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Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389)

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cytidine
noun Etymology: cytosine + -idine Date: 1911 a nucleoside containing cytosine
cyto-
combining form see cyt-
cytochalasin
noun Etymology: cyt- + Greek chalasis slackening + English 1-in Date: 1966 any of a group of metabolites isolated from fungi (especially Helminthosporium dematioideum) that ...
cytochemical
adjective see cytochemistry
cytochemistry
noun Date: circa 1905 1. microscopic biochemistry 2. the chemistry of cells • cytochemical adjective
cytochrome
noun Date: 1925 any of several intracellular hemoprotein respiratory pigments that are enzymes functioning in electron transport as carriers of electrons
cytochrome c
noun Usage: often italic 2d c Date: 1940 the most abundant and stable of the cytochromes
cytochrome oxidase
noun Date: 1942 an iron-porphyrin enzyme important in cell respiration due to its ability to catalyze the oxidation of reduced cytochrome c in the presence of oxygen
cytodifferentiation
noun Date: 1959 the development of specialized cells (as muscle, blood, or nerve cells) from undifferentiated precursors
cytogenetic
adjective see cytogenetics
cytogenetical
adjective see cytogenetics
cytogenetically
adverb see cytogenetics
cytogeneticist
noun see cytogenetics
cytogenetics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1931 a branch of biology that deals with the study of heredity and ...
cytokine
noun Etymology: cyt- + -kine (as in lymphokine) Date: 1979 any of a class of immunoregulatory proteins (as interleukin or interferon) that are secreted by cells especially of ...
cytokinesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1919 1. the cytoplasmic changes accompanying mitosis 2. cleavage of the cytoplasm into daughter cells following nuclear division • ...
cytokinetic
adjective see cytokinesis
cytokinin
noun Etymology: cyt- + kinin Date: 1965 any of various plant growth substances (as kinetin) that are usually derivatives of adenine
cytol
abbreviation cytological; cytology
cytologic
adjective see cytology
cytological
adjective see cytology
cytologically
adverb see cytology
cytologist
noun see cytology
cytology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1889 1. a branch of biology dealing with the structure, function, multiplication, pathology, and life history of ...
cytolysin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1903 a substance (as an antibody that lyses bacteria) producing cytolysis
cytolysis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1907 the usually pathologic dissolution or disintegration of cells • cytolytic adjective
cytolytic
adjective see cytolysis
cytomegalic
adjective Etymology: New Latin cytomegalia condition of having enlarged cells, from cyt- + megal- + -ia Date: 1950 characterized by or causing the formation of enlarged cells
cytomegalovirus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from cytomegalia + -o- + virus Date: 1963 a herpesvirus (species Human herpesvirus 5 of the genus Cytomegalovirus) that causes cellular enlargement ...
cytomembrane
noun Date: 1962 one of the cellular membranes including those of the plasma membrane, endoplasmic reticulum, nuclear envelope, and Golgi apparatus; specifically unit membrane
cytopathic
adjective Date: 1952 of, relating to, characterized by, or producing pathological changes in cells
cytopathogenic
adjective Date: 1952 pathologic for or destructive to cells • cytopathogenicity noun
cytopathogenicity
noun see cytopathogenic
cytopathologist
noun see cytopathology
cytopathology
noun Date: 1936 a branch of pathology that deals with manifestations of disease at the cellular level • cytopathologist noun
cytophilic
adjective Date: circa 1909 having an affinity for cells
cytophotometric
adjective see cytophotometry
cytophotometry
noun Date: 1952 photometry applied to the study of the cell or its constituents • cytophotometric adjective
cytoplasm
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1874 the organized complex of inorganic and organic substances external to the nuclear membrane of a cell and ...
cytoplasmic
adjective see cytoplasm
cytoplasmically
adverb see cytoplasm
cytosine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary cyt- + -ose + 2-ine Date: 1894 a pyrimidine base C4H5N3O that codes genetic information in the polynucleotide chain of DNA ...
