Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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Delphi
geographical name ancient town central Greece in Phocis on S slope of Mt. Parnassus near present village of Dhelfoí
Delphian
adjective Date: 1567 Delphic
Delphic
adjective Date: 1567 1. of or relating to ancient Delphi or its oracle 2. often not capitalized ambiguous, obscure • delphically adverb
delphically
adverb see Delphic
delphinium
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek delphinion larkspur, diminutive of delphin-, delphis dolphin; probably from the shape of the nectary Date: 1664 any of a ...
Delphinus
noun Etymology: Latin (genitive Delphini), literally, dolphin, from Greek delphin-, delphis Date: 1854 a northern constellation nearly west of Pegasus
Delray Beach
geographical name city SE Florida S of West Palm Beach population 60,020
delt
noun Date: 1980 deltoid — usually used in plural
Delta
I. Date: 1952 — a communications code word for the letter d II. geographical name municipality Canada in SW British Columbia population 96,950
delta
I. noun Etymology: Middle English deltha, from Greek delta, of Semitic origin; akin to Hebrew dāleth daleth Date: 13th century 1. the 4th letter of the Greek alphabet — ...
delta ray
noun Date: 1908 an electron ejected by an ionizing particle in its passage through matter
delta rhythm
noun see delta wave
delta wave
noun Date: 1936 a high amplitude electrical rhythm of the brain with a frequency of less than four cycles per second that occurs especially in slow-wave sleep, in infancy, and ...
delta wing
noun Etymology: 1delta; from its shape Date: 1946 a triangular swept-back airplane wing with a usually straight trailing edge
Delta, The
geographical name region NW Mississippi between Mississippi & Yazoo rivers • Delta adjective
deltaic
adjective see delta I
deltoid
I. noun Etymology: New Latin deltoides, from Greek deltoeidēs shaped like a delta, from delta Date: circa 1681 a large triangular muscle that covers the shoulder joint and ...
deltoideus
noun (plural deltoidei) Etymology: New Latin, alteration of deltoides Date: circa 1860 deltoid
Deltona
geographical name city Florida N of Orlando population 69,543
delude
transitive verb (deluded; deluding) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin deludere, from de- + ludere to play — more at ludicrous Date: 15th century 1. to mislead the mind ...
deluder
noun see delude
deluge
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French deluje, from Latin diluvium, from diluere to wash away, from dis- + lavere to wash — more at lye Date: 14th century 1. ...
delusion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin delusion-, delusio, from deludere Date: 15th century 1. the act of deluding ; the state of being deluded 2. a. something ...
delusional
adjective see delusion
delusionary
adjective see delusion
delusive
adjective Date: 1605 1. likely to delude 2. constituting a delusion • delusively adverb • delusiveness noun
delusively
adverb see delusive
delusiveness
noun see delusive
delusory
adjective Date: 15th century deceptive, delusive
deluster
transitive verb Date: 1926 to reduce the sheen of (as yarn or fabric)
deluxe
adjective Etymology: French de luxe, literally, of luxury Date: 1819 notably luxurious, elegant, or expensive
delve
I. verb (delved; delving) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English delfan; akin to Old High German telban to dig Date: before 12th century transitive verb archaic ...
delver
noun see delve I
dely
abbreviation delivery
dem
abbreviation demonstrative
Dem
noun Date: 1875 democrat 2
demagnetization
noun see demagnetize
demagnetize
transitive verb Date: 1839 to deprive of magnetic properties • demagnetization noun • demagnetizer noun
demagnetizer
noun see demagnetize
demagog
I. noun see demagogue I II. verb see demagogue II
demagogic
adjective Date: 1831 of, relating to, or characteristic of a demagogue ; employing demagoguery • demagogically adverb
demagogically
adverb see demagogic
demagogue
I. noun also demagog Etymology: Greek dēmagōgos, from dēmos people (perhaps akin to Greek daiesthai to divide) + agōgos leading, from agein to lead — more at tide, agent ...
demagoguery
noun see demagogue I
demagogy
noun see demagogue I
demand
I. noun Date: 13th century 1. a. an act of demanding or asking especially with authority b. something claimed as due 2. archaic question 3. a. willingness ...
