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Слова на букву cobl-deco (6389)

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contradictorily
adverb see contradictory II
contradictoriness
noun see contradictory II
contradictory
I. noun (plural -ries) Date: 14th century a proposition so related to another that if either of the two is true the other is false and if either is false the other must be ...
contradistinction
noun Date: 1647 distinction by means of contrast • contradistinctive adjective • contradistinctively adverb
contradistinctive
adjective see contradistinction
contradistinctively
adverb see contradistinction
contradistinguish
transitive verb Date: 1622 to distinguish by contrasting qualities
contrail
noun Etymology: condensation trail Date: 1943 streaks of condensed water vapor created in the air by an airplane or rocket at high altitudes
contraindicate
transitive verb Date: 1666 to make (a treatment or procedure) inadvisable
contraindication
noun Date: 1623 something (as a symptom or condition) that makes a particular treatment or procedure inadvisable
contralateral
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1882 occurring on or acting in conjunction with a part on the opposite side of the body
contralto
noun (plural -tos) Etymology: Italian, from contra- + alto Date: 1740 1. a. a singing voice having a range between tenor and mezzo-soprano b. a person having this ...
contraposition
noun Etymology: Late Latin contraposition-, contrapositio, from Latin contraponere to place opposite, from contra- + ponere to place — more at position Date: 1551 the ...
contrapositive
noun Date: 1870 a proposition or theorem formed by contradicting both the subject and predicate or both the hypothesis and conclusion of a given proposition or theorem and ...
contraption
noun Etymology: perhaps blend of contrivance, trap, and invention Date: circa 1825 device, gadget
contrapuntal
adjective Etymology: Italian contrappunto counterpoint, from Medieval Latin contrapunctus — more at counterpoint Date: 1845 1. polyphonic 2. of, relating to, or marked by ...
contrapuntally
adverb see contrapuntal
contrapuntist
noun Date: 1776 one who writes counterpoint
contrarian
noun Date: 1657 a person who takes a contrary position or attitude; specifically an investor who buys shares of stock when most others are selling and sells when others are ...
contrarianism
noun see contrarian
contrariety
noun (plural -eties) Etymology: Middle English contrariete, from Anglo-French contrarieté, from Late Latin contrarietat-, contrarietas, from Latin contrarius contrary Date: ...
contrarily
adverb see contrary II
contrariness
noun see contrary II
contrarious
adjective Date: 13th century perverse, antagonistic
contrariwise
adverb Date: 14th century 1. on the contrary 2. vice versa 3. in a contrary manner
contrary
I. noun (plural -traries) Etymology: Middle English contrarie, from Anglo-French contraire, contrairie, from Medieval Latin contrarius, from Latin, adjective, opposite, adverse, ...
contrary to
preposition Date: 14th century in conflict with ; despite
contrast
I. verb Etymology: French contraster, from Middle French, to oppose, resist, alteration of contrester, from Vulgar Latin *contrastare, from Latin contra- + stare to stand — ...
contrastable
adjective see contrast I
contrastingly
adverb see contrast I
contrastive
adjective Date: 1841 forming or consisting of a contrast • contrastively adverb
contrastively
adverb see contrastive
contrasty
adjective Date: 1891 having or producing in photography great contrast between highlights and shadows
contravene
transitive verb (-vened; -vening) Etymology: Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French contrevenir, from Late Latin contravenire, from Latin contra- + venire to come — more at ...
contravener
noun see contravene
contravention
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Late Latin contravenire Date: 1579 the act of contravening ; violation
contredanse
variant of contra dance
contretemps
noun (plural contretemps) Etymology: French, from contre- counter- + temps time, from Latin tempus Date: 1769 1. an inopportune or embarrassing occurrence or situation 2. ...
contrib
abbreviation contribution; contributor
contribute
verb (-uted; -uting) Etymology: Latin contributus, past participle of contribuere, from com- + tribuere to grant — more at tribute Date: 1530 transitive verb 1. to give or ...
contribution
noun Date: 14th century 1. a payment (as a levy or tax) imposed by military, civil, or ecclesiastical authorities usually for a special or extraordinary purpose 2. the act of ...
contributive
adjective see contribution
contributively
adverb see contribution
contributor
noun see contribute
contributory
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. subject to a levy of supplies, money, or men b. contributing to a common fund or enterprise 2. of, relating to, or forming a ...