cytoskeletal
adjective see cytoskeleton
cytoskeleton
noun Date: 1940 the network of protein filaments and microtubules in the cytoplasm that controls cell shape, maintains intracellular organization, and is involved in cell ...
cytosol
noun Date: 1970 the fluid portion of the cytoplasm exclusive of organelles and membranes — called also ground substance • cytosolic adjective
cytosolic
adjective see cytosol
cytostatic
adjective Date: 1949 tending to retard cellular activity and multiplication • cytostatic noun
cytotaxonomic
adjective see cytotaxonomy
cytotaxonomically
adverb see cytotaxonomy
cytotaxonomy
noun Date: 1930 1. study of the relationships and classification of organisms using both classical systematic techniques and comparative studies of chromosomes 2. the nuclear ...
cytotechnologist
noun Date: 1961 a medical technician trained in the identification of cells and cellular abnormalities (as in cancer) • cytotechnology noun
cytotechnology
noun see cytotechnologist
cytotoxic
adjective Date: 1904 1. of or relating to a cytotoxin 2. toxic to cells • cytotoxicity noun
cytotoxic T cell
noun Date: 1972 killer T cell
cytotoxicity
noun see cytotoxic
cytotoxin
noun Date: 1902 a substance (as a toxin or antibody) having a toxic effect on cells
Cyzicus
geographical name 1. — see Kapidagi 2. ancient city in Mysia on isthmus leading to Kapidagi Peninsula
CZ
abbreviation Canal Zone
czar
also tsar noun Etymology: New Latin czar, from Russian tsar', from Old Russian tsĭsarĭ, from Gothic kaisar, from Greek or Latin; Greek, from Latin Caesar — more at Caesar ...
czardas
noun (plural czardas) Etymology: Hungarian csárdás Date: 1860 a Hungarian dance to music in duple time in which the dancers start slowly and finish with a rapid whirl
czardom
noun see czar
czarevitch
also tsarevitch noun Etymology: Russian tsarevich, from tsar' + -evich, patronymic suffix Date: 1710 an heir apparent of a Russian czar
czarina
also tsarina noun Etymology: probably modification of German Zarin, from Zar czar, from Russian tsar' Date: 1717 the wife of a czar
czarism
also tsarism noun Date: 1855 1. the government of Russia under the czars 2. autocratic rule • czarist also tsarist noun or adjective
czarist
noun or adjective see czarism
Czech
noun Etymology: Czech Čech Date: 1841 1. a native or inhabitant of western Czechoslovakia including Bohemia and Moravia 2. the Slavic language of the Czechs 3. a native ...
Czech Republic
geographical name country central Europe; a constituent republic of Czechoslovakia 1918-92 capital Prague area 30,450 square miles (78,866 square kilometers), population ...
Czechish
adjective see Czech
Czechoslovak
adjective or noun see Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakia
geographical name country 1918-92 central Europe; a republic capital Prague area 49,371 square miles (127,871 square kilometers); divided January 1, 1993 into separate ...
Czechoslovakian
adjective or noun see Czechoslovakia
Czerny
biographical name Carl 1791-1857 Austrian pianist & composer
Czestochowa
or Russian Chenstokhov geographical name city S Poland on the Warta population 258,700
D
I. abbreviation 1. Democrat 2. derivative 3. Dutch II. symbol deuterium
d
I. noun (plural d's or ds) Usage: often capitalized, often attributive Date: before 12th century 1. a. the 4th letter of the English alphabet b. a graphic ...
