Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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Dvina, Western
geographical name river 634 miles (1020 kilometers) Latvia, W Belarus, & W Russia in Europe rising in Valdai Hills & flowing W into Gulf of Riga
Dvinsk
geographical name — see Daugavpils
DVM
abbreviation doctor of veterinary medicine
Dvorak
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: August Dvorak died 1975 American educator Date: 1983 a typing keyboard with frequently used letters placed centrally — compare ...
Dvořák
biographical name Antonín 1841-1904 Bohemian composer
DW
abbreviation 1. deadweight 2. delayed weather 3. distilled water 4. dust wrapper
dwarf
I. noun (plural dwarfs; also dwarves) Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English dwerg, dwerf, from Old English dweorg, dweorh; akin to Old High German twerg dwarf ...
dwarfish
adjective see dwarf I
dwarfishly
adverb see dwarf I
dwarfishness
noun see dwarf I
dwarfism
noun Date: 1865 the condition of stunted growth
dwarflike
adjective see dwarf I
dwarfness
noun see dwarf I
dweeb
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1968 slang an unattractive, insignificant, or inept person • dweebish adjective, slang • dweeby adjective, slang
dweebish
adjective see dweeb
dweeby
adjective see dweeb
dwell
intransitive verb (dwelled or dwelt; dwelling) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English dwellan to go astray, hinder; akin to Old High German twellen to tarry Date: 13th ...
dweller
noun see dwell
dwelling
noun Date: 14th century a shelter (as a house) in which people live
DWI
noun Etymology: driving while intoxicated Date: 1969 DUI
Dwiggins
biographical name William Addison 1880-1956 American type designer
Dwight
I. biographical name Timothy 1752-1817 American clergyman; president Yale U. (1795-1817) II. biographical name Timothy 1828-1916 grandson of preceding American clergyman; ...
dwindle
verb (dwindled; dwindling) Etymology: probably frequentative of dwine to waste away, from Middle English, from Old English dwīnan; akin to Old Norse dvīna to pine away, deyja ...
dwt
abbreviation 1. deadweight ton 2. pennyweight
Dwyfor
biographical name Earl of — see Lloyd George
DX
noun Date: circa 1924 distance — used of long-distance radio transmission
dy
abbreviation 1. delivery 2. deputy 3. duty
Dy
symbol dysprosium
dy-
or dyo- combining form Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from dyo — more at two two
dyad
noun Etymology: Late Latin dyad-, dyas, from Greek, from dyo Date: 1675 1. pair; specifically two individuals (as husband and wife) maintaining a sociologically significant ...
dyadic
noun Date: 1884 a mathematical expression formed by addition or subtraction of dyads
dyadically
adverb see dyad
Dyak
variant of Dayak
dyarchy
also diarchy noun (plural -chies) Date: 1640 a government in which power is vested in two rulers or authorities
dybbuk
noun (plural dybbukim; also dybbuks) Etymology: Yiddish dibek, from Late Hebrew dibbūq Date: circa 1903 a wandering soul believed in Jewish folklore to enter and control a ...
Dyce
biographical name Alexander 1798-1869 Scottish editor
dye
I. noun Etymology: Middle English dehe, from Old English dēah, dēag Date: before 12th century 1. color from dyeing 2. a soluble or insoluble coloring matter II. ...
dyeability
noun see dye II
dyeable
adjective see dye II
dyed-in-the-wool
adjective Date: 1580 thoroughgoing, uncompromising
Dyer
I. biographical name John 1699-1757 British poet II. biographical name Mary died 1660 American Quaker martyr
dyer
noun see dye II
dyestuff
noun Date: 1685 dye 2
dyewood
noun Date: 1699 a wood (as logwood or fustic) from which coloring matter is extracted for dyeing
dying
present part of die
dyke
I. chiefly British variant of dike II. noun also dike Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1931 often disparaging lesbian • dykey adjective, often disparaging
dykey
adjective see dyke II
Dylan
biographical name Bob 1941- originally Robert Zimmerman American singer & songwriter
dynam
abbreviation dynamics
dynamic
I. adjective Etymology: French dynamique, from Greek dynamikos powerful, from dynamis power, from dynasthai to be able Date: 1827 1. (also dynamical) a. of or relating to ...
