Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389)

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condition
I. noun Etymology: Middle English condicion, from Anglo-French, from Latin condicion-, condicio terms of agreement, condition, from condicere to agree, from com- + dicere to ...
conditionable
adjective see condition II
conditional
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. subject to, implying, or dependent upon a condition 2. expressing, containing, or implying a supposition 3. a. true only for ...
conditional probability
noun Date: 1937 the probability that a given event will occur if it is certain that another event has taken place or will take place
conditionality
noun see conditional I
conditionally
adverb see conditional I
conditioned
adjective Date: 1537 1. brought or put into a specified state 2. determined or established by conditioning
conditioner
noun Date: 1888 something that conditions; specifically a preparation used to improve the condition of hair
conditioning
noun Date: 1861 1. the process of training to become physically fit by a regimen of exercise, diet, and rest; also the resulting state of physical fitness 2. a simple form ...
condo
noun (plural condos) Date: 1964 condominium 3
condolatory
adjective see condole
condole
verb (condoled; condoling) Etymology: Late Latin condolēre, from Latin com- + dolēre to feel pain Date: circa 1586 intransitive verb 1. obsolete grieve 2. to express ...
condolence
noun Date: 1603 1. sympathy with another in sorrow 2. an expression of sympathy Synonyms: see pity
condom
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1706 1. a sheath commonly of rubber worn over the penis (as to prevent conception or venereal infection during coitus) 2. a ...
condominium
noun (plural -iums; also condominia) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin com- + dominium domain Date: circa 1714 1. a. joint dominion; especially joint sovereignty by two or ...
Condon
biographical name Edward Uhler 1902-1974 American physicist
condonable
adjective see condone
condonation
noun Date: 1625 implied pardon of an offense by treating the offender as if it had not been committed
condone
transitive verb (condoned; condoning) Etymology: Latin condonare to absolve, from com- + donare to give — more at donation Date: 1805 to regard or treat (something bad or ...
condoner
noun see condone
condor
noun Etymology: Spanish cóndor, from Quechua kuntur Date: 1604 1. a. a very large American vulture (Vultur gryphus) of the high Andes having the head and neck bare and ...
Condorcet
biographical name Marquis de 1743-1794 Marie-Jean-Antoine-Nicholas de Caritat French philosopher & politician
condottiere
noun (plural condottieri) Etymology: Italian, from condotta troop of mercenaries, from feminine of condotto, past participle of condurre to conduct, hire, from Latin conducere ...
conduce
intransitive verb (conduced; conducing) Etymology: Middle English, to conduct, from Latin conducere to conduct, conduce, from com- + ducere to lead — more at tow Date: 1528 ...
conducive
adjective Date: 1646 tending to promote or assist • conduciveness noun
conduciveness
noun see conducive
conduct
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin conductus, from Latin conducere Date: 15th century 1. obsolete escort, guide 2. the act, manner, or process of ...
conductance
noun Date: 1885 1. conducting power 2. the readiness with which a conductor transmits an electric current expressed as the reciprocal of electrical resistance
conductibility
noun see conduct II
conductible
adjective see conduct II
conductimetric
adjective see conductometric
conduction
noun Date: 1534 1. the act of conducting or conveying 2. a. transmission through or by means of a conductor; also the transfer of heat through matter by communication of ...
conduction band
noun Date: 1939 the range of permissible energy values which an electron in a solid material can have that allows the electron to dissociate from a particular atom and become a ...
conductive
adjective Date: 1840 having conductivity ; relating to conduction (as of electricity)
conductivity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1837 the quality or power of conducting or transmitting: as a. the reciprocal of electrical resistivity b. the quality of living matter ...
conductometric
also conductimetric adjective Date: circa 1926 1. of or relating to the measurement of conductivity 2. being or relating to titration based on determination of changes in ...
conductor
noun Date: 15th century one that conducts: as a. guide b. a collector of fares in a public conveyance c. the leader of a musical ensemble d. (1) a material or ...