D and C
abbreviation dilation and curettage
D layer
noun Date: circa 1934 a layer within the D region of the ionosphere; also D region
D region
noun Date: 1930 the lowest part of the ionosphere occurring approximately between 30 and 55 miles (50 and 90 kilometers) above the surface of the earth
D ring
noun Date: circa 1899 a usually metal ring having the shape of a capital D
D'
biographical name , etc. for many names beginning with these elements see the specific family names
D' Albert
biographical name Eugen Francis Charles 1864-1932 German (Scottish-born) pianist & composer
d'accord
foreign term Etymology: French in accord ; agreed
D'Annunzio
biographical name Gabriele 1863-1938 Italian author & soldier
D'Avenant
biographical name see Davenant
D'Entrecasteaux Islands
geographical name islands SW Pacific N of E tip of New Guinea belonging to Papua New Guinea area 1200 square miles (3120 square kilometers), population 38,894
D'Oyly Carte
biographical name — see Carte, D'Oyly
d'un certain âge
foreign term Etymology: French of a certain age ; no longer young
D'Urfey
biographical name Thomas 1653-1723 English songwriter & dramatist
d,l-
prefix see dl- 1
d-
prefix Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from dextr- 1. dextrorotatory 2. having a similar configuration at a selected carbon atom to the configuration of ...
D-day
noun Etymology: Dutch, abbreviation for day Date: 1918 a day set for launching an operation; specifically June 6, 1944, on which Allied forces began the invasion of France in ...
D-mark
noun Date: 1948 deutsche mark
d.t.'s
noun plural Usage: often capitalized D&T Date: 1857 delirium tremens
D/A
abbreviation digital to analog
d/b/a
abbreviation doing business as
d4T
noun Etymology: dideoxy-4-thymidine Date: 1988 a synthetic antiretroviral nucleoside C10H12N2O4 that is an analog of thymidine and is administered orally in the treatment of ...
da
abbreviation deka-
Da
geographical name — see black
DA
I. noun Etymology: duck's ass; from its resemblance to the tail of a duck Date: 1951 ducktail II. abbreviation 1. days after acceptance 2. delayed action 3. deposit ...
da capo
adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian Date: circa 1724 from the beginning — used as a direction in music to repeat
Da Nang
or formerly Tourane geographical name city & port central Vietnam in Annam population 369,734
Da Yunhe
geographical name — see Grand Canal
DAB
abbreviation Dictionary of American Biography
dab
I. noun Etymology: Middle English dabbe Date: 14th century 1. a sudden blow or thrust ; poke 2. a small amount 3. a gentle touch or stroke ; pat 4. daub II. ...
dab hand
noun Etymology: 4dab Date: circa 1828 chiefly British expert
dabber
noun see dab II
dabble
verb (dabbled; dabbling) Etymology: perhaps frequentative of 2dab Date: 1557 transitive verb to wet by splashing or by little dips or strokes ; spatter intransitive verb ...
dabbler
noun Date: 1611 one that dabbles: as a. one not deeply engaged in or concerned with something b. a duck (as a mallard or shoveler) that feeds by dabbling — called also ...
dabbling
noun Date: circa 1847 a superficial or intermittent interest, investigation, or experiment
dabbling duck
noun see dabbler
dabchick
noun Etymology: probably irregular from obsolete English dop to dive + English chick Date: circa 1550 any of several small grebes
Dabrowa Gornicza
geographical name city S Poland population 139,200
Dacca
geographical name — see Dhaka
dace
noun (plural dace) Etymology: Middle English dace, darce, from Anglo-French dars, from Medieval Latin darsus Date: 15th century 1. a small freshwater European cyprinid fish ...
dacha
noun Etymology: Russian, from Old Russian, land allotted by a prince; akin to Latin dos dowry — more at date Date: 1896 a Russian country cottage used especially in the ...
Dachau
geographical name city S Germany in S Bavaria population 35,892; site of Nazi concentration camp during World War II
dachshund
noun Etymology: German, from Dachs badger + Hund dog Date: 1882 any of a breed of long-bodied, short-legged dogs of German origin that occur in short-haired, long-haired, and ...