demand deposit
noun Date: 1923 a bank deposit that can be withdrawn without advance notice
demand loan
noun Date: 1913 call loan
demand note
noun Date: 1844 a note payable on demand
demand-pull
noun Date: 1952 an increase or upward trend in spendable money that tends to result in increased competition for available goods and services and a corresponding increase in ...
demand-side
adjective Date: 1980 of, relating to, or being an economic theory that advocates use of government spending and growth in the money supply to stimulate the demand for goods ...
demandable
adjective see demand II
demandant
noun Date: 15th century 1. archaic the plaintiff in a real action 2. archaic one who makes a demand or claim
demander
noun see demand II
demanding
adjective Date: 1926 requiring much time, effort, or attention ; exacting • demandingly adverb • demandingness noun
demandingly
adverb see demanding
demandingness
noun see demanding
demantoid
noun Etymology: German, from obsolete German Demant diamond, from Middle High German diemant, from Old French diamant — more at diamond Date: circa 1890 a green variety of ...
demarcate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: back-formation from demarcation, from Spanish demarcación, from demarcar to delimit, from de- + marcar to mark, probably from ...
demarcation
noun see demarcate
démarche
or demarche noun Etymology: French démarche, literally, gait, from Middle French, from demarcher to march, from Old French demarchier, from de- + marchier to march Date: 1658 ...
demarche
noun see démarche
demark
transitive verb Date: 1834 demarcate
dematerialization
noun see dematerialize
dematerialize
verb Date: circa 1864 transitive verb to cause to become or appear immaterial intransitive verb to lose or appear to lose materiality • dematerialization noun
Demavend
geographical name — see Damavand
deme
noun Etymology: Greek dēmos people, deme Date: 1833 1. a unit of local government in ancient Attica 2. a local population of closely related interbreeding organisms
demean
I. transitive verb (demeaned; demeaning) Etymology: Middle English demenen, from Anglo-French demener to conduct, from de- + mener to lead, from Latin minare to drive, from ...
demeanor
noun Etymology: 1demean Date: 15th century behavior toward others ; outward manner Synonyms: see bearing
demeanour
British variant of demeanor
demented
adjective Date: 1632 1. mad, insane 2. suffering from or exhibiting cognitive dementia • dementedly adverb • dementedness noun
dementedly
adverb see demented
dementedness
noun see demented
dementia
noun Etymology: Latin, from dement-, demens mad, from de- + ment-, mens mind — more at mind Date: 1806 1. a usually progressive condition (as Alzheimer's disease) marked by ...
dementia praecox
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, premature dementia Date: 1899 schizophrenia
demential
adjective see dementia
Demerara
geographical name river 200 miles (322 kilometers) Guyana flowing N into the Atlantic
demerara sugar
noun Etymology: Demerara, river and region in Guyana Date: 1848 a coarse light-brown raw sugar
demerit
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French demerite, from Medieval Latin demeritum, from neuter of demeritus, past participle of demerēre ...
Demerol
trademark — used for meperidine
demersal
adjective Etymology: Latin demersus (past participle of demergere to sink, from de- + mergere to dip, sink) + English 1-al — more at merge Date: 1889 living near, deposited ...
demesne
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French demesne, demeine — more at domain Date: 14th century 1. legal possession of land as one's own 2. manorial land actually ...
Demeter
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Dēmētēr Date: 1835 the Greek goddess of agriculture — compare Ceres
demethylate
transitive verb Date: 1926 to remove a methyl group from (a chemical compound) • demethylation noun
demethylation
noun see demethylate
demi-
prefix Etymology: Middle English, from demi, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *dimedius, modification of Latin dimidius, from dis- + medius mid — more at mid 1. half ...
demi-glace
noun Etymology: French, half cooking stock, literally, half-ice Date: 1900 a highly concentrated reduced brown sauce often used as a base for other sauces
demi-sec
adjective Etymology: French Date: 1926 of champagne moderately sweet
demigod
noun Date: 1530 1. a mythological being with more power than a mortal but less than a god 2. a person so outstanding as to seem to approach the divine
demigoddess
noun Date: 1603 a female demigod
demijohn
noun Etymology: by folk etymology from French dame-jeanne, literally, Lady Jane Date: 1769 a large narrow-necked bottle usually enclosed in wickerwork
demilitarization
noun see demilitarize
demilitarize
transitive verb Date: 1883 1. a. to do away with the military organization or potential of b. to prohibit (as a zone or frontier area) from being used for military ...