contrite
adjective Etymology: Middle English contrit, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin contritus, from Latin, past participle of conterere to grind, bruise, from com- + terere to ...
contritely
adverb see contrite
contriteness
noun see contrite
contrition
noun Date: 14th century the state of being contrite ; repentance Synonyms: see penitence
contrivance
noun Date: circa 1628 1. a. a thing contrived; especially a mechanical device b. an artificial arrangement or development 2. the act or faculty of contriving ; the ...
contrive
verb (contrived; contriving) Etymology: Middle English controven, contreven, from Anglo-French controver, contrever, from Medieval Latin contropare to compare, from Latin com- + ...
contrived
adjective Date: 15th century artificial, labored
contriver
noun see contrive
control
I. verb (controlled; controlling) Etymology: Middle English countrollen, from Anglo-French contrerouler, from contreroule copy of an account, audit, from Medieval Latin ...
control experiment
noun see control II
control freak
noun Date: 1977 a person whose behavior indicates a powerful need to control people or circumstances in everyday matters
control surface
noun Date: 1917 a movable airfoil designed to change the attitude of an aircraft
controllability
noun see control I
controllable
adjective see control I
controlled
adjective Date: 1586 1. restrained 2. regulated by law with regard to possession and use
controller
noun Etymology: Middle English countreroller, from Anglo-French contreroulur, from contreroule Date: 15th century 1. a. comptroller 1 b. comptroller 2 c. the chief ...
controllership
noun see controller
controlling
adjective Date: 1974 inclined to control others' behavior ; domineering
controlling interest
noun Date: 1867 sufficient stock ownership in a corporation to exert control over policy
controlment
noun see control I
controversial
adjective Date: 1583 1. of, relating to, or arousing controversy 2. given to controversy ; disputatious • controversialism noun • controversialist noun • ...
controversialism
noun see controversial
controversialist
noun see controversial
controversially
adverb see controversial
controversy
noun (plural -sies) Etymology: Middle English controversie, from Anglo-French, from Latin controversia, from controversus disputable, literally, turned against, from contro- ...
controvert
verb Etymology: controversy Date: 1584 transitive verb to dispute or oppose by reasoning intransitive verb to engage in controversy • controverter noun • ...
controverter
noun see controvert
controvertible
adjective see controvert
contumacious
adjective Date: 1583 stubbornly disobedient ; rebellious • contumaciously adverb
contumaciously
adverb see contumacious
contumacy
noun Etymology: Middle English contumacie, from Anglo-French, from Latin contumacia, from contumac-, contumax rebellious Date: 13th century stubborn resistance to authority; ...
contumelious
adjective Date: 15th century insolently abusive and humiliating • contumeliously adverb
contumeliously
adverb see contumelious
contumely
noun (plural -lies) Etymology: Middle English contumelie, from Middle French, from Latin contumelia Date: 14th century harsh language or treatment arising from haughtiness and ...
contuse
transitive verb see contusion
contusion
noun Etymology: Middle English conteschown, from Latin contusion-, contusio, from contundere to pound, bruise, from com- + tundere to beat; akin to Gothic stautan to strike, ...
conundrum
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1645 1. a riddle whose answer is or involves a pun 2. a. a question or problem having only a conjectural answer b. an intricate ...
conurbation
noun Etymology: com- + Latin urb-, urbs city Date: 1915 an aggregation or continuous network of urban communities
conus
noun see conus arteriosus
conus arteriosus
noun (plural coni arteriosi) Etymology: New Latin, literally, arterial cone Date: circa 1860 1. a conical prolongation of the right ventricle in mammals from which the ...
conv
abbreviation 1. convention; conventional 2. convertible 3. convocation
convalesce
intransitive verb (-lesced; -lescing) Etymology: Latin convalescere, from com- + valescere to grow strong, from valēre to be strong, be well — more at wield Date: 15th ...
convalescence
noun see convalesce
convalescent
adjective or noun see convalesce
convect
verb Etymology: back-formation from convection Date: 1881 intransitive verb to transfer heat by convection transitive verb to circulate (as air) by convection • ...
