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Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389)

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communicatory
adjective Date: 1646 1. designed to communicate information 2. communicative 2
communion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin communion-, communio mutual participation, from communis Date: 14th century 1. an act or instance of sharing 2. a. capitalized ...
communiqué
noun Etymology: French, from past participle of communiquer to communicate, from Latin communicare Date: 1852 bulletin 1
communise
British variant of communize
communism
noun Etymology: French communisme, from commun common Date: 1840 1. a. a theory advocating elimination of private property b. a system in which goods are owned in common ...
Communism Peak
or Russian Pik Kommunizma geographical name mountain 24,590 feet (7495 meters) NE Tajikistan in Pamirs; highest in Tajikistan & the former Union of Soviet Socialist ...
communist
noun Date: 1840 1. an adherent or advocate of communism 2. capitalized communard 3. a. capitalized a member of a Communist party or movement b. often capitalized an ...
communistic
adjective see communist
communistically
adverb see communist
communitarian
adjective Date: circa 1909 of or relating to social organization in small cooperative partially collectivist communities • communitarian noun • communitarianism noun
communitarianism
noun see communitarian
community
noun (plural -ties) Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English comunete, from Anglo-French communité, from Latin communitat-, communitas, from communis Date: 14th ...
community antenna television
noun Date: 1953 cable television
community center
noun Date: 1915 a building or group of buildings for a community's educational and recreational activities
community chest
noun Date: 1919 a general fund accumulated from individual subscriptions to defray demands on a community for charity and social welfare
community college
noun Date: 1948 a 2-year government-supported college that offers an associate degree
community property
noun Date: circa 1925 property held jointly by husband and wife
communization
noun see communize
communize
transitive verb (-nized; -nizing) Etymology: back-formation from communization Date: 1888 1. a. to make common b. to make into state-owned property 2. to subject to ...
commutable
adjective see commute I
commutate
transitive verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: back-formation from commutation Date: 1893 to reverse every other half cycle of (an alternating current) so as to form a ...
commutation
noun Etymology: Middle English commutacion, from Anglo-French, from Latin commutation-, commutatio, from commutare Date: 15th century 1. exchange, trade 2. replacement; ...
commutation ticket
noun Date: 1848 a transportation ticket sold for a fixed number of trips over the same route during a limited period
commutative
adjective Date: 1612 1. of, relating to, or showing commutation 2. of, relating to, having, or being the property that a given mathematical operation and set have when the ...
commutativity
noun Date: 1929 the property of being commutative
commutator
noun Date: 1880 1. a series of bars or segments so connected to armature coils of a generator or motor that rotation of the armature will in conjunction with fixed brushes ...
commute
I. verb (commuted; commuting) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin commutare to change, exchange, from com- + mutare to change — more at mutable Date: 15th century ...
commuter
noun Date: circa 1859 1. a person who commutes (as between a suburb and a city) 2. a small airline that carries passengers relatively short distances on a regular schedule
Commynes
or Comines or Commines biographical name Philippe de circa 1447-1511 French politician & chronicler
Como
geographical name commune N Italy in Lombardy at SW end of Lake Como (37 miles or 59 kilometers long) population 85,955
Comodoro Rivadavia
geographical name city & port S Argentina population 96,865
comonomer
noun Etymology: co- + monomer Date: 1945 one of the constituents of a copolymer
comorbid
adjective Etymology: co- + morbid Date: 1981 existing simultaneously with and usually independently of another medical condition • comorbidity noun
comorbidity
noun see comorbid
Comorin, Cape
geographical name cape S India in Tamil Nadu; southernmost point of India, at 8°5′N
Comoros
geographical name group of islands forming a country off SE Africa between Mozambique & Madagascar; formerly a French possession; a republic (except for Mayotte Island, which ...
comp
I. noun Etymology: short for complimentary Date: 1887 a complimentary ticket; broadly something provided free of charge II. transitive verb Date: 1961 to provide with ...
compact
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, firmly put together, from Latin compactus, from past participle of compingere to put together, from com- + pangere to fasten — more at ...
