Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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deflective
adjective see deflect
deflector
noun see deflect
deflexed
adjective Etymology: Latin deflexus, past participle of deflectere Date: 1826 turned abruptly downward
defloration
noun Etymology: Middle English defloracioun, from Middle French & Late Latin; Middle French defloracion, from Late Latin defloration-, defloratio, from deflorare Date: 15th ...
deflower
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English deflouren, from Middle French or Late Latin; Old French desflorer, from Late Latin deflorare, from Latin de- + flor-, flos flower — ...
deflowerer
noun see deflower
Defoe
biographical name Daniel 1660-1731 English journalist & novelist
defog
transitive verb Date: 1904 to remove fog or condensed moisture from • defogger noun
defogger
noun see defog
defoliant
noun Date: 1943 a chemical spray or dust applied to plants in order to cause the leaves to drop off prematurely
defoliate
transitive verb Etymology: Late Latin defoliatus, past participle of defoliare, from Latin de- + folium leaf — more at blade Date: 1791 to deprive of leaves especially ...
defoliation
noun see defoliate
defoliator
noun see defoliate
deforce
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French deforcer, from de- + forcer to force Date: 15th century 1. to keep (as lands) by force from the rightful owner 2. ...
deforcement
noun see deforce
deforest
transitive verb see deforestation
deforestation
noun Date: 1874 the action or process of clearing of forests; also the state of having been cleared of forests • deforest transitive verb
deform
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French desfurmer, from Latin deformare, from de- + formare to form, from forma form Date: 15th century ...
deformable
adjective see deform
deformalize
transitive verb Date: 1880 to make less formal
deformation
noun Date: 15th century 1. alteration of form or shape; also the product of such alteration 2. the action of deforming ; the state of being deformed 3. change for the ...
deformational
adjective see deformation
deformative
adjective Date: 1641 tending to deform
deformed
adjective Date: 15th century distorted or unshapely in form ; misshapen
deformity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English deformite, from Middle French defformeteit, from Latin deformitat-, deformitas, from deformis deformed, from de- + forma Date: 15th ...
defrag
transitive verb (defragged; defragging) Date: 1988 defragment
defragment
transitive verb Date: 1985 to reorganize separated fragments of related data on (a computer disk) into a contiguous arrangement • defragmentation noun
defragmentation
noun see defragment
defragmenter
noun Date: 1986 software that defragments a computer disk
defraud
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French defrauder, from Latin defraudare, from de- + fraudare to cheat, from fraud-, fraus fraud Date: 14th century to ...
defrauder
noun see defraud
defray
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French deffroyer, from des- de- + frayer to expend, from Old French, from frais, plural of fret, frait expenditure, literally, damage by ...
defrayable
adjective see defray
defrayal
noun see defray
defrock
transitive verb Date: 1581 1. to deprive (as a priest) of the right to exercise the functions of office 2. to remove from a position of honor or privilege
defrost
verb Date: 1895 transitive verb 1. to release from a frozen state 2. to free from ice ; also defog intransitive verb to thaw out especially from a deep-frozen ...
defroster
noun see defrost
deft
adjective Etymology: Middle English defte gentle — more at daft Date: 15th century characterized by facility and skill Synonyms: see dexterous • deftly adverb • ...
deftly
adverb see deft
deftness
noun see deft
defunct
adjective Etymology: Latin defunctus, from past participle of defungi to finish, die, from de- + fungi to perform — more at function Date: 1599 no longer living, existing, ...
defund
transitive verb Date: 1948 to withdraw funding from
defuse
transitive verb Date: 1943 1. to remove the fuse from (as a mine or bomb) 2. to make less harmful, potent, or tense
defy
I. transitive verb (defied; defying) Etymology: Middle English, to renounce faith in, challenge, from Anglo-French desfier, defier, from des- de- + fier to entrust, from Vulgar ...
deg
abbreviation degree
dégagé
adjective Etymology: French, from past participle of dégager to put at ease, from Old French desgagier to redeem a pledge, free, from des- de- + gage pledge — more at gage ...
