Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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decompress
verb Date: 1905 transitive verb 1. to release from pressure or compression 2. to convert (as a compressed file or signal) to an expanded or original size intransitive ...
decompression
noun see decompress
decompression sickness
noun Date: 1941 a sometimes fatal disorder that is marked by neuralgic pains and paralysis, distress in breathing, and often collapse and that is caused by the release of gas ...
deconcentrate
transitive verb Date: circa 1889 to reduce or abolish the concentration of ; decentralize • deconcentration noun
deconcentration
noun see deconcentrate
decondition
transitive verb Date: 1941 1. to cause extinction of (a conditioned response) 2. to cause to lose physical fitness
decongest
transitive verb see decongestion
decongestant
noun Date: 1947 an agent that relieves congestion (as of mucous membranes) • decongestant adjective
decongestion
noun Date: 1908 the process of relieving congestion • decongest transitive verb • decongestive adjective
decongestive
adjective see decongestion
deconsecrate
transitive verb Date: 1876 to remove the sacred character of • deconsecration noun
deconsecration
noun see deconsecrate
deconstruct
transitive verb Date: 1973 1. to examine (as a work of literature) using the methods of deconstruction 2. to take apart or examine in order to reveal the basis or ...
deconstruction
noun Etymology: French déconstruction, from dé- de- + construction Date: 1973 1. a philosophical or critical method which asserts that meanings, metaphysical constructs, and ...
deconstructionism
noun Date: 1977 deconstruction 1 • deconstructionist adjective or noun
deconstructionist
adjective or noun see deconstructionism
deconstructive
adjective see deconstruct
deconstructivism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1988 an architectural movement or style influenced by deconstruction that encourages radical freedom of form and the open manifestation of ...
deconstructivist
adjective or noun see deconstructivism
deconstructor
noun see deconstruct
decontaminate
transitive verb Date: 1936 to rid of contamination (as radioactive material) • decontamination noun • decontaminator noun
decontamination
noun see decontaminate
decontaminator
noun see decontaminate
decontextualize
transitive verb Date: 1977 to remove from a context
decontrol
transitive verb Date: 1919 to end control of • decontrol noun
decor
or décor noun Etymology: French décor, from décorer to decorate, from Latin decorare Date: 1897 1. a stage setting 2. a. decoration 2 b. the style and layout of ...
décor
noun see decor
decorate
transitive verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Latin decoratus, past participle of decorare, from decor-, decus ornament, honor — more at decent Date: 1530 1. to add honor to ...
decoration
noun Date: 1585 1. the act or process of decorating 2. something that adorns, enriches, or beautifies ; ornament 3. a badge of honor (as a United States military award)
Decoration Day
noun Etymology: from the custom of decorating graves on this day Date: 1871 Memorial Day
decorative
adjective Date: 1791 serving to decorate; especially purely ornamental • decoratively adverb • decorativeness noun
decorative art
noun Date: 1853 1. art that is concerned primarily with the creation of useful items (as furniture, ceramics, or textiles) — usually used in plural 2. objects of decorative ...
decoratively
adverb see decorative
decorativeness
noun see decorative
decorator
I. noun Date: circa 1755 one that decorates; especially one that designs or executes interiors and their furnishings II. adjective Date: 1950 suitable for interior ...
decorous
adjective Etymology: Latin decorus, from decor beauty, grace; akin to Latin decēre to be fitting — more at decent Date: 1653 marked by propriety and good taste ; correct ...
decorously
adverb see decorous
decorousness
noun see decorous
decorticate
transitive verb see decortication
decortication
noun Etymology: Latin decortication-, decorticatio, from decorticare to remove the bark from, from de- + cortic-, cortex bark — more at cuirass Date: circa 1623 1. the act ...
decorticator
noun see decortication
decorum
noun Etymology: Latin, from neuter of decorus Date: 1568 1. literary and dramatic propriety ; fitness 2. propriety and good taste in conduct or appearance 3. orderliness ...
decoupage
or découpage noun Etymology: French découpage, literally, act of cutting out, from Middle French, from decouper to cut out, from de- + couper to cut — more at cope Date: ...
découpage
I. noun see decoupage II. transitive verb see decoupage
decouple
transitive verb Date: 1938 to eliminate the interrelationship of ; separate
decoy
I. noun Etymology: probably from Dutch de kooi, literally, the cage Date: 1630 1. a pond into which wildfowl are lured for capture 2. someone or something used to lure or ...
