Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389)

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constellate
verb (-lated; -lating) Date: 1643 transitive verb 1. to unite in a cluster 2. to set or adorn with or as if with constellations intransitive verb cluster
constellation
noun Etymology: Middle English constellacioun, from Anglo-French constellation, from Late Latin constellation-, constellatio, from Latin com- + stella star — more at star ...
constellatory
adjective see constellation
consternate
transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Date: 1651 to fill with consternation
consternation
noun Etymology: French or Latin; French, from Latin consternation-, consternatio, from consternare to throw into confusion, from com- + -sternare, probably from sternere to ...
constipate
transitive verb (-pated; -pating) Etymology: Medieval Latin constipatus, past participle of constipare, from Latin, to crowd together, from com- + stipare to pack tight — more ...
constipated
adjective Date: 1547 1. affected with constipation 2. stilted or stodgy in appearance, expression, or action
constipation
noun Date: 15th century 1. abnormally delayed or infrequent passage of usually dry hardened feces 2. stultification
constituency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1831 1. a. a body of citizens entitled to elect a representative (as to a legislative or executive position) b. the residents in an electoral ...
constituent
I. noun Etymology: French constituant, from Middle French, from present participle of constituer to constitute, from Latin constituere Date: 1622 1. one who authorizes ...
constituently
adverb see constituent II
constitute
transitive verb (-tuted; -tuting) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin constitutus, past participle of constituere to set up, constitute, from com- + statuere to set — more at ...
constitution
noun Date: 14th century 1. an established law or custom ; ordinance 2. a. the physical makeup of the individual especially with respect to the health, strength, and ...
constitutional
I. adjective Date: 1682 1. relating to, inherent in, or affecting the constitution of body or mind 2. of, relating to, or entering into the fundamental makeup of something ; ...
constitutionalism
noun Date: 1832 adherence to or government according to constitutional principles; also a constitutional system of government • constitutionalist noun
constitutionalist
noun see constitutionalism
constitutionality
noun Date: 1787 the quality or state of being constitutional; especially accordance with the provisions of a constitution
constitutionalization
noun see constitutionalize
constitutionalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1831 to provide with a constitution ; organize along constitutional principles • constitutionalization noun
constitutionally
adverb Date: 1742 1. a. in accordance with one's constitution b. in structure, composition, or constitution 2. in accordance with a political constitution
constitutionless
adjective see constitution
constitutive
adjective Date: 1592 1. having the power to enact or establish ; constructive 2. constituent, essential 3. relating to or dependent on constitution • constitutively ...
constitutively
adverb see constitutive
constrain
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French constraindre, from Latin constringere to constrict, constrain, from com- + stringere to draw tight — more at ...
constrainedly
adverb see constrain
constraint
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French constrainte, from constraindre Date: 15th century 1. a. the act of constraining b. the state of being checked, ...
constrict
verb Etymology: Latin constrictus, past participle of constringere Date: 1732 transitive verb 1. a. to make narrow or draw together b. compress, squeeze 2. to ...
constriction
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act or product of constricting 2. the quality or state of being constricted 3. something that constricts
constrictive
adjective see constrict
constrictor
noun Date: 1735 1. a muscle that contracts a cavity or orifice or compresses an organ 2. a snake (as a boa constrictor) that coils around and compresses prey 3. one that ...
constringe
transitive verb (constringed; constringing) Etymology: Latin constringere Date: 1604 1. to cause to shrink 2. constrict • constringent adjective
constringent
adjective see constringe
construable
adjective see construe I
construal
noun Date: 1948 interpretation 1
construct
I. transitive verb Etymology: Latin constructus, past participle of construere, from com- + struere to build — more at structure Date: 1663 1. to make or form by combining ...
constructability
noun see construct I
constructable
adjective see construct I
constructibility
noun see construct I
constructible
adjective see construct I
construction
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or result of construing, interpreting, or explaining 2. a. the process, art, or manner of constructing something; also a thing ...
