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Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389)

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cutaway
I. adjective Date: 1841 having or showing parts cut away II. noun Date: 1849 1. a coat with skirts tapering from the front waistline to form tails at the back 2. a. ...
cutback
noun Date: 1897 1. something cut back 2. reduction
cutch
noun Etymology: modification of Malay kachu Date: 1759 catechu a
cute
I. adjective (cuter; cutest) Etymology: short for acute Date: circa 1731 1. a. clever or shrewd often in an underhanded manner b. impertinent, smart-alecky
cutely
adverb see cute I
cuteness
noun see cute I
cutesiness
noun see cutesy
cutesy
adjective (cutesier; -est) Etymology: cute + -sy (as in folksy) Date: 1914 self-consciously or excessively cute • cutesiness noun
cutey
noun see cutie
Cuthbert
biographical name Saint 635?-687 English monk
cuticle
noun Etymology: Latin cuticula, diminutive of cutis skin — more at hide Date: 1615 1. an outer covering layer: as a. an external envelope (as of an insect) secreted ...
cuticular
adjective see cuticle
cutie
or cutey noun (plural cuties or cuteys) Etymology: cute + -ie Date: 1908 an attractive person; especially a pretty girl
cutie-pie
noun Date: 1956 a cute person ; sweetheart
cutin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Latin cutis Date: circa 1872 an insoluble mixture containing waxes, fatty acids, soaps, and resinous material that ...
cutinized
adjective Date: 1901 infiltrated with cutin
cutis
noun (plural cutes or cutises) Etymology: Latin Date: 1603 dermis
cutlass
noun Etymology: Middle French coutelas, augmentative of coutel knife, from Latin cultellus, diminutive of culter knife, plowshare Date: 1584 1. a short curving sword formerly ...
cutler
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French cuteler, from Late Latin cultellarius, from Latin cultellus Date: 14th century one who makes, deals in, or repairs cutlery
cutlery
noun Date: 15th century 1. the business of a cutler 2. edged or cutting tools; specifically implements for cutting and eating food
cutlet
noun Etymology: French côtelette, from Old French costelette, diminutive of coste rib, side, from Latin costa — more at coast Date: 1682 1. a small slice of meat 2. a ...
cutline
noun Date: 1943 caption, legend
cutoff
noun Date: 1741 1. the act or action of cutting off 2. a. the new and relatively short channel formed when a stream cuts through the neck of an oxbow b. shortcut 1 c. ...
cutoff man
noun Date: 1967 a player in baseball who relays a ball from an outfielder to the infield
cutout
noun Date: 1851 1. something cut out or off from something else; also the space or hole left after cutting 2. one that cuts out 3. an intermediary in a clandestine ...
cutover
adjective Date: 1899 having most of the salable timber cut down
cutpurse
noun Date: 14th century pickpocket
cuttable
adjective Date: 15th century capable of being cut ; ready for cutting
Cuttack
geographical name city E India in Orissa population 440,295
cutter
noun Date: 15th century 1. one that cuts: a. one whose work is cutting or involves cutting b. (1) an instrument, machine, machine part, or tool that cuts (2) a ...
cutthroat
I. noun Date: 1535 1. killer, murderer 2. a cruel unprincipled person II. adjective Date: 1565 1. murderous, cruel 2. marked by unprincipled practices ; ruthless ...
cutthroat contract
noun Date: circa 1944 contract bridge in which partnerships are determined by the bidding
cutthroat trout
noun Date: circa 1891 a large spotted trout (Oncorhynchus clarki syn. Salmo clarki) chiefly of northwestern North America that has reddish streaks on the integument of the ...
cutting
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. something cut or cut off or out: as a. a plant section originating from stem, leaf, or root and capable of developing into a new plant b. ...
cutting board
noun Date: 1639 a board on which something (as food or cloth) is placed for cutting
cutting edge
noun Date: 1804 1. a sharp effect or quality 2. the foremost part or place ; vanguard • cutting-edge adjective
cutting horse
noun Date: 1881 an agile saddle horse trained to separate individual animals from a cattle herd
cutting room
noun Date: 1918 a room where film or videotape is edited — often used attributively in cutting-room floor to describe something removed or discarded in or as if in editing a ...
