Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389)

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compressively
adverb see compressive
compressor
noun Date: 1839 one that compresses: as a. a muscle that compresses a part b. a machine that compresses gases
comprise
transitive verb (comprised; comprising) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French compris, past participle of comprendre, from Latin comprehendere Date: 15th century 1. to ...
compromise
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, mutual promise to abide by an arbiter's decision, from Anglo-French compromisse, from Latin compromissum, from neuter of compromissus, past ...
compromiser
noun see compromise II
compt
archaic variant of count
compte rendu
foreign term Etymology: French report (as of proceedings in an investigation)
Compton
I. biographical name Arthur Holly 1892-1962 American physicist II. biographical name Karl Taylor 1887-1954 brother of A.H. American physicist III. geographical name city ...
comptroller
noun Etymology: Middle English, alteration of countreroller controller Date: 15th century 1. a royal-household official who examines and supervises expenditures 2. a public ...
comptrollership
noun see comptroller
compulsion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French, from Late Latin compulsion-, compulsio, from Latin compellere to compel Date: 15th century 1. ...
compulsive
adjective Date: 1588 1. having power to compel 2. of, relating to, caused by, or suggestive of psychological compulsion or obsession • compulsively adverb • ...
compulsively
adverb see compulsive
compulsiveness
noun see compulsive
compulsivity
noun see compulsive
compulsorily
adverb see compulsory
compulsory
adjective Date: 1581 1. mandatory, enforced 2. coercive, compelling • compulsorily adverb
compunction
noun Etymology: Middle English compunccioun, from Anglo-French compunction, from Late Latin compunction-, compunctio, from Latin compungere to prick hard, sting, from com- + ...
compunctious
adjective see compunction
compurgation
noun Etymology: Late Latin compurgation-, compurgatio, from Latin compurgare to clear completely, from com- + purgare to purge Date: circa 1658 the clearing of an accused ...
compurgator
noun Date: 1533 one who under oath vouches for the character or conduct of an accused person
computability
noun see computable
computable
adjective Date: 1646 capable of being computed • computability noun
computation
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the act or action of computing ; calculation b. the use or operation of a computer 2. a system of reckoning 3. an amount computed • ...
computational
adjective see computation
computationally
adverb see computation
compute
verb (computed; computing) Etymology: Latin computare — more at count Date: 1616 transitive verb to determine especially by mathematical means ; also to determine or ...
computed axial tomography
noun see computed tomography
computed tomography
noun Date: 1974 radiography in which a three-dimensional image of a body structure is constructed by computer from a series of plane cross-sectional images made along an axis ...
computer
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1646 one that computes; specifically a programmable usually electronic device that can store, retrieve, and process data • computerdom ...
computerdom
noun see computer
computerese
noun Date: circa 1960 jargon used by computer technologists
computerise
chiefly British variant of computerize
computerist
noun Date: 1973 a person who uses or operates a computer
computerizable
adjective see computerize
computerization
noun see computerize
computerize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1957 1. to carry out, control, or produce by means of a computer 2. to equip with computers 3. a. to store in a computer b. ...
computerized axial tomography
noun see computed tomography
computerized tomography
noun see computed tomography
computerless
adjective see computer
computerlike
adjective see computer
computernik
noun Date: 1968 a computer enthusiast or expert
computerphobe
noun Date: 1976 a person who experiences anxiety about computers and especially about their use • computerphobia noun • computerphobic adjective
computerphobia
noun see computerphobe
computerphobic
adjective see computerphobe
comr
abbreviation commissioner
comrade
noun Etymology: Middle French camarade group sleeping in one room, roommate, companion, from Old Spanish camarada, from cámara room, from Late Latin camera, camara — more at ...
comradeliness
noun see comrade
comradely
adjective see comrade
comradery
noun Date: 1879 camaraderie
comradeship
noun see comrade
Comsat
service mark — used for communications services involving an artificial satellite
Comstock
biographical name Anthony 1844-1915 American reformer
Comstock Lode
geographical name gold & silver lode at Virginia City, Nevada
Comstockery
noun Etymology: Anthony Comstock + English -ery Date: 1905 1. strict censorship of materials considered obscene 2. censorious opposition to alleged immorality (as in ...