convection
noun Etymology: Late Latin convection-, convectio, from Latin convehere to bring together, from com- + vehere to carry — more at way Date: circa 1623 1. the action or ...
convection oven
noun Date: 1973 an oven having a fan that circulates hot air uniformly and continuously around food
convectional
adjective see convection
convective
adjective see convect
convector
noun Date: 1907 a heating unit in which air heated by contact with a heating device (as a radiator or a tube with fins) in a casing circulates by convection
convene
verb (convened; convening) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin convenire, from Latin, to assemble — more at convenient Date: 15th century intransitive verb to ...
convener
noun see convene
convenience
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. fitness or suitability for performing an action or fulfilling a requirement 2. a. something (as an appliance, device, or service) conducive ...
convenience store
noun Date: 1965 a small often franchised market that is open long hours
conveniency
noun Date: 1601 archaic convenience
convenient
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin convenient-, conveniens, from present participle of convenire to assemble, come together, be suitable, from com- + venire to come ...
conveniently
adverb see convenient
convenor
noun see convene
convent
I. noun Etymology: Middle English covent, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin conventus, from Latin, assembly, from convenire Date: 13th century a local community or house ...
conventicle
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin conventiculum, diminutive of conventus assembly Date: 14th century 1. assembly, meeting 2. an assembly of an irregular or ...
conventicler
noun see conventicle
convention
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin convention-, conventio, from convenire Date: 15th century 1. a. agreement, contract ...
conventional
adjective Date: 15th century 1. formed by agreement or compact 2. a. according with, sanctioned by, or based on convention b. lacking originality or individuality ; ...
conventional wisdom
noun Date: 1958 the generally accepted belief, opinion, judgment, or prediction about a particular matter
conventionalism
noun see conventional
conventionalist
noun or adjective see conventional
conventionality
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1834 1. a conventional usage, practice, or thing 2. the quality or state of being conventional; especially adherence to conventions
conventionalization
noun see conventional
conventionalize
transitive verb see conventional
conventionally
adverb see conventional
conventioneer
noun Date: 1926 a person attending a convention
conventual
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Medieval Latin; Anglo-French conventuel, from Medieval Latin conventualis, from conventus convent Date: 15th ...
conventually
adverb see conventual I
converge
verb (converged; converging) Etymology: Late Latin convergere, from Latin com- + vergere to bend, incline — more at wrench Date: 1691 intransitive verb 1. to tend or move ...
convergence
noun Date: 1713 1. the act of converging and especially moving toward union or uniformity; especially coordinated movement of the two eyes so that the image of a single point ...
convergency
noun Date: 1709 convergence
convergent
adjective Date: circa 1751 1. tending to move toward one point or to approach each other ; converging 2. exhibiting convergence in form, function, or development 3. ...
converging lens
noun Date: 1860 a lens that causes parallel rays (as of light) to come to a focus
conversable
adjective Date: circa 1631 1. archaic relating to or suitable for social interaction 2. pleasant and easy to converse with
conversance
noun Date: 1609 the quality or state of being conversant
conversancy
noun Date: 1798 conversance
conversant
adjective Date: 14th century 1. archaic having frequent or familiar association 2. archaic concerned, occupied 3. having knowledge or experience — used with with
conversation
noun Etymology: Middle English conversacioun, from Anglo-French conversacion, from Latin conversation-, conversatio, from conversari to associate with, frequentative of ...
conversation piece
noun Date: 1712 1. a painting of a group of persons in their customary surroundings 2. something (as a novel or unusual object) that stimulates conversation
conversational
adjective see conversation
conversationalist
noun Date: 1819 one who converses a great deal or who excels in conversation
conversationally
adverb see conversation
conversazione
noun (plural -ones or conversazioni) Etymology: Italian, literally, conversation, from Latin conversation-, conversatio Date: 1739 a meeting for conversation especially about ...
converse
I. noun Etymology: Middle English convers, from Anglo-French converse, from converser Date: 15th century 1. archaic social interaction 2. conversation II. intransitive ...
conversely
adverb see converse IV
converser
noun see converse II
conversion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin conversion-, conversio, from convertere Date: 14th century 1. the act of converting ; the process of being ...
