Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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ectomorph
noun Etymology: ectoderm + -morph Date: 1940 an ectomorphic individual
ectomorphic
adjective Etymology: ectoderm + -morphic; from the predominance in such types of structures developed from the ectoderm Date: 1940 1. of or relating to the component in W. H. ...
ectoparasite
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1861 a parasite that lives on the exterior of its host • ectoparasitic adjective
ectoparasitic
adjective see ectoparasite
ectopic
adjective Etymology: Greek ektopos out of place, from ex- out + topos place Date: 1873 occurring in an abnormal position or in an unusual manner or form • ectopically ...
ectopic pregnancy
noun Date: 1895 development of a fertilized egg elsewhere than in the uterus (as in a fallopian tube or in the peritoneal cavity)
ectopically
adverb see ectopic
ectoplasm
noun Date: 1883 1. the outer relatively rigid granule-free layer of the cytoplasm usually held to be a gel reversibly convertible to a sol 2. a substance held to produce ...
ectoplasmic
adjective see ectoplasm
ectotherm
noun Date: 1940 a cold-blooded animal ; poikilotherm • ectothermic adjective
ectothermic
adjective see ectotherm
ectotrophic
adjective Date: circa 1889 of a mycorrhiza growing in a close web on the surface of the associated root — compare endotrophic
ecu
I. noun (plural ecus) Etymology: Middle French, literally, shield, from Old French escu, from Latin scutum; from the device of a shield on the coin — more at esquire Date: ...
Ecua
abbreviation Ecuador
Ecuador
geographical name country W South America bordering on the Pacific; a republic capital Quito area 109,483 square miles (283,561 square kilometers), population 10,985,000 • ...
Ecuadoran
adjective or noun see Ecuador
Ecuadorean
adjective or noun see Ecuador
Ecuadorian
adjective or noun see Ecuador
ecumenical
adjective Etymology: Late Latin oecumenicus, from Late Greek oikoumenikos, from Greek oikoumenē the inhabited world, from feminine of oikoumenos, present passive participle of ...
ecumenical patriarch
noun Usage: often capitalized E&P Date: 1862 the patriarch of Constantinople as the dignitary given first honor in the Eastern Orthodox Church
ecumenicalism
noun Date: 1888 ecumenism
ecumenically
adverb see ecumenical
ecumenicism
noun Date: 1961 ecumenism • ecumenicist noun
ecumenicist
noun see ecumenicism
ecumenicity
noun Date: 1840 the quality or state of being drawn close to others especially through Christian ecumenism
ecumenics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: circa 1945 the study of the nature, mission, problems, and strategy of the Christian church from the perspective of its ...
ecumenism
noun Date: 1948 ecumenical principles and practices especially as shown among religious groups (as Christian denominations) • ecumenist noun
ecumenist
noun see ecumenism
eczema
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek ekzema, from ekzein to erupt, from ex- out + zein to boil — more at ex-, yeast Date: circa 1753 an inflammatory condition of the skin ...
eczematous
adjective see eczema
ED
abbreviation erectile dysfunction
ed
I. noun Date: 1954 education
edacious
adjective Etymology: Latin edac-, edax, from edere to eat — more at eat Date: circa 1798 1. archaic of or relating to eating 2. voracious • edacity noun
edacity
noun see edacious
Edam
I. noun Etymology: Edam, Netherlands Date: 1836 a yellow pressed cheese of Dutch origin usually made in flattened balls and often coated with red wax II. geographical name ...
edaphic
adjective Etymology: Greek edaphos bottom, ground Date: circa 1900 1. of or relating to the soil 2. resulting from or influenced by the soil rather than the climate — ...
edaphic climax
noun Date: 1926 an ecological climax resulting from soil factors and commonly persisting through cycles of climatic and physiographic change — compare climatic climax
edaphically
adverb see edaphic
EDB
abbreviation ethylene dibromide
EdD
abbreviation doctor of education
EDD
abbreviation English Dialect Dictionary
Eddic
adjective Etymology: Old Norse Edda, a 13th century collection of mythological, heroic, and aphoristic poetry Date: 1868 of, relating to, or resembling the Old Norse Edda
Eddington
biographical name Sir Arthur Stanley 1882-1944 English astronomer
Eddy
biographical name Mary (Morse) 1821-1910 née Baker American founder of the Christian Science Church
eddy
I. noun (plural eddies) Etymology: Middle English (Scots) ydy, probably from Old Norse itha Date: 15th century 1. a. a current of water or air running contrary to the main ...
