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congruousness
noun see congruous
conic
I. adjective Date: 1570 1. of or relating to a cone 2. conical • conicity noun II. noun Date: 1879 conic section
conic section
noun Date: 1664 1. a plane curve, line, pair of intersecting lines, or point that is the intersection of or bounds the intersection of a plane and a cone with two nappes 2. a ...
conical
adjective Date: 1570 resembling a cone especially in shape • conically adverb
conically
adverb see conical
conicity
noun see conic I
conidial
adjective see conidium
conidiophore
noun Etymology: New Latin conidium + International Scientific Vocabulary -phore Date: 1874 a specialized hyphal branch of some fungi that produces conidia
conidium
noun (plural conidia) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek konis dust — more at incinerate Date: 1856 an asexual spore produced on a conidiophore of certain fungi • conidial ...
conifer
noun Etymology: ultimately from Latin conifer cone-bearing, from conus cone + -fer Date: circa 1841 any of an order (Coniferales) of mostly evergreen trees and shrubs having ...
coniferous
adjective see conifer
coniine
noun Etymology: German Koniin, from Late Latin conium hemlock, from Greek kōneion Date: 1831 a poisonous alkaloid C8H17N found in poison hemlock
Coningham
biographical name Sir Arthur 1895-1948 British air marshal
conj
abbreviation conjunction; conjunctive
conjectural
adjective Date: 1553 1. of the nature of or involving or based on conjecture 2. given to conjectures • conjecturally adverb
conjecturally
adverb see conjectural
conjecture
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin conjectura, from conjectus, past participle of conicere, literally, to throw together, ...
conjecturer
noun see conjecture II
conjoin
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French conjoindre, from Latin conjungere, from com- + jungere to join — more at yoke Date: 14th century transitive verb to join ...
conjoined
adjective Date: 1570 being, coming, or brought together so as to meet, touch, overlap, or unite
conjoint
adjective Etymology: Middle English, past participle of conjoinen, from Anglo-French, past participle of conjoindre Date: 1725 1. united, conjoined 2. related to, made up ...
conjointly
adverb see conjoint
conjugal
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin conjugalis, from conjug-, conjux husband, wife, from conjungere to join, unite in marriage Date: 1545 of ...
conjugal rights
noun plural Date: 1768 the sexual rights or privileges implied by and involved in the marriage relationship ; the right of sexual intercourse between husband and wife
conjugality
noun see conjugal
conjugally
adverb see conjugal
conjugant
noun Date: 1910 either of a pair of conjugating gametes or organisms
conjugate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English conjugat, from Latin conjugatus, past participle of conjugare to unite, from com- + jugare to join, from jugum yoke — more at yoke ...
conjugate complex number
noun Date: circa 1909 one of two complex numbers differing only in the sign of the imaginary part
conjugated
adjective Date: 1882 1. formed by the union of two compounds or united with another compound 2. relating to, containing, or being a system of two double bonds separated by ...
conjugated protein
noun Date: circa 1909 a compound of a protein with a nonprotein — compare simple protein
conjugately
adverb see conjugate I
conjugateness
noun see conjugate I
conjugation
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. a schematic arrangement of the inflectional forms of a verb b. verb inflection c. a class of verbs having the same type of inflectional ...
conjugational
adjective see conjugation
conjugationally
adverb see conjugation
conjunct
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin conjunctus, past participle of conjungere Date: 15th century 1. united, joined 2. joint 3. relating to melodic ...
conjunction
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or an instance of conjoining ; the state of being conjoined ; combination 2. occurrence together in time or space ; concurrence 3. a. ...
conjunctional
adjective see conjunction
conjunctionally
adverb see conjunction
conjunctiva
noun (plural -vas or conjunctivae) Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin, feminine of conjunctivus conjoining, from Latin conjunctus Date: 14th century the mucous membrane ...
conjunctival
adjective see conjunctiva
conjunctive
adjective Date: 1581 1. connective 2. conjunct, conjoined 3. being or functioning like a conjunction 4. copulative 1a • conjunctive noun • conjunctively adverb
conjunctively
adverb see conjunctive
conjunctivitis
noun Date: 1835 inflammation of the conjunctiva
conjuncture
noun Date: 1605 1. conjunction, union 2. a combination of circumstances or events usually producing a crisis ; juncture
conjunto
noun Etymology: American Spanish. literally, ensemble Date: 1982 a kind of Mexican-American music that has been influenced by the music of German immigrants to Texas and that ...