construction paper
noun Date: circa 1924 a thick groundwood paper available in many colors and used especially for school artwork
constructional
adjective see construction
constructionally
adverb see construction
constructionist
noun Date: 1838 one who construes a legal document (as the United States Constitution) in a specific way
constructive
adjective Date: circa 1680 1. declared such by judicial construction or interpretation 2. of or relating to construction or creation 3. promoting improvement or ...
constructively
adverb see constructive
constructiveness
noun see constructive
constructivism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1925 a nonobjective art movement originating in Russia and concerned with formal organization of planes and expression of volume in terms ...
constructivist
adjective or noun see constructivism
constructor
noun see construct I
construe
I. verb (construed; construing) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin construere, from Latin, to construct Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to analyze the ...
consubstantial
adjective Etymology: Late Latin consubstantialis, from Latin com- + substantia substance Date: 14th century of the same substance
consubstantiation
noun Date: 1597 the actual substantial presence and combination of the body and blood of Christ with the eucharistic bread and wine according to a teaching associated with ...
consuetude
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin consuetudo — more at custom Date: 14th century social usage ; custom • consuetudinary adjective
consuetudinary
adjective see consuetude
consul
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin; perhaps akin to Latin consulere to consult Date: 14th century 1. a. either of two annually elected chief magistrates of the ...
consul general
noun (plural consuls general) Date: 1753 a consul of the first rank stationed in an important place or having jurisdiction in several places or over several consuls
consular
adjective see consul
consulate
noun Date: 14th century 1. a government by consuls 2. the office, term of office, or jurisdiction of a consul 3. the residence or official premises of a consul
consulate general
noun (plural consulates general) Date: 1865 the residence, office, or jurisdiction of a consul general
consulship
noun see consul
consult
I. verb Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French consulter, from Latin consultare, frequentative of consulere to deliberate, counsel, consult Date: 1527 transitive ...
consultancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1955 1. consultation 2. an agency that provides consulting services 3. the position of a consultant
consultant
noun Date: 1697 1. one who consults another 2. one who gives professional advice or services ; expert • consultantship noun
consultantship
noun see consultant
consultation
noun Date: 15th century 1. council, conference; specifically a deliberation between physicians on a case or its treatment 2. the act of consulting or conferring
consultative
adjective Date: 1583 of, relating to, or intended for consultation ; advisory
consulter
noun see consult I
consulting
adjective Date: 1801 1. providing professional or expert advice 2. of or relating to consultation or a consultant
consultive
adjective Date: 1616 consultative
consultor
noun Date: 1520 one who consults or advises; especially an adviser to a Roman Catholic bishop, provincial, or sacred congregation
consumable
I. adjective Date: 1641 capable of being consumed II. noun Date: 1802 something (as food or fuel) that is consumable — usually used in plural
consume
verb (consumed; consuming) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French consumer, from Latin consumere, from com- + sumere to take up, take, from sub- ...
consumedly
adverb Date: 1707 as if consumed ; excessively
consumer
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 15th century one that consumes: as a. one that utilizes economic goods b. an organism requiring complex organic compounds for food ...
consumer credit
noun Date: 1927 credit granted to an individual especially to finance the purchase of consumer goods or to defray personal expenses
consumer goods
noun plural Date: 1890 goods that directly satisfy human wants
consumer price index
noun Date: 1948 an index measuring the change in the cost of typical wage-earner purchases of goods and services expressed as a percentage of the cost of these same goods and ...
consumerism
noun Date: 1944 1. the promotion of the consumer's interests 2. the theory that an increasing consumption of goods is economically desirable; also a preoccupation with and ...
consumerist
noun or adjective see consumerism
consumeristic
adjective see consumerism
consumership
noun see consumer
consuming
adjective Date: 1905 deeply felt ; ardent ; also engrossing
consummate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English consummat fulfilled, from Latin consummatus, past participle of consummare to sum up, finish, from com- + summa sum Date: 1527 1. ...