compact disc
noun Date: 1979 CD
compacter
noun see compact II
compactible
adjective see compact II
compaction
noun Date: 14th century the act or process of compacting ; the state of being compacted
compactly
adverb see compact I
compactness
noun see compact I
compactor
noun see compact II
compadre
noun Etymology: Spanish, literally, godfather, from Medieval Latin compater — more at compeer Date: 1834 a close friend ; buddy
compagnon de voyage
foreign term Etymology: French traveling companion
companion
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English compainoun, from Anglo-French cumpaing, cumpaignun, from Late Latin companion-, companio, from Latin com- + panis ...
companion cell
noun Date: 1887 a living nucleated cell that is closely associated in origin, position, and probably function with a cell making up part of a sieve tube of a vascular plant
companion piece
noun Date: 1844 a work (as of literature) that is associated with and complements another
companionability
noun see companionable
companionable
adjective Date: 14th century marked by, conducive to, or suggestive of companionship ; sociable • companionability noun • companionableness noun • companionably ...
companionableness
noun see companionable
companionably
adverb see companionable
companionate
adjective Date: 1926 relating to or having the manner of companions; specifically harmoniously or suitably accompanying
companionship
noun Date: 1548 the fellowship existing among companions ; company
companionway
noun Etymology: 3companion Date: 1822 a ship's stairway from one deck to another
company
I. noun (plural -nies) Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English companie, from cumpaignie, from cumpaing companion — more at companion Date: 13th century 1. a. ...
company grade officer
noun see company officer
company man
noun Date: circa 1921 a worker who acquiesces in company policy without complaint
company officer
noun Date: 1832 a commissioned officer in the army, air force, or marine corps of the rank of captain, first lieutenant, or second lieutenant — called also company grade ...
company town
noun Date: 1927 a community that is dependent on one firm for all or most of the necessary services or functions of town life (as employment, housing, and stores)
company union
noun Date: 1917 an unaffiliated labor union of the employees of a single firm; especially one dominated by the employer
comparability
noun Date: 1843 the quality or state of being comparable
comparable
adjective Date: 15th century 1. capable of or suitable for comparison 2. similar, like • comparableness noun • comparably adverb
comparable worth
noun Date: 1983 the concept that women and men should receive equal pay for jobs calling for comparable skill and responsibility
comparableness
noun see comparable
comparably
adverb see comparable
comparatist
noun Etymology: comparative + -ist Date: 1933 one that uses a comparative method (as in the study of literature)
comparative
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. of, relating to, or constituting the degree of comparison in a language that denotes increase in the quality, quantity, or relation ...
comparatively
adverb see comparative I
comparativeness
noun see comparative I
comparativist
noun Date: 1887 comparatist
comparator
noun Date: 1883 a device for comparing something with a similar thing or with a standard measure
compare
I. verb (compared; comparing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French comparer, from Latin comparare to couple, compare, from compar like, from com- + par equal Date: 14th ...
comparison
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French comparison, from Latin comparation-, comparatio, from comparare Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of comparing: as ...
comparison shop
intransitive verb Date: 1970 to compare prices (as of competing brands) in order to find the best value • comparison shopper noun
comparison shopper
noun see comparison shop
compartment
I. noun Etymology: Middle French compartiment, from Italian compartimento, from compartire to mark out in parts, from Late Latin compartiri to share out, from Latin com- + ...
compartmental
adjective see compartment I
compartmentalise
British variant of compartmentalize
compartmentalization
noun see compartmentalize
compartmentalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1925 to separate into isolated compartments or categories • compartmentalization noun
compartmentation
noun Date: 1926 division into separate sections or units
compas
noun Etymology: Haitian Creole konpa, literally, beat, rhythm, modification of Spanish compás beat, measure Date: 1985 a popular music of Haiti that combines Cuban and ...
compass
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French cumpasser to measure, from Vulgar Latin *compassare to pace off, from Latin com- + passus pace Date: 14th ...
compass card
noun Date: 1789 the circular card attached to the needles of a mariner's compass on which are marked the 360° of the circle and 32 equidistant points
compass plant
noun Date: 1848 a yellow-flowered composite plant (Silphium laciniatum) that has large pinnatifid leaves in which the leaf edges typically align in a northerly and southerly ...