conjuration
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of conjuring ; incantation 2. an expression or trick used in conjuring 3. a solemn appeal ; adjuration
conjure
verb (conjured; conjuring) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French conjurer, from Latin conjurare to join in taking an oath, from com- + jurare to swear — more at jury ...
conjure with
phrasal chiefly British to treat or regard as important
conjurer
or conjuror noun Date: 14th century 1. one that practices magic arts ; wizard 2. one that performs feats of sleight of hand and illusion ; magician, juggler
conjuror
noun see conjurer
conk
I. noun Etymology: perhaps from conch Date: 1812 slang chiefly Brit nose II. transitive verb Etymology: English slang conk head Date: 1821 to hit especially on the head ...
conker
noun Etymology: conch + 2-er, from the original use of a snail shell on a string in the game Date: circa 1886 1. a horse chestnut especially when used in conkers 2. plural a ...
conky
adjective see conk III
Conn
abbreviation Connecticut
conn
I. transitive verb also con (conned; conning) Etymology: alteration of cond, probably alteration of Middle English condien, conduen to conduct, from Anglo-French cunduire — ...
Connacht
or formerly Connaught geographical name province W Ireland area 6611 square miles (17,189 square kilometers), population 422,909
connate
adjective Etymology: Late Latin connatus, past participle of connasci to be born together, from Latin com- + nasci to be born — more at nation Date: 1641 1. akin, congenial ...
connately
adverb see connate
connatural
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin connaturalis, from Latin com- + naturalis natural Date: 1592 1. connected by nature ; inborn 2. of the same nature • connaturality ...
connaturality
noun see connatural
connaturally
adverb see connatural
Connaught
geographical name see Connacht
connect
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin conectere, connectere, from com- + nectere to bind Date: 15th century intransitive verb 1. to become joined 2. a. to ...
connect the dots
phrasal to link together logically related elements in order to draw a conclusion
connect-the-dots
adjective Date: 1981 done or proceeding in a series of simple and usually predictable steps
connectable
adjective see connect
connected
adjective Date: 1712 1. joined or linked together 2. having the parts or elements logically linked together 3. related by blood or marriage 4. having social, ...
connectedly
adverb see connected
connectedness
noun see connected
connecter
noun see connect
connectible
adjective see connect
Connecticut
geographical name 1. river 407 miles (655 kilometers) NE United States rising in N New Hampshire & flowing S into Long Island Sound 2. state NE United States capital Hartford ...
connecting rod
noun Date: 1839 a rod that transmits motion between a reciprocating part of a machine (as a piston) and a rotating part (as a crankshaft)
connection
noun Etymology: Latin connexion-, connexio, from conectere Date: 14th century 1. the act of connecting ; the state of being connected: as a. causal or logical relation or ...
connectional
adjective see connection
connectionism
noun Date: 1987 a school of cognitive science that holds that human mental processes (as learning) can be explained by the computational modeling of neural nets which are ...
connectionist
noun see connectionism
connective
I. adjective Date: circa 1660 serving to connect • connectively adverb II. noun Date: 1751 something that connects: as a. a linguistic form that connects words or ...
connective tissue
noun Date: 1846 a tissue of mesodermal origin that consists of various cells (as fibroblasts and macrophages) and interlacing protein fibers (as of collagen) embedded in a ...
connectively
adverb see connective I
connectivity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1893 the quality, state, or capability of being connective or connected ; especially the ability to connect to or communicate with another computer ...
connector
noun see connect
Connemara
I. noun Etymology: Connemara, Ireland Date: circa 1952 any of a breed of hardy rugged ponies developed in Ireland II. geographical name district Ireland in W Galway
connexion
chiefly British variant of connection
conning tower
noun Date: 1886 a raised structure on the deck of a submarine used especially formerly for navigation and attack direction
conniption
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1833 a fit of rage, hysteria, or alarm
connivance
noun Date: 1593 the act of conniving; especially knowledge of and active or passive consent to wrongdoing
connive
intransitive verb (connived; conniving) Etymology: French or Latin; French conniver, from Latin conivēre, connivēre to close the eyes, connive, from com- + -nivēre (akin to ...