degas
transitive verb Date: 1928 to remove gas from
Degas
biographical name (Hilaire-Germain-) Edgar 1834-1917 French artist
degauss
transitive verb Etymology: de- + gauss, after Karl F. Gauss Date: circa 1940 to remove or neutralize the magnetic field of • degausser noun
degausser
noun see degauss
degeneracy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1664 1. the state of being degenerate 2. the process of becoming degenerate 3. sexual perversion 4. the coding of an amino acid by more than one ...
degenerate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English degenerat, from Latin degeneratus, past participle of degenerare to degenerate, from de- + gener-, genus race, kind — more at kin Date: ...
degenerately
adverb see degenerate I
degenerateness
noun see degenerate I
degeneration
noun Date: 15th century 1. degenerate condition 2. a lowering of effective power, vitality, or essential quality to an enfeebled and worsened kind or state 3. ...
degenerative
adjective Date: circa 1846 of, relating to, involving, or causing degeneration
deglaciated
adjective see deglaciation
deglaciation
noun Date: 1895 the melting of ice; specifically the retreat of a glacier or ice sheet • deglaciated adjective
deglamorization
noun see deglamorize
deglamorize
transitive verb Date: 1938 to remove the glamour from • deglamorization noun
deglaze
I. transitive verb Date: circa 1889 to remove the glaze from II. transitive verb Etymology: modification of French déglacer, literally, to melt the ice from, from dé- + ...
deglutition
noun Etymology: French déglutition, from Latin deglutire to swallow down, from de- + glutire, gluttire to swallow — more at glutton Date: 1650 the act or process of ...
degradability
noun see degradable
degradable
adjective Date: circa 1962 capable of being chemically degraded — compare biodegradable • degradability noun
degradation
noun Date: circa 1535 1. the act or process of degrading 2. a. decline to a low, destitute, or demoralized state b. moral or intellectual decadence ; degeneration • ...
degradative
adjective see degradation
degrade
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French degrader, from Late Latin degradare, from Latin de- + gradus step, grade — more at grade Date: 14th century transitive verb ...
degraded
adjective Date: 1643 1. reduced far below ordinary standards of civilized life and conduct 2. characterized by degeneration of structure or function • degradedly adverb
degradedly
adverb see degraded
degrader
noun see degrade
degradingly
adverb see degrade
degranulation
noun Date: circa 1941 the process of losing granules; specifically the process by which cytoplasmic granules (as of mast cells) release their contents
degrease
transitive verb Date: circa 1889 to remove grease from • degreaser noun
degreaser
noun see degrease
degree
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French degré, from Vulgar Latin *degradus, from Latin de- + gradus Date: 13th century 1. a step or stage in a process, course, or ...
degree of freedom
Date: 1867 1. any of a limited number of ways in which a body may move or in which a dynamic system may change 2. one of the capabilities of a statistic for variation of which ...
degree-day
noun Date: 1832 a unit that represents one degree of difference from a given point (as 65°) in the mean daily outdoor temperature and that is used especially to measure heat ...
degreed
adjective see degree
degressive
adjective Etymology: de- + -gressive (as in progressive) Date: 1886 tending to descend or decrease • degressively adverb
degressively
adverb see degressive
dégringolade
noun Etymology: French, from dégringoler to tumble down, from Middle French desgringueler, from des- de- + gringueler to tumble, from Middle Dutch crinkelen to make curl, from ...
degum
transitive verb Date: circa 1884 to free from gum, a gummy substance, or sericin
degust
transitive verb see degustation
degustation
noun Etymology: French dégustation, from Latin degustation-, degustatio, from degustare to taste, from de- + gustare to taste — more at choose Date: circa 1656 the action ...
dehisce
intransitive verb (dehisced; dehiscing) Etymology: Latin dehiscere to split open, from de- + hiscere to gape; akin to Latin hiare to yawn — more at yawn Date: 1657 to split ...
