Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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Dixmuide
geographical name see Diksmuide
Dixon
biographical name Jeremiah died 1777 English surveyor in America
DIY
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1955 do-it-yourself
Diyarbakir
or Diarbekr geographical name city SE Turkey on the Tigris population 381,144
dizen
transitive verb Etymology: earlier disen to dress a distaff with flax, from Middle Dutch Date: 1619 archaic bedizen
dizygotic
also dizygous adjective Date: 1916 of twins fraternal 2
dizygous
adjective see dizygotic
dizzily
adverb see dizzy I
dizziness
noun see dizzy I
dizzy
I. adjective (dizzier; -est) Etymology: Middle English disy, from Old English dysig stupid; akin to Old High German tusig stupid Date: before 12th century 1. foolish, silly ...
dizzyingly
adverb see dizzy II
DJ
I. noun Usage: often not capitalized Date: 1950 disc jockey II. abbreviation 1. district judge 2. doctor of jurisprudence 3. dust jacket
Djakarta
geographical name — see Jakarta
Djawa
geographical name — see java
djellaba
also djellabah noun Etymology: French, from Arabic jallāba, jallābīya Date: 1919 a long loose garment with full sleeves and a hood
djellabah
noun see djellaba
Djerba
geographical name — see Jerba
DJIA
abbreviation Dow Jones Industrial Average
Djibouti
geographical name 1. (or formerly French Territory of the Afars and the Issas) (or earlier French Somaliland) country E Africa on Gulf of Aden; a republic area 8880 square ...
djinn
I. see djinni II. noun see jinni
djinni
or djinn variant of jinni
dk
abbreviation 1. dark 2. deck 3. dock
dl
abbreviation deciliter
DL
abbreviation disabled list
dl-
prefix 1. (also d,l-) consisting of equal amounts of the dextrorotatory and levorotatory forms of a specified compound 2. consisting of equal amounts of the d- and l- forms ...
DLit
abbreviation see DLitt
DLitt
or DLit abbreviation Etymology: New Latin doctor litterarum doctor of letters; doctor of literature
DLO
abbreviation dead letter office
DLS
abbreviation doctor of library science
dm
abbreviation decimeter
DM
abbreviation deutsche mark
DMA
abbreviation doctor of musical arts
DMD
abbreviation Etymology: New Latin dentariae medicinae doctor doctor of dental medicine
DME
noun Etymology: distance measuring equipment Date: 1947 an electronic device that informs the pilot of an airplane of its distance from a particular ground station
DMin
abbreviation doctor of ministry
Dmowski
biographical name Roman 1864-1939 Polish statesman
DMSO
noun Date: 1964 dimethyl sulfoxide
DMT
noun Date: circa 1966 dimethyltryptamine
DMV
abbreviation Department of Motor Vehicles
DMZ
abbreviation demilitarized zone
dn
abbreviation down
DNA
noun Etymology: deoxyribonucleic acid Date: 1944 any of various nucleic acids that are usually the molecular basis of heredity, are constructed of a double helix held together ...
DNA fingerprint
noun see DNA fingerprinting
DNA fingerprinting
noun Date: 1984 a technique used especially for identification (as for forensic purposes) by extracting and identifying the base-pair pattern in an individual's DNA — called ...
DNA polymerase
noun Date: circa 1962 any of several polymerases that promote replication or repair of DNA usually using single-stranded DNA as a template
DNA typing
noun see DNA fingerprinting
DNA virus
noun Date: 1963 a virus whose genome consists of DNA
DNAase
noun see DNase
DNase
also DNAase noun Date: circa 1956 an enzyme that hydrolyzes DNA to nucleotides — called also deoxyribonuclease
DNB
abbreviation Dictionary of National Biography
Dneprodzerzhinsk
geographical name see Dniprodzerzhyns'k
Dnepropetrovsk
geographical name see Dnipropetrovs'k
DNF
abbreviation did not finish
Dnieper
geographical name river 1420 miles (2285 kilometers) Ukraine, E Belarus, & W Russia in Europe rising in S Valdai Hills & flowing S into Black Sea
Dniester
geographical name river 877 miles (1411 kilometers) W Ukraine & E Moldova rising on N slope of Carpathian Mountains near Polish border & flowing SE into Black Sea
Dniprodzerzhyns'k
or Dneprodzerzhinsk geographical name city E central Ukraine on the Dnieper W of Dnipropetrovs'k population 284,000
Dnipropetrovs'k
or Dnepropetrovsk or formerly Ekaterinoslav geographical name city E Ukraine population 1,189,000
DNP
abbreviation did not play
DNR
abbreviation do not resuscitate
DO
abbreviation 1. defense order 2. doctor of osteopathy
do
I. verb (did; done; doing; does) Etymology: Middle English don, from Old English dōn; akin to Old High German tuon to do, Latin -dere to put, facere to make, do, Greek tithenai ...
