Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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discomfit
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French descumfit, past participle of descumfire, from des- dis- + cumfire to prepare — more at comfit Date: 13th ...
discomfitingly
adverb see discomfit I
discomfiture
noun Date: 14th century the act of discomfiting ; the state of being discomfited
discomfort
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French descomforter, from des- dis- + comforter to comfort Date: 14th century 1. archaic dismay 1 2. to make ...
discomfortable
adjective see discomfort I
discommend
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English dyscommenden Date: 15th century 1. disapprove, disparage 2. to cause to be viewed unfavorably
discommode
transitive verb (-moded; -moding) Etymology: French discommoder, from dis- + commode convenient — more at commode Date: 1678 to cause inconvenience to ; trouble
discompose
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 15th century 1. to destroy the composure of 2. to disturb the order of • discomposure noun Synonyms: discompose, ...
discomposure
noun see discompose
disconcert
transitive verb Etymology: obsolete French disconcerter, alteration of Middle French desconcerter, from des- dis- + concerter to concert Date: 1687 1. to throw into confusion ...
disconcerting
adjective see disconcert
disconcertingly
adverb see disconcert
disconcertment
noun see disconcert
disconfirm
transitive verb Date: 1936 to deny or refute the validity of • disconfirmation noun
disconfirmation
noun see disconfirm
disconformity
noun Date: 1587 1. nonconformity 2. a break in a sequence of sedimentary rocks all of which have approximately the same dip
disconnect
I. verb Date: 1770 transitive verb 1. to sever the connection of or between 2. dissociate 1 intransitive verb 1. to terminate a connection 2. to become detached ...
disconnected
adjective Date: 1783 not connected ; separate; also incoherent • disconnectedly adverb • disconnectedness noun
disconnectedly
adverb see disconnected
disconnectedness
noun see disconnected
disconnection
noun see disconnect I
disconsolate
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin disconsolatus, from Latin dis- + consolatus, past participle of consolari to console Date: 14th century 1. cheerless ...
disconsolately
adverb see disconsolate
disconsolateness
noun see disconsolate
disconsolation
noun see disconsolate
discontent
I. adjective Date: 15th century discontented II. noun Date: 1534 lack of contentment: a. a sense of grievance ; dissatisfaction b. restless aspiration for ...
discontented
adjective Date: 1525 dissatisfied, malcontent • discontentedly adverb • discontentedness noun
discontentedly
adverb see discontented
discontentedness
noun see discontented
discontentment
noun see discontent III
discontinuance
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or an instance of discontinuing 2. the interruption or termination of a legal action by the plaintiff's not continuing it
discontinuation
noun see discontinue
discontinue
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French discontinuer, from Medieval Latin discontinuare, from Latin dis- + continuare to continue Date: 14th century transitive verb ...
discontinuity
noun Date: 1570 1. lack of continuity or cohesion 2. gap 5 3. a. the property of being not mathematically continuous b. an instance of being not mathematically ...
discontinuous
adjective Date: 1718 1. a. (1) not continuous (2) not continued ; discrete b. lacking sequence or coherence 2. having one or more mathematical ...
discontinuously
adverb see discontinuous
discophile
noun Date: 1940 one who studies and collects phonograph records or CDs
discord
I. noun Etymology: Middle English descorde, discord, from Anglo-French descorde, from Latin discordia, from discord-, discors Date: 13th century 1. a. lack of agreement or ...
discordance
noun Date: 14th century 1. the state or an instance of being discordant 2. dissonance
discordancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1607 discordance
discordant
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. being at variance ; disagreeing b. quarrelsome 2. relating to a discord • discordantly adverb
discordantly
adverb see discordant
discordia concors
foreign term Etymology: Latin harmonious discord ; harmony or unity gained by combining disparate or conflicting elements
discotheque
or discothèque noun Etymology: French discothèque, from disque disk, record + -o- + -thèque (as in bibliothèque library) Date: 1954 disco 1
discothèque
noun see discotheque
discount
I. noun Date: 1622 1. a reduction made from the gross amount or value of something: as a. (1) a reduction made from a regular or list price (2) a proportionate ...