dehiscence
noun Etymology: New Latin dehiscentia, from Latin dehiscent-, dehiscens, present participle of dehiscere Date: 1819 an act or instance of dehiscing • dehiscent adjective
dehiscent
adjective see dehiscence
Dehiwala-Mount Lavinia
geographical name town W Sri Lanka on coast S of Colombo population 193,000
Dehmelt
biographical name Hans Georg 1922- American (German-born) physicist
dehorn
transitive verb Date: 1888 1. to deprive of horns 2. to prevent the growth of the horns of • dehorner noun
dehorner
noun see dehorn
Dehra Dun
geographical name city N India capital of Uttaranchal population 270,028
dehumanization
noun see dehumanize
dehumanize
transitive verb Date: 1818 to deprive of human qualities, personality, or spirit • dehumanization noun
dehumidification
noun see dehumidify
dehumidifier
noun see dehumidify
dehumidify
transitive verb Date: 1927 to remove moisture from (as air) • dehumidification noun • dehumidifier noun
dehydrate
verb Date: 1876 transitive verb 1. a. to remove bound water or hydrogen and oxygen from (a chemical compound) in the proportion in which they form water b. to remove ...
dehydration
noun Date: 1854 the process of dehydrating; especially an abnormal depletion of body fluids
dehydrator
noun see dehydrate
dehydrochlorinate
transitive verb see dehydrochlorination
dehydrochlorination
noun Date: 1936 the process of removing hydrogen and chlorine or hydrogen chloride from a compound • dehydrochlorinate transitive verb
dehydroepiandrosterone
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary de- + hydr- + epi- + androsterone Date: 1961 a weakly androgenic ketosteroid C19H28O2 secreted by the adrenal glands that ...
dehydrogenase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1923 an enzyme that accelerates the removal of hydrogen from metabolites and its transfer to other substances — ...
dehydrogenate
transitive verb see dehydrogenation
dehydrogenation
noun Date: 1866 the removal of hydrogen from a chemical compound • dehydrogenate transitive verb
Dei gratia
foreign term Etymology: Latin by the grace of God
deice
transitive verb Date: 1934 to rid or keep free of ice
deicer
noun see deice
deicide
noun Etymology: ultimately from Latin deus god + -cidium, -cida -cide — more at deity Date: 1577 1. the act of killing a divine being or a symbolic substitute of such a ...
deictic
adjective Etymology: Greek deiktikos able to show, from deiktos, verbal of deiknynai to show — more at diction Date: 1876 showing or pointing out directly
deification
noun Date: 14th century the act or an instance of deifying
deify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French deifier, from Late Latin deificare, from Latin deus god + -ficare -fy Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
deign
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French deigner, from Latin dignare, dignari, from dignus worthy — more at decent Date: 14th century intransitive verb to ...
deil
noun Etymology: Middle English devel, del Date: 15th century Scottish devil
deindustrialization
noun Date: 1940 the reduction or destruction of a nation's or region's industrial capacity • deindustrialize verb
deindustrialize
verb see deindustrialization
deinonychus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek deinos terrifying + -onychos -clawed (from onych-, onyx claw, nail) — more at dire, nail Date: 1969 any of a genus (Deinonychus) of ...
deinstitutionalization
noun Date: 1955 1. the release of institutionalized individuals from institutional care (as in a psychiatric hospital) to care in the community 2. the reform or modification ...
deinstitutionalize
transitive verb see deinstitutionalization
deionization
noun see deionize
deionize
transitive verb Date: 1906 to remove ions from • deionization noun • deionizer noun
deionizer
noun see deionize
Deisenhofer
biographical name Johann 1943- German biochemist
deism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1682 a movement or system of thought advocating natural religion, emphasizing morality, and in the 18th century denying the interference of ...
deist
noun see deism
deistic
adjective see deism
deistical
adjective see deism
deistically
adverb see deism
deity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English deitee, from Anglo-French deité, from Late Latin deitat-, deitas, from Latin deus god; akin to Old English Tīw, god of war, Latin ...
deixis
noun Etymology: Greek, literally, display, from deiknynai to show — more at diction Date: 1946 the pointing or specifying function of some words (as definite articles and ...