conductorial
adjective see conductor
conductress
noun Date: 1624 a woman who is a conductor
conduit
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French cunduit pipe, passage, conduct, in part from cunduit, past participle of cunduire to lead, from Latin conducere, in part from ...
conduplicate
adjective Etymology: Latin conduplicatus, past participle of conduplicare to double, from com- + duplic-, duplex double — more at duplex Date: 1777 folded lengthwise
condylar
adjective Date: 1876 of or relating to a condyle
condyle
noun Etymology: French & Latin; French, from Latin condylus knuckle, from Greek kondylos Date: 1634 an articular prominence of a bone; especially one resembling a pair of ...
condyloid
adjective see condyle
condyloma
noun (plural condylomata; also -mas) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek kondylōma, from kondylos Date: circa 1526 genital wart • condylomatous adjective
condylomatous
adjective see condyloma
cone
I. noun Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin conus, from Greek kōnos Date: 1545 1. a. a solid generated by rotating a right triangle about one of ...
coneflower
noun Date: circa 1818 any of several composite plants (as of the genera Echinacea and Ratibida) having cone-shaped flower disks: as a. rudbeckia b. purple coneflower
conenose
noun Date: circa 1891 kissing bug
Conestoga
noun see Conestoga wagon
Conestoga wagon
noun Etymology: Conestoga, Pa. Date: 1717 a broad-wheeled covered wagon drawn usually by six horses and used especially for transporting freight across the prairies — ...
coney
or cony noun (plural coneys or conies) Etymology: Middle English conies, plural, from Anglo-French conis, plural of conil, from Latin cuniculus Date: 12th century 1. a. ...
Coney Island
geographical name resort section of New York City in S Brooklyn; formerly an island
conf
abbreviation 1. conference 2. confidential
conf
abbreviation 1. conference 2. confidential
confab
noun Date: 1701 1. chat 1 2. discussion, conference • confab intransitive verb
confabulate
intransitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin confabulatus, past participle of confabulari, from com- + fabulari to talk, from fabula story — more at fable Date: circa ...
confabulation
noun see confabulate
confabulator
noun see confabulate
confabulatory
adjective see confabulate
confect
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin confectus, past participle of conficere to prepare — more at comfit Date: 14th century 1. to put together from varied ...
confection
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of confecting 2. something confected: as a. a fancy dish or sweetmeat; also a sweet food b. a medicinal preparation ...
confectionary
noun (plural -aries) Date: 1599 1. sweets 2. archaic confectioner 3. confectionery 3 • confectionary adjective
confectioner
noun Date: 1591 a manufacturer of or dealer in confections
confectioners' sugar
noun Date: circa 1889 a refined finely powdered sugar
confectionery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1751 1. the confectioner's art or business 2. sweet foods (as candy or pastry) 3. a confectioner's shop
Confed
abbreviation Confederate
confederacy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 14th century 1. a league or compact for mutual support or common action ; alliance 2. a combination of persons for unlawful purposes ; conspiracy ...
confederal
adjective Date: 1780 of or relating to a confederation
confederate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English confederat, from Late Latin confoederatus, past participle of confoederare to unite by a league, from Latin com- + foeder-, foedus compact ...
Confederate Memorial Day
noun Date: 1899 any of several days appointed for the commemoration of servicemen of the Confederacy
confederation
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act of confederating ; a state of being confederated ; alliance 2. league
confederative
adjective see confederate III
confer
verb (conferred; conferring) Etymology: Latin conferre to bring together, from com- + ferre to carry — more at bear Date: circa 1500 intransitive verb to compare views or ...
conferee
noun Date: 1771 one taking part in a conference
conference
noun Date: 1527 1. a. a meeting of two or more persons for discussing matters of common concern b. a usually formal interchange of views ; consultation c. a meeting of ...