compass rose
noun Date: circa 1891 a circle graduated to degrees or quarters and printed on a chart to show direction
compassable
adjective see compass I
compassion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French, from Late Latin compassion-, compassio, from compati to sympathize, from Latin com- + pati to ...
compassionate
I. adjective Date: 1579 1. having or showing compassion ; sympathetic 2. granted because of unusual distressing circumstances affecting an individual — used of some ...
compassionately
adverb see compassionate I
compassionateness
noun see compassionate I
compassionless
adjective see compassion
compatibility
noun see compatible
compatible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin compatibilis, literally, sympathetic, from Late Latin compati Date: 15th century 1. capable of existing together in ...
compatibleness
noun see compatible
compatibly
adverb see compatible
compatriot
noun Etymology: French compatriote, from Late Latin compatriota, from Latin com- + Late Latin patriota fellow countryman — more at patriot Date: 1611 1. a person born, ...
compatriotic
adjective see compatriot
compd
abbreviation compound
compeer
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French cumpere, literally, godfather, from Medieval Latin compater, from Latin com- + pater father — more at father Date: 13th ...
compel
transitive verb (compelled; compelling) Etymology: Middle English compellen, from Anglo-French compeller, from Latin compellere, from com- + pellere to drive — more at felt ...
compellable
adjective see compel
compellation
noun Etymology: Latin compellation-, compellatio, from compellare to address, from com- + -pellare (as in appellare to accost, appeal to) Date: 1603 1. an act or action of ...
compelling
adjective Date: 1606 that compels: as a. forceful b. demanding attention c. convincing • compellingly adverb
compellingly
adverb see compelling
compend
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin compendium Date: 1596 compendium
compendious
adjective Date: 14th century marked by brief expression of a comprehensive matter ; concise and comprehensive ; also comprehensive Synonyms: see concise • compendiously ...
compendiously
adverb see compendious
compendiousness
noun see compendious
compendium
noun (plural -diums or compendia) Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin, saving, shortcut, from compendere to weigh together, from com- + pendere to weigh — more at pendant ...
compensability
noun see compensable
compensable
adjective Date: 1661 that is to be or can be compensated • compensability noun
compensate
verb (-sated; -sating) Etymology: Latin compensatus, past participle of compensare, frequentative of compendere Date: 1646 transitive verb 1. to be equivalent to ; ...
compensation
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the act of compensating ; the state of being compensated b. correction of an organic defect or loss by hypertrophy or by increased ...
compensational
adjective see compensation
compensative
adjective see compensate
compensator
noun see compensate
compensatory
adjective see compensate
compensatory education
noun Date: 1965 educational programs intended to make up for experiences (as cultural) lacked by disadvantaged children
compere
I. noun or compère Etymology: French compère, literally, godfather — more at compeer Date: 1914 chiefly British the master of ceremonies of an entertainment (as a ...
compère
I. noun see compere I II. verb see compere II
compete
intransitive verb (competed; competing) Etymology: Late Latin competere to seek together, from Latin, to come together, agree, be suitable, from com- + petere to go to, seek — ...
competence
noun Date: 1605 1. a sufficiency of means for the necessities and conveniences of life 2. the quality or state of being competent: as a. the properties of an embryonic ...
competency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1596 competence
competent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, suitable, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin competent-, competens, from present participle of competere Date: 15th ...
competently
adverb see competent
competition
noun Etymology: Late Latin competition-, competitio, from Latin competere Date: 1579 1. the act or process of competing ; rivalry: as a. the effort of two or more parties ...
competitive
adjective Date: 1829 1. relating to, characterized by, or based on competition 2. inclined, desiring, or suited to compete 3. depending for effectiveness on the ...
competitively
adverb see competitive
competitiveness
noun see competitive
competitor
noun Date: 1534 one that competes: as a. rival b. one selling or buying goods or services in the same market as another c. an organism that lives in competition with ...