déjà vu
noun Etymology: French, adjective, literally, already seen Date: 1903 1. a. the illusion of remembering scenes and events when experienced for the first time b. a ...
deject
I. adjective Date: 15th century archaic dejected II. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, to throw down, from Latin dejectus, past participle of deicere, from de- + ...
dejecta
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, neuter plural of dejectus Date: circa 1829 feces, excrement
dejected
adjective Date: 1581 1. cast down in spirits ; depressed 2. a. obsolete, of the eyes downcast b. archaic thrown down 3. obsolete lowered in rank or condition • ...
dejectedly
adverb see dejected
dejectedness
noun see dejected
dejection
noun Date: 15th century lowness of spirits
dek-
I. combining form see deca- II. see deka-
deka-
or dek- — see deca-
dekagram
noun Date: 1810 — see metric system table
dekaliter
noun Date: circa 1879 — see metric system table
dekameter
noun Date: circa 1879 — see metric system table
dekametric
adjective Date: 1968 decametric
deke
verb (deked; dekeing) Etymology: short for 2decoy Date: 1960 transitive verb to fake (an opponent) out of position (as in ice hockey) intransitive verb to deke an ...
Dekker
biographical name Thomas 1572?-?1632 English dramatist
del
abbreviation 1. delegate; delegation 2. delete
Del
abbreviation Delaware
Del Rio
geographical name city S Texas on Rio Grande population 33,867
Delacroix
biographical name (Ferdinand-Victor-) Eugène 1798-1863 French painter
Delagoa Bay
geographical name inlet of Indian Ocean S Mozambique
delaminate
intransitive verb see delamination
delamination
noun Date: 1877 separation into constitutent layers • delaminate intransitive verb
Deland
biographical name Margaret 1857-1945 née Margaretta Wade Campbell American novelist
Delano
geographical name city S California NNW of Bakersfield population 38,824
Delaroche
biographical name (Hippolyte-) Paul 1797-1859 French painter
delate
transitive verb (delated; delating) Etymology: Latin delatus (past participle of deferre to bring down, report, accuse), from de- + latus, past participle of ferre to bear — ...
delation
noun see delate
delator
noun see delate
Delavigne
biographical name Jean-François-Casimir 1793-1843 French poet & dramatist
Delaware
I. noun (plural Delaware or Delawares) Etymology: Delaware River Date: 1721 1. a member of an American Indian people originally of the Delaware valley 2. the Algonquian ...
Delaware Bay
geographical name inlet of the Atlantic between SW New Jersey & E Delaware
Delawarean
noun see Delaware II
delay
I. noun Date: 13th century 1. a. the act of delaying ; the state of being delayed b. an instance of being delayed 2. the time during which something is delayed II. ...
delayer
noun see delay II
dele
I. transitive verb (deled; deleing) Etymology: Latin, imperative singular of delēre Date: 1705 to delete especially from typeset matter II. noun Date: circa 1751 a mark ...
delectability
noun see delectable I
delectable
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin delectabilis, from delectare to delight — more at delight Date: 15th century 1. highly pleasing ; ...
delectably
adverb see delectable I
delectation
noun Date: 14th century delight, enjoyment
delegable
adjective Date: 1660 capable of being delegated
delegacy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 15th century 1. a body of delegates ; board 2. a. the act of delegating b. appointment as delegate
delegate
I. noun Etymology: Middle English delegat, from Medieval Latin delegatus, from Latin, past participle of delegare to delegate, from de- + legare to send — more at legate ...
delegatee
noun see delegate II
delegation
noun Date: 1612 1. the act of empowering to act for another 2. a group of persons chosen to represent others
delegator
noun see delegate II
delegitimate
transitive verb Date: 1972 delegitimize • delegitimation noun
delegitimation
noun see delegitimate
delegitimization
noun see delegitimize
delegitimize
transitive verb Date: 1968 to diminish or destroy the legitimacy, prestige, or authority of • delegitimization noun
Delémont
geographical name commune NW Switzerland capital of Jura canton population 11,467
delenda est Carthago
foreign term Etymology: Latin Carthage must be destroyed
delete
transitive verb (deleted; deleting) Etymology: Latin deletus, past participle of delēre to wipe out, destroy Date: circa 1605 to eliminate especially by blotting out, ...