cutting-edge
adjective see cutting edge
cuttingly
adverb see cutting II
cuttlebone
noun Etymology: Middle English cotul cuttlefish (from Old English cudele) + English bone Date: 1547 the shell of a cuttlefish that is sometimes used for polishing powder or ...
cuttlefish
noun Etymology: Middle English cotul + English fish Date: circa 1828 any of various marine cephalopod mollusks (order Sepioidea, especially genus Sepia) having eight short ...
cutty sark
noun Etymology: English dialect cutty short + sark Date: 1779 chiefly Scottish a short garment; especially a woman's short undergarment
cutty stool
noun Date: 1820 1. chiefly Scottish a low stool 2. a seat in a Scottish church where offenders formerly sat for public rebuke
cutup
noun Date: 1843 a person who clowns or acts boisterously
cutwater
noun Date: 1644 the forepart of a ship's stem
cutwork
noun Date: 15th century embroidery usually on linen in which a design is outlined in buttonhole stitch and the enclosed material cut away
cutworm
noun Date: 1816 any of various smooth-bodied chiefly nocturnal noctuid moth caterpillars which often feed on young plant stems near ground level
cuvée
also cuvee noun Etymology: French, from cuve Date: 1833 1. bulk wine; especially wine in casks or vats so blended as to ensure uniformity and marketability 2. a blend of ...
cuvee
noun see cuvée
cuvette
noun Etymology: French, diminutive of cuve tub, from Latin cupa — more at hive Date: circa 1909 a small often transparent laboratory vessel (as a tube)
Cuvier
biographical name Baron Georges 1769-1832 originally Jean-Léopold-Nicolas-Frédéric Cuvier French naturalist
Cuxhaven
geographical name city & port NW Germany on North Sea at mouth of the Elbe population 56,328
Cuyahoga
geographical name river 100 miles (161 kilometers) NE Ohio flowing into Lake Erie at Cleveland
Cuyahoga Falls
geographical name city NE Ohio N of Akron population 49,374
Cuyp
or Cuijp biographical name Aelbert Jacobsz 1620-1691 Dutch painter
Cuyuni
geographical name river 350 miles (563 kilometers) N South America rising in E Venezuela & flowing E into the Essequibo in N Guyana
Cuzco
or Cusco geographical name city S Peru population 316,804
cv
abbreviation 1. convertible 2. cultivar
CV
abbreviation 1. cardiovascular 2. curriculum vitae
CVA
abbreviation 1. cerebrovascular accident 2. Columbia Valley Authority
CVS
abbreviation chorionic villus sampling
cw
abbreviation clockwise
CW
abbreviation 1. chemical warfare; chemical weapon 2. chief warrant officer
cwm
noun Etymology: Welsh, valley Date: 1853 chiefly British cirque 3
CWO
abbreviation 1. cash with order 2. chief warrant officer
cwt
abbreviation hundredweight
CY
abbreviation calendar year
cy pres
I. noun Etymology: Anglo-French, so near, as near (as may be) Date: 1802 a rule providing for the interpretation of instruments in equity as nearly as possible in conformity ...
cy pres doctrine
noun see cy pres I
cyan
noun Etymology: Greek kyanos Date: circa 1889 a greenish-blue color — used in photography and color printing of one of the primary colors
cyan-
or cyano- combining form Etymology: German, from Greek kyan-, kyano-, from kyanos dark blue enamel 1. dark blue ; blue 2. cyanogen 3. cyanide
cyanamide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1838 1. a caustic acidic compound CH2N2 2. calcium cyanamide
cyanate
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1825 a salt (as ammonium cyanate) or ester of cyanic acid
cyanic acid
noun Date: 1825 a strong acid HOCN used to prepare cyanates
cyanide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1826 1. a compound of cyanogen with a more electropositive element or group: as a. potassium cyanide b. sodium ...
cyanine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1872 any of various dyes used especially to sensitize photographic film to light from the green, yellow, red, ...
cyano
adjective Etymology: cyan- Date: 1929 relating to or containing the cyanogen group
cyano-
combining form see cyan-
cyanoacrylate
noun Date: 1963 any of several liquid acrylate monomers that readily polymerize as anions and are used as adhesives in industry and in closing wounds in surgery
cyanobacterium
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1974 any of a major group (Cyanobacteria) of photosynthetic bacteria that have two photosystems, produce molecular oxygen, and use water as an ...
