Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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disk floret
noun see disk flower
disk flower
noun Date: 1870 one of the tubular flowers in the disk of a composite plant — called also disk floret
disk jockey
variant of disc jockey
diskette
noun Date: 1973 floppy disk
disklike
adjective see disk I
Disko
geographical name — see Qeqertarsuaq
dislikable
also dislikeable adjective Date: 1843 easy to dislike
dislike
I. noun Date: 1567 1. a feeling of aversion or disapproval 2. obsolete discord II. transitive verb Date: 1567 1. to regard with dislike ; disapprove 2. archaic ...
dislikeable
adjective see dislikable
disliker
noun see dislike II
dislimn
verb Date: 1606 dim
dislocate
transitive verb Etymology: Medieval Latin dislocatus, past participle of dislocare, from Latin dis- + locare to locate Date: 1601 1. to put out of place; specifically to ...
dislocation
noun Date: 14th century the act of dislocating ; the state of being dislocated: as a. displacement of one or more bones at a joint ; luxation b. a discontinuity in the ...
dislodge
verb Etymology: Middle English disloggen, from Anglo-French *desloger, from des- dis- + loger to find lodging for, encamp, from loge shelter — more at lodge Date: 15th ...
dislodgement
noun see dislodge
dislodgment
noun see dislodge
disloyal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French desleial, desloial, from des- dis- + leal loyal Date: 15th century lacking in loyalty; also showing an absence of ...
disloyally
adverb see disloyal
disloyalty
noun Date: 15th century lack of loyalty
dismal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from dismal, noun, days marked as unlucky in medieval calendars, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin dies mali, literally, evil days ...
Dismal Swamp
or Great Dismal Swamp geographical name swamp SE Virginia & NE North Carolina between Chesapeake Bay & Albemarle Sound about 37 miles (60 kilometers) long, 10 miles (16 ...
dismally
adverb see dismal
dismalness
noun see dismal
dismantle
transitive verb (dismantled; dismantling) Etymology: Middle French desmanteler, from des- dis- + mantel mantle Date: 1579 1. to take to pieces; also to destroy the integrity ...
dismantlement
noun see dismantle
dismast
transitive verb Date: 1747 to remove or break off the mast of
dismay
I. transitive verb (dismayed; dismaying) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French desmaier, from des- dis- + -maier, from Vulgar Latin *-magare, of Germanic origin; akin to ...
dismayingly
adverb see dismay I
disme
noun Etymology: obsolete English, tenth, from obsolete French, from Old French disme, dime — more at dime Date: 1792 a United States 10-cent coin struck in 1792
dismember
transitive verb (-bered; dismembering) Etymology: Middle English dismembren, from Anglo-French desmembrer, from des- dis- + membre member Date: 14th century 1. to cut off or ...
dismemberment
noun see dismember
dismiss
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, modification of Latin dimissus, past participle of dimittere, from dis- + mittere to send Date: 15th century 1. to permit or cause ...
dismissal
noun Date: 1778 the act of dismissing ; the fact or state of being dismissed
dismission
noun see dismiss
dismissive
adjective see dismiss
dismissively
adverb see dismiss
dismount
I. verb Etymology: probably modification of Middle French desmonter, from des- dis- + monter to mount Date: 1566 transitive verb 1. to throw down or remove from a mount or ...
Disney
biographical name Walter Elias 1901-1966 American film producer
Disneyesque
or Disneyish adjective Date: 1939 resembling or suggestive of the films, television productions, or amusement parks made by Walt Disney or his organization
Disneyfication
noun Etymology: Walt Disney + -fication Date: 1982 the transformation (as of something real or unsettling) into carefully controlled and safe entertainment or an environment ...