conversion disorder
noun Date: 1980 a psychoneurosis in which bodily symptoms (as paralysis of the limbs) appear without physical basis — called also conversion hysteria, conversion reaction
conversion hysteria
noun see conversion disorder
conversion reaction
noun see conversion disorder
conversional
adjective see conversion
converso
noun (plural -sos) Etymology: Spanish, literally, convert Date: 1889 a Jew who publicly recanted the Jewish faith and adopted Christianity under the pressure of the Spanish ...
convert
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French convertir, from Latin convertere to turn around, transform, convert, from com- + vertere to turn — more at worth Date: ...
convertaplane
noun see convertiplane
converter
noun Date: 1533 one that converts: as a. the furnace used in the Bessemer process b. (or convertor) a device employing mechanical rotation for changing electrical energy ...
convertibility
noun see convertible I
convertible
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. capable of being converted 2. having a top that may be lowered or removed • convertibility noun • convertibleness noun • ...
convertibleness
noun see convertible I
convertibly
adverb see convertible I
convertiplane
also convertaplane noun Date: 1949 an aircraft that takes off and lands like a helicopter and is convertible to a fixed-wing configuration for forward flight
convertor
noun see converter
convex
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French convexe, from Latin convexus vaulted, concave, convex, from com- + -vexus; perhaps akin to Latin vehere to carry — ...
convexity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1599 1. the quality or state of being convex 2. a convex surface or part
convexo-concave
adjective Date: 1693 1. concavo-convex 2. having the convex side of greater curvature than the concave
convey
transitive verb (conveyed; conveying) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French conveer to accompany, escort, from Vulgar Latin *conviare, from Latin com- + via way — more ...
conveyance
noun Date: 15th century 1. the action of conveying 2. a means or way of conveying: as a. an instrument by which title to property is conveyed b. a means of transport ; ...
conveyancer
noun Date: 1650 one whose business is conveyancing
conveyancing
noun Date: 1690 the act or business of drawing deeds, leases, or other writings for transferring the title to property
conveyer
noun see conveyor
conveyor
also conveyer noun Date: circa 1514 one that conveys: as a. a person who transfers property b. (usually conveyor) a mechanical apparatus for moving articles or bulk ...
conveyorise
British variant of conveyorize
conveyorization
noun see conveyorize
conveyorize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1941 to equip with a conveyor • conveyorization noun
convict
I. adjective Date: 14th century archaic having been convicted II. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French convicter, from Latin convictus, past participle of ...
conviction
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of convicting of a crime especially in a court of law 2. a. the act of convincing a person of error or of compelling the ...
convince
transitive verb (convinced; convincing) Etymology: Latin convincere to refute, convict, prove, from com- + vincere to conquer — more at victor Date: 1530 1. obsolete a. ...
convincer
noun see convince
convincing
adjective Date: 1624 1. satisfying or assuring by argument or proof 2. having power to convince of the truth, rightness, or reality of something ; plausible Synonyms: ...
convincingly
adverb see convincing
convincingness
noun see convincing
convivial
adjective Etymology: Late Latin convivialis, from Latin convivium banquet, from com- + vivere to live — more at quick Date: circa 1668 relating to, occupied with, or fond of ...
conviviality
noun see convivial
convivially
adverb see convivial
convocation
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French, from Latin convocation-, convocatio, from convocare Date: 14th century 1. a. an assembly of ...
convocational
adjective see convocation
convoke
transitive verb (convoked; convoking) Etymology: Middle French convoquer, from Latin convocare, from com- + vocare to call, from voc-, vox voice — more at voice Date: 1598 ...
convolute
verb (-luted; -luting) Etymology: Latin convolutus, past participle of convolvere Date: 1698 twist, coil
convoluted
adjective Date: 1766 1. having convolutions 2. involved, intricate
convoluted tubule
noun Date: 1923 all or part of the coiled sections of a nephron: a. proximal convoluted tubule b. distal convoluted tubule
convolution
noun Date: 1545 1. a form or shape that is folded in curved or tortuous windings 2. one of the irregular ridges on the surface of the brain and especially of the cerebrum of ...
convolve
verb (convolved; convolving) Etymology: Latin convolvere, from com- + volvere to roll — more at voluble Date: 1616 transitive verb to roll together ; writhe intransitive ...
convolvulus
noun (plural -luses or convolvuli) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin convolvere Date: 1548 any of a genus (Convolvulus) of erect, trailing, or twining herbs and shrubs of the ...
