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Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389)

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Damien
biographical name Father 1840-1889 originally Joseph de Veuster Belgian R.C. missionary in Hawaiian Islands
Damietta
geographical name city & port N Egypt population 93,488
Dammam
geographical name — see ad dammam
dammar
noun see damar
damn
I. verb (damned; damning) Etymology: Middle English dampnen, from Anglo-French dampner, from Latin damnare, from damnum damage, loss, fine Date: 13th century transitive verb ...
damn well
phrasal beyond doubt or question ; certainly
damnable
adjective Date: 14th century 1. liable to or deserving condemnation 2. very bad ; detestable • damnableness noun • damnably adverb
damnableness
noun see damnable
damnably
adverb see damnable
damnant quod non intelligunt
foreign term Etymology: Latin they condemn what they do not understand
damnation
noun Date: 14th century the act of damning ; the state of being damned
damnatory
adjective Date: 1682 expressing, imposing, or causing condemnation ; condemnatory
damndest
noun see damnedest
damned
I. adjective (damneder; damnedest or damndest) Date: 1596 1. damnable 2. complete, utter — often used as an intensive 3. extraordinary — used in the superlative ...
damnedest
or damndest noun Date: 1682 utmost, best — used chiefly in the phrase do one's damnedest
damnify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle French damnifier, from Old French, from Late Latin damnificare, from Latin damnificus injurious, from damnum damage Date: 1512 ...
damning
adjective Date: 1595 1. bringing damnation 2. causing or leading to condemnation or ruin • damningly adverb
damningly
adverb see damning
Damoclean
adjective see Damocles
Damocles
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Damoklēs Date: 1578 a courtier of ancient Syracuse held to have been seated at a banquet beneath a sword hung by a single hair • ...
Damodar
geographical name river 368 miles (592 kilometers) NE India in central Bihar & West Bengal flowing ESE into the Hugli
Damon
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Damōn Date: 1557 a legendary Sicilian who pledges his life for his condemned friend Pythias
damosel
noun see damsel
damozel
noun see damsel
damp
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, black damp, from Middle Dutch or Middle Low German, vapor; akin to Old High German damph vapor Date: 14th century 1. a noxious gas — ...
dampen
verb (dampened; dampening) Date: 1547 transitive verb 1. to check or diminish the activity or vigor of ; deaden 2. to make damp 3. damp 1c intransitive verb 1. ...
dampener
noun see dampen
damper
noun Date: 1707 1. a dulling or deadening influence 2. a device that damps: as a. a valve or plate (as in the flue of a furnace) for regulating the draft b. a small ...
Dampier
biographical name William 1652-1715 English buccaneer & navigator
damping-off
noun Date: 1890 a diseased condition of seedlings or cuttings caused by fungi and marked by wilting or rotting
dampish
adjective see damp III
damply
adverb see damp III
dampness
noun see damp III
Damrosch
biographical name Walter Johannes 1862-1950 American (German-born) musician & conductor
damsel
also damosel or damozel noun Etymology: Middle English damesel, from Anglo-French dameisele, from Vulgar Latin *domnicella young noblewoman, diminutive of Latin domina lady ...
damselfish
noun Date: 1904 any of numerous often brilliantly colored marine fishes (family Pomacentridae) living especially along coral reefs — called also demoiselle
damselfly
noun Date: 1815 any of numerous odonate insects (suborder Zygoptera) distinguished from dragonflies by laterally projecting eyes and usually stalked wings folded above the ...
damson
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin (prunum) damascenum, literally, plum of Damascus Date: 14th century the small tart fruit of a widely cultivated Asian plum tree ...
Dan
I. noun Etymology: Hebrew Dān Date: before 12th century a son of Jacob and the traditional eponymous ancestor of one of the tribes of Israel II. noun Etymology: Middle ...
Dana
I. biographical name Charles Anderson 1819-1897 American newspaper editor II. biographical name James Dwight 1813-1895 American geologist III. biographical name Richard ...
Dana Point
geographical name coastal city S California between Los Angeles & San Diego population 35,110
Danaë
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Danaē Date: 1562 a princess of Argos visited by Zeus in the form of a shower of gold and by him the mother of Perseus
danazol
noun Etymology: dan- (perhaps anagram of androgenic) + isoxazole, the compound C3H3NO Date: 1974 a synthetic androgen C22H27NO2 that inhibits the release of gonadotropins by ...
