Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389)

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death duty
noun Date: 1881 chiefly British death tax
death grip
noun Date: 1829 1. an extremely tight grip caused especially by fear 2. hold 3b
death instinct
noun Date: 1922 an innate and unconscious tendency toward self-destruction postulated in psychoanalytic theory to explain aggressive and destructive behavior not ...
death mask
noun Date: 1877 a cast taken from the face of a dead person
death metal
noun Date: 1987 a type of heavy metal music that is characterized by the use of dark, violent, or gory imagery
death rate
noun Date: 1852 the ratio between deaths and individuals in a specified population and time
death rattle
noun Date: 1822 a rattling or gurgling sound produced by air passing through mucus in the lungs and air passages of a dying person
death ray
noun Date: 1919 a weapon that generates an intense beam of particles or radiation by which it destroys its target
death row
noun Date: 1950 a prison area housing inmates sentenced to death — usually used with on
death sentence
noun Date: 1799 1. a sentence condemning a convicted defendant to death 2. an affliction or a situation that is considered to be fatal; also a prognosis of death
death squad
noun Date: 1969 any of various extremist groups whose members kill suspected political adversaries and criminals
death tax
noun Date: 1937 a tax arising on the transmission of property after the owner's death; especially estate tax
death trap
noun Date: 1835 a structure or situation that is potentially very dangerous to life
Death Valley
geographical name arid valley E California & S Nevada containing lowest point in the United States at 282 feet (86 meters) below sea level; most of area included in Death ...
death warrant
noun Date: 1692 1. a warrant for the execution of a death sentence 2. deathblow
death wish
noun Date: 1913 the conscious or unconscious desire for the death of oneself or of another
death's-head
noun Date: 1596 a human skull or a depiction of a human skull symbolizing death
death's-head hawk moth
noun Date: 1879 a large dark hawk moth (Acherontia atropos) especially of Mediterranean regions with markings resembling a human skull on the back of the thorax — called ...
death's-head moth
noun see death's-head hawk moth
deathbed
noun Date: before 12th century 1. the bed in which a person dies 2. the last hours of life
deathblow
noun Date: 1795 a destructive or killing stroke or event
deathless
adjective Date: 1589 immortal, imperishable • deathlessly adverb • deathlessness noun
deathlessly
adverb see deathless
deathlessness
noun see deathless
deathly
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. fatal 2. of, relating to, or suggestive of death • deathly adverb
deathsman
noun Date: 1589 archaic executioner
deathwatch
I. noun Etymology: death + watch (timepiece); from the superstition that its ticking presages death Date: 1646 a small insect that makes a ticking sound; especially ...
deathwatch beetle
noun Date: 1877 any of various small beetles (family Anobiidae, especially Xestobium rufovillosum) that bore in seasoned or dead wood (as of old buildings) and make a tapping ...
Deauville
geographical name town NW France on Bay of the Seine SSW of Le Havre population 4380
deb
I. noun Date: 1920 debutante II. abbreviation debenture
debacle
also débâcle noun Etymology: French débâcle, from débâcler to clear, from Middle French desbacler, from des- de- + bacler to block, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *bacculare, ...
débâcle
noun see debacle
debar
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English debarren, from Anglo-French debarrer, from de- + barrer to bar Date: 15th century to bar from having or doing something ; preclude ...
debark
I. verb Etymology: French debarquer, from de- + barque bark (ship) Date: 1654 disembark • debarkation noun II. transitive verb Date: 1742 to remove bark from • ...
debarkation
noun see debark I
debarker
noun see debark II
debarment
noun see debar
debase
transitive verb Date: 1565 1. to lower in status, esteem, quality, or character 2. a. to reduce the intrinsic value of (a coin) by increasing the base-metal content b. ...
debasement
noun see debase
debaser
noun see debase
debatable
adjective Date: 1536 1. claimed by more than one country 2. a. open to dispute ; questionable b. open to debate 3. capable of being debated • debatably adverb
debatably
adverb see debatable
debate
I. noun Date: 13th century a contention by words or arguments: as a. the formal discussion of a motion before a deliberative body according to the rules of parliamentary ...
debatement
noun see debate II
debater
noun see debate II
debauch
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle French debaucher, from Old French desbauchier to scatter, disperse, from des- de- + bauch beam, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German ...