conniver
noun see connive
connoisseur
noun Etymology: obsolete French (now connaisseur), from Old French connoisseor, from connoistre to know, from Latin cognoscere — more at cognition Date: 1714 1. expert; ...
connoisseurship
noun see connoisseur
connotation
noun Date: 1532 1. a. the suggesting of a meaning by a word apart from the thing it explicitly names or describes b. something suggested by a word or thing ; implication ...
connotational
adjective see connotation
connotative
adjective Date: 1614 1. connoting or tending to connote 2. relating to connotation • connotatively adverb
connotatively
adverb see connotative
connote
transitive verb (connoted; connoting) Etymology: Medieval Latin connotare, from Latin com- + notare to note Date: 1665 1. to be associated with or inseparable from as a ...
connubial
adjective Etymology: Latin conubialis, from conubium, connubium marriage, from com- + nubere to marry — more at nuptial Date: circa 1656 of or relating to the married state ...
connubialism
noun see connubial
connubiality
noun see connubial
connubially
adverb see connubial
conodont
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary con- (from Greek kōnos cone) + -odont Date: 1859 a Paleozoic toothlike fossil that is probably the remains of an extinct ...
conoid
or conoidal adjective Date: 1570 shaped like or nearly like a cone • conoid noun
conoidal
adjective see conoid
conquer
verb (conquered; conquering) Etymology: Middle English, to acquire, conquer, from Anglo-French conquerre, from Vulgar Latin *conquaerere, alteration of Latin conquirere to search ...
conqueror
noun see conquer
conquest
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *conquaesitus, alteration of Latin conquisitus, past participle of conquirere Date: 14th century 1. the ...
conquian
noun Etymology: Mexican Spanish conquián — more at cooncan Date: circa 1911 a card game for two played with 40 cards from which all games of rummy developed
conquistador
noun (plural conquistadores or conquistadors) Etymology: Spanish, ultimately from Latin conquirere Date: 1830 one that conquers; specifically a leader in the Spanish conquest ...
Conrad
biographical name Joseph 1857-1924 originally Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski British (Ukrainian-born of Polish parents) novelist • Conradian adjective
Conradian
adjective see Conrad
Conroe
geographical name city E Texas population 36,811
cons
abbreviation 1. consecrated 2. conservative 3. consigned; consignment 4. consolidated 5. consonant 6. constable 7. constitution 8. construction 9. consul 10. ...
consanguine
adjective Date: 1610 consanguineous
consanguineous
adjective Etymology: Latin consanguineus, from com- + sanguin-, sanguis blood Date: 1601 of the same blood or origin; specifically descended from the same ancestor • ...
consanguineously
adverb see consanguineous
consanguinity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century 1. the quality or state of being consanguineous 2. a close relation or connection
conscience
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin conscientia, from conscient-, consciens, present participle of conscire to be conscious, be conscious of guilt, from ...
conscience money
noun Date: 1839 money paid usually anonymously to relieve the conscience by restoring what has been wrongfully acquired
conscienceless
adjective see conscience
conscientious
adjective Date: 1576 1. governed by or conforming to the dictates of conscience ; scrupulous 2. meticulous, careful Synonyms: see upright • conscientiously adverb ...
conscientious objection
noun Date: 1775 objection on moral or religious grounds (as to service in the armed forces or to bearing arms)
conscientious objector
noun Date: 1899 a person who refuses to serve in the armed forces or bear arms on moral or religious grounds
conscientiously
adverb see conscientious
conscientiousness
noun see conscientious
conscionable
adjective Etymology: irregular from conscience Date: 1549 conscientious
conscious
I. adjective Etymology: Latin conscius, from com- + scire to know Date: 1592 1. perceiving, apprehending, or noticing with a degree of controlled thought or observation ...
consciously
adverb see conscious I
consciousness
noun Date: 1629 1. a. the quality or state of being aware especially of something within oneself b. the state or fact of being conscious of an external object, state, or ...
consciousness-raising
noun Date: 1968 an increasing of concerned awareness especially of some social or political issue
conscribe
transitive verb (conscribed; conscribing) Etymology: Latin conscribere Date: 1613 1. limit, circumscribe 2. to enlist forcibly ; conscript
conscript
I. noun Etymology: alteration of French conscrit, from Latin conscriptus, past participle of conscribere to enroll, enlist, from com- + scribere to write — more at scribe ...