Danbury
geographical name city SW Connecticut population 74,848
dance
I. verb (danced; dancing) Etymology: Middle English dauncen, from Anglo-French dancer Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to engage in or perform a dance 2. to move ...
dance attendance
phrasal to attend in an eager and servile manner
dance card
noun Date: 1895 1. a card listing partners for scheduled dances 2. a calendar of engagements
danceable
adjective see dance I
dancer
noun see dance I
dandelion
noun Etymology: Middle English dendelyoun, from Anglo-French dent de lion, literally, lion's tooth Date: 14th century any of a genus (Taraxacum) of yellow-flowered composite ...
dander
noun Etymology: alteration of dandruff Date: 1786 1. dandruff; specifically minute scales from hair, feathers, or skin that may be allergenic 2. anger, temper
dandiacal
adjective Etymology: 1dandy + -acal (as in demoniacal) Date: 1831 of, relating to, or suggestive of a dandy
Dandie Dinmont terrier
noun Etymology: Dandie Dinmont, character owning six such dogs in the novel Guy Mannering by Sir Walter Scott Date: 1875 any of a breed of terriers characterized by short ...
dandification
noun see dandify
dandify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Date: 1823 to cause to resemble a dandy • dandification noun
dandle
transitive verb (dandled; dandling) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1530 1. to move (as a baby) up and down in one's arms or on one's knee in affectionate play 2. pamper, ...
Dandong
or Antung or Tan-tung geographical name city & port NE China in SE Liaoning at mouth of the Yalu population 523,699
dandruff
noun Etymology: probably from dand- (origin unknown) + -ruff, from Middle English rove scabby condition, from Old Norse hrūfa scab; akin to Old High German hruf scurf, ...
dandruffy
adjective see dandruff
dandy
I. noun (plural dandies) Etymology: probably short for jack-a-dandy, from 1jack + a (of) + dandy (origin unknown) Date: circa 1780 1. a man who gives exaggerated attention to ...
dandyish
adjective see dandy I
dandyishly
adverb see dandy I
dandyism
noun Date: 1819 1. the style or conduct of a dandy 2. a literary and artistic style of the latter part of the 19th century marked by artificiality and excessive refinement
Dane
I. noun Etymology: Middle English Danish, from Old Norse Danr Date: 14th century 1. a native or inhabitant of Denmark 2. a person of Danish descent 3. Great Dane II. ...
danegeld
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: before 12th century an annual tax believed to have been imposed originally to buy off Danish invaders in England or to maintain forces to ...
Danelaw
noun Date: before 12th century 1. the law in force in the part of England held by the Danes before the Norman Conquest 2. the part of England under the Danelaw
dang
I. transitive verb Etymology: euphemism Date: circa 1797 damn 4 II. adjective or adverb Date: 1914 damned
danger
I. noun Etymology: Middle English daunger, from Anglo-French dangier, dongier, from Vulgar Latin *dominiarium, from Latin dominium ownership Date: 13th century 1. a. ...
Danger Islands
geographical name — see Pukapuka
dangerous
adjective Date: 15th century 1. exposing to or involving danger 2. able or likely to inflict injury or harm • dangerously adverb • dangerousness noun Synonyms: ...
dangerously
adverb see dangerous
dangerousness
noun see dangerous
dangle
I. verb (dangled; dangling) Etymology: probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Danish dangle to dangle Date: 1565 intransitive verb 1. to hang loosely and usually so as to ...
dangler
noun see dangle I
Daniel
I. noun Etymology: Hebrew Dānī'ēl Date: before 12th century 1. the Jewish hero of the Book of Daniel who as an exile in Babylon interprets dreams, gives accounts of ...
Daniels
biographical name Josephus 1862-1948 American journalist & statesman
Danilova
biographical name Aleksandra 1903?-1997 American (Russian-born) choreographer & dancer
danio
noun (plural danios) Etymology: New Latin, genus name Date: circa 1889 any of various small brightly colored Asian cyprinid fishes (genera Danio and Brachydanio) — compare ...
Danish
I. adjective Date: 14th century of, relating to, or characteristic of Denmark, the Danes, or the Danish language II. noun Date: 15th century 1. the Germanic language of the ...