consummately
adverb see consummate I
consummation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of consummating ; specifically the consummating of a marriage 2. the ultimate end ; finish
consummative
adjective see consummate II
consummator
noun see consummate II
consummatory
adjective Date: 1648 1. of or relating to consummation ; concluding 2. of, relating to, or being a response or act (as eating or copulating) that terminates a period of ...
consumption
noun Etymology: Middle English consumpcioun, from Latin consumption-, consumptio, from consumere Date: 14th century 1. a. a progressive wasting away of the body especially ...
consumptive
I. adjective Date: 1647 1. tending to consume 2. of, relating to, or affected with consumption • consumptively adverb II. noun Date: 1666 a person affected with ...
consumptively
adverb see consumptive I
cont
abbreviation 1. containing 2. contents 3. continent 4. continental 5. continued 6. control
contact
I. noun Etymology: French or Latin; French, from Latin contactus, from contingere to have contact with — more at contingent Date: 1626 1. a. union or junction of ...
contact binary
noun Date: 1952 a binary star system in which the two stars are close enough together for material to pass between them
contact hitter
noun Date: 1982 a hitter in baseball who seldom strikes out
contact inhibition
noun Date: 1965 cessation of cellular movement, growth, and division upon contact with other cells
contact language
noun Date: 1950 pidgin
contact lens
noun Date: 1888 a thin lens designed to fit over the cornea and usually worn to correct defects in vision
contact print
noun Date: 1890 a photographic print made with the negative in contact with the sensitized paper, plate, or film
contagion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin contagion-, contagio, from contingere to have contact with, pollute — more at contingent Date: 14th century 1. a. a contagious ...
contagious
adjective Date: 14th century 1. communicable by contact ; catching 2. bearing contagion 3. used for contagious diseases 4. exciting similar emotions or conduct in ...
contagious abortion
noun Date: 1910 a contagious or infectious disease (as a brucellosis) of domestic animals characterized by abortion
contagiously
adverb see contagious
contagiousness
noun see contagious
contagium
noun (plural contagia) Etymology: Latin, contagion, from contingere Date: 1870 an agent capable of causing a communicable disease
contain
verb Etymology: Middle English conteinen, from Anglo-French cunteign-, cuntyen-, stem of cuntenir, from Latin continēre to hold together, hold in, contain, from com- + tenēre ...
containable
adjective see contain
contained
adjective Date: 1653 restrained; also calm
container
noun Date: 15th century one that contains: as a. a receptacle (as a box or jar) for holding goods b. a portable compartment in which freight is placed (as on a train or ...
containerboard
noun Date: circa 1924 corrugated or solid cardboard used for making containers
containerisation
British variant of containerization
containerise
British variant of containerize
containerization
noun Date: 1956 a shipping method in which a large amount of material (as merchandise) is packaged into large standardized containers
containerize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1956 1. to ship by containerization 2. to pack in containers
containerless
adjective see container
containerport
noun Date: 1970 a shipping port specially equipped to handle containerized cargo
containership
noun Date: 1966 a ship specially designed or equipped for carrying containerized cargo
containment
noun Date: 1655 1. the act, process, or means of containing 2. the policy, process, or result of preventing the expansion of a hostile power or ideology
contaminant
noun Date: 1922 something that contaminates
contaminate
transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin contaminatus, past participle of contaminare; akin to Latin contingere to have contact with — more at ...
contamination
noun Date: 15th century 1. a process of contaminating ; a state of being contaminated 2. contaminant
contaminative
adjective see contaminate
contaminator
noun see contaminate
Contarini
biographical name Venetian family including especially Gasparo 1483-1542 cardinal & diplomat
contd
abbreviation continued
conte
noun Etymology: French Date: 1843 a usually short tale of adventure
contemn
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English contempnen, from Middle French contempner, from Latin contemnere, from com- + temnere to despise Date: 15th century to view or treat ...
contemner
noun see contemn
contemnor
noun see contemn
contemplate
verb (-plated; -plating) Etymology: Latin contemplatus, past participle of contemplari, from com- + templum space marked out for observation of auguries — more at temple Date: ...
contemplation
noun Date: 13th century 1. a. concentration on spiritual things as a form of private devotion b. a state of mystical awareness of God's being 2. an act of considering ...