Compiègne
geographical name town N France on the Oise population 44,703
compilation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of compiling 2. something compiled
compile
transitive verb (compiled; compiling) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French compiler, from Latin compilare to plunder Date: 14th century 1. to compose out of materials ...
compiler
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that compiles 2. a computer program that translates an entire set of instructions written in a higher-level symbolic language (as C) into ...
complacence
noun Date: 15th century 1. calm or secure satisfaction with oneself or one's lot ; self-satisfaction 2. obsolete complaisance 3. unconcern
complacency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1650 1. self-satisfaction especially when accompanied by unawareness of actual dangers or deficiencies 2. an instance of complacency
complacent
adjective Etymology: Latin complacent-, complacens, present participle of complacēre to please greatly, from com- + placēre to please — more at please Date: 1760 1. marked ...
complacently
adverb see complacent
complain
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English compleynen, from Anglo-French compleindre, from Vulgar Latin *complangere, from Latin com- + plangere to lament — more at plaint ...
complainant
noun Date: 15th century 1. the party who makes the complaint in a legal action or proceeding 2. one who complains
complainer
noun see complain
complainingly
adverb see complain
complaint
noun Etymology: Middle English compleynte, from Anglo-French compleint, from compleindre Date: 14th century 1. expression of grief, pain, or dissatisfaction 2. a. ...
complaisance
noun Date: 1651 disposition to please or comply ; affability
complaisant
adjective Etymology: French, from Middle French, from present participle of complaire to gratify, acquiesce, from Latin complacēre Date: 1638 1. marked by an inclination to ...
complaisantly
adverb see complaisant
compleat
adjective Etymology: archaic variant of complete in The Compleat Angler (1653) by Izaak Walton Date: 1526 having all necessary or desired elements or skills ; complete; also ...
complected
adjective Etymology: irregular from complexion Date: 1785 having a specified facial complexion Usage: Not an error, nor a dialectal term, nor nonstandard—all of which ...
complement
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin complementum, from complēre to fill up, complete, from com- + plēre to fill — more at full Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
complement fixation
noun Date: 1906 the process of binding serum complement to the product formed by the union of an antibody and the antigen for which it is specific that occurs when complement ...
complemental
adjective Date: 1597 1. relating to or being a complement 2. obsolete ceremonious, complimentary
complementarily
adverb see complementary
complementariness
noun see complementary
complementarity
noun Date: 1911 1. the quality or state of being complementary 2. the complementary relationship of theories explaining the nature of light or other quantized radiation in ...
complementary
adjective Date: 1829 1. relating to or constituting one of a pair of contrasting colors that produce a neutral color when combined in suitable proportions 2. serving to fill ...
complementary medicine
noun Date: 1982 any of the practices (as acupuncture) of alternative medicine accepted and utilized by mainstream medical practitioners; also alternative medicine
complementation
noun Date: 1942 1. the operation of determining the complement of a mathematical set 2. production of normal phenotype in an individual heterozygous for two closely related ...
complementizer
noun Date: 1965 a function word or morpheme that combines with a clause or verbal phrase to form a subordinate clause
complete
I. adjective (completer; -est) Etymology: Middle English complet, from Latin completus, from past participle of complēre Date: 14th century 1. a. having all necessary ...
complete fertilizer
noun Date: 1871 a fertilizer that contains the three chief plant nutrients nitrogen, phosphoric acid, and potash
complete with
phrasal made complete by the inclusion of
completely
adverb see complete I
completeness
noun see complete I
completion
noun Date: 1657 1. the act or process of completing 2. the quality or state of being complete 3. a completed forward pass in football
completist
noun Date: 1951 one who wants to make something (as a collection) complete
completive
adjective see complete I
complex
I. noun Etymology: Late Latin complexus totality, from Latin, embrace, from complecti Date: 1643 1. a whole made up of complicated or interrelated parts 2. a. a ...
complex carbohydrate
noun Date: 1938 a polysaccharide (as starch or cellulose) consisting of usually hundreds or thousands of monosaccharide units; also a food (as rice or pasta) composed ...