Danish pastry
noun Date: 1921 a pastry made of a rich raised dough
Danish West Indies
geographical name the W Virgin Islands that were until 1917 a Danish possession & now constitute the Virgin Islands of the United States
dank
adjective Etymology: Middle English danke Date: 1573 unpleasantly moist or wet Synonyms: see wet • dankly adverb • dankness noun
dankly
adverb see dank
dankness
noun see dank
Danmark
geographical name — see Denmark
danseur
noun Etymology: French, from danser to dance Date: 1776 a male ballet dancer
danseuse
noun Etymology: French, feminine of danseur Date: 1776 a female ballet dancer
Dante
biographical name 1265-1321 Dante or Durante Alighieri Italian poet • Dantean or Dantescan or Dantesque adjective
Dantean
adjective Date: 1785 of, relating to, or suggestive of Dante or his writings; especially having a hellish or bizarre quality
Dantescan
adjective see Dante
Dantesque
adjective see Dante
Danton
biographical name Georges-Jacques 1759-1794 French revolutionary
Danube
or German Donau or ancient Danubius or Ister geographical name river 1771 miles (2850 kilometers) central & SE Europe flowing SE from SW Germany into Black Sea • Danubian ...
Danubian
adjective see Danube
Danubius
geographical name see Danube
Danvers
geographical name town NE Massachusetts N of Lynn population 25,212
Danville
geographical name 1. city W California E of Oakland population 41,715 2. city E Illinois population 33,904 3. city S Virginia on Dan River population 48,411
Danzig
geographical name 1. — see gdansk 2. territory surrounding & including Gdańsk that (1920-39) constituted a free city under the League of Nations
Danzig, Gulf of
geographical name — see gdansk (Gulf of)
Daoism
variant of Taoism
daphne
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Latin, laurel, from Greek daphnē Date: circa 1841 any of a genus (Daphne) of Eurasian shrubs of the mezereon family with apetalous ...
Daphne
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Daphnē Date: 15th century a nymph in Greek mythology who is transformed into a laurel tree to escape the pursuing Apollo
daphnia
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name Date: 1847 any of a genus (Daphnia) of minute freshwater branchiopod crustaceans with biramous antennae used as locomotor organs — ...
Daphnis
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Date: 1563 a Sicilian shepherd renowned in Greek mythology as the inventor of pastoral poetry
dapper
adjective Etymology: Middle English dapyr, from Middle Dutch dapper quick, strong; akin to Old High German tapfar heavy, Old Church Slavic debelŭ thick Date: 15th century 1. ...
dapperly
adverb see dapper
dapperness
noun see dapper
dapple
I. noun Etymology: Middle English dappel-gray, adjective, gray marked with spots of another color Date: 1580 1. any of numerous usually cloudy and rounded spots or patches of ...
dappled
also dapple adjective Date: 15th century marked with small spots or patches contrasting with the background
dapsone
noun Etymology: diamine + phenyl + sulfone Date: 1952 an antimicrobial agent C12H12N2O2S used especially to treat leprosy and a chronic form of dermatitis
DAR
abbreviation Daughters of the American Revolution
Dar el Beida
geographical name — see Casablanca
Dar es Salaam
geographical name city & port capital of Tanzania on Indian Ocean population 1,360,850
Darby and Joan
noun Etymology: probably from Darby & Joan, couple in an 18th century song Date: 1760 a happily married usually elderly couple
Dard
noun Date: 1902 Dardic
Dardan
adjective or noun Etymology: Latin Dardanus, from Greek Dardanos Date: 1513 archaic Trojan
Dardanelles
or Hellespont or ancient Hellespontus geographical name strait NW Turkey connecting Sea of Marmara with the Aegean
Dardanian
adjective Date: 1581 Trojan
Dardic
noun Date: 1910 a complex of Indo-Aryan languages spoken in the upper valley of the Indus
DARE
abbreviation Dictionary of American Regional English
Dare
biographical name Virginia 1587-? 1st child born in America of English parents
dare
I. verb (dared; daring; dares or (auxiliary) dare) Etymology: Middle English dar (1st & 3d singular present indicative), from Old English dear; akin to Old High German gitar ...
daredevil
I. adjective Date: 1727 recklessly and often ostentatiously daring Synonyms: see adventurous II. noun Date: 1794 a recklessly bold person • daredevilry noun • ...
daredevilry
noun see daredevil II
daredeviltry
noun see daredevil II
dareful
adjective Date: 1580 obsolete daring
daren't
dare not ; dared not
darer
noun see dare I
daresay
verb Date: 13th century transitive verb venture to say ; think probable — used in pres. 1st sing. intransitive verb agree, suppose — used in pres. 1st sing.