do a number on
phrasal to defeat or confound thoroughly especially by indirect or deceptive means
do away with
phrasal 1. to put an end to ; abolish 2. to put to death ; kill
do by
phrasal to deal with ; treat
do down
transitive verb Date: 14th century British to get the better of (as by trickery)
do for
phrasal chiefly British 1. to attend to the wants and needs of ; take care of 2. to bring about the death or ruin of
do in
transitive verb Date: 1905 1. a. to bring about the defeat or destruction of ; also kill b. exhaust, wear out 2. cheat
do it
phrasal to have sexual intercourse
do justice
phrasal 1. a. to act justly b. to treat fairly or adequately c. to show due appreciation for 2. to acquit in a way worthy of one's abilities
do proud
phrasal to give cause for pride or gratification
do the trick
phrasal to produce a desired result
do up
transitive verb Date: 1666 1. to prepare (as by cleaning or repairing) for wear or use 2. a. to wrap up b. put up, can 3. a. to deck out ; clothe b. to ...
do with
phrasal to make good use of ; benefit by
do's
see dos
do-good
adjective Date: 1952 designed or disposed sometimes impracticably and too zealously toward bettering the conditions under which others live • do-goodism noun
do-gooder
noun Date: 1926 an earnest often naive humanitarian or reformer • do-gooding noun or adjective
do-gooding
noun or adjective see do-gooder
do-goodism
noun see do-good
do-it-yourself
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1952 the activity of doing or making something (as in woodworking or home repair) without professional training or assistance; broadly an ...
do-it-yourselfer
noun see do-it-yourself
do-nothing
I. noun Date: 1579 a shiftless or lazy person II. adjective Date: 1832 marked by inactivity or failure to make positive progress • do-nothingism noun
do-nothingism
noun see do-nothing II
do-or-die
adjective Date: 1873 1. doggedly determined to reach one's objective ; indomitable 2. presenting as the only alternatives complete success or complete ruin
do-rag
noun Etymology: 2do (hairdo) Date: 1984 a kerchief worn especially to cover the hair
do-si-do
noun (plural do-si-dos) Etymology: French dos-à-dos back to back Date: 1926 a square-dance figure: a. a figure in which the dancers pass each other right shoulder to ...
DOA
abbreviation dead on arrival
doable
adjective see do I
DOB
abbreviation date of birth
dobbin
noun Etymology: Dobbin, nickname for Robert Date: 1596 1. a farm horse 2. a quiet plodding horse
dobby
noun (plural dobbies) Etymology: perhaps from Dobby, nickname for Robert Date: 1878 1. a loom attachment for weaving small figures 2. a fabric or figured weave made with a ...
Dobe
noun Date: 1946 Doberman pinscher
Doberai
or formerly Vogelkop geographical name peninsula Indonesia in NW West Papua
Döbereiner
biographical name Johann Wolfgang 1780-1849 German chemist
Doberman
noun see Doberman pinscher
Doberman pinscher
noun Etymology: German Dobermann-pinscher, from Friedrich Ludwig Dobermann died 1894 German dog breeder + German Pinscher, a breed of hunting dog Date: 1917 any of a breed of ...