convoy
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French convoier, from Old French conveier, from Vulgar Latin *conviare — more at convey Date: 14th century ...
convulsant
adjective Date: 1875 causing convulsions ; convulsive 1a • convulsant noun
convulse
verb (convulsed; convulsing) Etymology: Latin convulsus, past participle of convellere to pluck up, convulse, from com- + vellere to pluck — more at vulnerable Date: 1614 ...
convulsion
noun Date: 1547 1. an abnormal violent and involuntary contraction or series of contractions of the muscles 2. a. a violent disturbance b. an uncontrolled fit ; ...
convulsionary
adjective see convulsion
convulsive
adjective Date: 1615 1. a. constituting or producing a convulsion b. caused by or affected with convulsions 2. resembling a convulsion in being violent, sudden, ...
convulsively
adverb see convulsive
convulsiveness
noun see convulsive
Conway
geographical name city central Arkansas N of Little Rock population 43,167
Conwy
geographical name administrative area of N Wales area 436 square miles (1130 square kilometers)
cony
variant of coney
coo
intransitive verb Etymology: imitative Date: 1577 1. to make the low soft cry of a dove or pigeon or a similar sound 2. to talk fondly, amorously, or appreciatively • ...
COO
abbreviation chief operating officer
Cooch Behar
geographical name former state NE India W of Assam; since 1947 attached to West Bengal
Cook
biographical name James 1728-1779 English navigator & explorer
cook
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English cōc, from Latin coquus, from coquere to cook; akin to Old English āfigen fried, Greek pessein to cook Date: before 12th ...
cook cheese
noun Date: 1941 an unripened cheese made from curd that has been cooked to a soft consistency — called also cooked cheese
Cook Inlet
geographical name inlet of the Pacific S Alaska W of Kenai Peninsula
Cook Islands
geographical name islands S Pacific SW of Society Islands; self-governing territory of New Zealand capital Avarua (on Rarotonga Island) area 92 square miles (238 square ...
cook off
intransitive verb Date: 1945 of a cartridge to fire as a result of overheating
cook one's goose
phrasal to make one's failure or ruin certain
Cook Strait
geographical name strait New Zealand between North Island & South Island
Cook's tour
noun Etymology: Thomas Cook & Son, English travel agency Date: circa 1909 a rapid or cursory survey or review
Cook, Mount
or formerly Aorangi geographical name mountain 12,349 feet (3764 meters) New Zealand in W central South Island; highest peak in Southern Alps & New Zealand
cook-off
noun Date: 1937 a cooking competition
cookable
adjective see cook II
cookbook
I. noun Date: 1809 a book of cooking directions and recipes; broadly a book of detailed instructions II. adjective Date: 1944 involving or using step-by-step procedures ...
Cooke
I. biographical name (Alfred) Alistair 1908- American (British-born) essayist & journalist II. biographical name Terence James 1921-1983 American cardinal
cooked cheese
noun see cook cheese
cooker
noun Date: 1884 one that cooks: as a. a utensil, device, or apparatus for cooking b. a person who tends a cooking process ; cook c. British stove
cookery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 14th century 1. the art or practice of cooking 2. an establishment for cooking
cookery book
noun Date: 1639 chiefly British cookbook
Cookeville
geographical name city N central Tennessee population 23,923
cookhouse
noun Date: 1789 a building for cooking
cookie
or cooky noun (plural cookies) Etymology: Dutch koekje, diminutive of koek cake Date: 1703 1. a small flat or slightly raised cake 2. a. an attractive woman
cookie cutter
noun Date: 1903 a device used to cut rolled cookie dough into shapes before baking
cookie sheet
noun Date: 1926 a flat rectangle of metal with at least one rolled edge used especially for the baking of cookies or biscuits
cookie-cutter
adjective Date: 1963 marked by lack of originality or distinction
cooking
adjective Date: circa 1813 suitable for or used in cooking
cookout
noun Date: 1947 an outing at which a meal is cooked and served in the open; also the meal cooked
cookshack
noun Date: 1909 a shack used for cooking
cookshop
noun Date: circa 1552 a shop providing cooked food
cookstove
noun Date: 1824 a stove for cooking
Cookstown
geographical name district central Northern Ireland, established 1974 area 241 square miles (627 square kilometers), population 30,808
cooktop
noun Date: 1948 1. the flat top of a range 2. a built-in cabinet-top cooking apparatus containing usually four heating units
cookware
noun Date: 1953 utensils used in cooking
cooky
noun see cookie
cool
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English col, from Old English cōl; akin to Old High German kuoli cool, Old English ceald cold — more at cold Date: before 12th century 1. ...