dynamic range
noun Date: 1917 the ratio of the strongest to the weakest sound intensity that can be transmitted or reproduced by an audio or broadcasting system
dynamical
adjective see dynamic I, 1
dynamically
adverb see dynamic I
dynamics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: circa 1789 1. a branch of mechanics that deals with forces and their relation primarily to the motion but sometimes ...
dynamism
noun Date: circa 1857 1. a. a theory that all phenomena (as matter or motion) can be explained as manifestations of force — compare mechanism b. dynamics 2 2. a ...
dynamist
noun see dynamism
dynamistic
adjective see dynamism
dynamite
I. noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary dynam- (from Greek dynamis power) + 1-ite Date: 1867 1. an explosive that is made of nitroglycerin absorbed in a porous ...
dynamiter
noun see dynamite II
dynamitic
adjective see dynamite I
dynamo
noun (plural -mos) Etymology: short for dynamoelectric machine Date: 1882 1. generator 3 2. a forceful energetic individual
dynamometer
noun Etymology: French dynamomètre, from Greek dynamis power + French -mètre -meter Date: 1810 1. an instrument for measuring mechanical force 2. an apparatus for ...
dynamometric
adjective see dynamometer
dynamometry
noun see dynamometer
dynamotor
noun Etymology: dynamo + motor Date: 1899 a motor generator combining the electric motor and generator
dynast
noun Etymology: Latin dynastes, from Greek dynastēs, from dynasthai to be able, have power Date: 1606 ruler 1
dynastic
adjective see dynasty
dynastically
adverb see dynasty
dynasty
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century 1. a succession of rulers of the same line of descent 2. a powerful group or family that maintains its position for a considerable ...
dynatron
noun Etymology: Greek dynamis power Date: 1918 a vacuum tube in which the secondary emission of electrons from the plate results in a decrease in the plate current as the ...
dyne
noun Etymology: French, from Greek dynamis Date: circa 1873 the unit of force in the centimeter-gram-second system equal to the force that would give a free mass of one gram ...
dynein
noun Etymology: dyne (force) + -in Date: 1965 an ATPase that is associated especially with microtubules involved in the movement of cellular organelles and structures (as ...
dynode
noun Etymology: Greek dynamis Date: 1939 an electrode in an electron tube that functions to produce secondary emission of electrons
dyo-
combining form see dy-
Dyrrachium
geographical name see Durres
dys-
prefix Etymology: Latin dys-, from Greek; akin to Old English tō-, te- apart, Sanskrit dus- bad, difficult 1. abnormal 2. difficult — compare eu- 3. impaired 4. ...
dysarthria
noun Etymology: New Latin, from dys- + arthr- + -ia Date: 1878 difficulty in articulating words due to disease of the central nervous system
dyscrasia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Medieval Latin, bad mixture of humors, from Greek dyskrasia, from dys- + krasis mixture, from kerannynai to mix — more at crater Date: 14th ...
dysenteric
adjective Date: 1727 of or relating to dysentery
dysentery
noun (plural -teries) Etymology: Middle English dissenterie, from Latin dysenteria, from Greek, from dys- + enteron intestine — more at inter- Date: 14th century 1. a ...
dysfunction
also disfunction noun Date: circa 1916 1. impaired or abnormal functioning 2. abnormal or unhealthy interpersonal behavior or interaction within a group • ...
dysfunctional
adjective see dysfunction
dysgenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1962 defective development especially of the gonads (as in Klinefelter's syndrome)
dysgenic
adjective Date: 1912 1. tending to promote survival of or reproduction by less well-adapted individuals (as the weak or diseased) especially at the expense of well-adapted ...
dyskinesia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek dyskinēsia difficulty in moving, from dys- + -kinesia, from kinēsis motion, from kinein to move — more at hight Date: circa 1706 ...
dyskinetic
adjective see dyskinesia
dyslexia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from dys- + Greek lexis word, speech, from legein to say — more at legend Date: circa 1888 a variable often familial learning disability involving ...