Disneyish
adjective see Disneyesque
disobedience
noun Date: 15th century refusal or neglect to obey
disobedient
adjective Date: 15th century refusing or neglecting to obey • disobediently adverb
disobediently
adverb see disobedient
disobey
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French desobeir, from des- dis- + obeir to obey Date: 14th century intransitive verb to be disobedient transitive verb to fail ...
disobeyer
noun see disobey
disoblige
transitive verb Etymology: French désobliger, from Middle French, from des- dis- + obliger to oblige Date: 1632 1. to go counter to the wishes of 2. inconvenience
disodium phosphate
noun Date: circa 1928 a sodium phosphate Na2HPO4
disomic
adjective Etymology: di- + -somic Date: 1922 having one or more chromosomes present in twice the normal number but not having the entire genome doubled
disorder
I. transitive verb Date: 15th century 1. to disturb the order of 2. to disturb the regular or normal functions of II. noun Date: 1523 1. lack of order 2. breach of ...
disordered
adjective Date: 1505 1. obsolete a. morally reprehensible b. unruly 2. a. marked by disorder b. not functioning in a normal orderly healthy way • ...
disorderedly
adverb see disordered
disorderedness
noun see disordered
disorderliness
noun see disorderly II
disorderly
I. adverb Date: 1560 archaic in a disorderly manner II. adjective Date: 1555 1. engaged in conduct offensive to public order 2. characterized by disorder • ...
disorderly conduct
noun Date: 1786 a petty offense chiefly against public order and decency that falls short of an indictable misdemeanor
disorderly house
noun Etymology: euphemism Date: 1749 bordello
disorganization
noun see disorganize
disorganize
transitive verb Etymology: French désorganiser, from dés- dis- + organiser to organize Date: 1793 to destroy or interrupt the orderly structure or function of • ...
disorganized
adjective Date: 1801 lacking coherence, system, or central guiding agency ; not organized
disorient
transitive verb Etymology: French désorienter, from dés- dis- + orienter to orient Date: 1655 1. a. to cause to lose bearings ; displace from normal position or ...
disorientate
transitive verb Date: circa 1704 disorient • disorientation noun
disorientation
noun see disorientate
disown
transitive verb Date: 1630 1. to refuse to acknowledge as one's own 2. a. to repudiate any connection or identification with b. to deny the validity or authority of ...
disownment
noun see disown
disp
abbreviation dispensary
disparage
transitive verb (-aged; -aging) Etymology: Middle English, to degrade by marriage below one's class, disparage, from Anglo-French desparager to marry below one's class, from des- ...
disparagement
noun see disparage
disparager
noun see disparage
disparaging
adjective see disparage
disparagingly
adverb see disparage
disparate
adjective Etymology: Middle English desparat, from Latin disparatus, past participle of disparare to separate, from dis- + parare to prepare — more at pare Date: 15th century ...
disparately
adverb see disparate
disparateness
noun see disparate
disparity
noun see disparate
dispart
verb Etymology: Italian & Latin; Italian dispartire, from Latin, from dis- + partire to divide — more at part Date: 1590 archaic separate, divide
dispassion
noun Date: 1692 absence of passion ; coolness
dispassionate
adjective Date: 1594 not influenced by strong feeling; especially not affected by personal or emotional involvement Synonyms: see fair • dispassionately adverb • ...
dispassionately
adverb see dispassionate
dispassionateness
noun see dispassionate
dispatch
I. verb Etymology: Spanish despachar or Italian dispacciare, from Occitan despachar to get rid of, from Middle French despechier to set free, from Old French, from des- dis- + ...
dispatch case
noun Date: circa 1918 a case for carrying papers
dispatcher
noun see dispatch I
dispel
transitive verb (dispelled; dispelling) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin dispellere, from dis- + pellere to drive, beat — more at felt Date: 15th century to drive away ...
dispensability
noun see dispensable
dispensable
adjective Date: 1649 capable of being dispensed with • dispensability noun
dispensary
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1699 a place where medicine or medical or dental treatment is dispensed
dispensation
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. a general state or ordering of things; specifically a system of revealed commands and promises regulating human affairs b. a particular ...