eddy current
noun Date: 1886 an electric current induced by an alternating magnetic field
Ede
geographical name 1. commune E Netherlands NW of Arnhem population 96,044 2. city SW Nigeria NE of Ibadan population 271,000
edelweiss
noun Etymology: German, from edel noble + weiss white Date: 1862 a small alpine perennial composite herb (Leontopodium alpinum) of central and southeast Europe that has a ...
edema
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek oidēma swelling, from oidein to swell; akin to Armenian aytnu- swell, Old English ātor poison Date: 15th century 1. an abnormal ...
edematous
adjective see edema
Eden
I. noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Hebrew ‘Ēdhen Date: before 12th century 1. paradise 2 2. the garden where according to the account in Genesis Adam and Eve first ...
Eden Prairie
geographical name village SE central Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis population 54,901
Edenic
adjective see Eden I
edentate
I. adjective Etymology: Latin edentatus, past participle of edentare to make toothless, from e- + dent-, dens tooth — more at tooth Date: 1828 1. lacking teeth 2. being ...
edentulous
adjective Etymology: Latin edentulus, from e- + dent-, dens Date: 1782 toothless
Edessa
geographical name — see Urfa
Edgar
noun Etymology: Edgar Allan Poe, regarded as father of the detective story Date: 1947 a statuette awarded annually by a professional organization for notable achievement in ...
edge
I. noun Etymology: Middle English egge, from Old English ecg; akin to Latin acer sharp, Greek akmē point Date: before 12th century 1. a. the cutting side of a blade
edge city
noun Date: 1988 a suburb that has developed its own political, economic, and commercial base independent of the central city
edge effect
noun Date: 1933 the effect of an abrupt transition between two quite different adjoining ecological communities on the numbers and kinds of organisms in the marginal habitat
edge in
transitive verb Date: 1683 to work in ; interpolate
edge tool
noun Date: 14th century a tool with a sharp cutting edge
edge-grain
or edge-grained adjective Date: 1906 quartersawn
edge-grained
adjective see edge-grain
edged
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. having a specified kind of edge, boundary, or border or a specified number of edges 2. sharp, cutting
edgeless
adjective see edge I
edger
noun Date: 1591 one that edges; especially a tool used to trim the edge of a lawn along a sidewalk or curb
edgeways
adverb Date: 1566 chiefly British sideways
edgewise
adverb Date: 1677 1. sideways 2. as if by an edge ; barely — usually used in the phrase get a word in edgewise
Edgeworth
biographical name Maria 1767-1849 British novelist
edgily
adverb see edgy
edginess
noun see edgy
edging
noun Date: 1558 something that forms an edge or border
edgy
adjective (edgier; -est) Date: 1775 1. having an edge ; sharp 2. a. being on edge ; tense, irritable b. characterized by tension 3. having a bold, provocative, or ...
edh
also eth noun Etymology: Icelandic eth Date: 1875 the letter ð used in Old English to represent either of the fricatives \th\ or \ṯẖ\ and in Icelandic and some phonetic ...
Ediacara
adjective see Ediacaran
Ediacaran
also Ediacara adjective Etymology: Ediacara Hills, South Australia Date: 1966 being or belonging to an assemblage of extinct multicellular marine organisms of the late ...
edibility
noun see edible
edible
adjective Etymology: Late Latin edibilis, from Latin edere to eat — more at eat Date: 1594 fit to be eaten ; eatable • edibility noun • edible noun • edibleness ...
edibleness
noun see edible
edict
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin edictum, from neuter of edictus, past participle of edicere to decree, from e- + dicere to say — more at diction Date: 14th ...
edictal
adjective see edict
edification
noun Date: 14th century an act or process of edifying
edifice
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin aedificium, from aedificare Date: 14th century 1. building; especially a large or massive structure 2. a ...
edify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French edifier, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin aedificare to instruct or improve spiritually, from ...
