Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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dissociative
adjective see dissociation
dissociative identity disorder
noun Date: 1993 multiple personality disorder
dissoluble
adjective Etymology: Latin dissolubilis, from dissolvere to dissolve Date: 1534 capable of being dissolved or disintegrated
dissolute
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin dissolutus, from past participle of dissolvere to loosen, dissolve Date: 14th century lacking restraint; especially marked by ...
dissolutely
adverb see dissolute
dissoluteness
noun see dissolute
dissolution
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of dissolving: as a. separation into component parts b. (1) decay, disintegration (2) death c. termination or ...
dissolvable
adjective see dissolve I
dissolve
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin dissolvere, from dis- + solvere to loosen — more at solve Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to cause to disperse ...
dissolvent
noun or adjective see dissolve I
dissolver
noun see dissolve I
dissonance
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. lack of agreement; especially inconsistency between the beliefs one holds or between one's actions and one's beliefs — compare cognitive ...
dissonant
adjective Etymology: Middle English dissonaunte, from Latin dissonant-, dissonans, present participle of dissonare to be discordant, from dis- + sonare to sound — more at ...
dissonantly
adverb see dissonant
dissuade
transitive verb (dissuaded; dissuading) Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French dissuader, from Latin dissuadēre, from dis- + suadēre to urge — more at sweet Date: ...
dissuader
noun see dissuade
dissuasion
noun Etymology: Middle English dissuasioun, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin dissuasion-, dissuasio, from dissuadēre Date: 15th century the action of ...
dissuasive
adjective Date: 1609 tending to dissuade • dissuasively adverb • dissuasiveness noun
dissuasively
adverb see dissuasive
dissuasiveness
noun see dissuasive
dissyllable
variant of disyllable
dissymmetric
adjective see dissymmetry
dissymmetry
noun Date: 1845 the absence of or the lack of symmetry • dissymmetric adjective
dist
abbreviation 1. distance 2. district
distaff
I. noun (plural distaffs) Etymology: Middle English distaf, from Old English distæf, from dis- (akin to Middle Low German dise bunch of flax) + stæf staff Date: before 12th ...
distain
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English disteynen, from Anglo-French desteindre to take away the color of, from de- + teindre to dye, from Latin tingere to wet, dye — more at ...
distal
adjective Etymology: distant + -al Date: 1803 1. situated away from the point of attachment or origin or a central point especially of the body — compare proximal 2. of, ...
distal convoluted tubule
noun Date: circa 1901 the convoluted portion of the vertebrate nephron that lies between the loop of Henle and the nonsecretory part of the nephron and that is concerned ...
distally
adverb see distal
distance
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. obsolete discord 2. a. separation in time b. the degree or amount of separation between two points, lines, surfaces, or objects c. ...
distant
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin distant-, distans, present participle of distare to stand apart, be distant, from dis- + stare to stand — ...
distantly
adverb see distant
distantness
noun see distant
distaste
I. verb Date: 1592 transitive verb 1. archaic to feel aversion to 2. archaic offend, displease intransitive verb obsolete to have an offensive taste II. noun Date: ...
distasteful
adjective Date: 1607 1. a. objectionable because offensive to one's personal taste ; unpleasant, disagreeable b. objectionable because in poor taste, inappropriate, or ...
distastefully
adverb see distasteful
distastefulness
noun see distasteful
distelfink
noun Etymology: Pennsylvania German dischdelfink, literally, goldfinch, from dischdel thistle + fink finch Date: 1939 a traditional Pennsylvania Dutch design motif in the ...
distemper
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English distempren, from Late Latin distemperare to temper badly, from Latin dis- + temperare to temper Date: 14th century 1. to throw ...
distemperate
adjective see distemper II
distemperature
noun Date: 1531 a disordered condition
distend
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin distendere, from dis- + tendere to stretch — more at thin Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. extend 2. to enlarge from ...
distensibility
noun see distensible
distensible
adjective Etymology: distens- (from Latin distensus, past participle of distendere) + -ible Date: circa 1828 capable of being distended • distensibility noun
distension
or distention noun Etymology: Middle English distensioun, from Latin distention-, distentio, from distendere Date: 15th century the act of distending or the state of being ...