deleterious
adjective Etymology: Greek dēlētērios, from dēleisthai to hurt Date: 1643 harmful often in a subtle or unexpected way Synonyms: see pernicious • deleteriously ...
deleteriously
adverb see deleterious
deleteriousness
noun see deleterious
deletion
noun Etymology: Latin deletion-, deletio destruction, from delēre Date: 1590 1. the act of deleting 2. a. something deleted b. (1) the absence of a section of ...
delft
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Delft, Netherlands Date: 1723 1. tin-glazed Dutch earthenware with blue and white or polychrome decoration 2. ceramic ware (as ...
Delft
geographical name commune SW Netherlands population 90,066
delftware
noun Date: 1714 delft
Delgado, Cape
geographical name cape NE Mozambique
Delhi
geographical name 1. union territory N India W of Uttar Pradesh capital Delhi area 573 square miles (1484 square kilometers), population 9,420,644 2. city, its capital ...
Delhi belly
noun Etymology: Delhi, India Date: 1943 diarrhea contracted in India especially by tourists; broadly traveler's diarrhea
deli
noun (plural delis) Date: circa 1954 delicatessen
Delian
adjective or noun see Delos
deliberate
I. verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 14th century intransitive verb to think about or discuss issues and decisions carefully transitive verb to think about deliberately and ...
deliberately
adverb see deliberate II
deliberateness
noun see deliberate II
deliberation
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the act of deliberating b. a discussion and consideration by a group of persons (as a jury or legislature) of the reasons for and against a ...
deliberative
adjective see deliberation
deliberatively
adverb see deliberation
deliberativeness
noun see deliberation
Delibes
biographical name (Clément-Philibert-) Léo 1836-1891 French composer
delicacy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 14th century 1. obsolete a. the quality or state of being luxurious b. indulgence 2. something pleasing to eat that is considered rare or ...
delicate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English delicat, from Latin delicatus given to self-indulgence, fastidious, subtly pleasing, not robust; akin to Latin delicere to allure Date: ...
delicately
adverb see delicate I
delicatessen
noun plural Etymology: obsolete German (now Delikatessen), plural of Delicatesse delicacy, from French délicatesse, probably from Old Italian delicatezza, from delicato ...
delicious
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Late Latin deliciosus, from Latin deliciae delights, from delicere to allure Date: 14th century 1. affording ...
Delicious
noun (plural Deliciouses or Delicious) Date: circa 1903 a sweet red or yellow eating apple of United States origin that has a crown of five rounded prominences on the end ...
deliciously
adverb see delicious
deliciousness
noun see delicious
delict
noun Etymology: Latin delictum fault, from neuter of delictus, past participle of delinquere Date: 1523 an offense against the law
delight
I. noun Date: 13th century 1. a high degree of gratification ; joy; also extreme satisfaction 2. something that gives great pleasure 3. archaic the power of affording ...
delighted
adjective Date: 1601 1. obsolete delightful 2. highly pleased • delightedly adverb • delightedness noun
delightedly
adverb see delighted
delightedness
noun see delighted
delighter
noun see delight II
delightful
adjective Date: circa 1530 highly pleasing • delightfully adverb • delightfulness noun
delightfully
adverb see delightful
delightfulness
noun see delightful
delightsome
adjective Date: circa 1520 very pleasing ; delightful
Delilah
noun Etymology: Hebrew Dĕlīlāh Date: 1573 the mistress and betrayer of Samson in the book of Judges
delimit
transitive verb Etymology: French délimiter, from Latin delimitare, from de- + limitare to limit, from limit-, limes boundary, limit Date: 1852 to fix or define the limits ...