contemplative
I. adjective Date: 14th century marked by or given to contemplation; specifically of or relating to a religious order devoted to prayer and penance • contemplatively ...
contemplatively
adverb see contemplative I
contemplativeness
noun see contemplative I
contemplator
noun see contemplate
contempo
adjective Date: 1972 contemporary, present-day
contemporaneity
noun Date: 1772 the quality or state of being contemporaneous or contemporary
contemporaneous
adjective Etymology: Latin contemporaneus, from com- + tempor-, tempus time Date: circa 1656 existing, occurring, or originating during the same time Synonyms: see ...
contemporaneously
adverb see contemporaneous
contemporaneousness
noun see contemporaneous
contemporarily
adverb see contemporary I
contemporary
I. adjective Etymology: com- + Latin tempor-, tempus Date: 1631 1. happening, existing, living, or coming into being during the same period of time 2. a. simultaneous ...
contemporize
transitive verb (-rized; -rizing) Date: 1646 to make contemporary
contempt
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin contemptus, from contemnere Date: 14th century 1. a. the act of despising ; the state of mind of one who ...
contemptibility
noun see contemptible
contemptible
adjective Date: 14th century 1. worthy of contempt 2. obsolete scornful, contemptuous • contemptibility noun • contemptibleness noun • contemptibly adverb ...
contemptibleness
noun see contemptible
contemptibly
adverb see contemptible
contemptuous
adjective Etymology: Latin contemptus Date: 1574 manifesting, feeling, or expressing contempt • contemptuously adverb • contemptuousness noun
contemptuously
adverb see contemptuous
contemptuousness
noun see contemptuous
contemptus mundi
foreign term Etymology: Latin contempt for the world
contend
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French contendre, from Latin contendere, from com- + tendere to stretch — more at thin Date: 15th century ...
contender
noun Date: 1547 one that contends; especially a competitor for a championship or high honor
content
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin contentus, from past participle of continēre to hold in, contain — more at contain Date: 15th century ...
content analysis
noun Date: 1940 analysis of the manifest and latent content of a body of communicated material (as a book or film) through a classification, tabulation, and evaluation of its ...
content word
noun Date: 1940 a word that primarily expresses lexical meaning — compare function word
contented
adjective Date: 15th century feeling or showing satisfaction with one's possessions, status, or situation • contentedly adverb • contentedness noun
contentedly
adverb see contented
contentedness
noun see contented
contention
noun Etymology: Middle English contencioun, from Anglo-French cuntenciun, from Latin contention-, contentio, from contendere Date: 14th century 1. an act or instance of ...
contentious
adjective Date: 15th century 1. likely to cause contention 2. exhibiting an often perverse and wearisome tendency to quarrels and disputes Synonyms: see belligerent ...
contentiously
adverb see contentious
contentiousness
noun see contentious
contentment
noun Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being contented 2. something that contents
conterminous
adjective Etymology: Latin conterminus, from com- + terminus boundary — more at term Date: 1631 1. having a common boundary 2. coterminous 3. enclosed within one ...
conterminously
adverb see conterminous
contest
I. verb Etymology: Middle French contester, from Latin contestari (litem) to bring an action at law, from contestari to call to witness, from com- + testis witness — more at ...
contestable
adjective see contest I
contestant
noun Date: 1665 1. one that participates in a contest 2. one that contests an award or decision
contestation
noun Date: 1580 controversy, debate
contester
noun see contest I
context
noun Etymology: Middle English, weaving together of words, from Latin contextus connection of words, coherence, from contexere to weave together, from com- + texere to weave — ...
context-free
adjective Date: 1964 of, relating to, or being a grammar or language based on rules that describe a change in a string without reference to elements outside of the string; also ...
contextless
adjective see context
contextual
adjective see context
contextualization
noun see contextualize
contextualize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1934 to place (as a word or activity) in a context • contextualization noun
contextually
adverb see context
contexture
noun Etymology: French, from Latin contextus, past participle of contexere Date: 1603 1. the act, process, or manner of weaving parts into a whole; also a structure so formed ...