distention
noun see distension
distich
noun Etymology: Latin distichon, from Greek, from neuter of distichos having two rows, from di- + stichos row, verse; akin to Greek steichein to go — more at stair Date: 1553 ...
distichous
adjective Etymology: Late Latin distichus, from Greek distichos Date: circa 1753 disposed in two vertical rows
distil
verb see distill
distill
also distil verb (distilled; distilling) Etymology: Middle English distillen, from Anglo-French distiller, from Late Latin distillare, alteration of Latin destillare, from de- + ...
distillate
noun Date: 1839 1. a liquid product condensed from vapor during distillation 2. something concentrated or extracted as if by distilling
distillation
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the process of purifying a liquid by successive evaporation and condensation b. a process like distillation ; also an instance of such ...
distiller
noun Date: 1562 one that distills especially alcoholic liquors
distillery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1758 the works where distilling (as of alcoholic liquors) is done
distinct
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin distinctus, from past participle of distinguere Date: 14th century 1. distinguishable to the eye or mind as discrete ; separate ...
distinction
noun Date: 13th century 1. a. archaic division b. class 4 2. the distinguishing of a difference ; also the difference distinguished 3. something that ...
distinctive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. serving to distinguish b. having or giving style or distinction 2. capable of making a segment of utterance different in meaning ...
distinctively
adverb see distinctive
distinctiveness
noun see distinctive
distinctly
adverb see distinct
distinctness
noun see distinct
distingué
adjective Etymology: French, from past participle of distinguer Date: 1813 distinguished especially in manner or bearing
distinguish
verb Etymology: alteration of Middle English distinguen, from Anglo-French distinguer, from Latin distinguere, literally, to separate by pricking, from dis- + -stinguere (akin to ...
distinguishability
noun see distinguish
distinguishable
adjective see distinguish
distinguishably
adverb see distinguish
distinguished
adjective Date: 1714 1. marked by eminence, distinction, or excellence 2. befitting an eminent person Synonyms: see famous
Distinguished Conduct Medal
noun Date: 1862 a British military decoration awarded for distinguished conduct in the field
Distinguished Flying Cross
noun Date: 1918 1. a British military decoration awarded for acts of gallantry when flying in operations against an enemy 2. a United States military decoration awarded for ...
Distinguished Service Cross
noun Date: 1914 1. a British military decoration awarded for distinguished service against the enemy 2. a United States Army decoration awarded for extraordinary heroism ...
Distinguished Service Medal
noun Date: 1914 1. a British military decoration awarded for distinguished conduct in war 2. a United States military decoration awarded for exceptionally meritorious service ...
Distinguished Service Order
noun Date: 1886 a British military decoration awarded for special services in action
distort
verb Etymology: Latin distortus, past participle of distorquēre, from dis- + torquēre to twist — more at torture Date: 1567 transitive verb 1. to twist out of the true ...
distorter
noun see distort
distortion
noun Date: 1581 1. the act of distorting 2. the quality or state of being distorted ; a product of distorting: as a. a lack of proportionality in an image resulting from ...
distortional
adjective see distortion
distr
abbreviation distribute; distribution
distract
I. adjective Date: 14th century archaic insane, mad II. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin distractus, past participle of distrahere, literally, to draw ...
distractable
adjective see distract II
distracted
adjective Date: 1576 1. mentally confused, troubled, or remote 2. maddened or deranged especially by grief or anxiety Synonyms: see abstracted • distractedly adverb
distractedly
adverb see distracted
distractibility
noun see distract II
distractible
adjective see distract II
distractingly
adverb see distract II
distraction
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of distracting or the state of being distracted; especially mental confusion 2. something that distracts; especially amusement • ...
distractive
adjective see distraction
distrain
verb Etymology: Middle English distreynen, from Anglo-French destreindre, from Medieval Latin distringere, from Latin, to draw apart, detain, from dis- + stringere to bind tight ...
distrainable
adjective see distrain
distrainer
noun see distrain
distrainor
noun see distrain
distraint
noun Etymology: distrain + -t (as in constraint) Date: circa 1736 the act or action of distraining
distrait
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French destreit, from Latin distractus Date: 15th century apprehensively divided or withdrawn in attention ; distracted
distraite
adjective Date: 15th century distrait — used especially of women
distraught
adjective Etymology: Middle English, modification of Latin distractus Date: 14th century 1. agitated with doubt or mental conflict or pain 2. mentally deranged ; crazed ...