Darfur
geographical name region W Sudan; chief city El Fasher
Darién
geographical name Spanish colonial settlement Central America W of Gulf of Darien
Darien, Gulf of
geographical name inlet of the Caribbean between E Panama & NW Colombia
Darien, Isthmus of
geographical name — see panama (Isthmus of)
daring
I. adjective Date: 1575 venturesomely bold in action or thought Synonyms: see adventurous • daringly adverb • daringness noun II. noun Date: 1584 venturesome ...
daringly
adverb see daring I
daringness
noun see daring I
Darius
biographical name name of 3 kings of Persia: especially I 550-486 B.C. (reigned 522-486) Darius Hystaspes ; the Great
Darjeeling
I. noun Etymology: Darjeeling, India Date: 1895 a tea of high quality grown especially in the mountainous districts of northern India II. geographical name or Darjiling ...
Darjiling
geographical name see Darjeeling II
dark
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English derk, from Old English deorc; akin to Old High German tarchannen to hide Date: before 12th century 1. a. devoid or partially devoid ...
dark adaptation
noun Date: 1900 the process including dilation of the pupil, increase in sensitivity of the retinal rods, and regeneration of rhodopsin by which the eye adapts to conditions of ...
dark age
noun Date: 1640 1. a time during which a civilization undergoes a decline: as a. plural, capitalized D&A the European historical period from about A.D. 476 to about 1000; ...
dark continent
noun Date: 1829 1. often capitalized D&C the continent of Africa 2. something unknown or unexplored
dark field
noun Date: 1865 the dark area that serves as the background for objects viewed in an ultramicroscope
dark horse
noun Date: 1831 1. a. a usually little known contender (as a racehorse) that makes an unexpectedly good showing b. an entrant in a contest that is judged unlikely to ...
dark lantern
noun Date: 1640 a lantern that can be closed to conceal the light
dark matter
noun Date: 1982 nonluminous matter not yet directly detected by astronomers that is hypothesized to exist to account for various observed gravitational effects
dark reaction
noun Date: 1927 any of a series of chemical reactions in photosynthesis not requiring the presence of light and involving the reduction of carbon dioxide to form carbohydrate; ...
dark-adapted
adjective see dark adaptation
dark-eyed junco
noun Date: 1974 a common North American junco (Junco hyemalis)
dark-field microscope
noun Date: 1926 ultramicroscope
darken
verb (darkened; darkening) Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to grow dark ; become obscured 2. to become gloomy transitive verb 1. to make dark 2. to make ...
darkener
noun see darken
darkie
noun see darky
darkish
adjective see dark I
darkle
intransitive verb (darkled; darkling) Etymology: back-formation from darkling Date: 1800 1. a. to become clouded or gloomy b. to grow dark 2. to become concealed in ...
darkling
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English derkelyng, from derk dark + -lyng -ling Date: 15th century in the dark II. adjective Date: 1718 1. dark 2. done or taking place in ...
darkling beetle
noun Date: 1816 any of a family (Tenebrionidae) of firm-bodied mostly dark-colored vegetable-feeding nocturnal beetles which often have vestigial and functionless wings and ...
darkly
adverb see dark I
darkness
noun see dark I
darkroom
noun Date: 1841 a room with no light or with a safelight for handling and processing light-sensitive photographic materials
darksome
adjective Date: circa 1530 gloomily somber ; dark
darky
or darkie noun (plural darkies) Date: 1775 usually offensive a black person
Darlan
biographical name Jean-Louis-Xavier-François 1881-1942 French admiral
Darling
geographical name river about 1700 miles (2735 kilometers) SE Australia in Queensland & New South Wales flowing SW into Murray River
darling
I. noun Etymology: Middle English derling, from Old English dēorling, from dēore dear Date: before 12th century 1. a dearly loved person 2. favorite II. adjective ...
Darling Range
geographical name mountains SW Western Australia extending about 250 miles (400 kilometers) N-S along coast; highest point Mt. Cooke 1910 feet (582 meters)
darlingly
adverb see darling II
darlingness
noun see darling II
Darlington
geographical name town N England in Durham population 96,700
Darmstadt
geographical name city central Germany in Hesse SSW of Frankfurt am Main population 140,040
darn
I. verb Etymology: perhaps from French dialect darner Date: circa 1600 transitive verb 1. to mend with interlacing stitches 2. to embroider by filling in with long ...