cyanocobalamin
also cyanocobalamine noun Etymology: cyan- + cobalt + vitamin Date: 1950 vitamin B12 1
cyanocobalamine
noun see cyanocobalamin
cyanogen
noun Etymology: French cyanogène, from cyan- + gène -gen Date: 1816 1. a monovalent group –CN present in cyanides 2. a colorless flammable poisonous gas (CN)2
cyanogenesis
noun see cyanogenetic
cyanogenetic
or cyanogenic adjective Date: 1902 capable of producing cyanide (as hydrogen cyanide) • cyanogenesis noun
cyanogenic
adjective see cyanogenetic
cyanohydrin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from cyan- + hydr- + 1-in Date: 1925 any of various compounds containing both cyano and hydroxyl groups
cyanosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek kyanōsis dark blue color, from kyanos Date: 1834 a bluish or purplish discoloration (as of skin) due to deficient oxygenation of the ...
cyanotic
adjective see cyanosis
cyanuric acid
noun Etymology: cyan- + urea Date: 1838 a crystalline weak acid C3N3(OH)3 that yields cyanic acid when heated
Cybele
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Kybelē Date: 1576 a nature goddess of the ancient peoples of Asia Minor
cyber
adjective Etymology: cyber- Date: 1991 of, relating to, or involving computers or computer networks (as the Internet)
cyber-
combining form Etymology: cybernetic computer ; computer network
cybercafe
noun Date: 1994 a café or coffee shop providing computers for access to the Internet
cybercitizen
noun Date: 1994 netizen
cybernated
adjective see cybernation
cybernation
noun Etymology: cybernetics + -ation Date: 1962 the automatic control of a process or operation (as in manufacturing) by means of computers • cybernated adjective
cybernaut
noun Etymology: cyber- + -naut (as in astronaut) Date: 1989 netizen
cybernetic
adjective see cybernetics
cybernetical
adjective see cybernetics
cybernetically
adverb see cybernetics
cybernetician
noun Date: 1951 a specialist in cybernetics
cyberneticist
noun Date: 1948 cybernetician
cybernetics
noun plural but singular in construction Etymology: Greek kybernētēs pilot, governor (from kybernan to steer, govern) + English -ics Date: 1948 the science of communication ...
cyberporn
noun Date: 1992 pornography accessible online especially via the Internet
cyberpunk
noun Date: 1983 1. science fiction dealing with future urban societies dominated by computer technology 2. an opportunistic computer hacker
cybersex
noun Date: 1991 1. online sex-oriented conversations and exchanges 2. sex-oriented material available on a computer (as on the Internet and on CD-ROMs)
cyberspace
noun Date: 1982 the online world of computer networks and especially the Internet
cyberspeak
noun Date: 1991 jargon relating to or used in online communications
cybersurfer
noun Date: 1993 one who surfs the Internet
cyborg
noun Etymology: cybernetic + organism Date: 1960 a bionic human
cycad
noun Etymology: New Latin Cycad-, Cycas, genus name, from Greek kykas, manuscript variant of koïkas, accusative plural of koïx, a kind of palm Date: 1845 any of an order ...
cycadeoid
noun Etymology: New Latin Cycadeoidales, group name, ultimately from Cycad-, Cycas Date: 1860 any of a division (Cycadeoidophyta syn. Bennettitophyta) of extinct Jurassic to ...
cycadophyte
noun Etymology: ultimately from New Latin Cycad-, Cycas + Greek phyton plant — more at -phyte Date: 1911 any of a division (Cycadophyta) of usually unbranched mostly ...
cycasin
noun Etymology: New Latin Cycas cycad + International Scientific Vocabulary 1-in Date: circa 1965 a glucoside C8H16N2O7 that occurs in cycads and results in toxic and ...
cycl-
or cyclo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek kykl-, kyklo-, from kyklos 1. circle 2. cyclic
Cyclades
or Modern Greek Kikládhes geographical name islands Greece in the S Aegean area 993 square miles (2572 square kilometers), population 95,083 • Cycladic adjective
Cycladic
adjective see Cyclades
cyclamate
noun Etymology: cyclohexyl-sulfamate Date: 1954 an artificially prepared salt of sodium or calcium used especially formerly as a sweetener
cyclamen
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek kyklaminos Date: circa 1550 any of a genus (Cyclamen) of Old World plants of the primrose family having showy nodding flowers
cyclase
noun Etymology: cycl- + -ase Date: 1946 an enzyme (as adenylate cyclase) that catalyzes cyclization of a compound
cyclazocine
noun Etymology: cycl- + azocine (C7H7N), probably from az- + octa- + 2-ine Date: 1966 an analgesic drug C18H25NO that inhibits the effect of morphine and related addictive ...