conference call
noun Date: 1941 a telephone call by which a caller can speak with several people at the same time
conferencing
noun Date: 1865 the holding of conferences especially by means of an electronic communications system
conferential
adjective see conference
conferment
noun see confer
conferrable
adjective see confer
conferral
noun see confer
conferrence
noun see conference 2
conferrer
noun see confer
confess
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French confesser, from confés having confessed, from Latin confessus, past participle of confitēri to confess, from com- + fatēri to ...
confessable
adjective see confess
confessedly
adverb Date: 1634 by confession
confessio fidei
foreign term Etymology: Latin confession of faith
confession
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. an act of confessing; especially a disclosure of one's sins in the sacrament of reconciliation b. a session for the confessing of sins ...
confessional
I. noun Date: 1727 1. a place where a priest hears confessions 2. the practice of confessing to a priest II. adjective Date: 1684 1. of, relating to, or being a ...
confessionalism
noun see confessional II
confessionalist
noun see confessional II
confessionally
adverb see confessional II
confessor
noun Date: 12th century 1. one who gives heroic evidence of faith but does not suffer martyrdom 2. one that confesses 3. a. a priest who hears confessions b. a priest ...
confetti
noun Etymology: Italian, plural of confetto sweetmeat, from Medieval Latin confectum, from Latin, neuter of confectus, past participle of conficere to prepare — more at ...
confidant
noun Etymology: French confident, from Italian confidente, from confidente confident, trustworthy, from Latin confident-, confidens Date: 1646 one to whom secrets are ...
confidante
noun Etymology: French confidente, feminine of confident Date: 1662 confidant; especially one who is a woman
confide
verb (confided; confiding) Etymology: Middle English (Scots), from Latin confidere, from com- + fidere to trust — more at bide Date: 15th century intransitive verb 1. to ...
confidence
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. a. a feeling or consciousness of one's powers or of reliance on one's circumstances b. faith or belief that one will act in a right, ...
confidence interval
noun Date: 1934 a group of continuous or discrete adjacent values that is used to estimate a statistical parameter (as a mean or variance) and that tends to include the true ...
confidence limits
noun plural Date: 1939 the end points of a confidence interval
confident
adjective Etymology: Latin confident-, confidens, from present participle of confidere Date: circa 1567 1. full of conviction ; certain 2. having or showing assurance and ...
confidential
adjective Date: 1759 1. marked by intimacy or willingness to confide 2. private, secret 3. entrusted with confidences 4. containing information whose unauthorized ...
confidentiality
noun see confidential
confidentially
adverb see confidential
confidently
adverb see confident
confider
noun see confide
confiding
adjective Date: 1797 tending to confide ; trustful • confidingly adverb • confidingness noun
confidingly
adverb see confiding
confidingness
noun see confiding
configuration
noun Etymology: Late Latin configuration-, configuratio similar formation, from Latin configurare to form from or after, from com- + figurare to form, from figura figure Date: ...
configurational
adjective see configuration
configurationally
adverb see configuration
configurative
adjective see configuration
configure
transitive verb (-ured; -uring) Date: 1677 to set up for operation especially in a particular way
confine
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French confines, plural, from Latin confine border, from neuter of confinis adjacent, from com- + finis end ...
confined
adjective Date: 1772 undergoing childbirth
confinement
noun Date: 1592 an act of confining ; the state of being confined ; especially lying-in
confiner
noun see confine II
confirm
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French cunfermer, from Latin confirmare, from com- + firmare to make firm, from firmus firm Date: 13th century 1. to give ...
confirmability
noun see confirm
confirmable
adjective see confirm
confirmand
noun Etymology: Latin confirmandus, gerundive of confirmare Date: 1884 a candidate for religious confirmation
confirmation
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or process of confirming: as a. (1) a Christian rite conferring the gift of the Holy Spirit and among Protestants full church ...
confirmational
adjective see confirmation
confirmatory
adjective Date: 1636 serving to confirm ; corroborative
confirmed
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. marked by long continuance and likely to persist b. fixed in habit and unlikely to change 2. having received the rite of ...