conscription
noun Date: 1800 compulsory enrollment of persons especially for military service ; draft
consecrate
I. adjective Date: 14th century dedicated to a sacred purpose II. transitive verb (-crated; -crating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin consecratus, past participle of ...
consecration
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or ceremony of consecrating 2. the state of being consecrated 3. capitalized the part of a Communion rite in which the bread and wine are ...
consecrative
adjective see consecrate II
consecrator
noun see consecrate II
consecratory
adjective see consecrate II
consecution
noun Etymology: Latin consecution-, consecutio, from consequi to follow along — more at consequent Date: 1651 sequence
consecutive
adjective Date: 1611 following one after the other in order ; successive • consecutively adverb • consecutiveness noun
consecutively
adverb see consecutive
consecutiveness
noun see consecutive
consensual
adjective Etymology: Latin consensus + English -al Date: 1754 1. existing or made by mutual consent without an act of writing 2. involving or based on mutual consent ...
consensually
adverb see consensual
consensus
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Latin, from consentire Date: 1843 1. a. general agreement ; unanimity b. the judgment arrived at by most of those concerned ...
consent
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French consentir, from Latin consentire, from com- + sentire to feel — more at sense Date: 13th century 1. to ...
consent decree
noun Date: 1904 a judicial decree that sanctions a voluntary agreement between parties in dispute
consentaneous
adjective Etymology: Latin consentaneus, from consentire to agree Date: 1575 1. expressing agreement ; suited 2. done or made by the consent of all • consentaneously ...
consentaneously
adverb see consentaneous
consenter
noun see consent I
consentingly
adverb see consent I
consequence
noun Date: 14th century 1. a conclusion derived through logic ; inference 2. something produced by a cause or necessarily following from a set of conditions 3. a. ...
consequent
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin consequent-, consequens, present participle of consequi to follow along, from com- + sequi to follow — more at ...
consequential
adjective Date: 1626 1. of the nature of a secondary result ; indirect 2. consequent 3. having significant consequences ; important 4. self-important • ...
consequentialism
noun Date: 1982 the theory that the value and especially the moral value of an act should be judged by the value of its consequences • consequentialist adjective or noun
consequentialist
adjective or noun see consequentialism
consequentiality
noun see consequential
consequentially
adverb see consequential
consequentialness
noun see consequential
consequently
adverb Date: 15th century as a result ; in view of the foregoing ; accordingly
conservancy
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: alteration of obsolete conservacy conservation, from Anglo-French conservacie, from Medieval Latin conservatia, from Latin conservare Date: 1667 ...
conservation
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin conservation-, conservatio, from conservare Date: 14th century 1. a careful preservation and protection of ...
conservation of charge
Date: 1949 a principle in physics: the total electric charge of an isolated system remains constant irrespective of whatever internal changes may take place
conservation of energy
Date: 1853 a principle in physics: the total energy of an isolated system remains constant irrespective of whatever internal changes may take place with energy disappearing in ...
conservation of mass
Date: 1884 a principle in classical physics: the total mass of any isolated material system is neither increased nor diminished by reactions between the parts — called also ...
conservation of matter
see conservation of mass
conservational
adjective see conservation
conservationist
noun Date: 1870 a person who advocates conservation especially of natural resources
conservatism
noun Date: 1835 1. capitalized a. the principles and policies of a Conservative party b. the Conservative party 2. a. disposition in politics to preserve what is ...
conservative
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. preservative 2. a. of or relating to a philosophy of conservatism b. capitalized of or constituting a political party professing the ...
Conservative Judaism
noun Date: 1892 Judaism as practiced especially among some United States Jews with adherence to the Torah and Talmud but with allowance for some departures in keeping with ...
conservatively
adverb see conservative I
conservativeness
noun see conservative I
conservatize
verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1849 intransitive verb to grow conservative transitive verb to make conservative
conservatoire
noun Etymology: French, from Italian conservatorio Date: 1832 conservatory 2
conservator
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. one that preserves from injury or violation ; protector b. one that is responsible for the care, restoration, and repair of archival or ...
conservatorial
adjective see conservator
conservatorship
noun see conservator
conservatory
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1664 1. a greenhouse for growing or displaying plants 2. [Italian conservatorio home for foundlings, music school, from Latin conservare] a school ...