DeMille
biographical name Cecil Blount 1881-1959 American film director & producer
demimondaine
noun Etymology: French demi-mondaine, from feminine of demi-mondain, from demi-monde Date: 1894 a woman supported by a wealthy lover ; a woman of the demimonde
demimonde
noun Etymology: French demi-monde, from demi- + monde world, from Latin mundus Date: 1855 1. a. a class of women on the fringes of respectable society supported by wealthy ...
demineralization
noun Date: 1903 1. loss of bodily minerals (as calcium salts) especially in disease 2. the process of removing mineral matter or salts (as from water) • demineralize ...
demineralize
transitive verb see demineralization
demineralizer
noun see demineralization
demirep
noun Etymology: demi- + rep (reprobate) Date: 1749 demimondaine
demise
I. verb (demised; demising) Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to convey (as an estate) by will or lease 2. obsolete convey, give 3. to transmit by succession or ...
demisemiquaver
noun Date: circa 1706 thirty-second note
demission
noun Etymology: Middle English dimission relinquishment, conveyance, from Anglo-French dimissioun, from Latin demission-, demissio lowering, from demittere Date: 15th century ...
demit
verb (demitted; demitting) Etymology: Middle English dimitten, from Anglo-French demettre Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. archaic dismiss 2. resign 2 intransitive ...
demitasse
noun Etymology: French demi-tasse, from demi- + tasse cup, from Middle French, from Arabic ṭass — more at tazza Date: 1842 a small cup of black coffee; also the cup used ...
demiurge
noun Etymology: Late Latin demiurgus, from Greek dēmiourgos, literally, artisan, one with special skill, from dēmios of the people (from dēmos people) + -ourgos worker (from ...
demiurgic
adjective see demiurge
demiurgical
adjective see demiurge
demiworld
noun Date: 1862 demimonde 2
demo
noun (plural demos) Date: 1793 1. capitalized democrat 2 2. a. demonstration 1b b. British demonstration 4 3. a. demonstrator a b. a recording intended to show ...
demob
I. transitive verb Date: 1919 chiefly British demobilize II. noun Date: 1945 chiefly British the act or process of demobilizing
demobilization
noun see demobilize
demobilize
transitive verb Date: 1882 1. disband 2. to discharge from military service • demobilization noun
democracy
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: Middle French democratie, from Late Latin democratia, from Greek dēmokratia, from dēmos + -kratia -cracy Date: 1576 1. a. government by the ...
democrat
noun Date: 1789 1. a. an adherent of democracy b. one who practices social equality 2. capitalized a member of the Democratic party of the United States
democratic
adjective Date: 1602 1. of, relating to, or favoring democracy 2. often capitalized of or relating to one of the two major political parties in the United States evolving in ...
democratic centralism
noun Date: 1926 a principle of Communist party organization by which members take part in policy discussions and elections at all levels but must follow decisions made at ...
Democratic Republic of the Congo
geographical name see Congo 2
Democratic-Republican
adjective Date: 1818 of or relating to a major American political party of the early 19th century favoring a strict interpretation of the Constitution to restrict the powers of ...
democratically
adverb see democratic
democratization
noun see democratize
democratize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1798 to make democratic • democratization noun • democratizer noun
democratizer
noun see democratize
Democritus
biographical name circa 460-circa 370 B.C. the Laughing Philosopher Greek philosopher
démodé
adjective Etymology: French, from dé- de- + mode Date: 1873 no longer fashionable ; out-of-date
demoded
adjective Date: 1887 demode
demodulate
transitive verb Date: 1927 to extract the information from (a modulated signal) • demodulation noun • demodulator noun
demodulation
noun see demodulate
demodulator
noun see demodulate
Demogorgon
noun Etymology: Late Latin Date: 1590 a mysterious spirit or deity often explained as a primeval creator god who antedates the gods of Greek mythology
demographer
noun see demography
demographic
I. adjective also demographical Date: 1882 1. of or relating to demography or demographics 2. relating to the dynamic balance of a population especially with regard to ...