dyslexic
adjective or noun see dyslexia
dyslogistic
adjective Etymology: dys- + -logistic (as in eulogistic) Date: 1812 uncomplimentary • dyslogistically adverb
dyslogistically
adverb see dyslogistic
dysmenorrhea
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1810 painful menstruation • dysmenorrheic adjective
dysmenorrheic
adjective see dysmenorrhea
dysmenorrhoea
chiefly British variant of dysmenorrhea
dysmorphic
adjective Date: 1954 characterized by malformation
dyspepsia
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from dys- + pepsis digestion, from peptein, pessein to cook, digest — more at cook Date: circa 1706 1. indigestion 2. ill humor ; ...
dyspeptic
adjective or noun see dyspepsia
dyspeptically
adverb see dyspepsia
dysphagia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1783 difficulty in swallowing
dysphasia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1883 loss of or deficiency in the power to use or understand language as a result of injury to or disease of the brain • dysphasic ...
dysphasic
noun or adjective see dysphasia
dysphemism
noun Etymology: dys- + -phemism (as in euphemism) Date: 1884 the substitution of a disagreeable, offensive, or disparaging expression for an agreeable or inoffensive one; ...
dysphemistic
adjective see dysphemism
dysphonia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1706 defective use of the voice
dysphoria
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from dysphoros hard to bear, from dys- + pherein to bear — more at bear Date: circa 1842 a state of feeling unwell or unhappy • ...
dysphoric
adjective see dysphoria
dysplasia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1923 abnormal growth or development (as of organs or cells); broadly abnormal anatomical structure due to such growth • dysplastic ...
dysplastic
adjective see dysplasia
dyspnea
noun Etymology: Latin dyspnoea, from Greek dyspnoia, from dyspnoos short of breath, from dys- + pnein to breathe — more at sneeze Date: circa 1681 difficult or labored ...
dyspneic
adjective see dyspnea
dyspnoea
chiefly British variant of dyspnea
dysprosium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek dysprositos hard to get at, from dys- + prositos approachable, from prosienai to approach, from pros- + ienai to go — more at issue Date: ...
dysrhythmia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from dys- + Latin rhythmus rhythm Date: circa 1909 an abnormal rhythm; especially a disordered rhythm exhibited in a record of electrical activity ...
dysrhythmic
adjective see dysrhythmia
dysthymia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1844 a mood disorder characterized by chronic mildly depressed or irritable mood often accompanied by other symptoms (as eating and sleeping ...
dysthymic
adjective or noun see dysthymia
dysthymic disorder
noun see dysthymia
dystocia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek dystokia, from dys- + tokos childbirth; akin to Greek tiktein to give birth to — more at thane Date: circa 1706 slow or difficult labor ...
dystonia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1860 any of various conditions (as Parkinson's disease and torticollis) characterized by abnormalities of movement and muscle tone • ...
dystonic
adjective see dystonia
dystopia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from dys- + -topia (as in utopia) Date: circa 1950 1. an imaginary place where people lead dehumanized and often fearful lives 2. anti-utopia 2 ...
dystopian
adjective see dystopia
dystrophic
adjective Date: 1893 1. a. relating to or caused by faulty nutrition b. relating to or affected with a dystrophy 2. of a lake brownish with much dissolved humic ...
dystrophin
noun Etymology: dystrophy + 1-in Date: 1987 a protein that is associated with a transmembrane complex of skeletal muscle cells and that is absent in Duchenne muscular ...
dystrophy
noun (plural -phies) Etymology: New Latin dystrophia, from dys- + -trophia -trophy Date: 1901 1. a condition produced by faulty nutrition 2. any myogenic atrophy; especially ...
dysuria
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek dysouria, from dys- + -ouria -uria Date: 14th century difficult or painful discharge of urine — compare strangury
dz
abbreviation dozen
DZ
abbreviation drop zone
Dzaudzhikau
geographical name — see Vladikavkaz
Dzerzhinsk
geographical name city central Russia in Europe on Oka River W of Nizhniy Novgorod population 287,000
Dzungaria
or Dzungarian Basin geographical name — see Junggar
Dzungarian Basin
I. geographical name see Dzungaria II. geographical name see Junggar
E
abbreviation 1. electromotive force 2. energy 3. English 4. error 5. exponent
e
I. noun (plural e's or es) Usage: often capitalized, often attributive Date: before 12th century 1. a. the 5th letter of the English alphabet b. a graphic ...