dispensational
adjective see dispensation
dispensatory
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1566 a medicinal formulary
dispense
verb (dispensed; dispensing) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin & Latin; Medieval Latin dispensare to exempt, from Latin, to distribute, from dis- + pensare to weigh, ...
dispense with
phrasal 1. to set aside ; discard 2. to do without
dispenser
noun Date: 14th century one that dispenses: as a. a container that extrudes, sprays, or feeds out in convenient units b. a usually mechanical device for vending ...
dispeople
transitive verb Date: 15th century depopulate
dispersal
noun Date: 1821 the act or result of dispersing; especially the process or result of the spreading of organisms from one place to another
dispersant
noun Date: 1941 a dispersing agent; especially a substance for promoting the formation and stabilization of a dispersion of one substance in another • dispersant adjective
disperse
verb (dispersed; dispersing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin dispersus, past participle of dispergere to scatter, from dis- + spargere to scatter — more at spark Date: ...
dispersedly
adverb see disperse
disperser
noun see disperse
dispersible
adjective see disperse
dispersion
noun Date: 14th century 1. capitalized diaspora 1a 2. the act or process of dispersing ; the state of being dispersed 3. the scattering of the values of a frequency ...
dispersive
adjective Date: 1677 1. of or relating to dispersion 2. tending to disperse • dispersively adverb • dispersiveness noun
dispersively
adverb see dispersive
dispersiveness
noun see dispersive
dispersoid
noun Date: 1911 finely divided particles of one substance dispersed in another
dispirit
transitive verb Etymology: dis- + spirit Date: 1647 to deprive of morale or enthusiasm • dispirited adjective • dispiritedly adverb • dispiritedness noun
dispirited
adjective see dispirit
dispiritedly
adverb see dispirit
dispiritedness
noun see dispirit
dispiteous
adjective Etymology: alteration of despiteous Date: 1803 archaic cruel
displace
transitive verb Etymology: probably from Middle French desplacer, from des- dis- + place place Date: 1549 1. a. to remove from the usual or proper place; specifically to ...
displaceable
adjective see displace
displacement
noun Date: 1611 1. the act or process of displacing ; the state of being displaced 2. a. the volume or weight of a fluid (as water) displaced by a floating body (as a ...
displacement activity
noun see displacement
displacement behavior
noun see displacement
displant
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French desplanter, from des- dis- + planter to plant, from Late Latin plantare Date: 15th century 1. displace, remove 2. supplant
display
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French desplaier, desploier, literally, to unfold — more at deploy Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to put or ...
displayable
adjective see display I
displease
verb Etymology: Middle English displesen, from Anglo-French despleisir, desplere, from des- dis- + pleisir to please — more at please Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. ...
displeasure
noun Date: 15th century 1. the feeling of one that is displeased ; disfavor 2. discomfort, unhappiness 3. archaic offense, injury
displode
verb (disploded; disploding) Etymology: Latin displodere, from dis- + plaudere to clap, applaud Date: 1667 archaic explode • displosion noun
displosion
noun see displode
disport
I. noun Date: 14th century archaic sport, pastime II. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French desporter, to carry away, comfort, entertain, from des- dis- + porter ...
disportment
noun see disport II
disposability
noun see disposable I
disposable
I. adjective Date: 1643 1. subject to or available for disposal; specifically remaining to an individual after deduction of taxes and necessary living expenses 2. ...
disposal
noun Date: 1630 1. the power or authority to dispose or make use of as one chooses 2. the act or process of disposing: as a. orderly placement or distribution b. ...
dispose
I. verb (disposed; disposing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French desposer, from Latin disponere to arrange (perfect indicative disposui), from dis- + ponere to put — ...
dispose of
phrasal 1. to place, distribute, or arrange especially in an orderly way 2. a. to transfer to the control of another b. (1) to get rid of (2) to deal with ...