Dacia
geographical name ancient country & Roman province SE Europe roughly equivalent to Romania & Bessarabia • Dacian adjective or noun
Dacian
adjective or noun see Dacia
Dacron
trademark — used for a synthetic polyester textile fiber
dactyl
noun Etymology: Middle English dactile, from Latin dactylus, from Greek daktylos, literally, finger; from the fact that the first of three syllables is the longest, like the ...
dactyl-
or dactylo- combining form Etymology: Greek daktyl-, daktylo-, from daktylos finger ; toe ; digit
dactylic
adjective or noun see dactyl
dactylo-
combining form see dactyl-
dactylology
noun Date: circa 1656 finger spelling
dad
noun Etymology: probably baby talk Date: 15th century father 1a
Dada
noun Etymology: French Date: 1919 a movement in art and literature based on deliberate irrationality and negation of traditional artistic values; also the art and literature ...
dadaism
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: French dadaïsme Date: 1919 Dada • dadaist noun or adjective, often capitalized • dadaistic adjective, often capitalized
dadaist
noun or adjective see dadaism
dadaistic
adjective see dadaism
daddy
noun (plural daddies) Date: 15th century 1. father 1a 2. granddaddy 2
daddy longlegs
noun (plural daddy longlegs) Date: circa 1814 1. chiefly British crane fly 2. any of an order (Opiliones) of arachnids that have slender usually long legs and that resemble ...
dado
I. noun (plural dadoes) Etymology: Italian, die, plinth Date: 1664 1. a. the part of a pedestal of a column above the base b. the lower part of an interior wall when ...
Dadra and Nagar Haveli
geographical name union territory India bordering on Gujarat and Maharashtra area 189 square miles (491 square kilometers), population 138,477
DAE
abbreviation Dictionary of American English
daedal
adjective Etymology: Latin daedalus, from Greek daidalos Date: 1590 1. a. skillful, artistic b. intricate
Daedalean
adjective see Daedalus
Daedalian
adjective see Daedalus
Daedalus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Daidalos Date: 1546 the legendary builder of the Cretan labyrinth who makes wings to enable himself and his son Icarus to escape ...
Daegu
geographical name — see Taegu
Daejeon
geographical name — see Taejon
daemon
variant of demon
daff
transitive verb Etymology: alteration of doff Date: 1596 1. archaic to thrust aside 2. obsolete to put off (as with an excuse)
daffily
adverb see daffy
daffodil
noun Etymology: perhaps from Dutch de affodil the asphodel Date: 1548 any of various perennial bulbous herbs (genus Narcissus) of the amaryllis family; especially one whose ...
daffy
adjective (daffier; -est) Etymology: obsolete English daff, noun, fool Date: circa 1884 crazy, foolish • daffily adverb
daft
adjective Etymology: Middle English dafte gentle, stupid; akin to Old English gedæfte mild, gentle, Middle English defte deft, Old Church Slavic podobati to be fitting Date: ...
daftly
adverb see daft
daftness
noun see daft
dag
I. noun Etymology: Middle English dagge Date: 14th century 1. a hanging end or shred 2. matted or manure-coated wool II. abbreviation dekagram
Dagenham
geographical name former municipal borough SE England in Essex, now part of Barking and Dagenham
Dagestan
or Daghestan geographical name autonomous republic SE Russia in Europe on W shore of the Caspian capital Makhachkala area 19,421 square miles (50,300 square kilometers), ...
dagger
noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century 1. a sharp pointed knife for stabbing 2. a. something that resembles a dagger b. a character † used as a reference ...
daggerboard
noun Date: circa 1930 a removable narrow centerboard in some small boats that is raised and lowered by sliding up and down
daggerlike
adjective see dagger
Daghestan
geographical name see Dagestan
dago
noun (plural dagos or dagoes) Etymology: alteration of earlier diego, from Diego, a common Spanish given name Date: 1832 usually offensive a person of Italian or Spanish ...