contg
abbreviation containing
Conti
biographical name Niccolò de' circa 1395-1469 Venetian traveler
contiguity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1612 the quality or state of being contiguous ; proximity
contiguous
adjective Etymology: Latin contiguus, from contingere to have contact with — more at contingent Date: circa 1609 1. being in actual contact ; touching along a boundary or ...
contiguously
adverb see contiguous
contiguousness
noun see contiguous
continence
noun Date: 14th century 1. self-restraint; especially a refraining from sexual intercourse 2. the ability to retain a bodily discharge voluntarily
continent
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin continent-, continens, from present participle of continēre to hold in — more at contain Date: 14th ...
continental
I. adjective Date: 1758 1. a. of, relating to, or characteristic of a continent ; specifically often capitalized of or relating to the continent of Europe excluding the ...
continental breakfast
noun Usage: often capitalized C Date: 1911 a light breakfast (as of rolls or toast and coffee)
Continental Divide
or Great Divide geographical name the watershed of North America comprising the line of highest points of land separating the waters flowing W from those flowing N or E, ...
continental drift
noun Date: 1926 a slow movement of the continents on a deep-seated viscous zone within the earth — compare plate tectonics
continental shelf
noun Date: 1892 a shallow submarine plain of varying width forming a border to a continent and typically ending in a comparatively steep slope to the deep ocean floor
continental slope
noun Date: 1900 the comparatively steep slope from a continental shelf to the ocean floor
continentally
adverb see continental I
continently
adverb see continent I
contingence
noun Date: circa 1530 1. contingency 2. tangency
contingency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1561 1. the quality or state of being contingent 2. a contingent event or condition: as a. an event (as an emergency) that may but is not certain ...
contingency fee
noun Date: 1945 a fee for services (as of a lawyer) paid upon successful completion of the services and usually calculated as a percentage of the gain realized for the client ...
contingency table
noun Date: 1904 a table of data in which the row entries tabulate the data according to one variable and the column entries tabulate it according to another variable and ...
contingent
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin contingent-, contingens, present participle of contingere to have contact with, befall, from com- + ...
contingent fee
noun see contingency fee
contingently
adverb see contingent I
continual
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French continuel, from Latin continuus continuous Date: 14th century 1. continuing indefinitely in time without interruption ...
continually
adverb see continual
continuance
noun Date: 14th century 1. continuation 2. the extent of continuing ; duration 3. the quality of enduring ; permanence 4. an adjournment of a court case to a future day
continuant
noun Date: 1861 1. something that continues or serves as a continuation 2. a speech sound (as a fricative or vowel) that is produced without a complete closure of the breath ...
continuate
adjective Date: 1555 obsolete continuous, uninterrupted
continuation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or fact of continuing in or the prolongation of a state or activity 2. resumption after an interruption 3. something that continues, ...
continuative
adjective Date: 1684 expressing continuity or continuation (as of an idea or action)
continuator
noun Date: 1646 one that continues
continue
verb (-tinued; -tinuing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French continuer, from Latin continuare, from continuus Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to maintain ...
continued
adjective Date: 15th century 1. lasting or extending without interruption 2. resumed after interruption
continued fraction
noun Date: 1811 a fraction whose numerator is an integer and whose denominator is an integer plus a fraction whose numerator is an integer and whose denominator is an integer ...
continuer
noun see continue
continuing
adjective Date: 14th century 1. continuous, constant 2. needing no renewal ; enduring • continuingly adverb
continuing education
noun Date: 1954 formal courses of study for adult part-time students
continuingly
adverb see continuing
continuity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. a. uninterrupted connection, succession, or union b. uninterrupted duration or continuation especially without essential change ...
continuo
noun (plural -uos) Etymology: Italian, from continuo continuous, from Latin continuus Date: circa 1724 a bass part (as for a keyboard or stringed instrument) used especially ...
continuous
adjective Etymology: Latin continuus, from continēre to hold together — more at contain Date: 1673 1. marked by uninterrupted extension in space, time, or sequence 2. of a ...