Comstockian
adjective Date: 1921 of or relating to Comstockery
comsymp
noun Etymology: communist + sympathizer Date: circa 1961 usually disparaging a person sympathetic to Communist causes
Comte
biographical name Auguste 1798-1857 in full Isidore-Auguste-Marie-François-Xavier French mathematician & philosopher
Comtean
adjective see Comtian
Comtian
or Comtean adjective Date: 1846 of or relating to Auguste Comte or his doctrines • Comtism noun • Comtist adjective or noun
Comtism
noun see Comtian
Comtist
adjective or noun see Comtian
con
I. transitive verb (conned; conning) Etymology: Middle English connen to know, learn, study, alteration of cunnen to know, infinitive of can — more at can Date: 13th century ...
con amore
adverb Etymology: Italian Date: 1739 1. with love, devotion, or zest 2. in a tender manner — used as a direction in music
con anima
adverb Etymology: Italian, literally, with spirit Date: circa 1906 in a spirited manner — used as a direction in music
con brio
adverb Etymology: Italian, literally, with vigor Date: 1798 in a vigorous or brisk manner — often used as a direction in music
con espressione
adverb Etymology: Italian, literally, with expression Date: 1864 with feeling — used as a direction in music
con moto
adverb Etymology: Italian Date: circa 1854 with movement ; in a spirited manner — used as a direction in music
con spirito
adverb Etymology: Italian Date: 1801 with spirit or animation — used as a direction in music
con-
— see com-
Conakry
geographical name city & port capital of Guinea on the Atlantic population 581,000
conalbumin
noun Etymology: com- + albumin Date: 1900 a protein of the white of egg that binds with metal ions (as of iron and copper)
Conan Doyle
biographical name — see Doyle
Conanicut Island
geographical name island Rhode Island in Narragansett Bay W of Aquidneck Island
Conant
biographical name James Bryant 1893-1978 American chemist & educator
conation
noun Etymology: Latin conation-, conatio act of attempting, from conari to attempt — more at deacon Date: circa 1837 an inclination (as an instinct, a drive, a wish, or a ...
conative
adjective see conation
conc
abbreviation 1. concentrate; concentrated; concentration 2. concrete
concanavalin
noun Etymology: com- + canavalin, a noncrystalline globulin found in the jack bean, from New Latin Canavalia, genus name of the jack bean Date: 1917 a protein that occurs in ...
concatenate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin concatenatus, past participle of concatenare to link together, from Latin com- + catena chain Date: 15th century ...
concatenation
noun see concatenate II
concave
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin concavus, from com- + cavus hollow — more at cave Date: 15th century 1. hollowed or rounded inward like the inside of a ...
concavity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. a concave line, surface, or space ; hollow 2. the quality or state of being concave
concavo-convex
adjective Date: 1676 1. concave on one side and convex on the other 2. having the concave side curved more than the convex
conceal
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English concelen, from Anglo-French conceler, from Latin concelare, from com- + celare to hide — more at hell Date: 14th century 1. to ...
concealable
adjective see conceal
concealer
noun Date: 1514 1. one that conceals 2. a cosmetic used to conceal blemishes or discoloration especially under the eyes
concealingly
adverb see conceal
concealment
noun see conceal
concede
verb (conceded; conceding) Etymology: French or Latin; French concéder, from Latin concedere, from com- + cedere to yield Date: 1626 transitive verb 1. to grant as a right ...
concededly
adverb see concede
conceder
noun see concede
conceit
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from conceivre Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) a result of mental activity ; thought (2) individual opinion b. ...
conceited
adjective Etymology: 1conceit Date: 1526 1. ingeniously contrived ; fanciful 2. having or showing an excessively high opinion of oneself • conceitedly adverb • ...