Daguerre
biographical name Louis (-Jacques-Mandé) 1789-1851 French painter & inventor
daguerreotype
noun Etymology: French daguerréotype, from L. J. M. Daguerre + French -o- + type Date: 1839 an early photograph produced on a silver or a silver-covered copper plate; also ...
daguerreotypist
noun see daguerreotype
daguerreotypy
noun see daguerreotype
dah
noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1940 dash 7
DAH
abbreviation Dictionary of American History
dahl
noun see dal I
dahlia
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Anders Dahl died 1789 Swedish botanist Date: 1835 any of a genus (Dahlia) of American tuberous-rooted composite herbs having ...
Dahoman
adjective or noun see Dahomey
Dahomean
adjective or noun see Dahomey
Dahomey
geographical name — see Benin • Dahoman adjective or noun • Dahomean or Dahomeyan adjective or noun
Dahomeyan
adjective or noun see Dahomey
daidzein
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, alteration of daidzin, substance from which daidzein is derived, from daidz- (from Japanese daizu soybean) + 1-in Date: ...
daikon
noun Etymology: Japanese, from dai big + kon root Date: 1876 a large long hard white radish used especially in Asian cuisine; also a plant (Raphanus sativus longipinnatus) ...
dailiness
noun Date: 1596 daily or routine quality ; ordinariness
daily
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. occurring, made, or acted upon every day b. issued every day or every weekday c. of or providing for every day 2. a. ...
daily double
noun Date: 1932 a system of betting (as on horse races) in which the bettor must pick the winners of two stipulated races in order to win
daily dozen
noun Date: 1919 1. a series of physical exercises to be performed daily ; workout 2. a set of routine duties or tasks
daimio
noun see daimyo
Daimler
biographical name Gottlieb Wilhelm 1834-1900 German automotive manufacturer
daimon
noun (plural daimones or daimons) Etymology: Greek daimōn Date: 1769 1. demon 2 2. demon 3 • daimonic adjective
daimonic
adjective see daimon
daimyo
also daimio noun (plural -myo or -myos; also -mio or -mios) Etymology: Japanese daimyō Date: 1727 a Japanese feudal baron
daintily
adverb see dainty II
daintiness
noun see dainty II
dainty
I. noun (plural dainties) Etymology: Middle English deinte high esteem, delight, from Anglo-French deinté, from Latin dignitat-, dignitas dignity, worth Date: 14th century 1. ...
daiquiri
noun Etymology: Daiquirí, Cuba Date: 1920 a cocktail made usually of rum, lime juice, and sugar
Dairen
geographical name see Dalian
dairy
noun (plural dairies) Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English deyerie, from deye dairymaid, from Old English dǣge kneader of bread; akin to Old English dāg dough ...
dairy cattle
noun plural Date: 1895 cattle kept for milk production
dairying
noun Date: 1649 the business of operating a dairy
dairymaid
noun Date: 1599 a woman employed in a dairy
dairyman
noun Date: circa 1617 one who operates a dairy farm or works in a dairy
dais
noun Etymology: Middle English deis, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin discus high table, from Latin, dish, quoit — more at dish Date: 13th century a raised platform (as in ...
daishiki
variant of dashiki
daisy
noun (plural daisies) Etymology: Middle English dayeseye, from Old English dægesēage, from dæg day + ēage eye Date: before 12th century 1. a composite plant (as of the ...
daisy chain
noun Date: 1841 1. a string of daisies with stems linked to form a chain 2. an interlinked series
daisy ham
noun Date: circa 1938 a boned and smoked piece of pork from the shoulder
daisy wheel
noun Etymology: from its resemblance to the flower Date: circa 1977 a disk with spokes bearing type that serves as the printing element of an electric typewriter or printer; ...
daisy-chain
transitive verb Date: 1955 to link (as computer components) together in series
Dakar
geographical name city & port capital of Senegal population 1,729,823
Dakhla
or formerly Villa Cisneros geographical name town & port NW Africa in Western Sahara capital of Río de Oro
Dakin
biographical name Henry Drysdale 1880-1952 English chemist
Dakota
I. noun (plural Dakotas; also Dakota) Etymology: Dakota (Yankton-Yánktonai and Santee dialects) dakhóta, perhaps literally, friendly, allied Date: 1804 1. a member of an ...