Edina
geographical name village SE Minnesota SW of Minneapolis population 47,425
Edinburg
geographical name city S Texas NW of Brownsville population 48,465
Edinburgh
I. biographical name Duke of — see Philip II. geographical name 1. (or Scottish Gaelic Dunedin) city capital of Scotland constituting an administrative area on Firth of ...
Edinburghshire
geographical name see Edinburgh II, 2
Edirne
or formerly Adrianople geographical name city Turkey in Europe on the Maritsa population 102,345
Edison
biographical name Thomas Alva 1847-1931 American inventor • Edisonian adjective
Edisonian
adjective see Edison
Edisto
geographical name river 150 miles (241 kilometers) S South Carolina flowing SE into the Atlantic
edit
I. transitive verb Etymology: back-formation from editor Date: 1791 1. a. to prepare (as literary material) for publication or public presentation b. to assemble (as a ...
editable
adjective see edit I
Edith Cavell, Mount
geographical name mountain 11,033 feet (3363 meters) Canada in SW Alberta in Jasper National Park
editio princeps
noun (plural editiones principes) Etymology: New Latin, literally, first edition Date: 1802 the first printed edition especially of a work that circulated in manuscript ...
edition
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Latin edition-, editio publication, edition, from edere to bring forth, publish, from e- + -dere to put or -dere (from dare to give) — more ...
editor
noun Date: 1649 1. someone who edits especially as an occupation 2. a device used in editing motion-picture film or magnetic tape 3. a computer program that permits the ...
editor in chief
noun Date: 1873 an editor who heads an editorial staff
editorial
I. adjective Date: 1744 1. of or relating to an editor or editing 2. being or resembling an editorial • editorially adverb II. noun Date: 1830 a newspaper or ...
editorialist
noun Date: 1901 a writer of editorials
editorialization
noun see editorialize
editorialize
intransitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1856 1. to express an opinion in the form of an editorial 2. to introduce opinion into the reporting of facts 3. to express an ...
editorializer
noun see editorialize
editorially
adverb see editorial I
editorship
noun see editor
editress
noun Date: 1799 a woman who is an editor
editrix
noun (plural editrixes or editrices) Date: 1950 editress
EdM
abbreviation master of education
Edmond
geographical name city central Oklahoma N of Oklahoma City population 68,315
Edmonds
geographical name city W Washington N of Seattle population 39,515
Edmonton
geographical name 1. city Canada capital of Alberta on the North Saskatchewan population 666,104 2. former municipal borough SE England in Middlesex, now part of Enfield ...
Edmontonian
noun see Edmonton
Edmund
or Eadmund II biographical name circa 993-1016 Ironside king of the English (1016)
Edo
geographical name — see Tokyo
Edom
or Idumaea or Idumea geographical name ancient country SW Asia S of Judea & the Dead Sea
Edomite
noun Etymology: Edom (Esau), ancestor of the Edomites Date: 1534 a member of a Semitic people living south of the Dead Sea in biblical times
EDP
abbreviation electronic data processing
EdS
abbreviation specialist in education
EDT
abbreviation eastern daylight time
EDTA
noun Etymology: ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid Date: 1951 a white crystalline acid C10H16N2O8 used especially as a chelating agent, a preservative, and in medicine as an ...
edu
abbreviation educational institution — usually preceded by a period; used in World Wide Web addresses
educ
abbreviation education; educational
educability
noun see educable
educable
adjective Date: 1845 capable of being educated; specifically capable of some degree of learning • educability noun
educate
verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Middle English, to rear, from Latin educatus, past participle of educare to rear, educate, from educere to lead forth — more at educe Date: ...
educated
adjective Date: 1588 1. having an education; especially having an education beyond the average 2. a. giving evidence of training or practice ; skilled b. ...
educatedness
noun see educated
education
noun Date: 1531 1. a. the action or process of educating or of being educated; also a stage of such a process b. the knowledge and development resulting from an ...