demographical
adjective see demographic I
demographically
adverb see demographic I
demography
noun Etymology: French démographie, from Greek dēmos people + French -graphie -graphy Date: 1880 the statistical study of human populations especially with reference to size ...
demoiselle
noun Etymology: French, from Old French dameisele — more at damsel Date: 1520 1. a young lady 2. damselfish
DeMoivre's theorem
noun Etymology: Abraham De Moivre died 1754 French mathematician Date: 1840 a theorem of complex numbers: the nth power of a complex number has for its absolute value and its ...
demolish
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French demoliss-, stem of demolir, from Latin demoliri, from de- + moliri to construct, from moles mass — more at mole Date: 1570 1. a. ...
demolisher
noun see demolish
demolishment
noun see demolish
demolition
noun Date: 1549 1. the act of demolishing; especially destruction in war by means of explosives 2. plural explosives for destruction in war • demolitionist noun
demolition derby
noun Date: circa 1953 1. a contest in which skilled drivers ram old cars into one another until only one car remains running 2. something that resembles a demolition derby in ...
demolitionist
noun see demolition
demon
or daemon noun Etymology: Middle English demon, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin daemon evil spirit, from Latin, divinity, spirit, from Greek daimōn, probably from daiesthai ...
demonetization
noun see demonetize
demonetize
transitive verb Etymology: French démonétiser, from dé- de- + Latin moneta coin — more at mint Date: 1852 1. to stop using (a metal) as a monetary standard 2. to ...
demoniac
I. adjective also demoniacal Etymology: Middle English demoniak, from Late Latin daemoniacus, from Greek daimoniakos, from daimon-, daimōn Date: 14th century 1. possessed or ...
demoniacal
adjective see demoniac I
demoniacally
adverb see demoniac I
demonian
adjective see demon
demonic
also demonical adjective Date: 1662 of, relating to, or suggestive of a demon ; fiendish • demonically adverb
demonical
adjective see demonic
demonically
adverb see demonic
demonization
noun see demon
demonize
transitive verb see demon
demonological
adjective see demonology
demonologist
noun see demonology
demonology
noun Date: 1597 1. the study of demons or evil spirits 2. belief in demons ; a doctrine of evil spirits 3. a catalog of enemies • demonological adjective • ...
demonstrability
noun see demonstrable
demonstrable
adjective Date: 15th century 1. capable of being demonstrated 2. apparent, evident • demonstrability noun • demonstrably adverb
demonstrably
adverb see demonstrable
demonstrate
verb (-strated; -strating) Etymology: Latin demonstratus, past participle of demonstrare, from de- + monstrare to show — more at muster Date: 1548 transitive verb 1. to ...
demonstration
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act, process, or means of demonstrating to the intelligence: as a. (1) conclusive evidence ; proof (2) derivation 5 b. a showing of ...
demonstrational
adjective see demonstration
demonstrative
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. demonstrating as real or true b. characterized or established by demonstration 2. pointing out the one referred to and ...
demonstratively
adverb see demonstrative I
demonstrativeness
noun see demonstrative I
demonstrator
noun Date: 1611 one that demonstrates: a. a product (as an automobile) used to demonstrate performance or merits to prospective buyers b. a person who engages in a public ...
demoralization
noun see demoralize
demoralize
transitive verb Date: circa 1793 1. to corrupt the morals of 2. a. to weaken the morale of ; discourage, dispirit b. to upset or destroy the normal functioning of ...
demoralizer
noun see demoralize
demoralizingly
adverb see demoralize
demos
noun Etymology: Greek dēmos — more at demagogue Date: 1806 1. populace 2. the common people of an ancient Greek state
Demosthenes
biographical name 384-322 B.C. Athenian orator & statesman • Demosthenic adjective
Demosthenic
adjective see Demosthenes
demote
transitive verb (demoted; demoting) Etymology: de- + -mote (as in promote) Date: circa 1891 1. to reduce to a lower grade or rank 2. to relegate to a less important ...
demotic
adjective Etymology: Greek dēmotikos, from dēmotēs commoner, from dēmos Date: 1822 1. of, relating to, or written in a simplified form of the ancient Egyptian hieratic ...