Dakotan
adjective or noun see Dakota II
dal
I. noun also dahl Etymology: Hindi & Urdu dāl Date: 1673 a dried legume (as lentils, beans, or peas); also an Indian dish made of simmered and usually pureed and spiced ...
daL
abbreviation see dal II
dal segno
adverb Etymology: Italian, from the sign Date: circa 1854 — used as a direction in music to return to the sign that marks the beginning of a repeat
Daladier
biographical name Édouard 1884-1970 French statesman
Dalai Lama
I. noun Etymology: Mongolian dalai ocean Date: 1698 the spiritual head of Tibetan Buddhism II. biographical name 1935- Tenzin Gyatso Tibetan religious & political leader
dalasi
noun (plural dalasi or dalasis) Etymology: Wolof, probably ultimately from West African French dala 5-franc coin, from English dollar Date: 1966 — see money table
Dalcroze
biographical name Émile Jaques — see Émile Jaques-Dalcroze
dale
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English dæl; akin to Old High German tal valley, Welsh dôl Date: before 12th century valley, vale
Dale
I. biographical name Sir Henry Hallett 1875-1968 English physiologist II. biographical name Sir Thomas died 1619 English colonial administrator in Virginia
Dalecarlia
geographical name region W central Sweden • Dalecarlian adjective
Dalecarlian
adjective see Dalecarlia
Dalén
biographical name Nils Gustaf 1869-1937 Swedish inventor
dalesman
noun Date: 1769 British one living or born in a dale
daleth
noun Etymology: Hebrew dāleth, from deleth door Date: 1567 the 4th letter of the Hebrew alphabet — see alphabet table
Daley
biographical name Richard Joseph 1902-1976 American politician
Dalhousie
biographical name Earl & Marquis of — see Ramsay
Dalí
biographical name Salvador 1904-1989 Spanish surrealistic painter • Daliesque adjective
Dalian
or Ta-lien or Luda or Lu-ta or Dairen geographical name city NE China in S Liaoning on Liaodong Peninsula population 1,723,302
Daliesque
adjective see Dalí
Dall porpoise
noun see Dall's porpoise
Dall sheep
noun Etymology: William H. Dall died 1927 American naturalist Date: 1887 a large white wild sheep (Ovis dalli) of Alaska and northern British Columbia — called also Dall's ...
Dall's porpoise
noun Etymology: W. H. Dall Date: 1951 a black-and-white porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli) of temperate and arctic waters of the rim of the North Pacific Ocean — called also ...
Dall's sheep
noun see Dall sheep
Dallas
I. biographical name George Mifflin 1792-1864 vice president of the United States (1845-49) II. geographical name city NE Texas on Trinity River population 1,188,580 • ...
Dallasite
noun see Dallas II
dalliance
noun Date: 14th century an act of dallying: as a. play; especially amorous play b. frivolous action ; trifling
dallier
noun see dally
Dallis grass
noun Etymology: A. T. Dallis, 19th century American farmer Date: 1907 a tall tufted tropical South American perennial grass (Paspalum dilatatum) introduced as a pasture and ...
dally
intransitive verb (dallied; dallying) Etymology: Middle English dalyen, from Anglo-French dalier Date: 15th century 1. a. to act playfully; especially to play amorously ...
Dalmatia
geographical name region W Balkan Peninsula on the Adriatic in Croatia extending into Bosnia and Herzegovina & Montenegro • Dalmatian adjective or noun
dalmatian
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: from the supposed origin of the breed in Dalmatia Date: 1824 any of a breed of medium-sized dogs having a white short-haired coat ...