cycle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cicle, from Late Latin cyclus, from Greek kyklos circle, wheel, cycle — more at wheel Date: 14th century 1. an interval of time during ...
cycler
noun see cycle II
cycleway
noun Date: 1899 British bikeway
cyclic
or cyclical adjective Date: 1794 1. a. of, relating to, or being a cycle b. moving in cycles c. of, relating to, or being a chemical compound containing a ring of ...
cyclic AMP
noun Date: 1966 a cyclic mononucleotide of adenosine that is formed from ATP and is responsible for the intracellular mediation of hormonal effects on various cellular ...
cyclic GMP
noun Etymology: guanosine + mon- + phosphate Date: 1969 a cyclic mononucleotide of guanosine that acts similarly to cyclic AMP as a secondary messenger in response to hormones
cyclical
adjective see cyclic
cyclicality
noun see cyclicity
cyclically
adverb see cyclic
cyclicity
noun Date: 1944 the quality or state of being cyclic — called also cy•cli•cal•i•ty
cyclicly
adverb see cyclic
cyclin
noun Date: 1983 any of a group of proteins active in controlling the cell cycle and in initiating DNA synthesis
cyclist
noun Date: 1882 one who rides a cycle
cyclitol
noun Etymology: cycl- + -itol (as in inositol) Date: 1943 an alicyclic polyhydroxy compound (as inositol)
cyclization
noun Date: 1909 formation of a ring in a chemical compound • cyclize verb
cyclize
verb see cyclization
cyclo
noun (plural cyclos) Etymology: French, bicycle, moped, from cyclo- (as in cyclomoteur moped), from cycle 2- or 3-wheeled vehicle Date: 1964 a 3-wheeled often motor-driven ...
cyclo-
combining form see cycl-
cyclo-cross
noun Etymology: French, from cyclo + cross-country (from English) Date: 1953 the sport of racing bicycles over rough terrain that usually requires carrying the bicycle over ...
cycloaddition
noun Date: 1963 a chemical reaction leading to ring formation in a compound
cycloaliphatic
adjective Date: 1936 alicyclic
cyclodextrin
noun Date: 1960 any of a class of complex cyclic sugars that are products of the enzymatic decomposition of starch and that can catalyze reactions between simpler molecules ...
cyclodiene
noun Date: 1942 an organic insecticide (as dieldrin or chlordane) with a chlorinated methylene group forming a bridge across a 6-membered carbon ring
cyclogenesis
noun Etymology: cyclone + genesis Date: circa 1938 the development or intensification of a cyclone
cyclohexane
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1909 a pungent saturated cyclic hydrocarbon C6H12 found in petroleum or made synthetically and used chiefly as ...
cyclohexanone
noun Date: circa 1909 a liquid ketone C6H10O used especially as a solvent and in organic synthesis
cycloheximide
noun Etymology: cyclohexane + imide Date: 1950 an agricultural fungicide C15H23NO4 that inhibits protein synthesis and is obtained from a soil bacterium (Streptomyces griseus)
cyclohexylamine
noun Etymology: cyclohexane + -yl + amine Date: 1943 a colorless liquid amine C6H11NH2 that is used in organic synthesis and to prevent corrosion in boilers and that is ...
cycloid
I. noun Etymology: French cycloïde, from Greek kykloeidēs circular, from kyklos Date: 1661 a curve that is generated by a point on the circumference of a circle as it rolls ...
cycloidal
adjective see cycloid I
cyclometer
noun Date: 1880 a device made for recording the revolutions of a wheel and often used for registering distance traversed by a wheeled vehicle
cyclone
noun Etymology: modification of Greek kyklōma wheel, coil, from kykloun to go around, from kyklos circle Date: 1848 1. a. a storm or system of winds that rotates about a ...