distraughtly
adverb see distraught
distress
I. noun Etymology: Middle English destresse, from Anglo-French destresce, from Vulgar Latin *districtia, from Latin districtus, past participle of distringere Date: 13th ...
distressed
adjective Date: 1613 of, relating to, or experiencing economic decline or difficulty
distressful
adjective Date: 1591 causing distress ; full of distress • distressfully adverb • distressfulness noun
distressfully
adverb see distressful
distressfulness
noun see distressful
distressingly
adverb see distress II
distributary
noun (plural -taries) Date: 1863 a river branch flowing away from the main stream
distribute
verb (-uted; -uting) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin distributus, past participle of distribuere, from dis- + tribuere to allot — more at tribute Date: 15th century ...
distributed
adjective Date: 1968 1. characterized by a statistical distribution of a particular kind 2. of, relating to, or being a computer network in which at least some of the ...
distributee
noun see distribute
distribution
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the act or process of distributing b. the apportionment by a court of the personal property of an intestate 2. a. the position, ...
distribution function
noun Date: circa 1909 cumulative distribution function
distributional
adjective see distribution
distributive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. of or relating to distribution: as a. dealing a proper share to each of a group b. diffusing more or less evenly 2. of a word referring ...
distributively
adverb see distributive
distributivity
noun see distributive
distributor
noun Date: 1526 1. one that distributes 2. one that markets a commodity; especially wholesaler 3. an apparatus for directing the secondary current from the induction coil ...
district
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French, from Medieval Latin districtus jurisdiction, district, from distringere to distrain — more at distrain Date: 1611 1. ...
district attorney
noun Date: 1789 the prosecuting officer of a judicial district
district court
noun Date: 1789 a trial court that has jurisdiction over certain cases within a specific judicial district
District of Columbia
geographical name federal district E United States coextensive with city of Washington area 69 square miles (179 square kilometers), population 572,059
Distrito Federal
geographical name 1. district E Argentina largely comprising capital city of Buenos Aires area 77 square miles (199 square kilometers), population 2,960,976 2. — see federal ...
distrust
I. noun Date: 1513 the lack or absence of trust II. transitive verb Date: 1548 to have no trust or confidence in
distrustful
adjective Date: 1589 having or showing distrust • distrustfully adverb • distrustfulness noun
distrustfully
adverb see distrustful
distrustfulness
noun see distrustful
disturb
verb Etymology: Middle English disturben, destourben, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French destorber, from Latin disturbare, from dis- + turbare to throw into disorder, from ...
disturbance
noun Date: 13th century 1. the act of disturbing ; the state of being disturbed 2. a local variation from the average or normal wind conditions
disturbed
adjective Date: 1904 showing symptoms of emotional illness
disturber
noun see disturb
disturbingly
adverb see disturb
disubstituted
adjective Date: circa 1909 having two substituent atoms or groups in a molecule
disulfide
noun Date: 1869 1. a compound containing two atoms of sulfur combined with an element or radical 2. an organic compound containing the divalent group SS composed of two ...
disulfiram
noun Etymology: disulfide + thiourea + amyl Date: 1952 a compound C10H20N2S4 that causes a severe physiological reaction to alcohol and is used especially in the treatment of ...
disulfoton
noun Etymology: di- + sulfo- + -ton (probably from thion-) Date: 1965 a toxic organophosphorus systemic insecticide C8H19O2PS3
disunion
noun Date: 15th century 1. the termination of union ; separation 2. disunity • disunionist noun
disunionist
noun see disunion
disunite
transitive verb Date: 1598 divide, separate
disunity
noun Date: 1632 lack of unity; especially dissension
disused
adjective Date: 1611 no longer used or occupied ; abandoned
disutility
noun Date: 1879 the state or fact of being counterproductive
disvalue
I. transitive verb Date: 1603 1. archaic undervalue, depreciate 2. to consider of little value II. noun Date: 1603 1. obsolete disregard, disesteem 2. a negative value
disyllabic
adjective see disyllable
disyllable
also dissyllable noun Etymology: part translation of Middle French dissilabe, from Latin disyllabus having two syllables, from Greek disyllabos, from di- + syllabē syllable ...