Dobie
biographical name J(ames) Frank 1888-1964 American folklorist
dobra
noun Etymology: Portuguese, from feminine of obsolete dobro double, from Latin duplus — more at double Date: 1978 — see money table
Dobrée
biographical name Bonamy 1891-1974 English scholar
Dobro
trademark — used for an acoustic guitar having a metal resonator
Dobrudja
geographical name see Dobruja
Dobruja
or Dobrudja geographical name region S Europe in Romania & Bulgaria on Black Sea S of the Danube
Dobson
biographical name (Henry) Austin 1840-1921 English poet & essayist
dobsonfly
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1904 a winged insect (family Corydalidae) that has very long slender mandibles in the male and a large carnivorous aquatic larva ...
doc
I. noun Date: 1756 doctor II. abbreviation document
docendo discimus
foreign term Etymology: Latin we learn by teaching
docent
noun Etymology: obsolete German (now Dozent), from Latin docent-, docens, present participle of docēre Date: 1880 1. a college or university teacher or lecturer 2. a person ...
docetic
adjective Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Late Greek Dokētai Docetists, from Greek dokein to seem — more at decent Date: 1846 of or relating to Docetism or the ...
Docetism
noun Date: 1846 a belief opposed as heresy in early Christianity that Christ only seemed to have a human body and to suffer and die on the cross • Docetist noun
Docetist
noun see Docetism
doch-an-doris
noun see doch-an-dorris
doch-an-dorris
or doch-an-doris noun Etymology: Scottish Gaelic deoch an doruis & Irish deoch an dorais, literally, drink of the door Date: 1691 Scottish & Irish a parting drink ; stirrup ...
docile
adjective Etymology: Latin docilis, from docēre to teach; akin to Latin decēre to be fitting — more at decent Date: 15th century 1. easily taught 2. easily led or ...
docilely
adverb see docile
docility
noun see docile
dock
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English docce; akin to Middle Dutch docke dock Date: before 12th century 1. any of a genus (Rumex) of coarse weedy plants of the ...
dockage
noun Date: 1648 1. a charge for the use of a dock 2. the docking of ships 3. docking facilities
docker
I. noun Date: 1765 one that docks the tails of animals II. noun Date: 1887 chiefly British one connected with docks; especially longshoreman
docket
I. noun Etymology: Middle English doggette Date: 15th century 1. a brief written summary of a document ; abstract 2. a. (1) a formal abridged record of the ...
dockhand
noun Date: 1920 longshoreman
dockland
noun Date: 1904 British the part of a port occupied by docks; also a residential section adjacent to docks
dockmaster
noun Date: 1736 a person in charge of a dock or marina or of the docking of ships
dockside
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1887 the shore or area adjacent to a dock
dockworker
noun Date: 1913 longshoreman
dockyard
noun Date: 1704 1. shipyard 2. British navy yard
docosahexaenoic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary docosanoic acid (a crystalline fatty acid) + hexa- + -ene + -oic an omega-3 fatty acid C22H32O2 found especially in fish of ...
doctor
I. noun Etymology: Middle English doctour teacher, doctor, from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin doctor, from Latin, teacher, from docēre to ...
doctor of the church
noun see doctor I
doctoral
adjective see doctor I
doctorate
noun Date: 1570 the degree, title, or rank of a doctor
doctorless
adjective see doctor I
doctorship
noun see doctor I
doctrinaire
I. noun Etymology: French, from doctrine Date: 1831 one who attempts to put into effect an abstract doctrine or theory with little or no regard for practical difficulties II. ...
doctrinairism
noun see doctrinaire II
doctrinal
adjective Date: 15th century of, relating to, or preoccupied with doctrine • doctrinally adverb
doctrinally
adverb see doctrinal
doctrine
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin doctrina, from doctor Date: 14th century 1. archaic teaching, instruction 2. a. ...
docudrama
noun Etymology: documentary + drama Date: circa 1961 a drama made for television, motion pictures, or theater dealing freely with historical events especially of a recent and ...
document
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, precept, teaching, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin documentum official paper, from Latin, lesson, proof, from docēre ...
documentable
adjective see document II
documental
adjective see document I
documentalist
noun Date: 1939 a specialist in documentation
documentarian
noun Etymology: 2documentary Date: 1943 one who makes a documentary
documentarily
adverb see documentary I
documentarist
noun Etymology: 2documentary Date: 1949 documentarian
documentary
I. adjective Date: 1802 1. being or consisting of documents ; contained or certified in writing 2. of, relating to, or employing documentation in literature or art; ...
