. noun (plural cullies) Etymology: perhaps alteration of cullion Date: 1664 one easily tricked or imposed on ; dupe II. transitive verb (cullied; cullying) Date: 1676 ...
culm
I. noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century refuse coal screenings ; slack II. noun Etymology: Latin culmus stalk — more at haulm Date: circa 1657 a ...
culminant
adjective Date: 1605 1. being at greatest altitude or on the meridian 2. fully developed
culminate
verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Medieval Latin culminatus, past participle of culminare, from Late Latin, to crown, from Latin culmin-, culmen top — more at hill Date: 1647 ...
culmination
noun Date: 1633 1. the action of culminating 2. culminating position ; climax Synonyms: see summit
culotte
noun Etymology: French, breeches, from diminutive of cul backside — more at culet Date: 1911 a divided skirt; also a garment having a divided skirt — often used in plural
culpability
noun see culpable
culpable
adjective Etymology: Middle English coupable, from Anglo-French cupable, culpable, from Latin culpabilis, from culpare to blame, from culpa guilt Date: 14th century 1. archaic ...
culpableness
noun see culpable
culpably
adverb see culpable
Culpeper
biographical name variant of Colepeper
culprit
noun Etymology: Anglo-French cul. (abbreviation of culpable guilty) + prest, prit ready (i.e., to prove it), from Latin praestus — more at presto Date: 1678 1. one accused ...
cult
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French & Latin; French culte, from Latin cultus care, adoration, from colere to cultivate — more at wheel Date: 1617 1. formal ...
cultch
also culch noun Etymology: perhaps from a French dialect form of French couche couch Date: 1667 1. material (as oyster shells) laid down on oyster grounds to furnish points of ...
cultic
adjective see cult
cultigen
noun Etymology: cultivated + -gen Date: 1924 a cultivated or domestic organism (as the kidney bean Phaseolus vulgaris, the dog Canis familiaris, or corn Zea mays) which has ...
cultish
adjective see cult
cultishly
adverb see cult
cultishness
noun see cult
cultism
noun see cult
cultist
noun see cult
cultivability
noun see cultivable
cultivable
adjective Date: 1682 capable of being cultivated • cultivability noun
cultivar
noun Etymology: cultivated + variety Date: 1923 an organism and especially one of an agricultural or horticultural variety or strain originating and persistent under ...
cultivatable
adjective see cultivate
cultivate
transitive verb (-vated; -vating) Etymology: Medieval Latin cultivatus, past participle of cultivare, from cultivus cultivable, from Latin cultus, past participle of colere ...
cultivated
adjective Date: 1665 refined, educated
cultivation
noun Date: circa 1716 1. culture, refinement 2. the act or art of cultivating or tilling
cultivator
noun Date: 1665 one that cultivates; especially an implement for loosening the soil while crops are growing
cultlike
adjective see cult
cultural
adjective Date: circa 1864 1. of or relating to culture or culturing 2. concerned with the fostering of plant or animal growth • culturally adverb
cultural anthropologist
noun see cultural anthropology
cultural anthropology
noun Date: 1933 anthropology that deals with human culture especially with respect to social structure, language, law, politics, religion, magic, art, and technology — ...
culturally
adverb see cultural
culturati
noun plural Etymology: 1culture + -ati (as in literati) Date: 1964 people intensely interested in cultural affairs
culture
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, cultivated land, cultivation, from Anglo-French, from Latin cultura, from cultus, past participle Date: 15th century 1. cultivation, ...
culture shock
noun Date: 1940 a sense of confusion and uncertainty sometimes with feelings of anxiety that may affect people exposed to an alien culture or environment without adequate ...
cultured
adjective Date: circa 1746 1. cultivated 2. produced under artificial conditions
cultus
noun Etymology: Latin, adoration Date: 1640 cult
culver
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English culfer, from Vulgar Latin *columbra, from Latin columbula, diminutive of Latin columba dove — more at columbine Date: before ...
Culver City
geographical name city SW California population 38,816
culverin
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French couleuvrine, from couleuvre snake, from Latin colubra Date: 15th century an early firearm: a. a rude musket b. a long ...
culvert
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1773 1. a transverse drain 2. a conduit for a culvert 3. a bridge over a culvert
cum
I. conjunction Etymology: Latin, with; akin to Latin com- — more at co- Date: circa 1869 along with being ; and — used to form usually hyphenated phrases II. ...
cum grano salis
foreign term Etymology: Latin with a grain of salt
cum laude
adverb or adjective Etymology: New Latin, with praise Date: 1893 with distinction — compare magna cum laude, summa cum laude
Cumae
geographical name ancient town S Italy on Tyrrhenian coast W of modern Naples • Cumaean adjective
Cumaean
adjective see Cumae
Cumaná
geographical name city & port NE Venezuela on the Caribbean NE of Barcelona population 212,492
Cumb
abbreviation Cumbria
cumber
I. transitive verb (cumbered; cumbering) Etymology: Middle English combren, short for acombren, from Anglo-French acumbrer, encumbrer — more at encumber Date: 14th century ...
cumberbund
noun see cummerbund
Cumberland
geographical name 1. river 687 miles (1106 kilometers) S Kentucky & N Tennessee flowing W into Ohio River 2. town NE Rhode Island population 31,840 3. former county NW ...