complex fraction
noun Date: 1827 a fraction with a fraction or mixed number in the numerator or denominator or both — compare simple fraction
complex number
noun Date: 1856 a number of the form a + b √-1 where a and b are real numbers
complex plane
noun Date: circa 1909 a plane whose points are identified by means of complex numbers; especially Argand diagram
complexation
noun see complex III
complexify
verb (-fied; -fying) Date: 1830 transitive verb to make complex intransitive verb to become complex
complexion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin complexion-, complexio, from Latin, combination, from complecti Date: 14th century 1. the combination of ...
complexional
adjective see complexion
complexioned
adjective see complexion
complexity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1661 1. something complex 2. the quality or state of being complex
complexly
adverb see complex II
complexness
noun see complex II
compliance
noun Date: circa 1630 1. a. the act or process of complying to a desire, demand, proposal, or regimen or to coercion b. conformity in fulfilling official requirements 2. ...
compliancy
noun Date: 1643 compliance
compliant
adjective Date: 1642 1. ready or disposed to comply ; submissive 2. conforming to requirements • compliantly adverb
compliantly
adverb see compliant
complicacy
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: 2complicate Date: circa 1828 1. the quality or state of being complicated 2. something that is complicated
complicate
I. adjective Etymology: Latin complicatus, past participle of complicare to fold together, from com- + plicare to fold — more at ply Date: 1638 1. complex, intricate 2. ...
complicated
adjective Date: 1656 1. consisting of parts intricately combined 2. difficult to analyze, understand, or explain Synonyms: see complex • complicatedly adverb • ...
complicatedly
adverb see complicated
complicatedness
noun see complicated
complication
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. complexity, intricacy; especially a situation or a detail of character complicating the main thread of a plot b. a making difficult, ...
complice
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Late Latin complic-, complex, from Latin, closely connected, from complicare Date: 15th century archaic associate
complicit
adjective Date: 1973 having complicity
complicitous
adjective Date: 1860 complicit
complicity
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1656 1. association or participation in or as if in a wrongful act 2. an instance of complicity
complier
noun Date: 1660 one that complies
compliment
I. noun Etymology: Middle French, from Italian complimento, from Spanish cumplimiento, from cumplir to be courteous — more at comply Date: 1598 1. a. an expression of ...
complimentarily
adverb see complimentary
complimentary
adjective Date: 1714 1. a. expressing or containing a compliment b. favorable 2. given free as a courtesy or favor • complimentarily adverb
complimentary close
noun Date: 1919 the words (as sincerely yours) that conventionally come immediately before the signature of a letter and express the sender's regard for the receiver — called ...
complimentary closing
noun see complimentary close
compline
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Middle English compline, complie, from Anglo-French cumplie, modification of Late Latin completa, from Latin, feminine of completus ...
complot
I. noun Etymology: Middle French complot crowd, plot Date: 1577 archaic plot, conspiracy II. verb Date: 1579 archaic plot
comply
intransitive verb (complied; complying) Etymology: Italian complire, from Spanish cumplir to complete, perform what is due, be courteous, modification of Latin complēre to ...
compo
noun (plural compos) Etymology: short for composition Date: 1823 any of various composition materials
component
I. noun Etymology: Latin component-, componens, present participle of componere to put together — more at compound Date: 1645 1. a constituent part ; ingredient 2. ...
componential
adjective see component I
comport
I. verb Etymology: Middle French comporter to bear, conduct, from Latin comportare to bring together, from com- + portare to carry — more at fare Date: 1589 intransitive ...
comportment
noun see comport I
compos mentis
adjective Etymology: Latin, literally, having mastery of one's mind Date: 1616 of sound mind, memory, and understanding
compose
verb (composed; composing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French composer, from Latin componere (perfect indicative composui) — more at compound Date: 15th century ...
composed
adjective Date: 1607 free from agitation ; calm; especially self-possessed Synonyms: see cool • composedly adverb • composedness noun
composedly
adverb see composed
composedness
noun see composed
composer
noun Date: 1597 one that composes; especially a person who writes music
composing room
noun Date: 1737 the department in a printing office where typesetting and related operations are performed
composing stick
noun Date: 1659 a tray with an adjustable slide that a compositor holds in one hand and sets type into with the other
composite
I. adjective Etymology: Latin compositus, past participle of componere Date: 1563 1. made up of distinct parts: as a. capitalized relating to or being a modification of ...