educational
adjective see education
educational psychologist
noun see educational psychology
educational psychology
noun Date: 1911 psychology concerned with human maturation, school learning, teaching methods, guidance, and evaluation of aptitude and progress by standardized tests • ...
educational television
noun Date: 1951 1. television that provides instruction especially for students 2. public television
educationalist
noun see educationist
educationally
adverb see education
educationese
noun Date: 1954 the jargon used especially by educational theorists
educationist
also educationalist noun Date: 1829 1. chiefly British a professional educator 2. an educational theorist
educative
adjective Date: 1844 1. tending to educate ; instructive 2. of or relating to education
educator
noun Date: 1673 1. one skilled in teaching ; teacher 2. a. a student of the theory and practice of education ; educationist 2 b. an administrator in education
educe
transitive verb (educed; educing) Etymology: Latin educere to draw out, from e- + ducere to lead — more at tow Date: 1603 1. to bring out (as something latent) 2. deduce ...
educible
adjective see educe
eduction
noun see educe
eductor
noun Etymology: Late Latin, one that leads out, from Latin educere Date: 1796 ejector 2
edutainment
noun Etymology: education + entertainment Date: 1973 entertainment (as by games, films, or shows) that is designed to be educational
Edward
I. biographical name name of 8 post-Norman English {British} kings: I 1239-1307 (reigned 1272-1307); II 1284-1327 (reigned 1307-27); III 1312-1377 (reigned 1327-77); IV ...
Edward, Lake
geographical name lake E Africa SW of Lake Albert on boundary between NE Democratic Republic of the Congo & SW Uganda area 830 square miles (2158 square kilometers)
Edwardean
adjective see Edwards
Edwardian
adjective Date: 1908 of, relating to, or characteristic of Edward VII of England or his age; especially of clothing marked by the hourglass silhouette for women and long ...
Edwards
biographical name Jonathan 1703-1758 American theologian • Edwardean adjective
Edwards Plateau
geographical name highland 2000-5000 feet (610-1524 meters) SW Texas
Edwin
or Eadwine biographical name 585?-633 king of Northumbria (616-633)
EE
abbreviation electrical engineer
EEC
abbreviation European Economic Community
EEG
abbreviation electroencephalogram; electroencephalograph
eek
interjection Date: 1951 — used to express surprise or dismay
eel
noun Etymology: Middle English ele, from Old English ǣl; akin to Old High German āl eel Date: before 12th century 1. a. any of numerous voracious elongate snakelike ...
eelgrass
noun Date: 1790 1. a submerged long-leaved monocotyledonous marine plant (Zostera marina) that is found especially in coastal temperate waters and whose dried stems and ...
eellike
adjective see eel
eelpout
noun Date: before 12th century 1. any of various elongate tapered marine fishes (family Zoarcidae) usually living on the bottom of cold seas 2. burbot
eelworm
noun Date: 1888 a nematode worm; especially any of various small free-living or plant-parasitic roundworms
eely
adjective see eel
EENT
abbreviation eye, ear, nose, and throat
EEO
abbreviation equal employment opportunity
EEOC
abbreviation Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
EEPROM
abbreviation electronically erasable programmable read-only memory
eerie
also eery adjective (eerier; -est) Etymology: Middle English (northern dialect) eri Date: 14th century 1. chiefly Scottish affected with fright ; scared 2. so mysterious, ...
eerily
adverb see eerie
eeriness
noun see eerie
eery
adjective see eerie
EEZ
abbreviation exclusive economic zone
ef
noun Date: before 12th century the letter f
Efate
or French Vaté geographical name island SW Pacific in central Vanuatu; chief town Port-Vila (capital of Vanuatu) area 353 square miles (914 square kilometers), population ...
eff
abbreviation efficiency
efface
transitive verb (effaced; effacing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French esfacer, effacer, from e- + face face Date: 15th century 1. to eliminate or make indistinct ...
effaceable
adjective see efface
effacement
noun see efface
effacer
noun see efface
effect
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin effectus, from efficere to bring about, from ex- + facere to make, do — more at do ...