Cumberland Caverns
geographical name caverns central Tennessee SE of McMinnville
Cumberland Falls
geographical name falls SE Kentucky in upper course of Cumberland River
Cumberland Gap
geographical name mountain pass 1640 feet (500 meters) NE Tennessee through a ridge of the Cumberland Plateau SE of Middlesboro, Kentucky
Cumberland Plateau
geographical name mountain region E United States, part of the S Appalachian Mountains W of Tennessee River extending from S West Virginia to NE Alabama
cumbersome
adjective Date: 1535 1. dialect burdensome, troublesome 2. unwieldy because of heaviness and bulk 3. slow-moving ; ponderous Synonyms: see heavy • cumbersomely adverb ...
cumbersomely
adverb see cumbersome
cumbersomeness
noun see cumbersome
Cumbre, La
geographical name — see Uspallata Pass
Cumbria
geographical name county NW England including former counties of Cumberland & Westmorland capital Carlisle area 2724 square miles (7055 square kilometers), population 486,900 ...
Cumbrian
adjective or noun see Cumbria
Cumbrian Mountains
geographical name mountains NW England chiefly in Cumbria & Lancashire — see Scafell Pike
cumbrous
adjective Date: 15th century cumbersome Synonyms: see heavy • cumbrously adverb • cumbrousness noun
cumbrously
adverb see cumbrous
cumbrousness
noun see cumbrous
cumin
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cymen, from Latin cuminum, from Greek kyminon, of Semitic origin; akin to Akkadian kamūnu cumin Date: before 12th century a ...
cummerbund
also cumberbund noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu kamarband, from Persian, from kamar waist + band band Date: 1616 a broad waistband usually worn in place of a vest with men's ...
Cummings
biographical name Edward Estlin 1894-1962 known as e. e. cummings American poet
cumshaw
noun Etymology: Chinese (Xiamen) kam siā grateful thanks Date: 1839 present, gratuity; also bribe, payoff
cumul-
or cumuli- or cumulo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Latin cumulus cumulus and
cumulate
verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin cumulatus, past participle of cumulare, from cumulus mass Date: 1534 transitive verb 1. to gather or pile in a heap 2. to combine ...
cumulation
noun see cumulate
cumulative
adjective Date: 1605 1. a. made up of accumulated parts b. increasing by successive additions 2. tending to prove the same point 3. a. taking effect upon ...
cumulative distribution function
noun Date: 1950 a function that gives the probability that a random variable is less than or equal to the independent variable of the function
cumulatively
adverb see cumulative
cumulativeness
noun see cumulative
cumuli-
combining form see cumul-
cumuliform
adjective Date: 1885 of the form of a cumulus
cumulo-
combining form see cumul-
cumulonimbus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1887 cumulus cloud having a low base and often spread out in the shape of an anvil extending to great heights — see cloud illustration
cumulous
adjective Date: 1815 resembling cumulus
cumulus
noun (plural cumuli) Etymology: Latin Date: 1659 1. heap, accumulation 2. [New Latin, from Latin] a dense puffy cloud form having a flat base and rounded outlines often ...
Cunaxa
geographical name town in ancient Babylonia NW of Babylon
cunctation
noun Etymology: Latin cunctation-, cunctatio, from cunctari to hesitate; akin to Sanskrit śaṅkate he wavers, Old English hangian to hang Date: 1585 delay • cunctative ...
cunctative
adjective see cunctation
cuneate
adjective Etymology: Latin cuneatus, from cuneus wedge Date: 1658 narrowly triangular with the acute angle toward the base — see leaf illustration
cuneiform
I. adjective Etymology: probably from French cunéiforme, from Middle French, from Latin cuneus + Middle French -iforme -iform Date: 1677 1. having the shape of a wedge 2. ...
Cunene
or Kunene geographical name river 700 miles (1126 kilometers) SW Africa in SW Angola flowing S & W into the Atlantic
Cunha
biographical name Tristão da 1460-1540 Portuguese navigator & explorer
cunner
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1602 either of two wrasses: a. a European wrasse (Crenilabrus melops) b. a wrasse (Tautogolabrus adspersus) common along the ...
cunnilinctus
noun see cunnilingus
cunnilingus
also cunnilinctus noun Etymology: cunnilingus, New Latin, from Latin, one who licks the vulva, from cunnus vulva + lingere to lick; cunnilinctus, New Latin, from Latin cunnus + ...
cunning
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from present participle of can know Date: 14th century 1. dexterous or crafty in the use of special resources (as skill or knowledge) ...
Cunningham
I. biographical name Allan 1784-1842 Scottish author II. biographical name Merce 1919- American choreographer
cunningly
adverb see cunning I
cunningness
noun see cunning I
cunt
noun Etymology: Middle English cunte; akin to Middle Low German kunte female pudenda Date: 14th century 1. usually obscene the female genital organs; also sexual intercourse ...
cup
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cuppe, from Old English, from Late Latin cuppa cup, alteration of Latin cupa tub — more at hive Date: before 12th century 1. an open ...
cup fungus
noun Date: circa 1905 any of an order (Pezizales) of mostly saprophytic ascomycetous fungi with a fleshy or horny apothecium that is often colored and typically shaped like a ...

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