Darnah
or Derna geographical name city & port NE Libya
darned
adjective or adverb see darn IV
darnel
noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century any of several usually weedy ryegrasses (genus Lolium)
darner
noun see darn I
darning needle
noun Date: 1742 1. a long needle with a large eye for use in darning 2. dragonfly, damselfly
Darnley
biographical name Lord 1545-1567 Henry Stewart or Stuart; husband of Mary, Queen of Scots
DARPA
abbreviation Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency
Darrow
biographical name Clarence Seward 1857-1938 American lawyer & author
dart
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German tart dart, Old English daroth Date: 14th century 1. a. archaic a light ...
dartboard
noun Date: 1901 a usually circular board (as of compressed bristles) used as a target in the game of darts
darter
noun Date: 1796 1. anhinga 2. any of numerous small North American freshwater bony fishes (especially genera Ammocrypta, Etheostoma, and Percina of the family Percidae)
Dartmoor
geographical name tableland SW England in S Devon area 365 square miles (945 square kilometers)
Dartmouth
geographical name 1. town SE Massachusetts W of New Bedford population 30,666 2. town & port SW England in S Devon on Dart River population 6298
Darwin
I. biographical name Charles Robert 1809-1882 English naturalist II. biographical name Erasmus 1731-1802 grandfather of C.R. English physiologist & poet III. geographical ...
Darwin tulip
noun Date: 1889 a tall late-flowering tulip with the flowers single and of one color
Darwin's finches
noun plural Etymology: Charles Darwin Date: 1947 finches of a subfamily (Geospizinae) having great variation in bill shape and confined mostly to the Galápagos Islands
Darwinian
adjective Date: 1860 1. of or relating to Charles Darwin, his theories especially of evolution, or his followers 2. of, relating to, or being a competitive environment or ...
Darwinism
noun Date: 1864 1. a theory of the origin and perpetuation of new species of animals and plants that offspring of a given organism vary, that natural selection favors the ...
Darwinist
noun or adjective see Darwinism
dash
I. verb Etymology: Middle English dasshen, probably from Middle French dachier to impel forward Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to break by striking or knocking 2. ...
dashboard
noun Date: 1842 1. a screen on the front of a usually horse-drawn vehicle to intercept water, mud, or snow 2. a panel extending across the interior of a vehicle (as an ...
dashed
adjective Date: circa 1889 made up of a series of dashes
dasheen
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1899 taro
dasher
noun Date: 1790 1. a dashing person 2. one that dashes 3. a device having blades for agitating a liquid or semisolid
dashi
noun Etymology: Japanese, broth Date: circa 1961 a fish broth made from dried bonito
dashiki
also daishiki noun Etymology: modification of Yoruba dàńṣíkí Date: circa 1968 a usually brightly colored loose-fitting pullover garment
dashing
adjective Date: circa 1697 1. marked by vigorous action ; spirited 2. marked by smartness especially in dress and manners • dashingly adverb
dashingly
adverb see dashing
dashpot
noun Date: 1861 a device for cushioning or damping a movement (as of a mechanical part) to avoid shock
dassie
noun Etymology: Afrikaans Date: 1814 hyrax
dastard
noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 15th century 1. coward 2. a person who acts treacherously or underhandedly
dastardliness
noun see dastardly
dastardly
adjective Date: 1542 1. cowardly 2. characterized by underhandedness or treachery Synonyms: see cowardly • dastardliness noun
dat
abbreviation dative
DAT
abbreviation 1. differential aptitude test 2. digital audiotape
data
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Usage: often attributive Etymology: Latin, plural of datum Date: 1646 1. factual information (as measurements or ...
data bank
noun Date: 1966 database
data processing
noun Date: 1954 the converting of raw data to machine-readable form and its subsequent processing (as storing, updating, combining, rearranging, or printing out) by a ...
data processor
noun see data processing
data structure
noun Date: 1963 any of various methods or formats (as an array, file, or record) for organizing data in a computer
database
noun Date: circa 1962 a usually large collection of data organized especially for rapid search and retrieval (as by a computer) • database transitive verb
datable
adjective see date III
date
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, ultimately from Latin dactylus — more at dactyl Date: 14th century 1. the oblong edible fruit of a palm (Phoenix ...