demotion
noun see demote
demount
transitive verb Date: circa 1930 1. to remove from a mounted position 2. disassemble • demountable adjective
demountable
adjective see demount
Dempsey
biographical name William Harrison 1895-1983 Jack American boxer
demulcent
I. adjective Etymology: Latin demulcent-, demulcens, present participle of demulcēre to soothe, from de- + mulcēre to soothe Date: 1732 soothing II. noun Date: 1732 a ...
demultiplexer
noun Date: 1963 an electronic device that separates a multiplex signal into its component parts
demur
I. intransitive verb (demurred; demurring) Etymology: Middle English demuren, demeren to linger, from Anglo-French demurer, demoerer, from Latin demorari, from de- + morari to ...
demure
adjective Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century 1. reserved, modest 2. affectedly modest, reserved, or serious ; coy • demurely adverb • demureness noun
demurely
adverb see demure
demureness
noun see demure
demurrage
noun Date: 1641 1. the detention of a ship by the freighter beyond the time allowed for loading, unloading, or sailing 2. a charge for detaining a ship, freight car, or truck
demurral
noun Date: 1810 the act or an instance of demurring
demurrer
I. noun Etymology: Anglo-French demourer, verb Date: circa 1521 1. a response in a court proceeding in which the defendant does not dispute the truth of the allegation but ...
demyelinating
adjective Date: 1939 causing or characterized by the loss or destruction of myelin • demyelination noun
demyelination
noun see demyelinating
demystification
noun see demystify
demystify
transitive verb Date: 1963 to eliminate the mystifying features of • demystification noun
demythologization
noun see demythologize
demythologize
transitive verb Date: 1950 1. to divest of mythological forms in order to uncover the meaning underlying them 2. to divest of mythical elements or associations • ...
demythologizer
noun see demythologize
Den
abbreviation Denmark
den
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English denn; akin to Old English denu valley, Old High German tenni threshing floor Date: before 12th century 1. the lair of a ...
Den Helder
geographical name commune W Netherlands in North Holland on an outlet from Waddenzee to North Sea population 61,149
den mother
noun Date: 1936 a female adult leader of a Cub Scout den; also a person seen in the role of leader or protector of a group
Denali
geographical name see McKinley, Mount
Denali, Denali National Park
geographical name — see McKinley (Mount)
denar
noun (plural denars; also denar or denari) Etymology: Macedonian, alteration of dinar dinar, ultimately from Arabic dīnār — more at dinar Date: 15th century — see money ...
denarius
noun (plural denarii) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin — more at denier Date: 14th century 1. a small silver coin of ancient Rome 2. a gold coin of the Roman Empire ...
denationalization
noun see denationalize
denationalize
transitive verb Date: 1807 1. to divest of national character or rights 2. to remove from ownership or control by the national government • denationalization noun
denaturalization
noun see denaturalize
denaturalize
transitive verb Date: 1800 1. to make unnatural 2. to deprive of the rights and duties of a citizen • denaturalization noun
denaturant
noun see denature
denaturation
noun see denature
denature
verb (denatured; denaturing) Date: 1685 transitive verb 1. dehumanize 2. to deprive of natural qualities ; change the nature of: as a. to make (alcohol) unfit for ...
denazification
noun see denazify
denazify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Date: 1940 to rid of Nazism and its influence • denazification noun
Denbigh
or Denbighshire geographical name administrative area of N Wales area 326 square miles (844 square kilometers)
Denbighshire
geographical name see Denbigh
Dendermonde
or French Termonde geographical name commune NW central Belgium population 42,499
dendr-
or dendro- combining form Etymology: Greek, from dendron; akin to Greek drys tree — more at tree tree ; resembling a tree
dendriform
adjective Date: circa 1847 treelike in form
dendrite
noun Date: 1751 1. a branching treelike figure produced on or in a mineral by a foreign mineral; also the mineral so marked 2. a crystallized arborescent form 3. any of ...