effective
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. producing a decided, decisive, or desired effect b. impressive, striking 2. ready for service or action 3. actual 4. ...
effectively
adverb Date: circa 1536 1. in effect ; virtually 2. in an effective manner
effectiveness
noun see effective I
effectivity
noun see effective I
effector
noun Date: 1906 1. a bodily organ (as a gland or muscle) that becomes active in response to stimulation 2. a molecule (as an inducer or a corepressor) that activates, ...
effectual
adjective Date: 14th century producing or able to produce a desired effect Synonyms: see effective • effectuality noun • effectualness noun
effectuality
noun see effectual
effectually
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in an effectual manner 2. with great effect ; completely
effectualness
noun see effectual
effectuate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1580 effect 2 • effectuation noun
effectuation
noun see effectuate
effeminacy
noun Date: 1602 the quality of being effeminate
effeminate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin effeminatus, from past participle of effeminare to make effeminate, from ex- + femina woman — more at feminine Date: 15th ...
effendi
noun Etymology: Turkish efendi master, from Modern Greek aphentēs, alteration of Greek authentēs — more at authentic Date: 1614 a man of property, authority, or education ...
efferent
adjective Etymology: French efférent, from Latin efferent-, efferens, present participle of efferre to carry outward, from ex- + ferre to carry — more at bear Date: 1856 ...
efferently
adverb see efferent
effervesce
intransitive verb (-vesced; -vescing) Etymology: Latin effervescere, from ex- + fervescere to begin to boil, inchoative of fervēre to boil — more at brew Date: 1784 1. to ...
effervescence
noun see effervesce
effervescent
adjective see effervesce
effervescently
adverb see effervesce
effete
adjective Etymology: Latin effetus, from ex- + fetus fruitful — more at feminine Date: 1660 1. no longer fertile 2. a. having lost character, vitality, or strength ...
effetely
adverb see effete
effeteness
noun see effete
efficacious
adjective Etymology: Latin efficac-, efficax, from efficere Date: 1528 having the power to produce a desired effect Synonyms: see effective • efficaciously adverb • ...
efficaciously
adverb see efficacious
efficaciousness
noun see efficacious
efficacity
noun Date: 15th century efficacy
efficacy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 13th century the power to produce an effect
efficiency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1633 1. the quality or degree of being efficient 2. a. efficient operation b. (1) effective operation as measured by a comparison of ...
efficiency apartment
noun Date: 1930 a small usually furnished apartment with minimal kitchen and bath facilities
efficiency engineer
noun see efficiency expert
efficiency expert
noun Date: 1913 one who analyzes methods, procedures, and jobs in order to secure maximum efficiency — called also efficiency engineer
efficient
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin efficient-, efficiens, from present participle of efficere Date: 14th century 1. ...
efficiently
adverb see efficient
effigy
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: Middle French effigie, from Latin effigies, from effingere to form, from ex- + fingere to shape — more at dough Date: 1539 an image or ...
Effigy Mounds National Monument
geographical name site NE Iowa on Mississippi River NW of Dubuque including prehistoric mounds
effloresce
intransitive verb (-resced; -rescing) Etymology: Latin efflorescere, from ex- + florescere to begin to blossom — more at florescence Date: 1775 1. to burst forth ; bloom ...
efflorescence
noun Date: 1626 1. a. the action or process of developing and unfolding as if coming into flower ; blossoming b. an instance of such development c. fullness of ...
efflorescent
adjective see efflorescence
effluence
noun Date: 1603 1. something that flows out 2. an action or process of flowing out
effluent
I. adjective Etymology: Latin effluent-, effluens, present participle of effluere to flow out, from ex- + fluere to flow — more at fluid Date: 1726 flowing out ; emanating, ...
effluvia
noun see effluvium
effluvium
also effluvia noun (plural -via; also -viums) Etymology: Latin effluvium act of flowing out, from effluere Date: 1651 1. an invisible emanation; especially an offensive ...
efflux
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin effluxus, from effluere Date: 1647 1. something given off in or as if in a stream 2. a. effluence 2 b. a passing away ; expiration • ...