discount rate
noun Date: circa 1927 1. the interest on an annual basis deducted in advance on a loan 2. the charge levied by a central bank for advances and rediscounts
discountable
adjective Date: 1800 1. set apart for discounting 2. subject to being discounted
discountenance
I. transitive verb Date: 1580 1. abash, disconcert 2. to look with disfavor on ; discourage by evidence of disapproval II. noun Date: 1580 disapprobation, disfavor
discounter
noun see discount II
discourage
transitive verb (-aged; -aging) Etymology: Middle English discoragen, from Middle French descorager, from Old French descoragier, from des- dis- + corage courage Date: 15th ...
discourageable
adjective see discourage
discouragement
noun Date: 1561 1. the act of discouraging ; the state of being discouraged 2. something that discourages
discourager
noun see discourage
discouragingly
adverb see discourage
discourse
I. noun Etymology: Middle English discours, from Medieval Latin & Late Latin discursus; Medieval Latin, argument, from Late Latin, conversation, from Latin, act of running ...
discourse analysis
noun Date: 1952 the study of linguistic relations and structures in discourse
discourser
noun see discourse II
discourteous
adjective Date: 1578 lacking courtesy ; rude • discourteously adverb • discourteousness noun
discourteously
adverb see discourteous
discourteousness
noun see discourteous
discourtesy
noun Date: 1555 1. rudeness 2. a rude act
discover
verb (discovered; discovering) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French descoverir, descovrir, from Late Latin discooperire, from Latin dis- + cooperire to cover — more at ...
discoverable
adjective see discover
discoverer
noun see discover
Discoverers' Day
noun Date: 1974 Columbus Day
discovery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1529 1. a. the act or process of discovering b. (1) archaic disclosure (2) obsolete display c. obsolete exploration 2. something ...
Discovery Day
noun Date: circa 1913 Columbus Day
discredit
I. transitive verb Date: 1559 1. to refuse to accept as true or accurate ; disbelieve 2. to cause disbelief in the accuracy or authority of 3. to deprive of good ...
discreditable
adjective Date: 1640 injurious to reputation ; disgraceful • discreditably adverb
discreditably
adverb see discreditable
discreet
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French discret, from Medieval Latin discretus, from Latin, past participle of discernere to separate, distinguish between — more ...
discreetly
adverb see discreet
discreetness
noun see discreet
discrepancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: circa 1623 1. the quality or state of being discrepant 2. an instance of being discrepant
discrepant
adjective Etymology: Middle English discrepaunt, from Latin discrepant-, discrepans, present participle of discrepare to sound discordantly, from dis- + crepare to rattle, creak ...
discrepantly
adverb see discrepant
discrete
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin discretus Date: 14th century 1. constituting a separate entity ; individually distinct 2. a. consisting of distinct or ...
discretely
adverb see discrete
discreteness
noun see discrete
discretion
noun Date: 14th century 1. the quality of being discreet ; circumspection; especially cautious reserve in speech 2. ability to make responsible decisions 3. a. ...
discretionary
adjective Date: 1698 1. left to discretion ; exercised at one's own discretion 2. available for discretionary use
discretionary account
noun Date: circa 1920 a security or commodity market account in which an agent (as a broker) is given power of attorney so as to be able to make independent decisions and buy ...
discriminability
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1901 1. the quality of being discriminable 2. the ability to discriminate
discriminable
adjective Date: 1736 capable of being discriminated • discriminably adverb
discriminably
adverb see discriminable
discriminant
noun Date: circa 1948 a mathematical expression providing a criterion for the behavior of another more complicated expression, relation, or set of relations
discriminant function
noun Date: circa 1936 a function of a set of variables that is evaluated for samples of events or objects and used as an aid in discriminating between or classifying them
discriminate
verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Latin discriminatus, past participle of discriminare, from discrimin-, discrimen distinction, from discernere to distinguish between — more at ...