dendritic
adjective Date: 1816 resembling or having dendrites ; branching like a tree
dendritic cell
noun Date: 1934 any of various antigen-presenting cells with long irregular processes
dendro-
combining form see dendr-
dendrochronological
adjective see dendrochronology
dendrochronologically
adverb see dendrochronology
dendrochronologist
noun see dendrochronology
dendrochronology
noun Date: circa 1928 the science of dating events and variations in environment in former periods by comparative study of growth rings in trees and aged wood • ...
dendrogram
noun Date: circa 1953 a branching diagram representing a hierarchy of categories based on degree of similarity or number of shared characteristics especially in biological ...
dendroid
adjective Etymology: Greek dendroeidēs, from dendron Date: circa 1828 resembling a tree in form ; arborescent
dendrological
adjective see dendrology
dendrologist
noun see dendrology
dendrology
noun Date: circa 1708 the study of trees • dendrological adjective • dendrologist noun
dene
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English denu Date: before 12th century British valley
Déné
noun (plural Déné or Dénés) Etymology: Canadian French, of Athabascan origin; akin to Chipewyan & Slave (Athabascan languages of Canada) dene person Date: 1891 a member of ...
Deneb
noun Etymology: Arabic dhanab al-dajāja, literally, the tail of the hen Date: circa 1867 a star of the first magnitude in Cygnus
denegation
noun Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French denegation, from Latin denegation-, denegatio, from denegare to deny — more at deny Date: 15th century denial
denervate
transitive verb (-vated; -vating) Date: 1905 to deprive of a nerve supply • denervation noun
denervation
noun see denervate
Deng Xiaoping
biographical name — see Teng Hsiao-p'ing
dengue
noun Etymology: American Spanish Date: 1828 an acute infectious disease caused by a flavivirus (species Dengue virus of the genus Flavivirus), transmitted by aedes mosquitoes, ...
dengue fever
noun see dengue
deni
noun plural Etymology: Macedonian, probably alteration of denari, plural of denar denar Date: 1992 — see denar at money table
deniability
noun Date: 1973 the ability to deny something especially on the basis of being officially uninformed
deniable
adjective Date: 1548 capable of being denied
denial
noun Date: 1528 1. refusal to satisfy a request or desire 2. a. (1) refusal to admit the truth or reality (as of a statement or charge) (2) assertion that an ...
denier
I. noun Date: 15th century one who denies II. noun Etymology: Middle English denere, from Anglo-French dener, denier, from Latin denarius, coin worth ten asses, from ...
denigrate
transitive verb (-grated; -grating) Etymology: Latin denigratus, past participle of denigrare, from de- + nigrare to blacken, from nigr-, niger black Date: 1526 1. to attack ...
denigration
noun see denigrate
denigrative
adjective see denigrate
denigrator
noun see denigrate
denigratory
adjective see denigrate
Deniker
biographical name Joseph 1852-1918 French anthropologist
denim
noun Etymology: French (serge) de Nîmes serge of Nîmes, France Date: 1695 1. a. a firm durable twilled usually cotton fabric woven with colored warp and white filling ...
denimed
adjective see denim
Denis
or Denys biographical name Saint died 258? 1st bishop of Paris & patron saint of France
Denison
geographical name city NE Texas on Red River population 22,773
denitrification
noun Date: 1883 the loss or removal of nitrogen or nitrogen compounds; specifically reduction of nitrates or nitrites commonly by bacteria (as in soil) that usually results in ...
denitrifier
noun see denitrification
denitrify
transitive verb see denitrification
denizen
noun Etymology: Middle English denizeine, from Anglo-French denisein, denzein inhabitant, inner part, inner, from denz within, from Late Latin deintus, from Latin de- + intus ...
Denizli
geographical name city SW Turkey SE of Izmir population 204,118
Denmark
or Danish Danmark geographical name country N Europe occupying most of Jutland Peninsula & adjacent islands in Baltic & North seas; a kingdom capital Copenhagen area 16,629 ...
Denmark Strait
geographical name strait 130 miles (209 kilometers) wide between SE Greenland & Iceland connecting Arctic Ocean with the Atlantic
denominal
adjective Date: 1959 derived from a noun
denominate
transitive verb Etymology: Latin denominatus, past participle of denominare, from de- + nominare to name — more at nominate Date: circa 1552 1. to give a name to ; ...

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