dit
noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1940 a dot in radio or telegraphic code
ditat Deus
foreign term Etymology: Latin God enriches — motto of Arizona
ditch
I. noun Etymology: Middle English dich, from Old English dīc dike, ditch; akin to Middle High German tīch pond, dike Date: before 12th century a long narrow excavation dug ...
ditchdigger
noun Date: 1843 1. one that digs ditches 2. one employed at menial and usually hard physical labor
dite
noun Etymology: variant of doit Date: circa 1877 dialect mite, bit
dither
I. intransitive verb (dithered; dithering) Etymology: Middle English didderen Date: 15th century 1. shiver, tremble 2. to act nervously or indecisively ; vacillate • ...
ditherer
noun see dither I
dithery
adjective see dither II
dithiocarbamate
noun Date: 1929 any of several sulfur analogs of the carbamates including some used as fungicides
dithyramb
noun (plural dithyrambs) Etymology: Greek dithyrambos Date: circa 1647 1. a usually short poem in an inspired wild irregular strain 2. a statement or writing in an exalted ...
dithyrambic
adjective see dithyramb
dithyrambically
adverb see dithyramb
Ditmars
biographical name Raymond Lee 1876-1942 American naturalist
ditransitive
adjective Date: 1972 able to take both a direct and an indirect object • ditransitive noun
ditsiness
noun see ditzy
ditsy
adjective see ditzy
dittany
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Middle English ditoyne, detony from Anglo-French ditayne, from Latin dictamnum, from Greek diktamnon Date: 12th century 1. a pink-flowered mint ...
ditto
I. noun (plural dittos) Etymology: Italian ditto, detto, past participle of dire to say, from Latin dicere — more at diction Date: circa 1639 1. a thing mentioned ...
ditty
noun (plural ditties) Etymology: Middle English ditee, from Anglo-French dité story, song, from past participle of diter to compose, from Latin dictare to dictate, compose ...
ditty bag
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1860 a bag used especially by sailors to hold small articles (as needles and thread)
ditty box
noun Date: circa 1880 a box used for the same purpose as a ditty bag
ditz
noun Date: 1982 a ditzy person
ditziness
noun see ditzy
ditzy
or ditsy adjective (ditzier or ditsier; -est) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1973 eccentrically silly, giddy, or inane ; dizzy • ditziness or ditsiness noun
Diu
geographical name district W India at S end of Kathiawar Peninsula; a constituent part of the union territory of Daman and Diu — see Goa, Portuguese India
diuresis
noun (plural diureses) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1681 an increased excretion of urine
diuretic
adjective Etymology: Middle English duretik, diuretic, from Late Latin diureticus, from Greek diourētikos, from diourein to urinate, from dia- + ourein to urinate — more at ...
diuretically
adverb see diuretic
diurnal
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin diurnalis — more at journal Date: 14th century 1. a. recurring every day b. having a daily cycle 2. a. of, ...
diurnally
adverb see diurnal I
diuron
noun Etymology: dichlor- + urea + -on (as in parathion) Date: 1957 a persistent herbicide C9H10Cl2N2O used especially to control annual weeds
div
abbreviation 1. divided 2. dividend 3. division 4. divorced
diva
noun (plural divas or dive) Etymology: Italian, literally, goddess, from Latin, feminine of divus divine, god — more at deity Date: 1883 1. a. prima donna 1 b. prima ...
divagate
intransitive verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Late Latin divagatus, past participle of divagari, from Latin dis- + vagari to wander — more at vagary Date: 1599 to wander ...
divagation
noun see divagate
divalent
adjective Date: 1868 having a chemical valence of two; also bonded to two other atoms or groups
divan
noun Etymology: Turkish, from Persian dīvān account book Date: 1586 1. a. the privy council of the Ottoman Empire b. council 2. a council chamber 3. a large couch ...
divaricate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Latin divaricatus, past participle of divaricare, from dis- + varicare to straddle — more at prevaricate Date: 1673 to spread ...
divarication
noun Date: 1578 1. the action, process, or fact of divaricating 2. a divergence of opinion
dive
I. verb (dived or dove; dived; also dove; diving) Etymology: Middle English diven, duven, from Old English dȳfan to dip & dūfan to dive; akin to Old English dyppan to dip — ...