conceitedly
adverb see conceited
conceitedness
noun see conceited
conceivability
noun see conceivable
conceivable
adjective Date: 15th century capable of being conceived ; imaginable • conceivability noun • conceivableness noun
conceivableness
noun see conceivable
conceivably
adverb Date: 1625 1. in a conceivable manner 2. it may be conceived ; possibly
conceive
verb (conceived; conceiving) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French conceivre, from Latin concipere to take in, conceive, from com- + capere to take — more at heave ...
conceiver
noun see conceive
concelebrant
noun Date: circa 1931 one that concelebrates a Eucharist or Mass
concelebrate
verb Etymology: Medieval Latin concelebratus, past participle of concelebrare, from Latin, to frequent, celebrate, from com- + celebrare to celebrate Date: 1879 transitive ...
concelebration
noun see concelebrate
concent
noun Etymology: Latin concentus, from concinere to sing together, from com- + canere to sing — more at chant Date: 1585 archaic harmony
concenter
verb Etymology: French concentrer, from com- + centre center Date: 1598 transitive verb to draw or direct to a common center ; concentrate intransitive verb to come to a ...
concentrate
I. verb (-trated; -trating) Etymology: com- + Latin centrum center Date: 1641 transitive verb 1. a. to bring or direct toward a common center or objective ; focus
concentratedly
adverb see concentrate I
concentration
noun Date: 1634 1. a. the act or process of concentrating ; the state of being concentrated; especially direction of attention to a single object b. an academic major or ...
concentration camp
noun Date: 1901 a camp where persons (as prisoners of war, political prisoners, or refugees) are detained or confined
concentrative
adjective see concentrate I
concentrator
noun Date: 1833 one that concentrates: as a. an industrial plant that produces concentrates from ores b. a mirror or group of mirrors that focus sunlight for use as an ...
concentric
adjective Etymology: Middle English consentrik, from Medieval Latin concentricus, from Latin com- + centrum center Date: 14th century 1. having a common center 2. having a ...
concentrically
adverb see concentric
concentricity
noun see concentric
Concepción
geographical name city S central Chile population 267,891
concept
I. noun Etymology: Latin conceptum, neuter of conceptus, past participle of concipere to conceive — more at conceive Date: 1556 1. something conceived in the mind ; ...
conceptacle
noun Etymology: New Latin conceptaculum, from Latin, receptacle, from conceptus, past participle of concipere to take in Date: 1835 an external cavity containing reproductive ...
conception
noun Etymology: Middle English concepcioun, from Anglo-French concepcion, from Latin conception-, conceptio, from concipere Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) the process of ...
conceptional
adjective see conception
conceptive
adjective see conception
conceptual
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin conceptualis of thought, from Late Latin conceptus act of conceiving, thought, from Latin concipere Date: circa 1834 of, relating to, or ...
conceptual art
noun Usage: often capitalized C Date: circa 1969 an art form in which the artist's intent is to convey a concept rather than to create an art object • conceptual artist ...
conceptual artist
noun see conceptual art
conceptualise
British variant of conceptualize
conceptualism
noun Date: circa 1838 1. a theory in philosophy intermediate between realism and nominalism that universals exist in the mind as concepts of discourse or as predicates which ...
conceptualist
noun Date: 1785 an adherent to the tenets of conceptualism or of conceptual art
conceptualistic
adjective see conceptualism
conceptualistically
adverb see conceptualism
conceptuality
noun see conceptual
conceptualization
noun see conceptualize
conceptualize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1878 to form a concept of; especially to interpret conceptually • conceptualization noun • conceptualizer noun
conceptualizer
noun see conceptualize
conceptually
adverb see conceptual
conceptus
noun (plural -tuses; also concepti) Etymology: Latin, one conceived, from past participle of concipere to conceive Date: 1745 a fertilized egg, embryo, or fetus
concern
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French & Medieval Latin; Middle French concerner, from Medieval Latin concernere, from Late Latin, to sift together, mingle, from ...