decrease
I. verb (decreased; decreasing) Etymology: Middle English decreessen, from Anglo-French decrestre, from Latin decrescere, from de- + crescere to grow — more at crescent Date: ...
decreasingly
adverb see decrease I
decree
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French decré, from Latin decretum, from neuter of decretus, past participle of decernere to decide, from de- + cernere to sift, ...
decree-law
noun Date: 1926 a decree of a ruler or ministry having the force of a law enacted by the legislature
decreer
noun see decree II
decrement
noun Etymology: Latin decrementum, from decrescere Date: 1610 1. a gradual decrease in quality or quantity 2. a. the quantity lost by diminution or waste b. the amount ...
decremental
adjective see decrement
decrepit
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin decrepitus Date: 15th century 1. wasted and weakened by or as if by the infirmities of old age 2. a. impaired by use or ...
decrepitate
verb Etymology: probably from New Latin *decrepitatus, past participle of *decrepitare, from Latin de- + crepitare to crackle — more at crepitate Date: 1646 transitive verb ...
decrepitation
noun see decrepitate
decrepitly
adverb see decrepit
decrepitude
noun Date: 1603 the quality or state of being decrepit
decrescendo
I. noun (plural -dos) Etymology: Italian, literally, decreasing, from Latin decrescendum, gerund of decrescere Date: 1877 1. a gradual decrease in volume of a musical ...
decrescent
adjective Etymology: alteration of earlier decressant, from Anglo-French, present participle of Anglo-French decrestre to decrease Date: 1610 becoming less by gradual ...
decretal
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin decretalis of a decree, from Latin decretum decree Date: 14th century decree; especially a papal letter ...
decretive
adjective Date: 1609 having the force of a decree ; decretory
decretory
adjective Date: circa 1631 relating to or fixed by a decree or decision
decrier
noun see decry
decriminalization
noun see decriminalize
decriminalize
transitive verb Date: 1969 to remove or reduce the criminal classification or status of; especially to repeal a strict ban on while keeping under some form of regulation ...
decry
transitive verb Etymology: French décrier, from Old French decrier, from de- + crier to cry Date: 1614 1. to depreciate (as a coin) officially or publicly 2. to express ...
decrypt
transitive verb Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary de- + cryptogram, cryptograph Date: 1935 decode 1a • decryption noun
decryption
noun see decrypt
decubitus ulcer
noun Etymology: New Latin decubitus position assumed in lying down, from Latin decumbere Date: 1946 bedsore
decumbent
adjective Etymology: Latin decumbent-, decumbens, present participle of decumbere to lie down, from de- + -cumbere to lie down; akin to Latin cubare to lie Date: 1656 1. lying ...
decuple
adjective Etymology: French décuple, from Middle French, from Late Latin decuplus, from Latin decem ten + -uplus (as in quadruplus quadruple) Date: 1613 1. tenfold 2. taken ...
decurion
noun Etymology: Middle English decurioun, from Latin decurion-, decurio, from decuria division of ten, from decem Date: 14th century 1. a Roman cavalry officer in command of ...
decurrent
adjective Etymology: Latin decurrent-, decurrens, present participle of decurrere to run down, from de- + currere to run — more at car Date: circa 1753 running or extending ...
decurved
adjective Etymology: part translation of Late Latin decurvatus, from Latin de- + curvatus curved Date: 1835 curved downward ; bent down
decussate
I. verb (-sated; -sating) Etymology: Latin decussatus, past participle of decussare to arrange crosswise, from decussis the number ten, numeral X, intersection, from decem + ...
decussation
noun Date: circa 1656 1. the action of crossing (as of nerve fibers) especially in the form of an X 2. a crossed tract of nerve fibers passing between centers on opposite ...