discriminating
adjective Date: 1647 1. making a distinction ; distinguishing 2. marked by discrimination: a. discerning, judicious b. discriminatory • discriminatingly adverb
discriminatingly
adverb see discriminating
discrimination
noun Date: 1648 1. a. the act of discriminating b. the process by which two stimuli differing in some aspect are responded to differently 2. the quality or power of ...
discriminational
adjective see discrimination
discriminative
adjective Date: 1677 1. making distinctions 2. discriminatory 2
discriminator
noun Date: 1828 one that discriminates; especially a circuit that can be adjusted to accept or reject signals of different characteristics (as amplitude or frequency)
discriminatorily
adverb see discriminatory
discriminatory
adjective Date: 1828 1. discriminative 1 2. applying or favoring discrimination in treatment • discriminatorily adverb
discursive
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin discursivus, from Latin discursus, past participle of discurrere to run about — more at discourse Date: 1598 1. a. moving from topic ...
discursively
adverb see discursive
discursiveness
noun see discursive
discus
noun (plural discuses) Etymology: Latin — more at dish Date: 1656 a heavy disk (as of wood or plastic) that is thicker in the center than at the perimeter and that is hurled ...
discuss
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French discusser, Latin discussus, past participle of discutere to disperse, from dis- apart + quatere to shake — more at ...
discussable
adjective see discuss
discussant
noun Date: 1926 one who takes part in a formal discussion or symposium
discusser
noun see discuss
discussible
adjective see discuss
discussion
noun Date: 14th century 1. consideration of a question in open and usually informal debate 2. a formal treatment of a topic in speech or writing
disdain
I. noun Etymology: Middle English desdeyne, from Anglo-French desdaign, from desdeigner Date: 14th century a feeling of contempt for someone or something regarded as ...
disdainful
adjective Date: circa 1542 full of or expressing disdain Synonyms: see proud • disdainfully adverb • disdainfulness noun
disdainfully
adverb see disdainful
disdainfulness
noun see disdainful
disease
noun Etymology: Middle English disese, from Anglo-French desease, desaise, from des- dis- + eise ease Date: 14th century 1. obsolete trouble 2. a condition of the living ...
diseased
adjective see disease
diseconomy
noun Date: 1937 1. a lack of economy 2. a factor responsible for an increase in cost
disembark
verb Etymology: Middle French desembarquer, from des- dis- + embarquer to embark Date: 1582 transitive verb to remove to shore from a ship intransitive verb 1. to go ...
disembarkation
noun see disembark
disembarrass
transitive verb Date: 1726 to free (as oneself) from something troublesome or superfluous Synonyms: see extricate
disembody
transitive verb Date: 1714 to divest of a body, of corporeal existence, or of reality
disembogue
verb (-bogued; -boguing) Etymology: modification of Spanish desembocar, from des- dis- (from Latin dis-) + embocar to put into the mouth, from en in (from Latin in) + boca mouth, ...
disembowel
transitive verb Date: 1618 1. to take out the bowels of ; eviscerate 2. to remove the substance of • disembowelment noun
disembowelment
noun see disembowel
disempower
transitive verb Date: 1813 to deprive of power, authority, or influence ; make weak, ineffectual, or unimportant • disempowerment noun
disempowerment
noun see disempower
disenchant
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French desenchanter, from des- dis- + enchanter to enchant Date: circa 1586 to free from illusion • disenchanter noun • disenchanting ...
disenchanted
adjective Date: 1832 disappointed, dissatisfied
disenchanter
noun see disenchant
disenchanting
adjective see disenchant
disenchantingly
adverb see disenchant
disenchantment
noun see disenchant
disencumber
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French desencombrer, from des- dis- + encombrer to encumber Date: 1598 to free from encumbrance ; disburden Synonyms: see extricate
disendow
transitive verb Date: 1861 to strip of endowment • disendower noun • disendowment noun
disendower
noun see disendow
disendowment
noun see disendow
disenfranchise
transitive verb Date: 1664 to deprive of a franchise, of a legal right, or of some privilege or immunity; especially to deprive of the right to vote • disenfranchisement ...