disposer
noun see dispose I
disposition
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin disposition-, dispositio, from disponere Date: 14th century 1. the act or the power of disposing or the state of ...
dispositional
adjective see disposition
dispositive
adjective Date: circa 1618 directed toward or effecting disposition (as of a case)
dispossess
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French despossesser, from des- dis- + possesser to possess Date: 15th century to put out of possession or occupancy • dispossession ...
dispossessed
adjective Date: 15th century deprived of homes, possessions, and security
dispossession
noun see dispossess
dispossessor
noun see dispossess
disposure
noun Date: 1569 archaic disposal, disposition
dispraise
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English dispraisen, from Anglo-French despreiser, despriser, from des- dis- + preiser to praise Date: 13th century to comment on with ...
dispraiser
noun see dispraise
dispraisingly
adverb see dispraise
dispread
transitive verb Date: 1590 to spread abroad or out
disprize
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English disprisen, from Anglo-French despriser Date: 15th century archaic undervalue, scorn
disproof
noun Date: 15th century 1. the action of disproving 2. evidence that disproves
disproportion
I. noun Date: 1555 lack of proportion, symmetry, or proper relation ; disparity; also an instance of such disparity • disproportional adjective II. transitive verb Date: ...
disproportional
adjective see disproportion I
disproportionate
adjective Date: 1555 being out of proportion • disproportionately adverb
disproportionately
adverb see disproportionate
disproportionation
noun Date: circa 1929 the transformation of a substance into two or more dissimilar substances usually by simultaneous oxidation and reduction • disproportionate ...
disprovable
adjective see disprove
disprove
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French desprover, from des- dis- + prover to prove Date: 14th century to prove to be false or wrong ; refute • ...
disputable
adjective see dispute I
disputably
adverb see dispute I
disputant
noun Date: 1593 one that is engaged in a dispute
disputation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the action of disputing ; verbal controversy 2. an academic exercise in oral defense of a thesis by formal logic
disputatious
adjective Date: 1660 1. a. inclined to dispute b. marked by disputation 2. provoking debate ; controversial • disputatiously adverb • disputatiousness noun
disputatiously
adverb see disputatious
disputatiousness
noun see disputatious
dispute
I. verb (disputed; disputing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French desputer, from Latin disputare to discuss, from dis- + putare to think Date: 13th century ...
disputer
noun see dispute I
disqualification
noun Date: circa 1714 1. something that disqualifies or incapacitates 2. the act of disqualifying ; the state of being disqualified
disqualify
transitive verb Date: 1712 1. to deprive of the required qualities, properties, or conditions ; make unfit 2. to deprive of a power, right, or privilege 3. to make ...
disquantity
transitive verb Date: 1605 obsolete diminish, lessen
disquiet
I. transitive verb Date: circa 1530 to take away the peace or tranquillity of ; disturb, alarm Synonyms: see discompose • disquieting adjective • disquietingly ...
disquieting
adjective see disquiet I
disquietingly
adverb see disquiet I
disquietly
adverb see disquiet III
disquietude
noun Date: 1682 anxiety, agitation
disquisition
noun Etymology: Latin disquisition-, disquisitio, from disquirere to investigate, from dis- + quaerere to seek Date: 1640 a formal inquiry into or discussion of a subject ; ...
Disraeli
biographical name Benjamin 1804-1881 1st Earl of Beaconsfield British politician & author; prime minister (1868; 1874-80)
disrate
transitive verb Date: 1751 to reduce in rank ; demote
disregard
I. transitive verb Date: 1613 to pay no attention to ; treat as unworthy of regard or notice Synonyms: see neglect II. noun Date: 1659 the act of disregarding ; the state ...