Dedham
geographical name town E Massachusetts SW of Boston population 23,464
dedicate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin dedicatus, past participle of dedicare to dedicate, from de- + dicare to proclaim, dedicate — more at diction Date: 14th ...
dedicated
adjective Date: circa 1600 1. devoted to a cause, ideal, or purpose ; zealous 2. given over to a particular purpose • dedicatedly adverb
dedicatedly
adverb see dedicated
dedicatee
noun Date: circa 1770 one to whom a thing is dedicated
dedication
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or rite of dedicating to a divine being or to a sacred use 2. a devoting or setting aside for a particular purpose 3. a name and often a ...
dedicator
noun see dedicate II
dedicatory
adjective see dedication
dedifferentiate
intransitive verb see dedifferentiation
dedifferentiation
noun Date: 1915 reversion of specialized structures (as cells) to a more generalized or primitive condition often as a preliminary to major physiological or structural change ...
deduce
transitive verb (deduced; deducing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin deducere, literally, to lead away, from de- + ducere to lead — more at tow Date: 15th century 1. to ...
deducible
adjective see deduce
deduct
transitive verb Etymology: Latin deductus, past participle of deducere Date: 15th century 1. to take away (an amount) from a total ; subtract 2. deduce, infer
deductibility
noun see deductible I
deductible
I. adjective Date: 1856 allowable as a deduction • deductibility noun II. noun Date: 1929 a clause in an insurance policy that relieves the insurer of responsibility ...
deduction
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. an act of taking away b. something that is or may be subtracted 2. a. the deriving of a conclusion by reasoning; specifically ...
deductive
adjective Date: 1665 1. of, relating to, or provable by deduction 2. employing deduction in reasoning • deductively adverb
deductively
adverb see deductive
dee
noun Date: 13th century 1. the letter d 2. something shaped like the letter D
Dee
geographical name 1. river 87 miles (140 kilometers) NE Scotland flowing E into North Sea 2. river 50 miles (80 kilometers) S Scotland flowing S into Solway Firth 3. river ...
deed
I. noun Etymology: Middle English dede, from Old English dǣd; akin to Old English dōn to do Date: before 12th century 1. something that is done 2. a usually illustrious ...
deed poll
noun (plural deeds poll) Etymology: 1deed + poll, adjective, having the edges cut even rather than indented, from 2poll Date: 1574 British a deed (as to change one's name) ...
deedless
adjective see deed I
deedy
adjective (deedier; -est) Date: 1615 dialect chiefly England industrious
deejay
noun Etymology: disc jockey Date: circa 1948 disc jockey • deejay verb
deem
verb Etymology: Middle English demen, from Old English dēman; akin to Old High German tuomen to judge, Old English dōm doom Date: before 12th century transitive verb to ...
deep
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English dep, from Old English dēop; akin to Old High German tiof deep, Old English dyppan to dip — more at dip Date: before 12th century 1. ...
deep ecologist
noun see deep ecology
deep ecology
noun Date: 1984 a movement or a body of concepts that considers humans no more important than other species and that advocates a corresponding radical readjustment of the ...
deep fat
noun Date: 1908 hot fat or oil deep enough in a cooking utensil to cover the food to be fried
deep focus
noun Date: 1948 a photographic effect or technique (as in filmmaking) characterized by great depth of field
deep freeze
noun Date: 1948 1. cold storage 2 2. intense cold
deep fryer
noun Date: 1950 a utensil suitable for deep-fat frying
deep pocket
noun Date: 1975 1. a person or an organization having substantial financial resources 2. plural substantial financial resources • deep-pocketed adjective
deep six
noun Etymology: from the leadsman's call by the deep six for a depth corresponding to the sixth deep on a sounding line Date: 1929 slang a place of disposal or abandonment ...
Deep South
geographical name region SE United States — usually considered to include Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and all or part of the ...
deep space
noun Date: circa 1952 space well outside the earth's atmosphere and especially that part lying beyond the earth-moon system
deep structure
noun Date: 1964 a formal representation of the underlying semantic content of a sentence; also the structure which such a representation specifies
deep throat
noun Usage: often capitalized D&T Etymology: from the nickname given to such an informant in the Watergate scandal by Bob Woodward b1943 United States journalist, from the ...