dive-bomb
transitive verb Date: 1935 to bomb from an airplane by making a steep dive toward the target before releasing the bomb • dive-bomber noun
dive-bomber
noun see dive-bomb
diver
noun Date: 1506 1. one that dives 2. a. a person who stays underwater for long periods by having air supplied from the surface or by carrying a supply of compressed air ...
diverge
verb (diverged; diverging) Etymology: Medieval Latin divergere, from Latin dis- + vergere to incline — more at wrench Date: 1665 intransitive verb 1. a. to move or ...
divergence
noun Date: 1656 1. a. a drawing apart (as of lines extending from a common center) b. difference, disagreement c. the acquisition of dissimilar characters by related ...
divergency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1709 divergence
divergent
adjective Etymology: Latin divergent-, divergens, present participle of divergere Date: 1696 1. a. diverging from each other b. differing from each other or from a ...
divergently
adverb see divergent
divers
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English divers, diverse Date: 14th century various II. pronoun, plural in construction Date: 1528 an indefinite number more than one
diverse
adjective Etymology: Middle English divers, diverse, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French divers, from Latin diversus, from past participle of divertere Date: 14th century ...
diversely
adverb see diverse
diverseness
noun see diverse
diversification
noun see diversify
diversifier
noun see diversify
diversify
verb (-fied; -fying) Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to make diverse ; give variety to 2. to balance (as an investment portfolio) defensively by dividing funds ...
diversion
noun Date: 1600 1. the act or an instance of diverting from a course, activity, or use ; deviation 2. something that diverts or amuses ; pastime 3. an attack or feint ...
diversionary
adjective Date: 1846 tending to draw attention away from the principal concern ; being a diversion
diversionist
noun Date: 1937 1. one engaged in diversionary activities 2. one characterized by political deviation
diversity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century 1. a. the condition of being diverse ; variety; especially the inclusion of diverse people (as people of different races or cultures) ...
divert
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French divertir, from Latin divertere to turn in opposite directions, from dis- + vertere to turn — more at ...
diverticular
adjective see diverticulum
diverticulitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1900 inflammation of a diverticulum
diverticulosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1917 an intestinal disorder characterized by the presence of many diverticula
diverticulum
noun (plural diverticula) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, bypath, probably alteration of deverticulum, from devertere to turn aside, from de- + vertere Date: circa 1819 1. ...
divertimento
noun (plural divertimenti or -mentos) Etymology: Italian, literally, diversion, from divertire to divert, amuse, from Latin divertere Date: 1823 1. an instrumental chamber ...
diverting
adjective Date: 1655 providing amusement or entertainment • divertingly adverb
divertingly
adverb see diverting
divertissement
noun (plural divertissements) Etymology: French, literally, diversion, from divertiss- (stem of divertir) Date: circa 1728 1. a dance sequence or short ballet usually used as ...
Dives
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, rich, rich man; misunderstood as a proper name in Luke 16:19 Date: 14th century a rich man
divest
transitive verb Etymology: alteration of devest Date: 1623 1. a. to deprive or dispossess especially of property, authority, or title b. to undress or strip especially ...
divestiture
noun Etymology: divest + -iture (as in investiture) Date: 1601 1. the act of divesting 2. the compulsory transfer of title or disposal of interests (as stock in a ...
divestment
noun see divest
divi-divi
noun Etymology: American Spanish dividivi, probably from Cumaná (extinct Cariban language of northern Venezuela) or a cognate Cariban word Date: circa 1837 a small tropical ...
dividable
adjective see divide I
divide
I. verb (divided; dividing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin dividere, from dis- + -videre to separate — more at widow Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. ...
divide et impera
foreign term Etymology: Latin divide and rule
divided
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. separated into parts or pieces b. of a leaf cut into distinct parts by incisions extending to the base or to the midrib c. having a ...
dividedly
adverb see divided
dividedness
noun see divided
dividend
noun Etymology: Middle English divident, from Latin dividendus, gerundive of dividere Date: 15th century 1. an individual share of something distributed: as a. a share in a ...
dividendless
adjective see dividend
divider
noun Date: 1534 1. one that divides 2. plural an instrument for measuring or marking (as in dividing lines) 3. something serving as a partition between separate spaces or ...
divination
noun Etymology: Middle English divinacioun, from Latin divination-, divinatio, from divinare Date: 14th century 1. the art or practice that seeks to foresee or foretell future ...
divinatory
adjective see divination
divine
I. adjective (diviner; -est) Etymology: Middle English divin, from Anglo-French, from Latin divinus, from divus god — more at deity Date: 14th century 1. a. of, relating ...