documentation
noun Date: 1884 1. the act or an instance of furnishing or authenticating with documents 2. a. the provision of documents in substantiation; also documentary evidence ...
documentational
adjective see documentation
documenter
noun see document II
DOD
abbreviation Department of Defense
dodder
I. noun Etymology: Middle English doder; akin to Middle High German toter dodder, egg yolk Date: 13th century any of a genus (Cuscuta) of wiry twining vines of the ...
doddered
adjective Etymology: probably alteration of dodded, from past participle of English dialect dod to lop, from Middle English dodden Date: 1697 1. deprived of branches through ...
dodderer
noun see dodder II
doddering
adjective Date: 1898 feeble, senile
doddery
adjective Date: 1866 1. doddered 2 2. doddering
dodec-
combining form see dodeca-
dodeca-
or dodec- combining form Etymology: Latin, from Greek dōdeka-, dōdek-, from dōdeka, dyōdeka, from dyō, dyo two + deka ten twelve
dodecagon
noun Etymology: Greek dōdekagōnon, from dōdeka- + -gōnon -gon Date: circa 1658 a polygon of 12 angles and 12 sides
dodecahedral
adjective see dodecahedron
dodecahedron
noun (plural -drons or dodecahedra) Etymology: Greek dōdekaedron, from dōdeka- + -edron -hedron Date: circa 1570 a solid having 12 plane faces • dodecahedral adjective
Dodecanese
geographical name islands Greece in the SE Aegean comprising the Southern Sporades S of Ikaria & Samos; belonged to Italy 1923-47 area 486 square miles (1264 square ...
Dodecanesian
adjective or noun see Dodecanese
dodecaphonic
adjective Etymology: dodeca- + phon- + -ic Date: 1949 twelve-tone • dodecaphonically adverb • dodecaphonist noun • dodecaphony noun
dodecaphonically
adverb see dodecaphonic
dodecaphonist
noun see dodecaphonic
dodecaphony
noun see dodecaphonic
Dodge
biographical name Mary Elizabeth 1831-1905 née Mapes American author
dodge
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1575 1. an act of evading by sudden bodily movement 2. a. an artful device to evade, deceive, or trick b. expedient II. ...
dodge a bullet
also dodge the bullet phrasal to narrowly avoid an unwelcome, harmful, or disastrous outcome or occurrence
Dodge City
geographical name city S Kansas on Arkansas River population 25,176
dodge the bullet
phrasal see dodge a bullet
dodgeball
noun Date: circa 1922 a game in which players stand in a circle and try to hit opponents within the circle with a large inflated ball
dodgem
noun Date: 1945 chiefly British bumper car — called also dodgem car
dodgem car
noun see dodgem
dodger
noun Date: 1568 1. one that dodges; especially one who uses tricky devices 2. a small leaflet ; circular 3. corn dodger 4. a usually canvas screen on a boat or ship ...
dodgery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1670 evasion, trickery
dodginess
noun see dodgy
Dodgson
biographical name Charles Lutwidge 1832-1898 pseudonym Lewis Carroll English mathematician & writer
dodgy
adjective Date: 1861 1. chiefly British evasive, tricky 2. chiefly British a. not sound, good, or reliable b. questionable, suspicious 3. chiefly British requiring ...
dodo
noun (plural dodoes or dodos) Etymology: Portuguese doudo, from doudo silly, stupid Date: 1628 1. a. an extinct heavy flightless bird (Raphus cucullatus syn. Didus ineptus ...
Dodoma
geographical name town NE central Tanzania, since 1974 designated as the future national capital
Dodsley
biographical name Robert 1703-1764 English author & bookseller
doe
noun (plural does or doe) Etymology: Middle English do, from Old English dā; akin to German dialect tē doe Date: before 12th century the adult female of various mammals (as ...