confirmedly
adverb see confirmed
confirmedness
noun see confirmed
confiscable
adjective Date: circa 1736 liable to confiscation
confiscatable
adjective Date: 1863 confiscable
confiscate
I. adjective Etymology: Latin confiscatus, past participle of confiscare to confiscate, from com- + fiscus treasury Date: circa 1533 1. appropriated by the government ; ...
confiscation
noun see confiscate II
confiscator
noun see confiscate II
confiscatory
adjective see confiscate II
confit
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, preparation, preserves, from past participle of confire to prepare — more at comfit Date: 1951 1. meat (as goose, duck, or pork) ...
confiteor
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, literally, I confess, from the opening words — more at confess Date: 13th century a liturgical form in which sinfulness is ...
confiture
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from confit Date: 1802 preserved or candied fruit ; jam
conflagrant
adjective Etymology: Latin conflagrant-, conflagrans, present participle of conflagrare to burn, from com- + flagrare to burn — more at black Date: circa 1656 burning, ...
conflagration
noun Etymology: Latin conflagration-, conflagratio, from conflagrare Date: 1600 1. fire; especially a large disastrous fire 2. conflict, war
conflate
transitive verb (conflated; conflating) Etymology: Latin conflatus, past participle of conflare to blow together, fuse, from com- + flare to blow — more at blow Date: 1610 1. ...
conflation
noun Date: 15th century blend, fusion; especially a composite reading or text
conflict
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin conflictus act of striking together, from confligere to strike together, from com- + fligere to strike — more at profligate ...
conflict of interest
Date: 1843 a conflict between the private interests and the official responsibilities of a person in a position of trust
conflicted
adjective Date: 1914 experiencing or marked by ambivalence or a conflict especially of emotions
conflictful
adjective see conflict I
conflicting
adjective Date: 1592 being in conflict, collision, or opposition ; incompatible • conflictingly adverb
conflictingly
adverb see conflicting
confliction
noun see conflict II
conflictive
adjective see conflict II
conflictual
adjective see conflict I
confluence
noun Date: 15th century 1. a coming or flowing together, meeting, or gathering at one point 2. a. the flowing together of two or more streams b. the place of meeting ...
confluent
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin confluent-, confluens, present participle of confluere to flow together, from com- + fluere to flow — more at fluid Date: ...
conflux
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin confluxus, from Latin confluere Date: 1606 confluence
confocal
adjective Date: 1867 having the same foci • confocally adverb
confocally
adverb see confocal
conform
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French conformer, from Latin conformare, from com- + formare to form, from forma form Date: 14th century transitive verb to give ...
conformable
adjective Date: 15th century 1. corresponding or consistent in form or character 2. submissive, compliant 3. following in unbroken sequence — used of geologic strata ...
conformably
adverb see conformable
conformal
adjective Etymology: Late Latin conformalis having the same shape, from Latin com- + formalis formal, from forma Date: 1893 1. leaving the size of the angle between ...
conformance
noun Date: 1606 conformity
conformation
noun Date: 1511 1. the act of conforming or producing conformity ; adaptation 2. formation of something by appropriate arrangement of parts or elements ; an assembling into a ...
conformational
adjective see conformation
conformer
noun see conform
conformism
noun see conform
conformist
noun or adjective see conform
conformity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. correspondence in form, manner, or character ; agreement 2. an act or instance of conforming 3. action in accordance with some ...
confound
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French confundre, from Latin confundere to pour together, confuse, from com- + fundere to pour — more at found Date: 14th ...
confounded
adjective Date: 14th century 1. confused, perplexed 2. damned • confoundedly adverb
confoundedly
adverb see confounded
confounder
noun see confound
confoundingly
adverb see confound
confraternity
noun Etymology: Middle English confraternite, from Medieval Latin confraternitat-, confraternitas, from confrater fellow, brother, from Latin com- + frater brother — more at ...
confrere
also confrère noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, translation of Medieval Latin confrater Date: 15th century colleague, comrade
confrère
noun see confrere
confront
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French confronter to border on, confront, from Medieval Latin confrontare to bound, from Latin com- + front-, frons forehead, front Date: circa ...