E and OE
abbreviation errors and omissions excepted
E coli
noun (plural E coli) Date: 1926 an enterobacterium (Escherichia coli) that is used in public health as an indicator of fecal pollution (as of water or food) and in medicine and ...
e contrario
foreign term Etymology: Latin on the contrary
E layer
noun Date: 1933 a layer of the ionosphere occurring about 65 miles (110 kilometers) above the earth's surface during daylight hours that is capable of reflecting shortwave ...
e pluribus unum
foreign term Etymology: Latin one out of many — used on the Great Seal of the United States and on several United States coins
E region
noun Date: 1930 the part of the ionosphere occurring between about 55 and 80 miles (90 and 130 kilometers) above the surface of the earth and containing the daytime E layer ...
e'en
adverb Date: circa 1553 even
e'er
adverb Date: 13th century ever
e-
I. prefix Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, out, forth, away, from Latin, from ex- 1. missing ; absent 2. away II. combining form ...
e-book
noun Date: 1988 a book composed in or converted to digital format for display on a computer screen or handheld device
e-commerce
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1993 commerce conducted via the Internet
e-mail
noun Etymology: electronic Date: 1982 1. a means or system for transmitting messages electronically (as between computers on a network) 2. a. messages sent and ...
e-mailer
noun see e-mail
e-tail
noun Etymology: blend of e- and 2retail Date: 1995 retail business conducted online via the World Wide Web • e-tailer noun • e-tailing noun
e-tailer
noun see e-tail
e-tailing
noun see e-tail
e-zine
noun Etymology: 2e- + -zine (as in fanzine) Date: 1992 an electronic magazine (as on the World Wide Web)
ea
abbreviation each
each
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English ech, from Old English ǣlc; akin to Old High German iogilīh each; both from West Germanic *aiw- ever, always (whence Old English ā ...
each other
pronoun Date: before 12th century each of two or more in reciprocal action or relation Usage: Some handbooks and textbooks recommend that each other be restricted to ...
Eadmund II
biographical name see Edmund
Eads
biographical name James Buchanan 1820-1887 American engineer & inventor
Eadward
biographical name see Edward III
Eadwine
biographical name see Edwin
Eagan
geographical name city SE Minnesota population 63,557
eager
adjective Etymology: Middle English egre, from Anglo-French egre, aigre, from Latin acer — more at edge Date: 14th century 1. a. archaic sharp b. obsolete sour 2. ...
eager beaver
noun Date: 1943 a person who is extremely zealous about performing duties and volunteering for more
eagerly
adverb see eager
eagerness
noun see eager
eagle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English egle, from Anglo-French egle, aigle, from Latin aquila Date: 13th century 1. any of various large diurnal birds of prey (family ...
eagle eye
noun Date: 1598 1. the ability to see or observe keenly 2. one that sees or observes keenly 3. close watch • eagle-eyed adjective
Eagle Lake
geographical name lake 13 miles (21 kilometers) long N California ENE of Lassen Peak
eagle ray
noun Date: circa 1856 any of several widely distributed large active marine stingrays (family Myliobatidae) with broad pectoral fins
Eagle Scout
noun Date: 1913 1. a Boy Scout who has reached the highest level of achievement in scouting 2. a straight-arrow and self-reliant man
eagle-eyed
adjective see eagle eye
eaglet
noun Date: 1572 a young eagle
Eakins
biographical name Thomas 1844-1916 American artist
ealdorman
noun Etymology: Old English — more at alderman Date: before 12th century the chief officer in a district (as a shire) in Anglo-Saxon England
Ealing
geographical name borough of W Greater London, England population 263,600
Eames
trademark — used for chairs made from modern materials and designed to fit the contours of the body
EAN
abbreviation European Article Number
ear
I. noun Etymology: Middle English ere, from Old English ēare; akin to Old High German ōra ear, Latin auris, Greek ous Date: before 12th century 1. a. the characteristic ...