concerned
adjective Date: 1656 1. a. anxious, worried b. interested 2. a. interestedly engaged b. culpably involved ; implicated
concerning
preposition Date: 15th century relating to ; regarding
concernment
noun Date: 1610 1. something in which one is concerned 2. importance, consequence 3. archaic involvement, participation 4. solicitude, anxiety
concert
I. noun Etymology: French, from Italian concerto, from concertare Date: 1571 1. agreement in design or plan ; union formed by mutual communication of opinion and views 2. ...
concert grand
noun Date: 1885 a grand piano of the largest size adapted in volume, timbre, and brilliance of tone to concert use
concert pitch
noun Date: 1767 1. international pitch 2. a high state of fitness, tension, or readiness
concerted
adjective Date: 1706 1. a. mutually contrived or agreed on b. performed in unison 2. arranged in parts for several voices or instruments • concertedly adverb ...
concertedly
adverb see concerted
concertedness
noun see concerted
concertgoer
noun Date: 1853 one who frequently attends concerts • concertgoing noun or adjective
concertgoing
noun or adjective see concertgoer
concertina
noun Etymology: probably from 1concert + Italian -ina, diminutive suffix Date: 1837 1. a musical instrument of the accordion family 2. concertina wire
concertina wire
noun Date: 1930 a coiled barbed wire for use as an obstacle
concertino
noun (plural -nos) Etymology: Italian, diminutive of concerto Date: circa 1801 1. the solo instruments in a concerto grosso 2. a short concerto
concertize
intransitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1847 to perform professionally in concerts
concertmaster
or concertmeister noun Etymology: German Konzertmeister, from Konzert concert + Meister master Date: 1853 the leader of the first violins of an orchestra and by custom usually ...
concertmeister
noun see concertmaster
concerto
noun (plural concerti or -tos) Etymology: Italian, from concerto concert Date: 1730 a piece for one or more soloists and orchestra with three contrasting movements
concerto grosso
noun (plural concerti grossi) Etymology: Italian, literally, big concerto Date: 1724 a baroque orchestral composition featuring a small group of solo instruments contrasting ...
concession
noun Etymology: Middle English concessyon, from Anglo-French concessioun, from Latin concession-, concessio, from concedere to concede Date: 15th century 1. a. the act or ...
concessionaire
noun Etymology: French concessionnaire, from concession Date: 1862 the owner or operator of a concession; especially one that operates a refreshment stand at a recreational ...
concessional
adjective see concession
concessionary
adjective see concession
concessioner
noun Date: circa 1891 concessionaire
concessive
adjective Date: 1711 1. denoting concession 2. making for or being a concession • concessively adverb
concessively
adverb see concessive
conch
noun (plural conchs or conches) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin concha mussel, mussel shell, from Greek konchē; akin to Sanskrit śaṅkha conch shell Date: 15th century ...
concha
I. noun (plural conchae) Etymology: Italian & Latin; Italian conca semidome, apse, from Late Latin concha, from Latin, shell Date: circa 1639 1. a. the plain semidome of ...
conchal
adjective see concha I
concho
noun see concha II
conchoidal
adjective Etymology: Greek konchoeidēs like a mussel, from konchē Date: 1666 having elevations or depressions shaped like the inside surface of a bivalve shell • ...
conchoidally
adverb see conchoidal
conchological
adjective see conchology
conchologist
noun see conchology
conchology
noun Etymology: Greek konchē Date: 1776 a branch of zoology that deals with shells • conchological adjective • conchologist noun
Conchos
geographical name river 300 miles (483 kilometers) N Mexico flowing NE into Rio Grande
concierge
noun (plural concierges) Etymology: French, from Old French, probably from Vulgar Latin *conservius, alteration of Latin conservus fellow slave, from com- + servus slave Date: ...
conciliar
adjective Etymology: Latin concilium council Date: circa 1677 of, relating to, or issued by a council • conciliarly adverb
conciliarly
adverb see conciliar
conciliate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin conciliatus, past participle of conciliare to assemble, unite, win over, from concilium assembly, council — more at council Date: 1545 ...