conserve
I. transitive verb (conserved; conserving) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French conserver, from Latin conservare, from com- + servare to keep, guard, observe; akin to ...
conserver
noun see conserve I
consider
verb (considered; considering) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French considerer, from Latin considerare to observe, think about, from com- + sider-, sidus heavenly body ...
considerable
I. adjective Date: circa 1619 1. worth consideration ; significant 2. large in extent or degree • considerably adverb II. noun Date: 1685 a considerable amount, ...
considerably
adverb see considerable I
considerate
adjective Date: 1572 1. marked by or given to careful consideration ; circumspect 2. thoughtful of the rights and feelings of others • considerately adverb • ...
considerately
adverb see considerate
considerateness
noun see considerate
consideration
noun Date: 14th century 1. continuous and careful thought 2. a. a matter weighed or taken into account when formulating an opinion or plan b. a taking into account ...
considered
adjective Date: circa 1677 1. matured by extended deliberative thought 2. viewed with respect or esteem
considering
I. preposition Date: 14th century in view of ; taking into account II. conjunction Date: 15th century inasmuch as
consigliere
noun (plural consiglieri; also -res) Etymology: Italian, from consiglio advice, counsel, from Latin consilium — more at counsel Date: 1615 counselor, adviser
consign
verb Etymology: Middle French consigner, from Latin consignare, from com- + signum sign, mark, seal — more at sign Date: 1528 transitive verb 1. to give over to another's ...
consignable
adjective see consign
consignation
noun see consign
consignee
noun Date: 1773 one to whom something is consigned or shipped
consignment
I. noun Date: circa 1668 1. the act or process of consigning 2. something consigned especially in a single shipment II. adjective Date: 1913 of, relating to, or received ...
consignor
noun see consign
consilience
noun Etymology: com- + resilience Date: 1840 the linking together of principles from different disciplines especially when forming a comprehensive theory
consist
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle French & Latin; Middle French consister, from Latin consistere, literally, to stop, stand still, from com- + sistere to take a stand; akin ...
consistence
noun Date: 1601 consistency
consistency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1594 1. a. archaic condition of adhering together ; firmness of material substance b. firmness of constitution or character ; persistency 2. ...
consistent
adjective Etymology: Latin consistent-, consistens, present participle of consistere Date: 1638 1. archaic possessing firmness or coherence 2. a. marked by harmony, ...
consistently
adverb see consistent
consistorial
adjective see consistory
consistory
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English consistorie, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin & Late Latin; Medieval Latin consistorium church tribunal, from Late Latin, ...
consociate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin consociatus, past participle of consociare, from com- + socius companion — more at social Date: 1566 transitive verb to bring into ...
consociation
noun Date: 1593 1. association in fellowship or alliance 2. an association of churches or religious societies 3. an ecological community with a single dominant species • ...
consociational
adjective see consociation
consol
abbreviation consolidated
consolation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or an instance of consoling ; the state of being consoled ; comfort 2. something that consoles; specifically a contest held for those who ...
consolation prize
noun Date: 1886 a prize given to a runner-up or a loser in a contest
consolatory
adjective see consolation
console
I. noun Etymology: French Date: 1664 1. an architectural member projecting from a wall to form a bracket or from a keystone for ornament 2. console table 3. a. an ...
console table
noun Date: 1807 a table fixed to a wall with its top supported by consoles or front legs; broadly a table designed to fit against a wall
consolidate
verb (-dated; -dating) Etymology: Latin consolidatus, past participle of consolidare to make solid, from com- + solidus solid Date: circa 1512 transitive verb 1. to join ...
consolidated school
noun Date: 1869 a public school formed by merging other schools
consolidation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of consolidating ; the state of being consolidated 2. the process of uniting ; the quality or state of being united; ...
consolidator
noun see consolidate
consolingly
adverb see console II
consommé
noun Etymology: French, from past participle of consommer to complete, boil down, from Latin consummare to complete — more at consummate Date: 1815 clear soup made from ...
consonance
noun Date: 15th century 1. harmony or agreement among components 2. a. correspondence or recurrence of sounds especially in words; specifically recurrence or repetition ...
consonancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 14th century consonance 1
consonant
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin consonant-, consonans, present participle of consonare to sound together, agree, from com- + sonare to sound — more at ...