DOE
abbreviation 1. Department of Energy 2. depends on experience
doe-eyed
adjective Date: 1933 having large innocent-looking eyes
doer
noun Date: 14th century one that takes an active part
does
present third singular of do plural of doe
doeskin
noun Date: 15th century 1. the skin of does or leather made of it; also soft leather from sheep- or lambskins 2. a compact coating and sportswear fabric napped and felted ...
doesn't
Date: 1739 does not
doest
archaic present second singular of do
doeth
archaic present third singular of do
doff
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from don to do + of off Date: 14th century 1. a. to remove (an article of wear) from the body b. to take off (the hat) in ...
doff one's cap to
phrasal see doff one's hat to
doff one's hat to
or doff one's cap to phrasal to show respect to ; salute
dog
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Old English docga Date: before 12th century 1. a. canid; especially a highly variable domestic mammal ...
dog and pony show
noun Date: 1970 an often elaborate public relations or sales presentation; also an elaborate or overblown affair or event
dog biscuit
noun Date: circa 1858 a hard dry cracker for dogs
dog collar
noun Date: 1501 1. a collar for a dog 2. slang clerical collar 3. a wide flexible snug-fitting necklace
dog days
noun plural Etymology: from their being reckoned from the heliacal rising of the Dog Star (Sirius) Date: 1538 1. the period between early July and early September when the hot ...
dog fennel
noun Date: 14th century 1. an ill-scented Eurasian chamomile (Anthemis cotula) naturalized as a weed in the United States 2. a usually annual composite weed (Eupatorium ...
dog in the manger
Etymology: from the fable of the dog who prevented an ox from eating hay which he did not want himself Date: 1573 a person who selfishly withholds from others something ...
dog it
phrasal to fail to do one's best ; goldbrick
dog paddle
noun Date: 1904 an elementary swimming stroke in which the arms paddle in the water and the legs maintain a kicking motion • dog-paddle intransitive verb
dog rose
noun Date: 1713 a chiefly European wild rose (Rosa canina)
Dog Star
noun Date: 1567 Sirius
dog tag
noun Date: 1918 an identification tag (as for military personnel or pets)
dog tick
noun Date: circa 1552 American dog tick
dog's breakfast
noun Date: circa 1934 chiefly British a confused mess or mixture
dog's chance
noun Date: 1902 a bare chance in one's favor
dog-ear
noun Date: 1856 the turned-down corner of a page especially of a book • dog-ear transitive verb
dog-eared
adjective Date: circa 1800 1. having dog-ears 2. shabby, timeworn
dog-eat-dog
adjective Date: 1834 marked by ruthless self-interest
dog-paddle
intransitive verb see dog paddle
dogbane
noun Date: 1597 any of a genus (Apocynum of the family Apocynaceae, the dogbane family) of often poisonous plants chiefly of temperate-zone regions with milky juice and fibrous ...
dogcart
noun Date: 1668 1. a cart drawn by a dog 2. a light two-wheeled carriage with two transverse seats set back to back
dogcatcher
noun Date: 1835 a community official assigned to catch and dispose of stray dogs
dogdom
noun Date: 1854 the world of dogs or of dog fanciers
doge
noun Etymology: Italian dialect, from Latin duc-, dux leader — more at duke Date: 1549 the chief magistrate in the republics of Venice and Genoa
dogface
noun Date: 1932 soldier; especially infantryman
dogfight
noun Date: 1656 1. a fight between dogs; broadly a fiercely disputed contest 2. a fight between two or more fighter planes usually at close quarters • dogfight ...
dogfighter
noun see dogfight
dogfish
noun Date: 15th century any of various usually small bottom-dwelling sharks (as of the families Squalidae, Carcharhinidae, and Scyliorhinidae) that often appear in schools near ...
dogged
adjective Date: 1653 marked by stubborn determination Synonyms: see obstinate • doggedly adverb • doggedness noun
doggedly
adverb see dogged
doggedness
noun see dogged
Dogger Bank
geographical name submerged sandbank about 150 miles (241 kilometers) long in North Sea E of N England
doggerel
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English dogerel, probably diminutive of dogge dog Date: 14th century loosely styled and irregular in measure especially for burlesque or comic ...