continuously
adverb see continuous
continuousness
noun see continuous
continuum
noun (plural continua; also -uums) Etymology: Latin, neuter of continuus Date: 1646 1. a coherent whole characterized as a collection, sequence, or progression of values or ...
contort
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin contortus, past participle of contorquēre, from com- + torquēre to twist — more at torture Date: 15th century transitive verb ...
contortion
noun see contort
contortionist
noun Date: 1859 one who contorts; specifically an acrobat able to twist the body into unusual postures • contortionistic adjective
contortionistic
adjective see contortionist
contortive
adjective see contort
contour
I. noun Etymology: French, from Italian contorno, from contornare to round off, from Medieval Latin, to turn around, from Latin com- + tornare to turn on a lathe — more at ...
contour feather
noun Date: 1867 one of the medium-sized feathers that form the general covering of a bird and determine the external contour
contour line
noun Date: 1844 a line (as on a map) connecting the points on a land surface that have the same elevation
contour map
noun Date: 1862 a map having contour lines
contr
abbreviation 1. contract; contraction 2. contralto 3. contrary 4. control; controller
contra
I. preposition Etymology: Middle English, from Latin Date: 15th century 1. against — used chiefly in the phrase pro and contra 2. in opposition or contrast to II. noun ...
contra dance
or contredanse noun Etymology: French contredanse, by folk etymology from English country-dance Date: 1803 1. a folk dance in which couples face each other in two lines or a ...
contra-
prefix Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from contra against, opposite — more at counter 1. against ; contrary ; contrasting 2. pitched below normal bass
contraband
noun Etymology: Italian contrabbando, from Medieval Latin contrabannum, from contra- + bannus, bannum decree, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German bannan to command — ...
contrabandist
noun Date: circa 1818 smuggler
contrabass
I. noun Etymology: Italian contrabbasso, from contra- + basso bass Date: 1813 double bass • contrabassist noun II. adjective pitched lower than a bass instrument of the ...
contrabassist
noun see contrabass I
contrabassoon
noun Date: 1877 a double-reed woodwind instrument having a range an octave lower than that of the bassoon — called also double bassoon
contraception
noun Etymology: contra- + conception Date: 1886 deliberate prevention of conception or impregnation • contraceptive adjective or noun
contraceptive
adjective or noun see contraception
contract
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin contractus, from contrahere to draw together, make a contract, reduce in size, from com- + trahere to draw ...
contract bridge
noun Date: 1924 a bridge game distinguished by the fact that overtricks do not count toward game or slam bonuses
contractibility
noun see contract II
contractible
adjective see contract II
contractile
adjective Date: circa 1706 having or concerned with the power or property of contracting • contractility noun
contractile vacuole
noun Date: 1876 a vacuole in a unicellular organism that contracts regularly to discharge fluid from the body
contractility
noun see contractile
contraction
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the action or process of contracting ; the state of being contracted b. the shortening and thickening of a functioning muscle or muscle ...
contractional
adjective see contraction
contractionary
adjective see contraction
contractive
adjective see contraction
contractor
noun Date: 1548 1. one that contracts or is party to a contract: as a. one that contracts to perform work or provide supplies b. one that contracts to erect buildings 2. ...
contractual
adjective Date: 1861 of, relating to, or constituting a contract • contractually adverb
contractually
adverb see contractual
contracture
noun Date: 1658 a permanent shortening (as of muscle, tendon, or scar tissue) producing deformity or distortion
contradict
transitive verb Etymology: Latin contradictus, past participle of contradicere, from contra- + dicere to say, speak — more at diction Date: 1582 1. to assert the contrary of ...
contradictable
adjective see contradict
contradiction
noun Date: 14th century 1. act or an instance of contradicting 2. a. a proposition, statement, or phrase that asserts or implies both the truth and falsity of something ...
contradictious
adjective Date: 1604 1. contradictory, opposite 2. given to or marked by contradiction ; contrary
contradictor
noun see contradict

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