Cyclone
trademark — used for a chain-link fence
cyclone cellar
noun Date: 1887 storm cellar
cyclonic
adjective see cyclone
cyclonically
adverb see cyclone
cycloolefin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1929 a hydrocarbon containing a ring having one or more double bonds • cycloolefinic adjective
cycloolefinic
adjective see cycloolefin
cyclooxygenase
noun Etymology: cycl- + oxygenase, an enzyme, from oxygen + -ase Date: 1975 an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins and that has two ...
cyclopaedia
noun see cyclopedia
cycloparaffin
noun Date: 1900 a saturated cyclic hydrocarbon of the formula CnH2n
cyclopean
adjective Date: 1582 1. often capitalized of, relating to, or characteristic of a Cyclops 2. huge, massive 3. of or relating to a style of stone construction marked ...
cyclopedia
also cyclopaedia noun Date: 1728 encyclopedia • cyclopedic adjective
cyclopedic
adjective see cyclopedia
cyclophosphamide
noun Date: 1960 an immunosuppressive and antineoplastic agent C7H15Cl2N2O2P used especially in the treatment of lymphomas and some leukemias
cyclopropane
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1894 a flammable gaseous saturated cyclic hydrocarbon C3H6 sometimes used as a general anesthetic
cyclops
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Kyklōps, from kykl- cycl- + ōps eye Date: 1513 1. plural cyclopes capitalized any of a race of giants in Greek mythology with a single eye ...
cyclorama
noun Etymology: cycl- + -orama (as in panorama) Date: 1840 1. a large pictorial representation encircling the spectator and often having real objects as a foreground 2. a ...
cycloramic
adjective see cyclorama
cycloserine
noun Date: 1952 a broad-spectrum antibiotic C3H6N2O2 produced by an actinomycete (Streptomyces orchidaceus) and used especially in the treatment of tuberculosis
cyclosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek kyklōsis encirclement, from kykloun to go around Date: 1835 the streaming of protoplasm within a cell
cyclospora
noun Etymology: New Latin, from cycl- + spora spore Date: 1993 any of a genus (Cyclospora of the order Coccidia) of sporozoans including one (C. cayetanensis) causing diarrhea ...
cyclosporin
noun see cyclosporine
cyclosporine
also cyclosporin noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary cycl- + spor- + 2-ine Date: 1976 an immunosuppressive polypeptide drug C62H111N11O12 obtained from various ...
cyclostome
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek kykl- + stoma mouth — more at stomach Date: 1835 any of a class (Cyclostomata) of jawless fishes having a large sucking mouth and ...
cyclostyle
noun Etymology: from Cyclostyle, a trademark Date: 1883 a machine for making multiple copies that utilizes a stencil cut by a graver whose tip is a small rowel • ...
cyclothymia
noun see cyclothymic
cyclothymic
adjective Etymology: New Latin cyclothymia (from German Zyklothymie, from zykl- cycl- + -thymie -thymia) + English -ic Date: 1923 relating to or being a mood disorder ...
cyclotomic
adjective Etymology: cyclotomy mathematical theory of the division of the circle into equal parts, from cycl- + -tomy Date: 1879 relating to, being, or containing a polynomial ...
cyclotron
noun Etymology: cycl- + -tron; from the circular movement of the particles Date: 1935 an accelerator in which charged particles (as protons, deuterons, or ions) are propelled ...
cyder
British variant of cider
Cydonia
geographical name — see Canea • Cydonian adjective or noun
Cydonian
adjective or noun see Cydonia
cygnet
noun Etymology: Middle English sygnett, from Anglo-French cignet, from cigne swan, from Latin cycnus, cygnus, from Greek kyknos Date: 15th century a young swan
Cygnus
noun Etymology: Latin (genitive Cygni), literally, swan Date: 1551 a northern constellation between Lyra and Pegasus in the Milky Way
cyl
abbreviation cylinder
cylinder
noun Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French cylindre, from Latin cylindrus, from Greek kylindros, from kylindein to roll; perhaps akin to Greek kyklos wheel — more at ...
cylinder head
noun Date: 1884 the closed end of an engine or pump cylinder
cylinder seal
noun Date: 1887 a cylinder (as of stone) engraved in intaglio and used especially in ancient Mesopotamia to roll an impression on wet clay
cylindered
adjective see cylinder
cylindric
adjective see cylindrical
cylindrical
also cylindric adjective Date: 1646 relating to or having the form or properties of a cylinder • cylindrically adverb
cylindrical coordinate
noun Date: circa 1934 any of the coordinates in space obtained by constructing in a plane a polar coordinate system and on a line perpendicular to the plane a linear coordinate ...