disregardful
adjective see disregard II
disrelated
adjective Date: 1894 not related
disrelation
noun Date: 1893 lack of a fitting or proportionate connection or relationship
disrelish
I. transitive verb Date: 1604 to find unpalatable or distasteful II. noun Date: circa 1625 lack of relish ; distaste, dislike
disremember
transitive verb Date: 1805 forget
disrepair
noun Date: 1798 the state of being in need of repair
disreputability
noun see disreputable
disreputable
adjective Date: circa 1726 not reputable • disreputability noun • disreputableness noun • disreputably adverb
disreputableness
noun see disreputable
disreputably
adverb see disreputable
disrepute
noun Date: 1637 lack or decline of good reputation ; a state of being held in low esteem Synonyms: see disgrace
disrespect
I. transitive verb Date: 1614 1. to have disrespect for 2. to show or express disrespect or contempt for ; insult, dis II. noun Date: 1621 lack of respect • ...
disrespectability
noun see disrespectable
disrespectable
adjective Date: 1798 not respectable • disrespectability noun
disrespectful
adjective see disrespect II
disrespectfully
adverb see disrespect II
disrespectfulness
noun see disrespect II
disrobe
verb Etymology: Middle French desrober, from des- dis- + robe garment, from Old French Date: 1581 intransitive verb to take off one's clothing transitive verb to strip ...
disrupt
transitive verb Etymology: Latin disruptus, past participle of disrumpere, from dis- + rumpere to break — more at reave Date: 1793 1. a. to break apart ; rupture b. to ...
disrupter
noun see disrupt
disruption
noun see disrupt
disruptive
adjective see disrupt
disruptively
adverb see disrupt
disruptiveness
noun see disrupt
diss
I. variant of dis II. abbreviation dissertation
dissatisfaction
noun Date: circa 1610 the quality or state of being dissatisfied ; discontent
dissatisfactory
adjective Date: circa 1610 causing dissatisfaction
dissatisfied
adjective Date: circa 1630 expressing or showing lack of satisfaction ; not pleased or satisfied
dissatisfy
transitive verb Date: 1666 to fail to satisfy ; displease
dissave
intransitive verb Date: 1936 to use savings for current expenses
disseat
transitive verb Date: 1612 archaic unseat
dissect
verb Etymology: Latin dissectus, past participle of dissecare to cut apart, from dis- + secare to cut — more at saw Date: 1598 transitive verb 1. to separate into pieces ; ...
dissected
adjective Date: 1652 1. cut deeply into fine lobes 2. divided into hills and ridges (as by gorges)
dissecting microscope
noun Date: circa 1897 a low-magnification stereomicroscope used especially in examining or dissecting biological specimens
dissection
noun Date: 1578 1. the act or process of dissecting ; the state of being dissected 2. an anatomical specimen prepared by dissecting
dissector
noun see dissect
disseise
or disseize transitive verb (disseised or disseized; disseising or disseizing) Etymology: Middle English disseisen, from Anglo-French disseisir, dis- + seisir to put in ...
disseisin
or disseizin noun Etymology: Middle English dysseysyne, from Anglo-French disseisine, from disseisir Date: 14th century the act of disseising ; the state of being disseised
disseisor
noun see disseise
disseize
transitive verb see disseise
disseizin
noun see disseisin
dissemble
verb (dissembled; dissembling) Etymology: Middle English dissymblen, alteration of dissimulen, from Middle French dissimuler, from Latin dissimulare — more at dissimulate ...
dissembler
noun see dissemble
disseminate
transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Latin disseminatus, past participle of disseminare, from dis- + seminare to sow, from semin-, semen seed — more at semen Date: ...
disseminated
adjective Date: 1876 widely dispersed in a tissue, organ, or the entire body
dissemination
noun see disseminate
disseminator
noun see disseminate
disseminule
noun Date: 1904 a part or organ (as a seed or spore) of a plant that ensures propagation
dissension
also dissention noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French discension, from Latin dissension-, dissensio, from dissentire Date: 14th century disagreement; especially ...