effluxion
noun see efflux
effort
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Old French esforz, esfort, from esforcier to force, from ex- + forcier to force Date: 15th century 1. conscious exertion of power ; hard ...
effortful
adjective Date: circa 1895 showing or requiring effort • effortfully adverb • effortfulness noun
effortfully
adverb see effortful
effortfulness
noun see effortful
effortless
adjective Date: 1801 showing or requiring little or no effort Synonyms: see easy • effortlessly adverb • effortlessness noun
effortlessly
adverb see effortless
effortlessness
noun see effortless
effrontery
noun (plural -teries) Etymology: French effronterie, ultimately from Medieval Latin effront-, effrons shameless, from Latin ex- + front-, frons forehead Date: 1697 shameless ...
effulgence
noun Etymology: Late Latin effulgentia, from Latin effulgent-, effulgens, present participle of effulgēre to shine forth, from ex- + fulgēre to shine — more at fulgent ...
effulgent
adjective see effulgence
effuse
I. verb (effused; effusing) Etymology: Latin effusus, past participle of effundere, from ex- + fundere to pour — more at found Date: 1526 transitive verb to pour out (a ...
effusion
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act of effusing 2. unrestrained expression of words or feelings 3. a. (1) the escape of a fluid from anatomical vessels by rupture ...
effusive
adjective Date: 1662 1. marked by the expression of great or excessive emotion or enthusiasm 2. archaic pouring freely 3. characterized or formed by a nonexplosive ...
effusively
adverb see effusive
effusiveness
noun see effusive
Efik
noun Date: 1849 1. a member of a people of southeastern Nigeria 2. the language of the Efik people
eft
noun Etymology: Middle English evete, ewte, from Old English efete Date: before 12th century newt; especially the terrestrial phase of a predominantly aquatic newt
EFT
or EFTS abbreviation electronic funds transfer (system)
EFTS
abbreviation see EFT
eftsoons
adverb Etymology: Middle English eftsones, alteration of Old English eftsōna, from Old English eft after + sōna soon; akin to Old English æfter after Date: before 12th ...
eg
abbreviation Etymology: Latin exempli gratia for example
Eg
abbreviation Egypt; Egyptian
egad
or egads interjection Etymology: probably euphemism for oh God Date: 1673 — used as a mild oath
Egadi Islands
or ancient Aegates Islands geographical name islands Italy off W coast of Sicily area 15 square miles (39 square kilometers), population 4335
egads
interjection see egad
egal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin aequalis Date: 14th century obsolete equal
egalitarian
adjective Etymology: French égalitaire, from égalité equality, from Latin aequalitat-, aequalitas, from aequalis equal Date: 1885 asserting, promoting, or marked by ...
egalitarianism
noun Date: 1905 1. a belief in human equality especially with respect to social, political, and economic rights and privileges 2. a social philosophy advocating the removal ...
égalité
noun Etymology: French Date: 1794 social or political equality
Egas Moniz
biographical name António Caetano de Abreu Freire 1874-1955 Portuguese neurologist & politician
Egbert
biographical name died 839 king of the West Saxons (802-839) & 1st king of the English (828-839)
Eger
or Czechoslovakian Ohře geographical name river 193 miles (311 kilometers) E Germany & NW Czech Republic flowing NE into the Elbe
Egeria
noun Etymology: Latin, a nymph who advised the legendary Roman king Numa Pompilius Date: 1621 a woman who is an adviser or a companion
egest
transitive verb see egestion
egesta
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, neuter plural of egestus Date: 1727 egested material
egestion
noun Etymology: Middle English egestioun, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French egestion, from Latin egestion-, egestio, from egerere to carry outside, discharge, from e- + ...
egestive
adjective see egestion
EGF
abbreviation epidermal growth factor
egg
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse eggja; akin to Old English ecg edge — more at edge Date: 13th century to incite to action — usually used with ...
egg and dart
noun Date: circa 1864 a carved ornamental design in relief consisting of an egg-shaped figure alternating with a figure somewhat like an elongated javelin or arrowhead
egg capsule
noun see egg case

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