debauchee
noun Etymology: French débauché, from past participle of débaucher Date: 1661 one given to debauchery
debaucher
noun see debauch I
debauchery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1642 1. a. extreme indulgence in sensuality b. plural orgies 2. archaic seduction from virtue or duty
debeak
transitive verb Date: 1937 to remove the tip of the upper mandible of (as a chicken) to prevent cannibalism and fighting
debeard
transitive verb Date: 1980 to remove the byssus from (a mussel)
debenture
noun Etymology: Middle English debentur, from Latin, they are due, 3d plural present passive of debēre to owe — more at debt Date: 15th century 1. British a corporate ...
Debierne
biographical name André-Louis 1874-1949 French chemist
debilitate
transitive verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Latin debilitatus, past participle of debilitare to weaken, from debilis weak Date: 1533 to impair the strength of ; enfeeble ...
debilitation
noun see debilitate
debility
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English debilite, from Middle French debilité, from Latin debilitat-, debilitas, from debilis, from de- de- + -bilis; akin to Sanskrit bala ...
debit
I. transitive verb Date: 1682 to enter upon the debit side of an account ; charge with a debit II. noun Etymology: Latin debitum debt Date: 1746 1. a. a record of an ...
debit card
noun Date: 1975 a card like a credit card by which money may be withdrawn or the cost of purchases paid directly from the holder's bank account without the payment of interest
debonair
adjective Etymology: Middle English debonere, from Anglo-French deboneire, from de bon aire of good family or nature Date: 13th century 1. archaic gentle, courteous 2. a. ...
debonairly
adverb see debonair
debonairness
noun see debonair
debone
transitive verb Date: 1944 bone • deboner noun
deboner
noun see debone
Deborah
noun Etymology: Hebrew Dĕbhōrāh Date: 14th century a Hebrew prophetess who rallied the Israelites in their struggles against the Canaanites
debouch
verb Etymology: French déboucher, from dé- de- + bouche mouth, from Old French boche, from Latin bucca cheek Date: 1745 transitive verb to cause to emerge ; discharge ...
debouchment
noun see debouch
Debrecen
geographical name city E Hungary population 222,300
Debreu
biographical name Gerard 1921- American (French-born) economist
debride
transitive verb see debridement
debridement
noun Etymology: French débridement, from débrider to remove adhesions, literally, to unbridle, from Middle French desbrider, from des- de- + bride bridle, from Middle High ...
debrief
transitive verb Date: 1945 1. to interrogate (as a pilot) usually upon return (as from a mission) in order to obtain useful information 2. to carefully review upon completion ...
debris
noun (plural debris) Etymology: French débris, from Middle French, from debriser to break to pieces, from Old French debrisier, from de- + brisier to break, of Celtic origin; ...
Debs
biographical name Eugene Victor 1855-1926 American socialist
debt
noun Etymology: Middle English dette, debte, from Anglo-French dette something owed, from Vulgar Latin *debita, from Latin, plural of debitum debt, from neuter of debitus, past ...
debt service
noun Date: 1929 the amount of interest and sinking fund payments due annually on long-term debt
debtless
adjective see debt
debtor
noun Date: 13th century 1. one guilty of neglect or violation of duty 2. one who owes a debt
debug
transitive verb Date: 1944 1. to remove insects from 2. to eliminate errors in or malfunctions of 3. to remove a concealed microphone or wiretapping device from • ...
debugger
noun see debug
debunk
transitive verb Date: 1923 to expose the sham or falseness of • debunker noun
debunker
noun see debunk
Debussy
biographical name (Achille-) Claude 1862-1918 French composer • Debussyan adjective
Debussyan
adjective see Debussy
debut
I. noun also début Etymology: French début, from débuter to begin, from Middle French desbuter to play first, from des- de- + but starting point, goal — more at butt Date: ...
début
noun see debut I
debutant
noun Etymology: French débutant, from present participle of débuter Date: circa 1822 one making a debut
debutante
noun Etymology: French débutante, feminine of débutant Date: 1801 debutant; especially a young woman making her formal entrance into society
Debye
biographical name Peter Joseph William 1884-1966 American (Dutch-born) physicist
dec
abbreviation 1. deceased 2. declaration; declared 3. declination 4. decorated; decorative 5. decrease 6. decrescendo
Dec
abbreviation December
dec-
combining form see deca-
deca-
or dec- or deka- or dek- combining form Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from Greek deka-, dek-, from deka — more at ten ten
decadal
adjective see decade
decade
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French décade, from Late Latin decad-, decas, from Greek dekad-, dekas, from deka Date: 15th century 1. a group or set of 10: as ...