confrontal
noun see confront
confrontation
noun Date: 1632 the act of confronting ; the state of being confronted: as a. a face-to-face meeting b. the clashing of forces or ideas ; conflict c. comparison • ...
confrontational
adjective see confrontation
confrontationalist
noun see confrontation
confrontationist
noun or adjective see confrontation
confronter
noun see confront
Confucian
adjective Date: 1837 of or relating to the Chinese philosopher Confucius or his teachings or followers • Confucian noun • Confucianism noun • Confucianist noun or ...
Confucianism
noun see Confucian
Confucianist
noun or adjective see Confucian
Confucius
Chinese K'ung-Fu-tzu or K'ung-tzu biographical name 551-479 B.C. Chinese philosopher
confuse
transitive verb (confused; confusing) Etymology: back-formation from Middle English confused frustrated, ruined, from Anglo-French confus, from Latin confusus, past participle of ...
confused
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. being perplexed or disconcerted b. disoriented with regard to one's sense of time, place, or identity 2. indistinguishable 3. ...
confusedly
adverb see confused
confusedness
noun see confused
confusingly
adverb see confuse
confusion
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or instance of confusing 2. a. the quality or state of being confused b. a confused mass or mixture • confusional adjective
confusional
adjective see confusion
confutation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of confuting ; refutation 2. something (as an argument or statement) that confutes • confutative adjective
confutative
adjective see confutation
confute
transitive verb (confuted; confuting) Etymology: Latin confutare to check, silence Date: 1529 1. to overwhelm in argument ; refute conclusively 2. obsolete confound • ...
confuter
noun see confute
cong
abbreviation congress; congressional
conga
noun Etymology: American Spanish, probably from feminine of congo black person, from Congo, region in Africa Date: 1935 1. a Cuban dance of African origin involving three ...
conga line
noun Date: 1946 snake dance 2
Congaree
geographical name river 60 miles (96 kilometers) central South Carolina flowing SE to unite with the Wateree forming the Santee
Congaree Swamp National Monument
geographical name reservation central South Carolina S of Columbia
congé
also congee noun Etymology: alteration of earlier congee, congie, from Middle English conge, from Anglo-French cungé, from Latin commeatus going back and forth, leave, from ...
congeal
verb Etymology: Middle English congelen, from Middle French congeler, from Latin congelare, from com- + gelare to freeze — more at cold Date: 14th century transitive verb ...
congealment
noun see congeal
congee
noun Etymology: Tamil kañci water from cooked rice Date: 1930 porridge made from rice
congelation
noun Date: 15th century the process or result of congealing
congener
noun Etymology: Latin, of the same kind, from com- + gener-, genus kind — more at kin Date: circa 1736 1. a member of the same taxonomic genus as another plant or animal ...
congeneric
adjective see congener
congenerous
adjective see congener
congenial
adjective Etymology: com- + genius Date: circa 1625 1. having the same nature, disposition, or tastes ; kindred 2. a. existing or associated together harmoniously b. ...
congeniality
noun see congenial
congenially
adverb see congenial
congenital
adjective Etymology: Latin congenitus, from com- + genitus, past participle of gignere to bring forth — more at kin Date: 1796 1. a. existing at or dating from birth ...
congenitally
adverb see congenital
conger eel
noun Etymology: Middle English congre, from Anglo-French, from Latin congr-, conger, probably from Greek gongros Date: 1602 a large strictly marine scaleless eel (Conger ...
congeries
noun (plural congeries) Etymology: Latin, from congerere Date: circa 1619 aggregation, collection
congest
verb Etymology: Latin congestus, past participle of congerere to bring together, from com- + gerere to bear Date: 1599 transitive verb 1. to concentrate in a small or narrow ...
congestion
noun see congest
congestive
adjective see congest
congestive heart failure
noun Date: 1930 heart failure in which the heart is unable to maintain an adequate circulation of blood in the bodily tissues or to pump out the venous blood returned to it ...