disenfranchisement
noun see disenfranchise
disengage
verb Etymology: French désengager, from Middle French, from des- dis- + engager to engage Date: 1611 transitive verb to release from something that engages or involves ...
disengaged
adjective Date: 1651 detached 2
disengagement
noun see disengage
disentail
transitive verb Date: 1641 to free from entail
disentangle
verb Date: 1598 transitive verb to free from entanglement ; unravel intransitive verb to become disentangled Synonyms: see extricate • disentanglement noun
disentanglement
noun see disentangle
disenthral
transitive verb see disenthrall
disenthrall
also disenthral transitive verb Date: 1643 to free from bondage ; liberate
disentitle
transitive verb Date: 1654 to deprive of title, claim, or right
disequilibrate
transitive verb Date: 1891 to put out of balance • disequilibration noun
disequilibration
noun see disequilibrate
disequilibrium
noun Date: 1840 loss or lack of equilibrium
disestablish
transitive verb Date: 1598 to deprive of an established status; especially to deprive of the status and privileges of an established church • disestablishment noun
disestablishment
noun see disestablish
disestablishmentarian
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: disestablishment Date: 1885 one who opposes an established order • disestablishmentarian adjective, often capitalized
disesteem
I. transitive verb Date: 1594 to regard with disfavor II. noun Date: 1603 disfavor, disrepute
diseuse
noun (plural diseuses) Etymology: French, feminine of diseur, from Old French, from dire to say, from Latin dicere — more at diction Date: 1896 a woman who is a skilled and ...
disfavor
I. noun Etymology: probably from Middle French desfaveur, from des- dis- + faveur favor, from Old French favor Date: circa 1533 1. disapproval, dislike 2. the state or ...
disfigure
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French desfigurer, from des- dis- + figure figure Date: 14th century 1. to impair (as in beauty) by deep and persistent ...
disfigurement
noun see disfigure
disfranchise
transitive verb Date: 15th century disenfranchise • disfranchisement noun
disfranchisement
noun see disfranchise
disfrock
transitive verb Date: 1837 defrock
disfunction
variant of dysfunction
disfurnish
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French desfourniss-, stem of desfournir, from des- dis- + fournir to furnish Date: 1531 to make destitute of possessions ; divest • ...
disfurnishment
noun see disfurnish
disgorge
verb Etymology: Middle French desgorger, from des- dis- + gorge gorge Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. to discharge by the throat and mouth ; vomit b. to ...
disgrace
I. transitive verb Date: 1580 1. archaic to humiliate by a superior showing 2. to be a source of shame to 3. to cause to lose favor or standing • disgracer noun II. ...
disgraceful
adjective Date: 1597 bringing or involving disgrace • disgracefully adverb • disgracefulness noun
disgracefully
adverb see disgraceful
disgracefulness
noun see disgraceful
disgracer
noun see disgrace I
disgruntle
transitive verb (disgruntled; disgruntling) Etymology: dis- + gruntle to grumble, from Middle English gruntlen, frequentative of grunten to grunt Date: 1682 to make ...
disgruntlement
noun see disgruntle
disguise
I. transitive verb (disguised; disguising) Etymology: Middle English disgisen, from Anglo-French desguiser, deguiser, from des- dis- + guise guise Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
disguisedly
adverb see disguise I
disguisement
noun see disguise I
disguiser
noun see disguise I
disgust
I. noun Date: 1598 marked aversion aroused by something highly distasteful ; repugnance II. verb Etymology: Middle French desgouster, from des- dis- + goust taste, from Latin ...
disgusted
adjective see disgust II
disgustedly
adverb see disgust II
disgustful
adjective Date: circa 1616 1. provoking disgust 2. full of or accompanied by disgust • disgustfully adverb
disgustfully
adverb see disgustful
disgusting
adjective Date: 1754 causing disgust • disgustingly adverb
disgustingly
adverb see disgusting
dish
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English disc plate, from Latin discus quoit, disk, dish, from Greek diskos, from dikein to throw Date: before 12th century 1. a. ...