deep-dish
adjective Date: 1918 baked in a deep dish ; especially baked in a deep dish with usually a fruit filling and no bottom crust
deep-freeze
transitive verb (deep-froze; deep-frozen) Date: 1943 1. quick-freeze 2. to store in a frozen state
deep-fry
transitive verb Date: 1922 to cook in deep fat
deep-pocketed
adjective see deep pocket
deep-rooted
adjective Date: 15th century deeply implanted or established Synonyms: see inveterate
deep-sea
adjective Date: 1626 of, relating to, or occurring in the deeper parts of the sea
deep-seated
adjective Date: 1741 1. situated far below the surface 2. firmly established Synonyms: see inveterate
deep-six
transitive verb Date: 1952 1. to get rid of ; discard, eliminate 2. slang to throw overboard
deep-sky
adjective Date: 1968 relating to or existing in space outside the solar system
deepen
verb (deepened; deepening) Date: 1598 transitive verb to make deep or deeper intransitive verb to become deeper or more profound
Deepfreeze
trademark — used for a freezer for food storage
Deeping
biographical name (George) Warwick 1877-1950 English novelist
deeply
adverb see deep I
deepness
noun see deep I
deepwater
adjective Date: 1795 of, relating to, or characterized by water of considerable depth ; especially able to accommodate oceangoing vessels
deer
noun (plural deer; also deers) Etymology: Middle English, deer, animal, from Old English dēor beast; akin to Old High German tior wild animal, Lithuanian dvasia breath, spirit ...
deer mouse
noun Etymology: from its agility Date: 1833 any of various mice (genus Peromyscus) of North and Central America; especially one (P. maniculatus) widely distributed in forests ...
Deer Park
geographical name city SE Texas population 28,520
deer tick
noun Date: 1982 an ixodid tick (Ixodes scapularis syn. I. dammini) of the eastern United States and Canada that transmits the bacterium causing Lyme disease — called also ...
deerberry
noun Date: 1814 1. either of two shrubs (Vaccinium stamineum or V. caesium) of the heath family that are found in dry woods and scrub of the eastern United States 2. the ...
Deere
biographical name John 1804-1886 American inventor
Deerfield Beach
geographical name city SE Florida N of Fort Lauderdale population 64,583
deerfly
noun Date: 1853 any of numerous small horseflies (as of the genus Chrysops) that include important vectors of tularemia
deerhound
noun Date: 1816 Scottish deerhound
deerlike
adjective see deer
deerskin
noun Date: 14th century leather made from the skin of a deer; also a garment of this leather
deerstalker
noun Date: 1870 a close-fitting hat with a visor at the front and the back and with earflaps that may be worn up or down — called also deerstalker cap, deerstalker hat
deerstalker cap
noun see deerstalker
deerstalker hat
noun see deerstalker
deeryard
noun Date: 1849 a place where deer herd in winter
deet
noun Usage: often all capitalized Etymology: probably from d. e. t., from di- + ethyl + toluamide (C8H9NO) Date: 1962 a colorless oily liquid insect and tick repellent ...
def
I. adjective (deffer; deffest) Etymology: probably alteration of death (from the phrase to death excessively) Date: 1979 slang cool 7 II. abbreviation 1. defendant; ...
deface
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French *desfacer, *deffacer, from des- de- + face front, face Date: 14th century 1. to mar the appearance of ; injure by ...
defacement
noun see deface
defacer
noun see deface
defalcate
verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Medieval Latin defalcatus, past participle of defalcare, from Latin de- + falc-, falx sickle Date: 1541 transitive verb archaic deduct, ...
defalcation
noun Date: 15th century 1. archaic deduction 2. the act or an instance of embezzling 3. a failure to meet a promise or an expectation
defalcator
noun see defalcate
defamation
noun Date: 14th century the act of defaming another ; calumny • defamatory adjective
defamatory
adjective see defamation
defame
transitive verb (defamed; defaming) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French deffamer, diffamer, from Medieval Latin defamare, alteration of ...
defamer
noun see defame
defamiliarization
noun see defamiliarize
defamiliarize
transitive verb Date: 1971 to present or render in an unfamiliar artistic form usually to stimulate fresh perception • defamiliarization noun
defang
transitive verb Date: 1953 to make harmless or less powerful
defat
transitive verb Date: 1919 to remove fat from
default
I. noun Etymology: Middle English defaute, defaulte, from Anglo-French, from defaillir to be lacking, fail, from de- + faillir to fail Date: 13th century 1. failure to do ...
defaulter
noun see default II
defeasance
noun Etymology: Middle English defesance, from Anglo-French, from defesaunt, present participle of defaire Date: 15th century 1. a. (1) the termination of a property ...