date line
noun see dateline 2
date rape
noun Date: 1975 rape committed by the victim's date; broadly acquaintance rape
date rape drug
noun Date: 1995 a drug (as GHB) administered surreptitiously (as in a drink) to induce an unconscious or sedated state in a potential date rape victim
date rapist
noun see date-rape
date-rape
transitive verb Date: 1984 to commit date rape on • date rapist noun
dateable
adjective see date III
dated
adjective Date: 1578 1. provided with a date 2. outmoded, old-fashioned • datedly adverb • datedness noun
datedly
adverb see dated
datedness
noun see dated
dateless
adjective Date: 1593 1. endless 2. having no date 3. too ancient to be dated 4. timeless
dateline
noun Date: 1888 1. a line in a written document or a printed publication giving the date and place of composition or issue 2. (usually date line) international date line ...
dater
noun see date III
dative
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English datif, from Latin dativus, from datus Date: 15th century of, relating to, or being the grammatical case that marks typically the ...
dative bond
noun Etymology: from the donation of electrons by one of the atoms Date: circa 1929 coordinate bond
Datong
or Tatung geographical name city NE China in N Shanxi population 798,319
datum
noun Etymology: Latin, from neuter of datus Date: 1646 1. plural data something given or admitted especially as a basis for reasoning or inference 2. plural datums something ...
datura
noun Etymology: ultimately from Hindi dhatūrā jimsonweed (or a cognate descendant of Sanskrit dhattūraḥ) Date: 1598 any of a genus (Datura) of widely distributed ...
dau
abbreviation daughter
daub
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French dauber Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to cover or coat with soft adhesive matter ; plaster 2. to coat with a ...
daube
noun Etymology: French Date: 1723 a stew of braised meat, vegetables, herbs, and spices
dauber
noun see daub I
Daubigny
biographical name Charles-François 1817-1878 French painter
Daudet
I. biographical name Alphonse 1840-1897 French novelist II. biographical name Léon 1867-1942 son of Alphonse French journalist & writer
Daugavpils
or Russian Dvinsk geographical name city E Latvia on Western Dvina River population 129,000
daughter
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, doughter, from Old English dohtor; akin to Old High German tohter daughter, Greek thygatēr Date: before 12th century 1. a. a female ...
daughter-in-law
noun (plural daughters-in-law) Date: 14th century the wife of one's son
daughterless
adjective see daughter I
Daumier
biographical name Honoré 1808-1879 French caricaturist & painter
daunomycin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary dauno- (from Latin Daunus Apulian) + -mycin Date: 1963 daunorubicin
daunorubicin
noun Etymology: dauno- (as in daunomycin) + rubidomycin, a substance found to be identical with daunomycin (from International Scientific Vocabulary rubido- —from Latin rubidus ...
daunt
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French danter, daunter, from Latin domitare to tame, frequentative of domare — more at tame Date: 14th century to ...
daunting
adjective Date: 13th century tending to overwhelm or intimidate • dauntingly adverb
dauntingly
adverb see daunting
dauntless
adjective Date: 1588 fearless, undaunted • dauntlessly adverb • dauntlessness noun
dauntlessly
adverb see dauntless
dauntlessness
noun see dauntless
dauphin
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Middle English dolphin, from Anglo-French dolphyn, from Old French dalfin, title of lords of the Dauphiné, from Dalfin, a surname ...
dauphine
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: French Date: 1824 the wife of the dauphin
Dauphiné
geographical name region & former province SE France N of Provence capital Grenoble
Dausset
biographical name Jean-Baptiste-Gabriel 1916- French physician
DAV
abbreviation Disabled American Veterans
Davao
geographical name city Philippines on Davao Gulf population 850,000
Davao Gulf
geographical name gulf of the Pacific Philippines in SE Mindanao
daven
also doven intransitive verb Etymology: Yiddish davnen Date: circa 1930 to recite the prescribed prayers in a Jewish liturgy
Davenant
or D'Avenant biographical name Sir William 1606-1668 English poet & dramatist; poet laureate (1638-68)
davenport
noun Etymology: probably from the name Davenport Date: 1853 1. a small compact writing desk 2. a large upholstered sofa often convertible into a bed
Davenport
I. biographical name John 1597-1670 American (English-born) clergyman & founder of New Haven colony II. geographical name city E Iowa on Mississippi River population 98,359
David
I. noun Etymology: Hebrew Dāwīdh Date: before 12th century 1. a Hebrew shepherd who became the second king of Israel in succession to Saul according to biblical accounts ...
David d'Angers
biographical name Pierre-Jean 1788-1856 French sculptor
David I
biographical name circa 1082-1153 king of Scotland (1124-53)

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