decadelong
adjective Date: 1974 lasting a decade
decadence
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Medieval Latin decadentia, from Late Latin decadent-, decadens, present participle of decadere to fall, sink — more at decay Date: 1530 1. ...
decadency
noun Date: 1632 decadence 1
decadent
I. adjective Etymology: back-formation from decadence Date: 1837 1. marked by decay or decline 2. of, relating to, or having the characteristics of the decadents 3. ...
decadently
adverb see decadent I
decaf
noun Etymology: short for decaffeinated Date: 1961 decaffeinated coffee
decaffeinated
adjective Date: 1921 having the caffeine removed
decagon
noun Etymology: New Latin decagonum, from Greek dekagōnon, from deka- deca- + -gōnon -gon Date: circa 1639 a plane polygon of 10 angles and 10 sides
decagram
noun Etymology: French décagramme, from déca- deca- + gramme gram Date: 1810 dekagram
decahedron
noun (plural -drons or decahedra) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1828 a polyhedron of 10 faces
decal
noun Etymology: short for decalcomania Date: 1937 a picture, design, or label made to be transferred (as to glass) from specially prepared paper
decalcification
noun Date: 1859 the removal or loss of calcium or calcium compounds (as from bones or soil) • decalcify transitive verb
decalcify
transitive verb see decalcification
decalcomania
noun Etymology: French décalcomanie, from décalquer to copy by tracing (from dé- de- + calquer to trace, from Italian calcare, literally, to tread, from Latin) + manie ...
decaliter
noun Etymology: French décalitre, from déca- + litre liter Date: 1810 dekaliter
decalogue
noun Etymology: Middle English decaloge, from Late Latin decalogus, from Greek dekalogos, from deka- + logos word — more at legend Date: 14th century 1. capitalized Ten ...
decameter
I. noun Etymology: French décamètre, from déca- + mètre meter Date: 1810 dekameter II. noun Etymology: Greek dekametron, from deka- + metron measure, meter Date: 1821 ...
decamethonium
noun Etymology: deca- + methylene + -onium Date: circa 1949 a synthetic ion used in the form of either its bromide or iodide salts (C16H38Br2N2 or C16H38I2N2) as a skeletal ...
decametric
adjective Etymology: decameter + -ic; from the wavelength range being between 1 and 10 dekameters Date: 1950 of, relating to, or being a radio wave of high frequency
decamp
intransitive verb Etymology: French décamper, from Middle French descamper, from des- de- + camper to camp Date: 1676 1. to break up a camp 2. to depart suddenly ; abscond ...
decampment
noun see decamp
decane
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary deca- Date: circa 1875 any of several isomeric liquid alkanes C10H22
decant
transitive verb Etymology: New Latin decantare, from Latin de- + Medieval Latin cantus edge, from Latin, iron ring round a wheel — more at cant Date: 1633 1. to draw off (a ...
decantation
noun see decant
decanter
noun Date: 1708 a vessel used to decant or to receive decanted liquids; especially an ornamental glass bottle used for serving wine
decapitate
transitive verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Late Latin decapitatus, past participle of decapitare, from Latin de- + capit-, caput head — more at head Date: circa 1611 to ...
decapitation
noun see decapitate
decapitator
noun see decapitate
decapod
noun Etymology: New Latin Decapoda, from deca- + -poda -pod Date: 1826 1. any of an order (Decapoda) of crustaceans (as shrimps, lobsters, and crabs) with five pairs of ...