defeasibility
noun see defeasible
defeasible
adjective Date: 15th century capable of being annulled or made void • defeasibility noun
defeat
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English deffeten, from Anglo-French defait, past participle of defaire, desfaire to destroy, from Medieval Latin disfacere, from Latin dis- ...
defeatable
adjective see defeat I
defeatism
noun Date: 1918 an attitude of accepting, expecting, or being resigned to defeat • defeatist noun or adjective
defeatist
noun or adjective see defeatism
defeature
noun Etymology: probably from de- + feature Date: 1590 1. archaic disfigurement 2. archaic defeat
defecate
verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Latin defaecatus, past participle of defaecare, from de- + faec-, faex dregs, lees Date: 1575 transitive verb 1. to free from impurity or ...
defecation
noun see defecate
defect
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin defectus lack, from deficere to desert, fail, from de- + facere to do — more at do Date: 15th century 1. a. an imperfection ...
defection
noun Date: 1546 conscious abandonment of allegiance or duty (as to a person, cause, or doctrine) ; desertion
defective
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. imperfect in form or function ; faulty b. falling below the norm in structure or in mental or physical function 2. lacking ...
defectively
adverb see defective I
defectiveness
noun see defective I
defector
noun see defect II
defeminization
noun see defeminize
defeminize
transitive verb Date: 1907 to divest of feminine qualities or characteristics ; masculinize • defeminization noun
defence
chiefly British variant of defense
defenceman
chiefly British variant of defenseman
defend
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French defendre, from Latin defendere, from de- + -fendere to strike; akin to Old English gūth battle, war, Greek theinein to strike ...
defendable
adjective see defend
defendant
I. noun Date: 14th century a person required to make answer in a legal action or suit — compare plaintiff II. adjective Date: 15th century being on the defensive ; ...
defender
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that defends 2. a player in a sport (as football) assigned to a defensive position
defenestrate
transitive verb see defenestration
defenestration
noun Etymology: de- + Latin fenestra window Date: 1620 1. a throwing of a person or thing out of a window 2. a usually swift dismissal or expulsion (as from a political ...
defense
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin defensa vengeance, from Latin, feminine of defensus, past participle of defendere Date: 14th century 1. ...
defense mechanism
noun Date: 1913 1. an often unconscious mental process (as repression) that makes possible compromise solutions to personal problems 2. a defensive reaction by an organism
defenseless
adjective see defense I
defenselessly
adverb see defense I
defenselessness
noun see defense I
defenseman
noun Date: 1895 a player in a sport (as hockey) who is assigned to a defensive zone or position
defensibility
noun see defensible
defensible
adjective Date: 14th century capable of being defended • defensibility noun • defensibly adverb
defensibly
adverb see defensible
defensive
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. serving to defend or protect 2. a. devoted to resisting or preventing aggression or attack b. of or relating to the attempt to ...
defensive medicine
noun Date: 1973 the practice of ordering medical tests, procedures, or consultations of doubtful clinical value in order to protect the prescribing physician from malpractice ...
defensively
adverb see defensive I
defensiveness
noun see defensive I
defer
I. transitive verb (deferred; deferring) Etymology: Middle English deferren, differren, from Middle French differer, from Latin differre to postpone, be different — more at ...
deference
noun Date: 1660 respect and esteem due a superior or an elder; also affected or ingratiating regard for another's wishes Synonyms: see honor
deferent
adjective Etymology: back-formation from deference Date: 1822 deferential
deferential
adjective Date: 1822 showing or expressing deference • deferentially adverb
deferentially
adverb see deferential
deferment
noun Date: 1607 the act of delaying or postponing; specifically official postponement of military service
deferrable
adjective Date: 1943 capable of or suitable or eligible for being deferred • deferrable noun
deferral
noun Date: 1865 the act of delaying ; postponement
deferred
adjective Date: 1651 1. withheld for or until a stated time 2. charged in cases of delayed handling
deferrer
noun see defer I
defervescence
noun Etymology: German Deferveszenz, from Latin defervescent-, defervescens, present participle of defervescere to stop boiling, from de- + fervescere to begin to boil — more ...