dissensus
noun Etymology: dis- + consensus Date: 1962 difference of opinion
dissent
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin dissentire, from dis- + sentire to feel — more at sense Date: 15th century 1. to withhold assent 2. to differ ...
dissenter
noun Date: 1639 1. one that dissents 2. capitalized an English Nonconformist
dissentient
adjective Etymology: Latin dissentient-, dissentiens, present participle of dissentire Date: 1651 expressing dissent • dissentient noun
dissenting
adjective Usage: often capitalized Date: 1644 of or relating to the English Nonconformists
dissenting opinion
noun see dissent II
dissention
noun see dissension
dissentious
adjective Date: 1560 characterized by dissension or dissent
dissepiment
noun Etymology: Latin dissaepimentum partition, from dissaepire to divide, from dis- + saepire to fence in — more at septum Date: circa 1727 a dividing tissue ; septum
dissert
intransitive verb Etymology: Latin dissertus, past participle of disserere, from dis- + serere to join, arrange — more at series Date: 1657 to speak or write at length
dissertate
intransitive verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Latin dissertatus, past participle of dissertare, from dissertus Date: 1766 dissert; also to write a dissertation • ...
dissertation
noun Date: 1651 an extended usually written treatment of a subject; specifically one submitted for a doctorate • dissertational adjective
dissertational
adjective see dissertation
dissertator
noun see dissertate
disserve
transitive verb Date: circa 1629 to serve badly or falsely ; harm
disservice
noun Date: 1599 ill service ; harm; also an unhelpful, unkind, or harmful act
disserviceable
adjective Date: 1635 counterproductive
dissever
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French deseivr-, stem of desevrer, from Late Latin disseparare, from Latin dis- + separare to separate Date: 13th century transitive ...
disseverance
noun see dissever
disseverment
noun see dissever
dissidence
noun Date: circa 1656 dissent, disagreement
dissident
adjective Etymology: Latin dissident-, dissidens, present participle of dissidēre to sit apart, disagree, from dis- + sedēre to sit — more at sit Date: 1769 disagreeing ...
dissimilar
adjective Date: 1599 unlike • dissimilarity noun • dissimilarly adverb
dissimilarity
noun see dissimilar
dissimilarly
adverb see dissimilar
dissimilate
intransitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: dis- + -similate (as in assimilate) Date: 1841 to undergo dissimilation • dissimilatory adjective
dissimilation
noun Date: circa 1874 the change or omission of one of two identical or closely related sounds in a word
dissimilatory
adjective see dissimilate
dissimilitude
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin dissimilitudo, from dissimilis unlike, from dis- + similis like — more at same Date: 15th century lack of resemblance
dissimulate
verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin dissimulatus, past participle of dissimulare, from dis- + simulare to simulate Date: 15th century transitive verb ...
dissimulation
noun see dissimulate
dissimulator
noun see dissimulate
dissipate
verb (-pated; -pating) Etymology: Latin dissipatus, past participle of dissipare, dissupare, from dis- + supare to throw Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. to ...
dissipated
adjective Date: 1744 given to or marked by dissipation ; dissolute • dissipatedly adverb • dissipatedness noun
dissipatedly
adverb see dissipated
dissipatedness
noun see dissipated
dissipater
noun see dissipate
dissipation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the action or process of dissipating ; the state of being dissipated: a. dispersion, diffusion b. archaic dissolution, disintegration c. ...
dissipative
adjective Date: 1665 relating to dissipation especially of heat
dissociability
noun see dissociable
dissociable
adjective Date: 1833 separable • dissociability noun
dissocial
adjective Date: 1762 unsocial, selfish
dissociate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin dissociatus, past participle of dissociare, from dis- + sociare to join, from socius companion — more at social Date: 1582 transitive ...
dissociation
noun Date: 1611 1. the act or process of dissociating ; the state of being dissociated: as a. the process by which a chemical combination breaks up into simpler ...

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