ear canal
noun Date: 1930 the tubular passage of the outer ear leading to the tympanic membrane
ear candy
noun Date: 1977 music that is pleasing to listen to but lacks depth
ear clip
noun Date: 1945 an earring with a clip fastener
ear pick
noun Date: 14th century a device often of precious metal for removing wax or foreign bodies from the ear
ear rot
noun Date: 1926 a condition of Indian corn that is characterized by molding and decay of the ears and that is caused by fungi (genera Diplodia, Fusarium, or Gibberella)
ear shell
noun Date: 1752 abalone
earache
noun Date: 1766 an ache or pain in the ear
earbud
noun Date: 1984 a small earphone inserted into the ear
eardrop
noun Date: 1720 earring; especially one with a pendant
eardrum
noun Date: 1645 tympanic membrane
eared
adjective Date: 14th century having ears especially of a specified kind or number
eared seal
noun Date: 1880 any of a family (Otariidae) of seals including the sea lions and fur seals and having independent mobile hind flippers and small well-developed external ears ...
earflap
noun Date: 1839 a warm covering for the ears; especially an extension on the lower edge of a cap that may be folded up or down
earful
noun Date: 1911 1. an outpouring of news or gossip 2. an outpouring of anger, abuse, or complaint
Earhart
biographical name Amelia 1897-1937 American aviator
earing
noun Etymology: perhaps from 1ear Date: 1626 a line used to fasten a corner of a sail to the yard or gaff or to haul a reef cringle to the yard
earl
noun Etymology: Middle English erl, from Old English eorl warrior, nobleman; akin to Old Norse jarl warrior, nobleman Date: 12th century a member of the British peerage ...
Earl Grey
noun Etymology: Charles Grey, 2d Earl Grey died 1845 English statesman Date: 1958 a black-tea blend flavored with bergamot oil
earl marshal
noun Date: 13th century an officer of state in England serving chiefly as a royal attendant on ceremonial occasions, as marshal of state processions, and as head of the College ...
earldom
noun see earl
earliness
noun see early II
earlobe
noun Date: 1851 the pendent part of the ear of humans or some domestic chickens
earlock
noun Date: circa 1775 a curl of hair hanging in front of the ear
Early
biographical name Jubal Anderson 1816-1894 American Confederate general
early
I. adverb (earlier; -est) Etymology: Middle English erly, from Old English ǣrlīce, from ǣr early, soon — more at ere Date: before 12th century 1. a. near the ...
Early American
noun Date: 1895 a style (as of furniture, architecture, or fabric) originating in or characteristic of colonial America
early bird
noun Etymology: from the proverb, “the early bird catches the worm” Date: circa 1922 1. an early riser 2. one that arrives early and especially before possible ...
early on
adverb Date: 1928 at or during an early point or stage Usage: This adverb is sometimes objected to in American writing as an obtrusive Briticism. It is a relative ...
earlywood
noun Date: circa 1914 springwood
earmark
I. noun Date: 15th century 1. a mark of identification on the ear of an animal 2. a distinguishing mark II. transitive verb Date: 1591 1. a. to mark (livestock) with ...
earmuff
noun Date: 1889 one of a pair of ear coverings connected by a flexible band and worn as protection against cold or noises
earn
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English ernen, from Old English earnian; akin to Old High German arnōn to reap, Czech jeseň autumn Date: before 12th century 1. a. ...
earned run
noun Date: 1880 a run in baseball that scores without benefit of an error before the fielding team has had a chance to make the third putout of the inning
earned run average
noun Date: 1947 the average number of earned runs per game scored against a pitcher in baseball determined by dividing the total of earned runs scored against him by the total ...
earner
noun see earn I
earnest
I. noun Etymology: Middle English ernest, from Old English eornost; akin to Old High German ernust earnest Date: before 12th century 1. a serious and intent mental state ...
earnestly
adverb see earnest II
earnestness
noun see earnest II
earnings
noun plural Date: 1594 1. something (as wages) earned 2. the balance of revenue after deduction of costs and expenses
Earp
biographical name Wyatt 1848-1929 American lawman
earphone
noun Date: 1924 a device that converts electrical energy into sound waves and is worn over or inserted into the ear
earpiece
noun Date: 1853 1. a part of an instrument (as a stethoscope or hearing aid) which is inserted into the outer opening of the ear; especially earphone 2. one of the two ...
earplug
noun Date: 1904 1. an ornament inserted in the lobe of the ear especially to distend it 2. a device of pliable material for insertion into the outer opening of the ear (as to ...
earring
noun Date: before 12th century an ornament for the ear and especially the earlobe
earshot
noun Date: 1607 the range within which one may hear a person's unaided voice
earsplitting
adjective Date: 1835 distressingly loud or shrill Synonyms: see loud
earth
I. noun Etymology: Middle English erthe, from Old English eorthe; akin to Old High German erda earth, Greek era Date: before 12th century 1. the fragmental material composing ...