conciliation
noun see conciliate
conciliative
adjective see conciliate
conciliator
noun see conciliate
conciliatory
adjective see conciliate
concinnity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Latin concinnitas, from concinnus skillfully put together Date: 1531 harmony or elegance of design especially of literary style in adaptation of ...
concise
adjective Etymology: Latin concisus, from past participle of concidere to cut up, from com- + caedere to cut, strike Date: circa 1590 marked by brevity of expression or ...
concisely
adverb see concise
conciseness
noun see concise
concision
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin concision-, concisio, from concidere Date: 14th century 1. archaic a cutting up or off 2. the quality or state of being concise
conclave
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Medieval Latin; Middle French, from Medieval Latin, from Latin, room that can be locked up, from com- + clavis key — more ...
conclude
verb (concluded; concluding) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin concludere to shut up, end, infer, from com- + claudere to shut — more at close Date: 14th century ...
concluder
noun see conclude
conclusion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin conclusion-, conclusio, from concludere Date: 14th century 1. a. a reasoned judgment ; inference b. the ...
conclusionary
adjective Date: 1976 conclusory
conclusive
adjective Date: 1536 1. of, relating to, or being a conclusion 2. putting an end to debate or question especially by reason of irrefutability • conclusively adverb • ...
conclusively
adverb see conclusive
conclusiveness
noun see conclusive
conclusory
adjective Date: 1923 consisting of or relating to a conclusion or assertion for which no supporting evidence is offered
concn
abbreviation concentration
concoct
transitive verb Etymology: Latin concoctus, past participle of concoquere to cook together, from com- + coquere to cook — more at cook Date: 1675 1. to prepare by combining ...
concocter
noun see concoct
concoction
noun see concoct
concoctive
adjective see concoct
concomitance
noun Date: circa 1535 accompaniment; especially a conjunction that is regular and is marked by correlative variation of accompanying elements
concomitant
I. adjective Etymology: Latin concomitant-, concomitans, present participle of concomitari to accompany, from com- + comitari to accompany, from comit-, comes companion — more ...
concomitantly
adverb see concomitant I
concord
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French concorde, from Latin concordia, from concord-, concors agreeing, from com- + cord-, cor heart — more at heart Date: 14th ...
Concord
geographical name 1. city W California NE of Oakland population 121,780 2. town E Massachusetts NW of Boston population 16,993 3. city capital of New Hampshire on the ...
concordance
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin concordantia, from Latin concordant-, concordans, present participle of concordare to agree, from concord-, ...
concordant
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin concordant-, concordans Date: 15th century consonant, agreeing • concordantly adverb
concordantly
adverb see concordant
concordat
noun Etymology: French, from Medieval Latin concordatum, from Latin, neuter of concordatus, past participle of concordare Date: 1616 compact, covenant; specifically an ...
concordia discors
foreign term Etymology: Latin discordant harmony
concours d'elegance
noun (plural concours d'elegance) Etymology: French concours d'élégance, literally, competition of elegance Date: 1950 a show or contest of vehicles and accessories in which ...
concourse
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French concours, from Latin concursus, from concurrere to run together — more at concur Date: 14th century ...
concrescence
noun Etymology: Latin concrescentia, from concrescent-, concrescens, present participle of concrescere to grow together, from com- + crescere to grow — more at crescent Date: ...
concrescent
adjective see concrescence
concrete
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin concretus, from past participle of concrescere Date: 14th century 1. naming a real thing or class of things 2. formed ...
concrete music
noun Date: 1953 musique concrete
concrete poetry
noun Date: 1958 poetry in which the poet's intent is conveyed by the graphic patterns of letters, words, or symbols rather than by the conventional arrangement of words
concretely
adverb see concrete I
concreteness
noun see concrete I
concretion
noun Date: 1541 1. something concreted: as a. a hard usually inorganic mass (as a bezoar or tophus) formed in a living body b. a mass of mineral matter found generally ...