dish out
transitive verb Date: 1641 to give or dispense freely
dishabille
or deshabille noun Etymology: French déshabillé, from past participle of déshabiller to undress, from dés- dis- + habiller to dress — more at habiliment Date: 1673 1. ...
disharmonic
adjective see disharmony
disharmonious
adjective Date: 1659 lacking in harmony
disharmonize
transitive verb Date: 1801 to make disharmonious
disharmony
noun Date: circa 1602 lack of harmony ; discord • disharmonic adjective
dishcloth
noun Date: circa 1828 a cloth for washing dishes
dishclout
noun Date: circa 1530 British dishcloth
dishdasha
noun Etymology: Arabic dishdāsha Date: 1938 a long usually white robe traditionally worn by men in the Middle East
dishearten
transitive verb Date: 1590 to cause to lose spirit or morale • dishearteningly adverb • disheartenment noun
dishearteningly
adverb see dishearten
disheartenment
noun see dishearten
dished
adjective Date: 1737 curved in ; concave
dishevel
transitive verb (disheveled or dishevelled; disheveling or dishevelling) Etymology: back-formation from disheveled Date: 1598 to throw into disorder or disarray • ...
disheveled
or dishevelled adjective Etymology: Middle English discheveled bareheaded, with disordered hair, part translation of Anglo-French deschevelé, from des- dis- + chevoil hair, from ...
dishevelled
adjective see disheveled
dishevelment
noun see dishevel
dishonest
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French deshoneste, from des- dis- + honeste honest Date: 14th century 1. obsolete shameful, unchaste 2. characterized by lack ...
dishonestly
adverb see dishonest
dishonesty
noun Date: 1599 1. lack of honesty or integrity ; disposition to defraud or deceive 2. a dishonest act ; fraud
dishonor
I. noun Etymology: Middle English dishonour, from Anglo-French deshonur, from des- dis- + honur honor Date: 13th century 1. lack or loss of honor or reputation 2. the state ...
dishonorable
adjective Date: 1534 1. lacking honor ; shameful 2. archaic not honored • dishonorableness noun • dishonorably adverb
dishonorableness
noun see dishonorable
dishonorably
adverb see dishonorable
dishonorer
noun see dishonor I
dishpan
noun Date: 1872 a large flat-bottomed pan used for washing dishes
dishpan hands
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1944 a condition of dryness, redness, and scaling of the hands that results typically from repeated exposure to, ...
dishrag
noun Date: 1839 dishcloth
dishware
noun Date: 1946 tableware (as of china) used in serving food
dishwasher
noun Date: 15th century 1. a worker employed to wash dishes 2. a machine for washing dishes
dishwater
noun Date: 15th century water in which dishes have been or are to be washed
dishy
adjective (dishier; -est) Date: 1961 1. attractive, good-looking 2. characterized by, full of, or given to gossip or disclosure
disillusion
I. noun Date: 1591 the condition of being disenchanted II. transitive verb (disillusioned; disillusioning) Date: 1855 to free from illusion; also to cause to lose naive ...
disillusioned
adjective Date: 1871 disappointed, dissatisfied
disillusionment
noun see disillusion II
disincentive
noun Date: 1946 deterrent
disinclination
noun Date: 1647 a preference for avoiding something ; slight aversion
disincline
transitive verb Date: 1647 to make unwilling
disinclined
adjective Date: 1647 unwilling because of mild dislike or disapproval Synonyms: disinclined, hesitant, reluctant, loath, averse mean lacking the will or desire to do ...
disinfect
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French desinfecter, from des- dis- + infecter to infect Date: 1598 to free from infection especially by destroying harmful microorganisms; ...
disinfectant
noun Date: 1837 an agent that frees from infection; especially a chemical that destroys vegetative forms of harmful microorganisms (as bacteria and fungi) especially on ...