delimitation
noun see delimit
delimiter
noun Date: 1958 a character that marks the beginning or end of a unit of data
delineate
transitive verb (-eated; -eating) Etymology: Latin delineatus, past participle of delineare, from de- + linea line Date: 1559 1. a. to indicate or represent by drawn or ...
delineation
noun Date: 1570 1. the act of delineating 2. something made by delineating • delineative adjective
delineative
adjective see delineation
delineator
noun see delineate
delineavit
foreign term Etymology: Latin he (or she) drew it
delinquency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1625 1. a. a delinquent act b. conduct that is out of accord with accepted behavior or the law; especially juvenile delinquency 2. a debt on ...
delinquent
I. noun Date: 15th century a delinquent person II. adjective Etymology: Latin delinquent-, delinquens, present participle of delinquere to fail, offend, from de- + linquere ...
delinquently
adverb see delinquent II
deliquesce
intransitive verb (-quesced; -quescing) Etymology: Latin deliquescere, from de- + liquescere, inchoative of liquēre to be fluid — more at liquid Date: 1756 1. to dissolve ...
deliquescence
noun see deliquescent
deliquescent
adjective Etymology: Latin deliquescent-, deliquescens, present participle of deliquescere Date: 1771 1. tending to melt or dissolve; especially tending to undergo gradual ...
delirious
adjective Date: 1599 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of delirium 2. affected with or marked by delirium • deliriously adverb • deliriousness noun
deliriously
adverb see delirious
deliriousness
noun see delirious
delirium
noun Etymology: Latin, from delirare to be crazy, literally, to leave the furrow (in plowing), from de- + lira furrow — more at learn Date: circa 1563 1. an acute mental ...
delirium tremens
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, trembling delirium Date: 1827 a violent delirium with tremors that is induced by excessive and prolonged use of alcoholic liquors — ...
delish
adjective Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1920 delicious
delist
transitive verb Date: 1933 to remove from a list; especially to remove (a security) from the list of securities that may be dealt in on a particular exchange
Delius
biographical name Frederick 1862-1934 English composer
deliver
verb (delivered; delivering) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French deliverer, delivrer, from Late Latin deliberare, from Latin de- + liberare to liberate Date: 13th ...
deliver the goods
phrasal to give results that are promised, expected, or desired
deliverability
noun see deliver
deliverable
adjective see deliver
deliverance
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of delivering someone or something ; the state of being delivered; especially liberation, rescue 2. something delivered; especially an ...
deliverer
noun see deliver
delivery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 15th century the act or manner of delivering something; also something delivered
delivery boy
noun Date: 1918 a person employed by a retail store to deliver small orders to customers on call
deliveryman
noun Date: 1889 a person who delivers wholesale or retail goods to customers usually over a regular local route
dell
noun Etymology: Middle English delle; akin to Middle High German telle ravine, Old English dæl valley — more at dale Date: 13th century a secluded hollow or small valley ...
Della Robbia
biographical name Luca 1399(or 1400)-1482 originally Luca di Simone di Marco Florentine sculptor
Dells of the Wisconsin
or Wisconsin Dells geographical name gorge of Wisconsin River in S central Wisconsin
Delmarva Peninsula
geographical name peninsula E United States between Chesapeake & Delaware bays comprising Delaware & parts of Maryland & Virginia — see Eastern Shore
Delmenhorst
geographical name city NW Germany in Lower Saxony WSW of Bremen population 75,967
Delmonico
noun see Delmonico steak
Delmonico steak
noun Etymology: from the Delmonico restaurants, New York City, after Lorenzo Delmonico died 1881 American restaurateur Date: 1925 club steak — called also Delmonico
delocalization
noun see delocalize
delocalize
transitive verb Date: 1855 to free from the limitations of locality; specifically to remove (a charge or charge carrier) from a particular position • delocalization noun
Delorme
or de l'Orme biographical name Philibert 1515?-1570 French architect
Delos
or Greek Dhílos geographical name island Greece in central Cyclades area 2 square miles (5.2 square kilometers) • Delian adjective or noun
delouse
transitive verb Date: circa 1919 to remove lice from

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