concretionary
adjective see concretion
concretism
noun Date: 1865 representation of abstract things as concrete; especially the theory or practice of concrete poetry • concretist noun
concretist
noun see concretism
concretization
noun see concretize
concretize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1884 transitive verb to make concrete, specific, or definite intransitive verb to become concrete • concretization noun
concubinage
noun Date: 14th century 1. cohabitation of persons not legally married 2. the state of being a concubine
concubine
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin concubina, from com- + cubare to lie Date: 14th century a woman with whom a man cohabits without being married: ...
concupiscence
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin concupiscentia, from Latin concupiscent-, concupiscens, present participle of concupiscere to desire ardently, ...
concupiscent
adjective see concupiscence
concupiscible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin concupiscibilis, from Latin concupiscere Date: 14th century archaic ...
concur
intransitive verb (concurred; concurring) Etymology: Middle English concurren, from Latin concurrere, from com- + currere to run — more at car Date: 15th century 1. to act ...
concurrence
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the simultaneous occurrence of events or circumstances b. the meeting of concurrent lines in a point 2. a. agreement or union in action ...
concurrency
noun Date: 1597 concurrence
concurrent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin concurrent-, concurrens, present participle of concurrere Date: 14th century 1. operating or occurring at the same time 2. ...
concurrent resolution
noun Date: 1778 a resolution passed by both houses of a legislative body that lacks the force of law
concurrently
adverb see concurrent
concuss
transitive verb Etymology: Latin concussus, past participle Date: 1597 to affect with or as if with concussion
concussion
noun Etymology: Middle English concussioun, from Latin concussion-, concussio, from concutere to shake violently, from com- + quatere to shake Date: 14th century 1. a. a ...
concussive
adjective see concussion
cond
abbreviation 1. condition 2. conductivity
Condé
biographical name Prince de 1621-1686 Louis II de Bourbon ; Duc d'Enghien French general
condemn
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French condempner, from Latin condemnare, from com- + damnare to condemn — more at damn Date: 14th century 1. to ...
condemnable
adjective see condemn
condemnation
noun Date: 14th century 1. censure, blame 2. the act of judicially condemning 3. the state of being condemned 4. a reason for condemning
condemnatory
adjective see condemn
condemner
noun see condemn
condemnor
noun see condemn
condensable
adjective see condense
condensate
noun Date: 1889 a product of condensation; especially a liquid obtained by condensation of a gas or vapor
condensation
noun Date: 1594 1. the act or process of condensing: as a. a chemical reaction involving union between molecules often with elimination of a simple molecule (as water) to ...
condensational
adjective see condensation
condense
verb (condensed; condensing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin condensare, from com- + densare to make dense, from densus dense Date: 15th century transitive verb to ...
condensed
adjective Date: 15th century reduced to a more compact or dense form; also having a face narrower than that of a standard typeface
condensed milk
noun Date: 1853 evaporated milk with sugar added
condenser
noun Date: 1686 1. one that condenses: as a. a lens or mirror used to concentrate light on an object b. an apparatus in which gas or vapor is condensed 2. capacitor
condensible
adjective see condense
condescend
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French condescendre, from Late Latin condescendere, from Latin com- + descendere to descend Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
condescendence
noun Date: 1638 condescension
condescending
adjective Date: 1660 showing or characterized by condescension ; patronizing • condescendingly adverb
condescendingly
adverb see condescending
condescension
noun Etymology: Late Latin condescension-, condescensio, from condescendere Date: 1647 1. voluntary descent from one's rank or dignity in relations with an inferior 2. ...
condign
adjective Etymology: Middle English condigne, from Anglo-French, from Latin condignus, from com- + dignus worthy — more at decent Date: 15th century deserved, appropriate ...
condignly
adverb see condign
condiment
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin condimentum, from condire to season Date: 15th century something used to enhance the flavor of food; especially ...
condimental
adjective see condiment

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