Dalmatian
adjective or noun see Dalmatia
dalmatic
noun Etymology: Middle English dalmatyk, from Old English dalmatice, from Late Latin dalmatica, from Latin, feminine of dalmaticus Dalmatian, from Dalmatia Date: before 12th ...
Dalrymple
I. biographical name Sir James 1619-1695 1st Viscount Stair Scottish jurist II. biographical name Sir James 1619-1695 1st Viscount Stair Scottish jurist
dalton
noun Etymology: John Dalton died 1844 English chemist Date: circa 1928 atomic mass unit — used chiefly in biochemistry
Dalton
I. biographical name (Edward) Hugh 1887-1962 Baron Dalton British politician II. biographical name John 1766-1844 English chemist & physicist III. geographical name city NW ...
Daly
biographical name (John) Augustin 1838-1899 American dramatist & theater manager
Daly City
geographical name city W California S of San Francisco population 103,621
Dam
biographical name (Carl Peter) Henrik 1895-1976 Danish biochemist
dam
I. noun Etymology: Middle English dam, dame lady, dam — more at dame Date: 13th century the female parent of an animal and especially of a domestic animal II. noun ...
damage
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from dan damage, from Latin damnum Date: 14th century 1. loss or harm resulting from injury to person, property, or ...
damage control
noun Date: 1943 measures taken to offset or minimize damage to reputation, credibility, or public image caused by a controverisal act, remark, or revelation
damageability
noun see damage II
damaged goods
noun plural Date: 1807 a person considered to be flawed or spoiled in character, efficiency, or worth
damager
noun see damage II
damaging
adjective Date: circa 1828 causing or able to cause damage ; injurious • damagingly adverb
damagingly
adverb see damaging
Daman
or Damão geographical name district W India on Gulf of Khambhat; a constituent part of the union territory of Daman and Diu (area 36 square miles or 93 square kilometers, ...
Damanhûr
geographical name city N Egypt E of Alexandria population 216,000
Damão
geographical name see Daman
damar
or dammar noun Etymology: Malay Date: 1698 any of various resins used in varnishes and inks and obtained chiefly in Malaya and Indonesia from several timber trees (families ...
damascene
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. capitalized a native or inhabitant of Damascus 2. the characteristic markings of Damascus steel II. adjective Date: 14th century 1. ...
Damascus
geographical name city SW Syria, its capital population 1,451,000
Damascus steel
noun Date: circa 1727 hard elastic steel ornamented with wavy patterns and used especially for sword blades
damask
I. noun Etymology: Middle English damaske, from Medieval Latin damascus, from Damascus Date: 14th century 1. a firm lustrous fabric (as of linen, cotton, silk, or rayon) made ...
damask rose
noun Etymology: obsolete Damask of Damascus, from obsolete Damask Damascus Date: 1540 a hardy rose (Rosa damascena) widely introduced from Asia Minor and having large fragrant ...
Damavand
or Demavend geographical name mountain 18,934 feet (5771 meters) N Iran; highest in Elburz Mountains
dame
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin domina, feminine of dominus master; akin to Latin domus house — more at dome Date: 13th century 1. a woman of ...
dame d'honneur
foreign term Etymology: French lady-in-waiting
dame school
noun Date: 1810 a school in which the rudiments of reading and writing were taught by a woman in her own home
dame's rocket
noun Date: circa 1900 a Eurasian perennial plant (Hesperis matronalis) of the mustard family cultivated for its spikes of showy fragrant white or purplish flowers — called ...
dame's violet
noun see dame's rocket
damiana
noun Etymology: American Spanish Date: 1868 1. the dried leaf of a tropical American shrub (Turnera diffusa syn. T. aphrodisiaca) used especially formerly as an aphrodisiac ...

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