decapodan
adjective or noun see decapod
decapodous
adjective see decapod
Decapolis
geographical name confederation of 10 ancient cities N Palestine in region chiefly SE of Sea of Galilee
decarbonate
transitive verb Date: 1831 to remove carbon dioxide or carbonic acid from • decarbonation noun
decarbonation
noun see decarbonate
decarbonize
transitive verb Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1825 to remove carbon from • decarbonizer noun
decarbonizer
noun see decarbonize
decarboxylase
noun Date: 1940 any of a group of enzymes that accelerate decarboxylation especially of amino acids
decarboxylate
transitive verb see decarboxylation
decarboxylation
noun Date: 1922 the removal or elimination of carboxyl from a molecule • decarboxylate transitive verb
decarburization
noun see decarburize
decarburize
transitive verb Date: 1856 decarbonize • decarburization noun
decare
noun Etymology: French décare, from déca- deca- + are Date: 1810 a metric unit of area equal to 10 ares or 0.2471 acre
decasualization
noun Date: 1892 the process of eliminating the employment of casual workers in order to stabilize the workforce
decasyllabic
adjective Etymology: probably from French décasyllabique, from Greek dekasyllabos, from deka- deca- + syllabē syllable Date: 1771 consisting of 10 syllables or composed of ...
decasyllable
noun see decasyllabic
decathlete
noun Etymology: blend of decathlon and athlete Date: 1968 an athlete who competes in the decathlon
decathlon
noun Etymology: French décathlon, from déca- deca- + -athlon (as in pentathlon) Date: 1912 a 10-event athletic contest; specifically a composite contest that consists of ...
Decatur
I. biographical name Stephen 1779-1820 American naval officer II. geographical name 1. city N Alabama population 53,929 2. city central Illinois population 81,860
decay
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French decaïr, from Late Latin decadere to fall, sink, from Latin de- + cadere to fall — more at chance Date: 15th century ...
decayer
noun see decay I
Decazes
biographical name Duc Élie 1780-1860 French statesman
Decca
noun Etymology: Decca Co., British firm which developed it Date: 1946 a system of long-range navigation used chiefly in Europe that utilizes the phase differences of ...
Deccan
geographical name plateau region S central India lying between Eastern Ghats & Western Ghats
decd
abbreviation deceased
decease
noun Etymology: Middle English deces, from Anglo-French, from Latin decessus departure, death, from decedere to depart, die, from de- + cedere to go Date: 14th century ...
deceased
I. adjective Date: 15th century no longer living; especially recently dead — used of persons Synonyms: see dead II. noun (plural deceased) Date: 1548 a dead person
decedent
noun Etymology: Latin decedent-, decedens, present participle of decedere Date: 1599 a deceased person — used chiefly in law
deceit
noun Etymology: Middle English deceite, from Anglo-French, from Latin decepta, feminine of deceptus, past participle of decipere Date: 14th century 1. the act or practice of ...
deceitful
adjective Date: 15th century having a tendency or disposition to deceive: a. not honest b. deceptive, misleading Synonyms: see dishonest • deceitfully adverb • ...
deceitfully
adverb see deceitful
deceitfulness
noun see deceitful
deceivable
adjective Date: 14th century 1. archaic deceitful, deceptive 2. archaic capable of being deceived
deceive
verb (deceived; deceiving) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French deceivre, from Latin decipere, from de- + capere to take — more at heave Date: 13th century transitive ...
deceiver
noun see deceive
deceivingly
adverb see deceive
decelerate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: de- + accelerate Date: 1899 transitive verb 1. to reduce the speed of ; slow down 2. to decrease the rate of progress of ...
deceleration
noun see decelerate
decelerator
noun see decelerate
December
noun Etymology: Middle English Decembre, from Old English or Anglo-French, both from Latin December (tenth month), from decem ten — more at ten Date: before 12th century the ...
Decembrist
noun Date: 1877 one taking part in the unsuccessful uprising against the Russian emperor Nicholas I in December 1825
decemvir
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, back-formation from decemviri, plural, from decem + viri, plural of vir man — more at virile Date: 15th century one of a ruling ...
decemviral
adjective see decemvir
decemvirate
noun see decemvir
decency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1567 1. archaic a. fitness b. orderliness 2. a. the quality or state of being decent ; propriety b. conformity to standards of taste, ...
decennial
adjective Date: circa 1656 1. consisting of or lasting for 10 years 2. occurring or being done every 10 years • decennial noun • decennially adverb
decennially
adverb see decennial
decennium
noun (plural -niums or decennia) Etymology: Latin, from decem + annus year — more at annual Date: 1685 a period of 10 years ; decade
decent
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin decent-, decens, present participle of decēre to be fitting; akin to Latin decus honor, dignus worthy, ...