doggery
noun (plural -geries) Date: 1830 a cheap saloon ; dive
doggie
noun see doggy I
doggie bag
or doggy bag noun Etymology: 1doggy; from the presumption that such leftovers are intended for a pet dog Date: 1963 a container for leftover food to be carried home from a ...
doggish
adjective Date: 15th century 1. canine 2. stylish in a showy way • doggishly adverb • doggishness noun
doggishly
adverb see doggish
doggishness
noun see doggish
doggo
adverb Etymology: probably from 1dog Date: 1893 in hiding — used chiefly in the phrase to lie doggo
doggone
I. verb (doggoned; doggoning) Etymology: euphemism for God damn Date: 1828 damn II. adjective or adverb or doggoned Date: 1851 damned III. noun Date: 1928 damn
doggoned
adjective or adverb see doggone II
doggy
I. noun or doggie (plural doggies) Date: 1788 a usually small dog II. adjective (doggier; -est) Date: 1859 1. concerned with or fond of dogs 2. resembling or suggestive ...
doggy bag
noun see doggie bag
doghouse
noun Date: 1594 1. a shelter for a dog 2. a state of disfavor — often used in the phrase in the doghouse
dogie
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1888 chiefly West a motherless calf in a range herd
dogleg
I. adjective Date: 1808 crooked or bent like a dog's hind leg II. noun Date: circa 1909 1. a. something having an abrupt angle b. a sharp bend (as in a road) 2. a ...
doglike
adjective see dog I
dogma
noun (plural dogmas; also dogmata) Etymology: Latin dogmat-, dogma, from Greek, from dokein to seem — more at decent Date: 1638 1. a. something held as an established ...
dogmatic
also dogmatical adjective Date: 1660 1. characterized by or given to the expression of opinions very strongly or positively as if they were facts 2. of or relating to ...
dogmatic theology
noun Date: circa 1766 dogmatics
dogmatical
adjective see dogmatic
dogmatically
adverb see dogmatic
dogmaticalness
noun see dogmatic
dogmatics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1845 a branch of theology that seeks to interpret the dogmas of a religious faith
dogmatism
noun Date: 1603 1. positiveness in assertion of opinion especially when unwarranted or arrogant 2. a viewpoint or system of ideas based on insufficiently examined premises
dogmatist
noun Date: 1606 one who dogmatizes
dogmatization
noun see dogmatize
dogmatize
verb (-tized; -tizing) Etymology: French dogmatiser, from Late Latin dogmatizare, from Greek dogmatizein, from dogmat-, dogma Date: 1611 intransitive verb to speak or write ...
dogmatizer
noun see dogmatize
dognap
transitive verb (-napped or dognaped; -napping or dognaping) Etymology: 1dog + -nap (as in kidnap) Date: circa 1942 to steal (a dog) especially to obtain a reward for its ...
dognaper
noun see dognap
dognapper
noun see dognap
Dogon
noun (plural Dogon or Dogons) Etymology: Dogon dogõ, a self-designation Date: circa 1931 1. a member of a people of Mali noted for their sculpture 2. the language of the ...
dogsbody
noun Etymology: British naval slang dogsbody pudding made of peas, junior officer Date: 1922 chiefly British drudge 1
dogsled
noun Date: 1810 a sled drawn by dogs • dogsled intransitive verb • dogsledder noun
dogsledder
noun see dogsled
dogtooth
noun Date: 1552 1. canine 1, eyetooth 2. an architectural ornament common in early English Gothic consisting usually of four leaves radiating from a raised point at the ...
dogtooth violet
noun Date: 1629 any of a genus (Erythronium) of small spring-flowering bulbous herbs of the lily family
dogtrot
I. noun Date: 15th century 1. a quick easy gait suggesting that of a dog 2. chiefly Southern & Midland a roofed passage similar to a breezeway; especially one connecting ...
dogwatch
noun Date: 1700 1. either of two watches of two hours on shipboard that extend from 4 to 6 and 6 to 8 p.m. 2. any of various night shifts; especially the last shift
dogwood
noun Date: 1617 any of various trees and shrubs (genus Cornus of the family Cornaceae, the dogwood family) with clusters of small flowers and often large white, pink, or red ...

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