Divine Liturgy
noun Date: 1640 the eucharistic rite of Eastern churches
Divine Office
noun Date: 15th century the office for the canonical hours of prayer that priests and religious say daily
divine right
noun Date: circa 1600 the right of a sovereign to rule as set forth by the theory of government that holds that a monarch receives the right to rule directly from God and not ...
divine service
noun Date: 14th century a service of Christian worship; specifically such a service that is not sacramental in character
divinely
adverb see divine I
diviner
noun Date: 14th century 1. a person who practices divination ; soothsayer 2. a person who divines the location of water or minerals
diving beetle
noun Date: circa 1889 any of various predatory aquatic beetles (family Dytiscidae) that breathe while submerged using air trapped under their elytra
diving bell
noun Date: 1661 a diving apparatus consisting of a container open only at the bottom and supplied with compressed air by a hose
diving board
noun Date: 1891 springboard 1
diving duck
noun Date: 1813 any of various ducks (as a bufflehead) that frequent deep waters and obtain their food by diving
diving suit
noun Date: 1908 a waterproof suit with a removable helmet that is worn by a diver who is supplied with air pumped through a tube
divining rod
noun Date: 1751 a forked rod believed to indicate the presence of water or minerals especially by dipping downward when held over a vein
divinity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century 1. theology 2. the quality or state of being divine 3. often capitalized a divine being: as a. god 1 b. (1) god 2 (2) ...
divinity school
noun Date: circa 1555 a professional school having a religious curriculum especially for ministerial candidates
divisibility
noun see divisible
divisible
adjective Date: 15th century capable of being divided • divisibility noun
division
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French devision, from Latin division-, divisio, from dividere to divide Date: 14th century 1. a. the act or process of dividing ; ...
division of labor
Date: 1776 the breakdown of labor into its components and their distribution among different persons, groups, or machines to increase productive efficiency
division sign
noun Date: circa 1934 1. the symbol ÷ used to indicate division 2. the slash / used to indicate a fraction
divisional
adjective see division
divisionism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1901 pointillism • divisionist noun or adjective
divisionist
noun or adjective see divisionism
divisive
adjective Date: 1642 creating disunity or dissension • divisively adverb • divisiveness noun
divisively
adverb see divisive
divisiveness
noun see divisive
divisor
noun Date: 15th century the number by which a dividend is divided
divorcé
noun Date: 1877 a divorced man
divorce
I. noun Etymology: Middle English divorse, from Anglo-French, from Latin divortium, from divertere, divortere to divert, to leave one's husband Date: 14th century 1. the ...
divorcée
noun Etymology: French, from feminine of divorcé, past participle of divorcer to divorce, from Middle French divorse Date: 1813 a divorced woman
divorcement
noun see divorce II
divot
noun Etymology: alteration of earlier Scots devat, from Middle English (Scots) duvat Date: 1586 1. Scottish a square of turf or sod 2. a loose piece of turf (as one dug ...
divulge
transitive verb (divulged; divulging) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin divulgare, from dis- + vulgare to make known, from vulgus mob Date: 15th century 1. archaic to make ...
divulgence
noun see divulge
divvy
transitive verb (divvied; divvying) Etymology: by shortening & alteration from divide Date: 1877 divide, share — usually used with up
Dix
I. biographical name Dorothea Lynde 1802-1887 American social reformer II. biographical name Dorothy — see Elizabeth Meriwether Gilmer
Dixie
I. trademark — used for a paper cup II. geographical name the states of the SE United States & especially those which constituted the Confederacy
Dixiecrat
noun Date: 1948 a dissident Southern Democrat; specifically a supporter of a 1948 presidential ticket opposing the civil rights stand of the Democrats • Dixiecratic ...
Dixiecratic
adjective see Dixiecrat
Dixieland
noun Etymology: probably from the Original Dixieland Jazz Band Date: 1927 jazz music in duple time usually played by a small band and characterized by ensemble and solo ...
Dixmude
geographical name see Diksmuide

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