decenter
transitive verb Date: 1870 to cause to lose or shift from an established center or focus; especially to disconnect from practical or theoretical assumptions of origin, ...
decently
adverb see decent
decentralisation
British variant of decentralization
decentralization
noun Date: 1846 1. the dispersion or distribution of functions and powers; specifically the delegation of power from a central authority to regional and local authorities 2. ...
decentralize
verb see decentralization
deception
noun Etymology: Middle English decepcioun, from Anglo-French deception, from Late Latin deception-, deceptio, from Latin decipere to deceive Date: 15th century 1. a. the ...
deceptional
adjective see deception
deceptive
adjective Date: circa 1611 tending or having power to deceive ; misleading • deceptively adverb • deceptiveness noun
deceptively
adverb see deceptive
deceptiveness
noun see deceptive
decerebrate
I. adjective Date: 1897 1. characteristic of decerebration 2. having the cerebrum removed or made inactive II. transitive verb Date: circa 1900 to remove the cerebrum ...
decerebration
noun see decerebrate II
decertification
noun see decertify
decertify
transitive verb Date: 1918 to withdraw or revoke the certification of • decertification noun
dechlorinate
transitive verb Date: 1941 to remove chlorine from • dechlorination noun
dechlorination
noun see dechlorinate
deci-
combining form Etymology: French déci-, from Latin decimus tenth, from decem ten — more at ten one tenth part of
decibel
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary deci- + bel Date: 1928 1. a. a unit for expressing the ratio of two amounts of electric or acoustic signal power equal ...
decidability
noun see decide
decidable
adjective see decide
decide
verb (decided; deciding) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin decidere, literally, to cut off, from de- + caedere to cut Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to ...
decided
adjective Date: 1790 1. unquestionable 2. free from doubt or wavering • decidedly adverb • decidedness noun
decidedly
adverb see decided
decidedness
noun see decided
decider
noun see decide
deciding
adjective Date: 1611 that decides ; decisive
decidua
noun (plural deciduae) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, feminine of deciduus Date: 1785 1. the part of the endometrium that in higher placental mammals undergoes special ...
decidual
adjective see decidua
deciduous
adjective Etymology: Latin deciduus, from decidere to fall off, from de- + cadere to fall — more at chance Date: 1688 1. falling off or shed seasonally or at a certain stage ...
deciduous tooth
noun Date: 1856 milk tooth
deciduousness
noun see deciduous
decigram
noun Etymology: French décigramme, from déci- + gramme gram Date: 1810 — see metric system table
decile
noun Etymology: Latin decem ten — more at ten Date: 1882 any one of nine numbers that divide a frequency distribution into 10 classes such that each contains the same number ...
deciliter
noun Etymology: French décilitre, from déci- + litre liter Date: 1801 — see metric system table
decillion
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Latin decem + English -illion (as in million) Date: 1847 — see number table
decimal
I. adjective Etymology: French décimal, from Medieval Latin decimalis of a tithe, from Latin decima tithe — more at dime Date: 1608 numbered or proceeding by tens: a. ...
decimal fraction
noun Date: 1660 a fraction (as .25 = 25/100 or .025 = 25/1000) or mixed number (as 3.025 = 3 25/1000) in which the denominator is a power of 10 usually expressed by use of the ...
decimal place
noun Date: 1706 the position of a digit as counted to the right of the decimal point in a decimal
decimal point
noun Date: circa 1771 a period, centered dot, or in some countries a comma at the left of a proper decimal fraction (as .678) or between the parts of a mixed number (as 3.678) ...
decimal system
noun Date: 1811 1. a number system that uses a notation in which each number is expressed in base 10 by using one of the first nine integers or 0 in each place and letting each ...
decimalisation
British variant of decimalization
decimalization
noun Date: 1855 conversion (as of a currency) to a decimal system • decimalize transitive verb
decimalize
transitive verb see decimalization
decimally
adverb see decimal I
decimate
transitive verb (-mated; -mating) Etymology: Latin decimatus, past participle of decimare, from decimus tenth, from decem ten Date: 1660 1. to select by lot and kill every ...