cool it
phrasal to calm down ; go easy
cool one's heels
phrasal to wait or be kept waiting for a long time especially from or as if from disdain or discourtesy
coolant
noun Date: 1926 a usually fluid cooling agent
cooldown
noun Date: 1978 the act or an instance of allowing physiological activity to return to normal gradually after strenuous exercise by engaging in less strenuous exercise
cooler
noun Date: 1575 1. one that cools: as a. a container for cooling liquids b. refrigerator 2. lockup, jail; especially a cell for violent or unmanageable prisoners 3. ...
Cooley's anemia
noun Etymology: Thomas B. Cooley died 1945 American pediatrician Date: circa 1935 a severe thalassemic anemia that is associated with the presence of microcytes, enlargement ...
coolheaded
adjective Date: 1777 not easily excited
Coolidge
biographical name (John) Calvin 1872-1933 30th president of the United States (1923-29)
coolie
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu qulī Date: 1638 an unskilled laborer or porter usually in or from the Far East hired for low or subsistence wages
coolie hat
noun Date: 1924 a conical-shaped usually straw hat worn especially to protect the head from the heat of the sun
cooling tower
noun Date: 1901 a structure over which circulated water is trickled to reduce its temperature by partial evaporation
cooling-off
adjective Date: 1926 designed to allow passions to cool or to permit negotiation between parties
coolish
adjective see cool I
coolly
adverb see cool I
coolness
noun see cool I
cooly
adverb see cool I
coomb
I. noun see combe II. see coombe
coombe
or coomb variant of combe
coon
noun Date: 1742 1. raccoon 2. usually offensive black 4
coon cat
noun Date: 1901 Maine coon
coon cheese
noun Etymology: Edward W. Coon, patenter in 1926 of a method for curing cheddar at a high temperature Date: 1946 a sharp cheddar cheese that has been cured at higher than ...
Coon Rapids
geographical name city E Minnesota N of St. Paul population 61,607
coon's age
noun Date: 1843 a long while
cooncan
noun Etymology: by folk etymology from Mexican Spanish conquián conquian, from Spanish ¿con quién? with whom? Date: 1889 a game of rummy played with two packs including two ...
coonhound
noun Date: 1919 a sporting dog trained to hunt raccoons; especially black-and-tan coonhound
coonskin
noun Date: 1818 1. the skin or pelt of the raccoon 2. an article (as a cap or coat) made of coonskin
coontie
noun Etymology: Creek (Florida dialect) kontí• Date: 1791 any of several tropical American woody cycads (genus Zamia) whose roots and stems yield a starchy foodstuff — ...
coop
I. noun Etymology: Middle English cupe; akin to Old English cȳpe basket Date: 14th century 1. a cage or small enclosure (as for poultry); also a small building for housing ...
Cooper
I. biographical name Anthony Ashley — see Shaftesbury II. biographical name James Fenimore 1789-1851 American novelist III. biographical name Leon N. 1930- American ...
cooper
I. noun Etymology: Middle English couper, cowper, from Middle Dutch cūper (from cūpe cask) or Middle Low German kūper, from kūpe cask; Middle Dutch cūpe & Middle Low German ...
Cooper City
geographical name city SE Florida WNW of Hollywood population 27,939
Cooper's hawk
noun Etymology: William Cooper died 1864 American naturalist Date: 1828 an American hawk (Accipiter cooperii) that is larger than the similarly colored sharp-shinned hawk and ...
cooperage
noun Date: 1705 1. a cooper's work or products 2. a cooper's place of business
cooperate
intransitive verb Etymology: Late Latin cooperatus, past participle of cooperari, from Latin co- + operari to work — more at operate Date: 1582 1. to act or work with ...
cooperation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the action of cooperating ; common effort 2. association of persons for common benefit • cooperationist noun

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