earth color
noun Date: 1931 earth tone
earth mother
noun Usage: often capitalized E&M Date: 1902 1. the earth viewed (as in primitive theology) as the divine source of terrestrial life 2. an embodiment of the female ...
earth science
noun Date: 1939 any of the sciences (as geology, meteorology, or oceanography) that deal with the earth or with one or more of its parts — compare geoscience • earth ...
earth scientist
noun see earth science
earth station
noun Date: 1970 dish 3a(2); especially one used primarily for receiving and transmitting television signals
earth tone
noun Date: 1973 any of various rich colors containing some brown • earth-toned adjective
earth-shattering
adjective Date: 1970 earthshaking
earth-sheltered
adjective Date: 1979 built partly or mostly underground
earth-toned
adjective see earth tone
earthborn
adjective Date: 1621 1. born on this earth ; mortal 2. associated with earthly life
earthbound
adjective Date: 1605 1. a. fast in or to the soil b. located on or restricted to land or to the surface of the earth 2. a. bound by earthly interests b. ...
earthen
adjective Date: 13th century 1. made of earth 2. earthly
earthenware
noun Date: 1646 ceramic ware made of slightly porous opaque clay fired at low heat
earthily
adverb Date: 1953 in an earthy manner
earthiness
noun see earthy
earthlight
noun Date: 1833 earthshine
earthlike
adjective see earth I
earthliness
noun see earthly
earthling
noun Date: 1593 1. an inhabitant of the earth 2. worldling
earthly
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. a. characteristic of or belonging to this earth b. relating to the human race's actual life on this earth 2. possible • ...
earthmover
noun Date: 1941 a machine (as a bulldozer) for excavating, pushing, or transporting large quantities of earth (as in road building) • earthmoving noun or adjective
earthmoving
noun or adjective see earthmover
earthquake
noun Date: 14th century 1. a shaking or trembling of the earth that is volcanic or tectonic in origin 2. upheaval 2
earthrise
noun Date: 1968 the rising of the earth above the horizon of the moon as seen from lunar orbit
earthshaking
adjective Date: 1948 of great importance ; momentous • earthshakingly adverb
earthshakingly
adverb see earthshaking
earthshine
noun Date: 1834 sunlight reflected by the earth that illuminates the dark part of the moon — called also earthlight
earthstar
noun Date: 1885 any of a genus (Geastrum) of globose basidiomycetous fungi with an outer peridium that splits into the shape of a star
earthward
also earthwards adverb Date: 14th century toward the earth
earthwards
adverb see earthward
earthwork
noun Date: 1633 1. an embankment or other construction made of earth; especially one used as a field fortification 2. the operations connected with excavations and ...
earthworm
noun Date: 14th century a terrestrial annelid worm (class Oligochaeta); especially any of a family (Lumbricidae) of numerous widely distributed hermaphroditic worms that move ...
earthy
adjective (earthier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. a. of, relating to, or consisting of earth b. suggestive of earth (as in texture, odor, or color) c. rough, ...
earwax
noun Date: 14th century the yellow waxy secretion from the glands of the external ear — called also cerumen
earwig
I. noun Etymology: Middle English erwigge, from Old English ēarwicga, from ēare ear + wicga insect Date: before 12th century any of numerous insects (order Dermaptera) ...
earwitness
noun Date: 1594 one who overhears something; especially one who gives a report on what has been heard
ease
I. noun Etymology: Middle English ese, from Anglo-French eise, aise convenience, comfort, ultimately from Latin adjacent-, adjacens neighboring — more at adjacent Date: 13th ...
easeful
adjective see ease I
easefully
adverb see ease I
easel
noun Etymology: Dutch ezel, literally, ass, from Middle Dutch esel; akin to Old English esol ass; both from a prehistoric East Germanic-West Germanic word borrowed from Latin ...
easement
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or means of easing or relieving (as from discomfort) 2. an interest in land owned by another that entitles its holder to a specific limited ...
easily
adverb Date: 13th century 1. in an easy manner ; without difficulty 2. a. without question ; by far
easiness
noun see easy I

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