decimation
noun see decimate
decimeter
noun Etymology: French décimètre, from déci- deci- + mètre meter Date: 1809 — see metric system table
decipher
transitive verb Date: 1545 1. decode 1a 2. obsolete depict 3. a. to make out the meaning of despite indistinctness or obscurity b. to interpret the meaning of • ...
decipherable
adjective see decipher
decipherer
noun see decipher
decipherment
noun see decipher
decision
I. noun Etymology: Middle English decisioun, from Middle French, from Latin decision-, decisio, from decidere to decide Date: 15th century 1. a. the act or process of ...
decision theory
noun Date: 1961 a branch of statistical theory concerned with quantifying the process of making choices between alternatives
decision tree
noun Date: 1964 a tree diagram which is used for making decisions in business or computer programming and in which the branches represent choices with associated risks, costs, ...
decisional
adjective see decision I
decisive
adjective Date: 1611 1. having the power or quality of deciding 2. resolute, determined 3. unmistakable, unquestionable Synonyms: see conclusive • decisively ...
decisively
adverb see decisive
decisiveness
noun see decisive
Decius
biographical name Gaius Messius Quintus Trajanus circa 201-251 Roman emperor (249-51)
deck
I. noun Etymology: Middle English dekke covering of a ship, from Middle Dutch *dec covering, probably from Middle Low German vordeck, from vordecken to cover, from vor- for- + ...
deck chair
noun Date: 1884 a folding chair often having an adjustable leg rest
deck shoe
noun Date: 1911 a low shoe having a nonslip sole and a lace that is threaded through a channel around the back of the shoe
deck tennis
noun Etymology: from its being played on the decks of ocean liners Date: 1927 a game in which players toss a ring or quoit back and forth over a net
decker
noun Date: 1762 something having a specified number of decks, levels, floors, or layers — used in combination
deckhand
noun Date: 1844 a sailor who performs manual duties
deckhouse
noun Date: 1856 a superstructure on a ship's upper deck
decking
noun Date: 1580 deck; also material for a deck
deckle
noun Etymology: German Deckel, literally, cover, from decken to cover, from Old High German decchen Date: 1816 a frame around the edges of a mold used in making paper by hand; ...
deckle edge
noun Date: circa 1874 the rough untrimmed edge of paper left by a deckle or produced artificially • deckle-edged adjective
deckle-edged
adjective see deckle edge
declaim
verb Etymology: Middle English declamen, from Latin declamare, from de- + clamare to cry out; akin to Latin calare to call — more at low Date: 14th century intransitive verb ...
declaimer
noun see declaim
declamation
noun see declaim
declamatory
adjective Date: 1581 of, relating to, or marked by declamation or rhetorical display
declarable
adjective see declare
declarant
noun Date: 1681 a person who makes a statement or declaration especially in connection with a legal proceeding
declaration
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of declaring ; announcement 2. a. the first pleading in a common-law action b. a statement made by a party to a legal transaction ...
declarative
adjective Date: 1628 making a declaration ; declaratory • declaratively adverb
declaratively
adverb see declarative
declaratory
adjective Date: 15th century 1. serving to declare, set forth, or explain 2. a. declaring what is the existing law b. declaring a legal right or interpretation
declare
verb (declared; declaring) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French declarer, from Latin declarare, from de- + clarare to make visible, from clarus ...
declarer
noun Date: 14th century one that declares; specifically the bridge player who names the trump and plays both his or her own hand and that of the dummy
declass
transitive verb Date: 1888 to remove from a class; especially to assign to a lower social status
déclassé
adjective Etymology: French, from past participle of déclasser to declass Date: 1887 1. fallen or lowered in class, rank, or social position 2. of inferior status
declassification
noun see declassify
declassify
transitive verb Date: 1945 to remove or reduce the security classification of • declassification noun
declaw
transitive verb Date: 1953 to remove the claws of (as a cat) surgically
declension
noun Etymology: Middle English declenson, modification of Middle French declinaison, from Latin declination-, declinatio grammatical inflection, turning aside, from declinare to ...
declensional
adjective see declension
declinable
adjective see decline I
declination
noun Etymology: Middle English declinacioun, from Middle French declination, from Latin declination-, declinatio angle of the heavens, turning aside Date: 14th century 1. ...
declinational
adjective see declination
decline
I. verb (declined; declining) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French decliner, from Latin declinare to turn aside, inflect, from de- + clinare to incline — more at lean ...

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