cylindrically
adverb see cylindrical
cyma
noun Etymology: Greek kyma, literally, wave Date: 1563 1. a projecting molding whose profile is an S-shaped curve 2. an S-shaped curve formed by the union of a concave line ...
cymatium
noun (plural cymatia) Etymology: Latin, from Greek kymation, diminutive of kymat-, kyma Date: 1563 a crowning molding in classic architecture; especially cyma
cymbal
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cymbal & Anglo-French cymbele, from Latin cymbalum, from Greek kymbalon, from kymbē bowl, boat Date: before 12th century a ...
cymbalist
noun see cymbal
cymbidium
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Latin cymba boat, from Greek kymbē Date: 1815 any of a genus (Cymbidium) of tropical Old World epiphytic orchids with showy flowers
cyme
noun Etymology: New Latin cyma, from Latin, cabbage sprout, from Greek kyma swell, wave, cabbage sprout, from kyein to be pregnant; akin to Sanskrit śvayati it swells, grows ...
cymling
noun Etymology: probably alteration of simnel Date: 1779 pattypan
cymophane
noun Etymology: French, from Greek kyma wave + French -phane -phane Date: circa 1804 chrysoberyl; especially an opalescent chrysoberyl
cymose
adjective Date: 1807 of, relating to, being, or bearing a cyme
Cymric
I. adjective also Kymric Date: 1838 of, relating to, or characteristic of the non-Gaelic Celtic people of Britain or their language; specifically welsh II. noun also Kymric ...
Cymru
geographical name — see Wales
Cymry
noun Etymology: Welsh, plural of Cymro Welshman Date: 1833 welsh 2
Cynewulf
or Cynwulf biographical name 9th century Anglo-Saxon poet
cynic
noun Etymology: Middle French or Latin, Middle French cynique, from Latin cynicus, from Greek kynikos, literally, like a dog, from kyn-, kyōn dog — more at hound Date: 1542 ...
cynical
adjective Date: 1542 1. captious, peevish 2. having or showing the attitude or temper of a cynic: as a. contemptuously distrustful of human nature and motives b. ...
cynically
adverb see cynical
cynicism
noun Date: 1663 1. capitalized the doctrine of the Cynics 2. cynical character, attitude, or quality; also an expression of such quality
cynomolgus monkey
noun Etymology: New Latin, alteration of cynamolgus, from Latin, member of an ancient tribe in Africa, from Greek Kynamolgoi, literally, dog milkers Date: 1936 a macaque ...
cynosure
noun Etymology: Middle French & Latin; Middle French, Ursa Minor, guide, from Latin cynosura Ursa Minor, from Greek kynosoura, from kynos oura, literally, dog's tail Date: ...
Cynthia
noun Etymology: Latin, from feminine of Cynthius of Cynthus, from Cynthus, mountain on Delos where she was born, from Greek Kynthos Date: 14th century 1. Artemis 2. moon 1a
Cynwulf
biographical name see Cynewulf
CYO
abbreviation Catholic Youth Organization
cypher
chiefly British variant of cipher
Cypress
geographical name city SW California SE of Los Angeles population 46,229
cypress
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cipres, from Anglo-French ciprès, from Latin cyparissus, from Greek kyparissos Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) any of a genus ...
cypress vine
noun Date: 1819 a tropical American annual vine (Ipomoea quamoclit syn. Quamoclit pennata) of the morning-glory family with usually red or white tubular flowers and finely ...
cyprian
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Latin cyprius of Cyprus, from Greek kyprios, from Kypros Cyprus, birthplace of Aphrodite Date: 1819 prostitute
Cyprian
biographical name Saint died 258 Thascius Caecilius Cyprianus Christian martyr; bishop of Carthage (circa 248-258)
cyprinid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Latin cyprinus carp, from Greek kyprinos Date: 1861 any of a family (Cyprinidae) of soft-finned freshwater fishes including the carps and ...