Deffand, du
biographical name Marquise 1697-1780 née Marie de Vichy-Chamrond French woman of letters
deffer
comparative of def
deffest
superlative of def
defiance
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or an instance of defying ; challenge 2. disposition to resist ; willingness to contend or fight
defiant
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Old French, present participle of defier to defy Date: 1583 full of or showing defiance ; bold, impudent • defiantly adverb
defiantly
adverb see defiant
defibrillate
transitive verb see defibrillator
defibrillation
noun see defibrillator
defibrillator
noun Date: 1952 an electronic device that applies an electric shock to restore the rhythm of a fibrillating heart • defibrillate transitive verb • defibrillation noun
defibrinate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1845 to remove fibrin from (blood) • defibrination noun
defibrination
noun see defibrinate
deficiency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1603 1. the quality or state of being deficient ; inadequacy 2. an amount that is lacking or inadequate ; shortage: as a. a shortage of ...
deficiency disease
noun Date: 1912 a disease (as scurvy) caused by a lack of essential dietary elements and especially a vitamin or mineral
deficient
I. adjective Etymology: Latin deficient-, deficiens, present participle of deficere to be wanting — more at defect Date: 1581 1. lacking in some necessary quality or ...
deficiently
adverb see deficient I
deficit
noun Etymology: French déficit, from Latin deficit it is wanting, 3d singular present indicative of deficere Date: 1782 1. a. (1) deficiency in amount or quality ...
deficit spending
noun Date: 1938 the spending of public funds raised by borrowing rather than by taxation
defier
noun Date: 1584 one that defies
defilade
transitive verb (-laded; -lading) Etymology: probably from de- + -filade (as in enfilade) Date: 1828 to arrange (fortifications) so as to protect the lines from frontal or ...
defile
I. transitive verb (defiled; defiling) Etymology: Middle English, alteration (influenced by filen to defile, from Old English fȳlan) of defoilen to trample, defile, from ...
defilement
noun see defile I
defiler
noun see defile I
definable
adjective Date: 1610 1. able to be defined 2. able to be specified to have a particular function or operation • definably adverb
definably
adverb see definable
define
verb (defined; defining) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin definire, from de- + finire to limit, end, from finis boundary, end Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. ...
definement
noun see define
definer
noun see define
definiendum
noun (plural definienda) Etymology: Latin, something to be defined, neuter of definiendus, gerundive of definire Date: 1871 an expression that is being defined
definiens
noun (plural definientia) Etymology: Latin, present participle of definire Date: 1838 an expression that defines ; definition
definite
adjective Etymology: Latin definitus, past participle of definire Date: 1553 1. having distinct or certain limits 2. a. free of all ambiguity, uncertainty, or ...
definite integral
noun Date: 1834 the difference between the values of the integral of a given function f(x) for an upper value b and a lower value a of the independent variable x
definitely
adverb see definite
definiteness
noun see definite
definition
noun Etymology: Middle English diffinicioun, from Anglo-French, from Latin definition-, definitio, from definire Date: 14th century 1. an act of determining; specifically the ...
definitional
adjective see definition
definitive
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English diffinityf, from Anglo-French diffinitive, from Latin definitivus, from definitus Date: 14th century 1. serving to provide a final ...
definitive host
noun Date: 1901 the host in which the sexual reproduction of a parasite takes place — compare intermediate host 1
definitively
adverb see definitive I
definitiveness
noun see definitive I
definitize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1876 to make definite
definitude
noun Etymology: irregular from definite Date: 1836 precision, definiteness
deflagrate
verb (-grated; -grating) Etymology: Latin deflagratus, past participle of deflagrare to burn down, from de- + flagrare to burn — more at black Date: circa 1727 transitive ...
deflagration
noun see deflagrate
deflate
verb (deflated; deflating) Etymology: de- + -flate (as in inflate) Date: 1891 transitive verb 1. to release air or gas from 2. to reduce in size, importance, or ...
deflater
noun see deflate
deflation
noun Date: 1891 1. an act or instance of deflating ; the state of being deflated 2. a contraction in the volume of available money or credit that results in a general decline ...
deflationary
adjective see deflation
deflator
noun see deflate
deflect
verb Etymology: Latin deflectere to bend down, turn aside, from de- + flectere to bend Date: circa 1555 transitive verb to turn aside especially from a straight course or ...
deflectable
adjective see deflect
deflection
noun Date: 1605 1. a turning aside or off course ; deviation 2. the departure of an indicator or pointer from the zero reading on the scale of an instrument

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