composite function
noun Date: 1965 a function whose values are found from two given functions by applying one function to an independent variable and then applying the second function to the ...
compositely
adverb see composite I
composition
noun Etymology: Middle English composicioun, from Anglo-French composicion, from Latin composition-, compositio, from componere Date: 14th century 1. a. the act or process ...
compositional
adjective see composition
compositionally
adverb see composition
compositionist
noun Date: 1985 a teacher of writing especially in a college or university
compositor
noun Date: 1569 one who sets type
compost
I. noun Etymology: Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin compostum, from Latin, neuter of compositus, compostus, past participle of componere Date: 1587 1. a mixture that ...
compostable
adjective see compost II
Compostela
geographical name — see Santiago 3
composter
noun see compost II
composure
noun Date: 1647 a calmness or repose especially of mind, bearing, or appearance ; self-possession Synonyms: see equanimity
compote
noun Etymology: French, from Old French composte, from Latin composta, feminine of compostus, past participle Date: 1693 1. a dessert of fruit cooked in syrup 2. a bowl of ...
compound
I. verb Etymology: Middle English compounen, from Anglo-French *cumpundre, from Latin componere, from com- + ponere to put — more at position Date: 14th century transitive ...
compound eye
noun Date: 1836 an eye (as of an insect) made up of many separate visual units
compound fracture
noun Date: 1543 a bone fracture resulting in an open wound through which bone fragments usually protrude
compound interest
noun Date: 1660 interest computed on the sum of an original principal and accrued interest
compound microscope
noun Date: circa 1859 a microscope consisting of an objective and an eyepiece mounted in a drawtube
compound number
noun Date: 15th century a number (as 2 feet 5 inches) involving different denominations or more than one unit
compound-complex
adjective Date: 1923 of a sentence having two or more main clauses and one or more subordinate clauses
compoundable
adjective see compound I
compounder
noun see compound I
comprador
or compradore noun Etymology: Portuguese comprador, literally, buyer Date: 1840 1. a Chinese agent engaged by a foreign establishment in China to have charge of its Chinese ...
compradore
noun see comprador
comprehend
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French comprendre, comprehendre, from Latin comprehendere, from com- + prehendere to grasp — more at get Date: 14th ...
comprehendible
adjective see comprehend
comprehensibility
noun see comprehensible
comprehensible
adjective Date: 1598 capable of being comprehended ; intelligible • comprehensibility noun • comprehensibleness noun • comprehensibly adverb
comprehensibleness
noun see comprehensible
comprehensibly
adverb see comprehensible
comprehension
noun Etymology: Middle French & Latin; Middle French, from Latin comprehension-, comprehensio, from comprehendere to understand, comprise Date: 15th century 1. a. the act ...
comprehensive
adjective Date: 1614 1. covering completely or broadly ; inclusive 2. having or exhibiting wide mental grasp • comprehensively adverb • comprehensiveness noun
comprehensively
adverb see comprehensive
comprehensiveness
noun see comprehensive
compress
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin compressare to press hard, frequentative of Latin comprimere to compress, from com- + premere to press — more at press ...
compressed
adjective Date: 14th century 1. pressed together ; reduced in size or volume (as by pressure) 2. flattened as though subjected to compression: a. flattened laterally ...
compressed air
noun Date: 1669 air under pressure greater than that of the atmosphere
compressedly
adverb see compressed
compressibility
noun see compressible
compressible
adjective Date: circa 1691 capable of being compressed • compressibility noun
compression
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the act, process, or result of compressing b. the state of being compressed 2. the process of compressing the fuel mixture in a cylinder ...
compression wave
noun see compressional wave
compressional
adjective see compression
compressional wave
noun Date: 1875 a longitudinal wave (as a sound wave) propagated by the elastic compression of the medium — called also compression wave
compressive
adjective Date: 1572 1. of or relating to compression 2. tending to compress • compressively adverb

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