consonant shift
noun Date: 1888 a set of regular changes in consonant articulation in the history of a language or dialect: a. such a set affecting the Indo-European stops and ...
consonantal
adjective Date: 1795 relating to, being, or marked by a consonant or group of consonants
consonantly
adverb see consonant I
consort
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin consort-, consors partner, sharer, from com- + sort-, sors lot, share — more at series Date: 15th century ...
consortium
noun (plural consortia; also -sortiums) Etymology: Latin, fellowship, from consort-, consors Date: 1829 1. an agreement, combination, or group (as of companies) formed to ...
conspecific
adjective Date: 1859 of the same species • conspecific noun
conspectus
noun Etymology: Latin, from conspectus, from conspicere Date: 1825 1. a usually brief survey or summary (as of an extensive subject) often providing an overall view 2. ...
conspicuity
noun Date: 1601 the quality or state of being conspicuous ; conspicuousness
conspicuous
adjective Etymology: Latin conspicuus, from conspicere to get sight of, from com- + specere to look — more at spy Date: circa 1534 1. obvious to the eye or mind 2. ...
conspicuous consumption
noun Date: 1899 lavish or wasteful spending thought to enhance social prestige
conspicuously
adverb see conspicuous
conspicuousness
noun see conspicuous
conspiracist
noun Date: 1976 one who believes or promotes a conspiracy theory
conspiracy
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: Middle English conspiracie, from Latin conspirare Date: 14th century 1. the act of conspiring together 2. a. an agreement among ...
conspiracy of silence
Date: 1865 a secret agreement to keep silent about an occurrence, situation, or subject especially in order to promote or protect selfish interests
conspiracy theorist
noun see conspiracy theory
conspiracy theory
noun Date: 1909 a theory that explains an event or set of circumstances as the result of a secret plot by usually powerful conspirators • conspiracy theorist noun
conspiration
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or action of plotting or secretly combining 2. a joint effort toward a particular end • conspirational adjective
conspirational
adjective see conspiration
conspirator
noun Date: 15th century one who conspires ; plotter
conspiratorial
adjective Date: 1855 of, relating to, or suggestive of a conspiracy • conspiratorially adverb
conspiratorially
adverb see conspiratorial
conspire
verb (conspired; conspiring) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French conspirer, from Latin conspirare to be in harmony, conspire, from com- + spirare to breathe Date: 14th ...
const
abbreviation 1. constant 2. constitution; constitutional 3. construction
constable
noun Etymology: Middle English conestable, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin comes stabuli, literally, officer of the stable Date: 13th century 1. a high officer of a royal ...
Constable
biographical name John 1776-1837 English painter
constabulary
I. adjective Date: 1824 of or relating to a constable or constabulary II. noun (plural -laries) Date: circa 1715 1. the organized body of constables of a particular ...
Constance
or German Konstanz geographical name commune S Germany on Lake Constance population 76,162
Constance, Lake
or German Bodensee geographical name lake 46 miles (74 kilometers) long W Europe on border between Germany, Austria, & Switzerland
constancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 15th century 1. a. steadfastness of mind under duress ; fortitude b. fidelity, loyalty 2. a state of being constant or unchanging
constant
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin constant-, constans, from present participle of constare to stand firm, be consistent, from com- + stare ...
Constant de Rebecque
biographical name Benjamin 1767-1830 French writer & politician
Constanţa
geographical name city & port SE Romania on Black Sea population 315,917
constantan
noun Etymology: from the fact that its resistance remains constant under change of temperature Date: 1903 an alloy of copper and nickel used especially for electrical ...
Constantine
I. biographical name name of 2 kings of Greece: I 1868-1923 (reigned 1913-17; 1920-22); II 1940- (reigned 1964-73; deposed) II. geographical name city NE Algeria population ...
Constantine I
biographical name died 337 the Great Roman emperor (306-337) • Constantinian adjective
Constantinian
adjective see Constantine I
Constantinople
geographical name — see Istanbul • Constantinopolitan adjective
Constantinopolitan
adjective see Constantinople
constantly
adverb see constant I
constative
adjective Etymology: constate to assert positively, from French constater, from Latin constat it is certain, 3d singular present indicative of constare Date: 1901 1. of, ...

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