Cypriot
adjective or noun see Cyprus
Cypriote
adjective or noun see Cyprus
cypripedium
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Late Latin Cypris, a name for Venus + -pedium (modification of Greek pedilon sandal) Date: 1807 1. any of a genus (Cypripedium) of ...
cyproheptadine
noun Etymology: cyclic + propyl + hepta- + piperidine Date: 1971 a histamine and serotonin antagonist C21H21N used especially in the form of its hydrochloride to treat allergy ...
cyproterone
noun Etymology: probably from cycl- + progesterone Date: 1966 a synthetic steroid C22H27ClO3 that inhibits androgenic secretions (as of testosterone)
Cyprus
geographical name 1. island E Mediterranean S of Turkey 2. country coextensive with the island; a republic of the Commonwealth of Nations capital Nicosia area 3572 square ...
Cyrankiewicz
biographical name Józef 1911-1989 Polish politician; prime minister (1947-52; 1954-70)
Cyrano de Bergerac
biographical name Savinien de 1619-1655 French poet & soldier
Cyrenaic
noun Etymology: Latin cyrenaicus, from Greek kyrēnaikos, from Kyrēnē Cyrene, Africa, home of Aristippus, author of the doctrine Date: 1586 an adherent of the doctrine that ...
Cyrenaica
or Italian Cirenaica geographical name 1. (or Cyrene) ancient coastal region N Africa dominated by city of Cyrene 2. region E Libya; formerly a province • Cyrenaic ...
Cyrenaican
adjective or noun see Cyrenaica
Cyrenaicism
noun see Cyrenaic
Cyrene
geographical name ancient city N Africa on the Mediterranean in NE Libya • Cyrenian adjective or noun
Cyrenian
adjective or noun see Cyrene
Cyril
biographical name Saint circa 827-869 Constantine apostle to the Slavs
Cyrillic
adjective Etymology: Saint Cyril, reputed inventor of the Cyrillic alphabet Date: 1813 of, relating to, or constituting an alphabet used for writing Old Church Slavic and for ...
Cyrus
biographical name 424?-401 B.C. the Younger Persian prince & satrap
Cyrus II
biographical name circa 585-circa 529 B.C. the Great or the Elder king of Persia (circa 550-529)
cyst
noun Etymology: New Latin cystis, from Greek kystis bladder, pouch; akin to Sanskrit śvasiti he blows, snorts — more at wheeze Date: circa 1720 1. a closed sac having a ...
cyst-
or cysti- or cysto- combining form Etymology: French, from Greek kyst-, kysto-, from kystis bladder ; sac
cysteamine
noun Etymology: cysteine + amine Date: 1943 a cysteine derivative C2H7NS used especially to treat cystinuria
cysteine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from cystine + -ein Date: 1884 a crystalline sulfur-containing amino acid C3H7NO2S readily oxidizable to cystine
cysti-
combining form see cyst-
cystic
adjective Date: 1713 1. of or relating to the urinary bladder or the gallbladder 2. relating to, composed of, or containing cysts 3. enclosed in a cyst
cystic fibrosis
noun Date: 1938 a hereditary disease especially among whites that appears usually in early childhood, is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, involves functional disorder ...
cysticercoid
noun Date: circa 1858 a tapeworm larva having an invaginated scolex and solid tailpiece
cysticercosis
noun (plural cysticercoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1905 infestation with or disease caused by cysticerci
cysticercus
noun (plural cysticerci) Etymology: New Latin, from cyst- + Greek kerkos tail Date: circa 1871 a tapeworm larva that consists of a fluid-filled sac containing an invaginated ...
cystine
noun Etymology: from its discovery in bladder stones Date: 1843 a crystalline amino acid C6H12N2O4S2 that is widespread in proteins (as keratins) and is a major metabolic ...
cystinuria
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1853 a metabolic defect characterized by excretion of excessive amounts of cystine in the urine and inherited as an autosomal recessive trait
cystitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1783 inflammation of the urinary bladder
cysto-
combining form see cyst-
cystolith
noun Etymology: German Zystolith, from zyst- cyst- + -lith Date: 1857 a calcium carbonate concretion arising from the cellulose wall of cells of higher plants
cystoscope
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1889 a rigid endoscope for inspecting and passing instruments into the urethra and bladder • cystoscopic ...
cystoscopic
adjective see cystoscope
cystoscopy
noun see cystoscope
cyt-
or cyto- combining form Etymology: German zyt-, zyto-, from Greek kytos hollow vessel — more at hide 1. cell 2. cytoplasm
Cytherea
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Kythereia, from Kythēra Cythera, island associated with Aphrodite Date: 15th century Aphrodite
Cytherean
adjective Date: 1885 of or relating to the planet Venus

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