disinfection
noun see disinfect
disinfest
transitive verb Date: circa 1920 to rid of small animal pests (as insects or rodents) • disinfestation noun
disinfestation
noun see disinfest
disinflation
noun Date: 1880 a reversal of inflationary pressures • disinflationary adjective
disinflationary
adjective see disinflation
disinformation
noun Date: 1939 false information deliberately and often covertly spread (as by the planting of rumors) in order to influence public opinion or obscure the truth
disingenuous
adjective Date: 1655 lacking in candor; also giving a false appearance of simple frankness ; calculating • disingenuously adverb • disingenuousness noun
disingenuously
adverb see disingenuous
disingenuousness
noun see disingenuous
disinherit
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 15th century 1. to prevent deliberately from inheriting something (as by making a will) 2. to deprive of natural or human ...
disinheritance
noun see disinherit
disinhibit
transitive verb see disinhibition
disinhibition
noun Date: circa 1927 loss or reduction of an inhibition (as by the action of interfering stimuli or events) • disinhibit transitive verb • disinhibitor noun
disinhibitor
noun see disinhibition
disintegrate
verb Date: 1796 transitive verb 1. to break or decompose into constituent elements, parts, or small particles 2. to destroy the unity or integrity of intransitive verb ...
disintegration
noun see disintegrate
disintegrative
adjective see disintegrate
disintegrator
noun see disintegrate
disinter
transitive verb Date: 1611 1. to take out of the grave or tomb 2. to bring back into awareness or prominence; also to bring to light ; unearth • disinterment noun
disinterest
I. transitive verb Date: 1612 to cause to regard something with no interest or concern II. noun Date: 1658 1. disinterestedness 2. lack of interest ; indifference
disinterested
adjective Date: circa 1612 1. a. not having the mind or feelings engaged ; not interested b. no longer interested 2. free from selfish motive or interest ; ...
disinterestedly
adverb see disinterested
disinterestedness
noun Date: circa 1682 the quality or state of being objective or impartial
disintermediate
verb see disintermediation
disintermediation
noun Date: 1967 1. the diversion of savings from accounts with low fixed interest rates to direct investment in high-yielding instruments 2. the elimination of an ...
disinterment
noun see disinter
disintoxicate
transitive verb Date: 1685 detoxify 2 • disintoxication noun
disintoxication
noun see disintoxicate
disinvest
intransitive verb Date: 1945 to reduce or eliminate capital investment (as in an industry or area)
disinvestment
noun Date: 1936 consumption of capital; also the withdrawing of investment
disinvite
transitive verb Date: 1580 to withdraw an invitation to
disjoin
verb Etymology: Middle English disjoynen, from Anglo-French desjoindre, from Latin disjungere, from dis- + jungere to join — more at yoke Date: 15th century transitive verb ...
disjoint
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English disjoynt, from Anglo-French desjoint, past participle of desjoindre Date: 15th century 1. obsolete disjointed 1a 2. having no ...
disjointed
adjective Date: circa 1586 1. a. being thrown out of orderly function b. lacking coherence or orderly sequence 2. separated at or as if at the joint • ...
disjointedly
adverb see disjointed
disjointedness
noun see disjointed
disjunct
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin disjunctus, past participle of disjungere to disjoin Date: 15th century marked by separation of or from usually contiguous ...
disjunction
noun Date: 14th century 1. a sharp cleavage ; disunion, separation 2. a compound sentence in logic formed by joining two simple statements by or: a. inclusive ...
disjunctive
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. relating to, being, or forming a logical disjunction b. expressing an alternative or opposition between the meanings of the words ...
disjunctively
adverb see disjunctive I
disjuncture
noun Etymology: Middle English, modification (influenced by Latin disjunctus) of Anglo-French desjointure, from desjoint disjoint Date: 14th century disjunction 1
disk
I. noun or disc Usage: often attributive Etymology: Latin discus — more at dish Date: 1664 1. a. the seemingly flat figure of a celestial body b. archaic discus ...
disk drive
noun Date: 1963 a device for reading and writing data on a magnetic disk

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