conglobate
transitive verb (-bated; -bating) Etymology: Latin conglobatus, past participle of conglobare, from com- + globus globe Date: 1635 to form into a round compact mass • ...
conglobation
noun see conglobate
conglobe
transitive verb (conglobed; conglobing) Date: 1535 conglobate
conglomerate
I. adjective Etymology: Latin conglomeratus, past participle of conglomerare to roll together, from com- + glomerare to wind into a ball, from glomer-, glomus ball — more at ...
conglomerateur
noun Etymology: 3conglomerate + -eur (as in entrepreneur) Date: 1969 a person who forms or heads a conglomerate ; conglomerator
conglomeratic
adjective see conglomerate III
conglomeration
noun Date: 1626 1. the act of conglomerating ; the state of being conglomerated 2. something conglomerated ; a mixed mass or collection
conglomerative
adjective see conglomerate II
conglomerator
noun see conglomerate II
conglutinate
verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Latin conglutinatus, past participle of conglutinare to glue together, from com- + glutin-, gluten glue — more at gluten Date: 1546 ...
conglutination
noun see conglutinate
Congo
geographical name 1. (or Zaire) river more than 2700 miles (4344 kilometers) central Africa flowing N, W, & SW into the Atlantic — see Lualaba 2. (or Democratic Republic of ...
Congo Free State
geographical name see Congo 2
Congo red
noun Etymology: Congo, territory in Africa Date: 1885 an azo dye C32H22N6Na2O6S2 that is red in alkaline and blue in acid solution and that is used especially as an indicator ...
Congolese
adjective or noun see Congo
congou
noun Etymology: probably from Chinese (Xiamen) kong-hu pains taken Date: 1725 a black tea from China
congratulate
transitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin congratulatus, past participle of congratulari to wish joy, from com- + gratulari to wish joy, from gratus pleasing — more at ...
congratulation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of congratulating 2. a congratulatory expression — usually used in plural
congratulator
noun see congratulate
congratulatory
adjective see congratulate
congregant
noun Date: 1886 one who congregates; specifically a member of a congregation
congregate
I. verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin congregatus, past participle of congregare, from com- + greg-, grex flock Date: 15th century transitive verb ...
congregation
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. an assembly of persons ; gathering; especially an assembly of persons met for worship and religious instruction b. a religious community: ...
congregational
adjective Date: 1639 1. of or relating to a congregation 2. capitalized of or relating to a body of Protestant churches deriving from the English Independents of the 17th ...
congregationalism
noun see congregational
congregationalist
noun or adjective see congregational
congregator
noun see congregate I
congress
noun Etymology: Latin congressus, from congredi to come together, from com- + gradi to go — more at grade Date: 1528 1. a. the act or action of coming together and ...
congressional
adjective see congress
congressional district
noun Date: 1812 a territorial division of a state from which a member of the United States House of Representatives is elected
Congressional Medal
noun Date: 1910 Medal of Honor
congressionally
adverb see congress
congressman
noun Date: 1780 a member of a congress; especially a member of the United States House of Representatives
congresspeople
noun plural Date: 1973 congressmen or congresswomen
congressperson
noun Date: 1972 a congressman or congresswoman
congresswoman
noun Date: 1917 a woman who is a member of a congress; especially a woman who is a member of the United States House of Representatives
Congreve
biographical name William 1670-1729 English dramatist
congruence
noun Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of agreeing, coinciding, or being congruent 2. a statement that two numbers or geometric figures are congruent
congruency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 15th century congruence
congruent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin congruent-, congruens, present participle of congruere Date: 15th century 1. congruous 2. superposable so as to be ...
congruently
adverb see congruent
congruity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century 1. the quality or state of being congruent or congruous 2. a point of agreement
congruous
adjective Etymology: Latin congruus, from congruere to come together, agree Date: 1599 1. a. being in agreement, harmony, or correspondence b. conforming to the ...
congruously
adverb see congruous

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