Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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denominate number
noun Etymology: Latin denominatus Date: 1579 a number (as 7 in 7 feet) that specifies a quantity in terms of a unit of measurement
denomination
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act of denominating 2. a value or size of a series of values or sizes (as of money) 3. name, designation; especially a general name for a ...
denominational
adjective see denomination
denominationalism
noun Date: circa 1855 1. devotion to denominational principles or interests 2. the emphasizing of denominational differences to the point of being narrowly exclusive ; ...
denominationally
adverb see denomination
denominative
adjective Etymology: Latin de from + nomin-, nomen name Date: circa 1783 derived from a noun or adjective • denominative noun
denominator
noun Date: circa 1542 1. the part of a fraction that is below the line and that functions as the divisor of the numerator 2. a. a shared trait b. the average level ...
denotation
noun Date: circa 1532 1. an act or process of denoting 2. meaning; especially a direct specific meaning as distinct from an implied or associated idea 3. a. a denoting ...
denotative
adjective Date: circa 1611 1. denoting or tending to denote 2. relating to denotation
denote
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French denoter, from Latin denotare, from de- + notare to note Date: 1562 1. to serve as an indication of ; betoken 2. to serve as an ...
denotement
noun see denote
denouement
also dénouement noun Etymology: French dénouement, literally, untying, from Middle French desnouement, from desnouer to untie, from Old French desnoer, from des- de- + noer to ...
dénouement
noun see denouement
denounce
transitive verb (denounced; denouncing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French denuncier to proclaim, from Latin denuntiare, from de- + nuntiare to report — more at ...
denouncement
noun see denounce
denouncer
noun see denounce
dense
adjective (denser; densest) Etymology: Latin densus; akin to Greek dasys thick with hair or leaves Date: 15th century 1. a. marked by compactness or crowding together of ...
densely
adverb see dense
denseness
noun see dense
densification
noun see densify
densify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Date: 1820 to make denser ; compress • densification noun
densitometer
noun Date: 1901 an instrument for determining optical, photographic, or mass density • densitometric adjective • densitometry noun
densitometric
adjective see densitometer
densitometry
noun see densitometer
density
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1598 1. the quality or state of being dense 2. the quantity per unit volume, unit area, or unit length: as a. the mass of a substance per unit ...
density function
noun Date: circa 1960 probability density function
Dent
biographical name Joseph Malaby 1849-1926 English publisher
dent
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, short for indenten to make dents in, indent Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to make a dent in
Dent Blanche
geographical name mountain 14,295 feet (4357 meters) S Switzerland in Pennine Alps
dent corn
noun Date: 1852 an Indian corn having kernels that contain both hard and soft starch and that become indented at maturity
Dent du Midi
geographical name mountain 10,686 feet (3257 meters) SW Switzerland in W Alps
dent-
or denti- or dento- combining form Etymology: Middle English denti-, from Latin, from dent-, dens tooth — more at tooth tooth ; teeth
dental
I. adjective Etymology: Latin dentalis, from dent-, dens Date: 1594 1. of or relating to the teeth or dentistry 2. articulated with the tip or blade of the tongue against ...
dental floss
noun Date: 1910 a thread used to clean between the teeth
dental hygienist
noun Date: 1916 a licensed dental professional who cleans and examines teeth
dental technician
noun Date: 1946 one who makes dental appliances
dentalium
noun (plural dentalia) Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Latin dentalis Date: 1847 any of a genus (Dentalium) of widely distributed tooth shells; broadly tooth shell
dentally
adverb see dental I
dentate
adjective Etymology: Latin dentatus, from dent-, dens Date: 1760 having teeth or pointed conical projections
denti-
combining form see dent-
denticle
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin denticulus, diminutive of dent-, dens Date: 14th century a conical pointed projection (as a small tooth)
denticulate
or denticulated adjective Date: 1661 1. finely dentate or serrate 2. cut into dentils • denticulation noun
denticulated
adjective see denticulate
denticulation
noun see denticulate
dentiform
adjective Date: 1708 shaped like a tooth
dentifrice
noun Etymology: Middle English dentifricie, from Latin dentifricium, from denti- + fricare to rub — more at friction Date: 15th century a powder, paste, or liquid for ...
dentil
noun Etymology: obsolete French dentille, from Middle French, diminutive of dent Date: 1663 one of a series of small projecting rectangular blocks forming a molding especially ...
dentiled
adjective see dentil
dentin
or dentine noun Date: circa 1845 a calcareous material similar to but harder and denser than bone that composes the principal mass of a tooth — see tooth illustration • ...
dentinal
adjective see dentin
dentine
noun see dentin
dentist
noun Etymology: French dentiste, from dent Date: 1752 one who is skilled in and licensed to practice the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diseases, injuries, and ...
dentistry
noun Date: 1838 the art or profession of a dentist
dentition
noun Etymology: Latin dentition-, dentitio, from dentire to cut teeth, from dent-, dens Date: 1615 1. the development and cutting of teeth 2. the character of a set of teeth ...
dento-
combining form see dent-
Denton
geographical name city N Texas NW of Dallas population 80,537
dentulous
adjective Etymology: back-formation from edentulous Date: 1926 having teeth
denture
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from dent Date: 1842 1. a set of teeth 2. an artificial replacement for one or more teeth; especially a set of false teeth
denturist
noun Date: 1964 a dental technician who makes, fits, and repairs dentures directly for the public
denuclearization
noun see denuclearize
denuclearize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1958 to remove nuclear arms from ; prohibit the use of nuclear arms in • denuclearization noun
denudation
noun see denude
denude
transitive verb (denuded; denuding) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin denudare, from de- + nudus bare — more at naked Date: 15th century 1. to deprive of something ...
denudement
noun see denude
denumerability
noun see denumerable
denumerable
adjective Date: 1902 countable • denumerability noun • denumerably adverb
denumerably
adverb see denumerable
denunciation
noun Date: 1548 an act of denouncing; especially a public condemnation • denunciative adjective • denunciatory adjective
denunciative
adjective see denunciation
denunciatory
adjective see denunciation
Denver
geographical name city NE central Colorado, its capital population 554,636 • Denverite noun
Denver boot
noun Etymology: Denver, Colo. Date: 1968 a metal clamp that is locked onto one of the wheels of an automobile to immobilize it especially until its owner pays accumulated ...
Denver omelet
noun Date: 1954 western omelet
Denver sandwich
noun Date: 1925 western sandwich
Denverite
noun see Denver
deny
transitive verb (denied; denying) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French deneier, denier, from Latin denegare, from de- + negare to deny — more at negate Date: 14th ...
denyingly
adverb see deny
Denys
biographical name see Denis
Deo favente
foreign term Etymology: Latin with God's favor
Deo gratias
foreign term Etymology: Latin thanks (be) to God
Deo volente
Etymology: Latin Date: 1763 God being willing
deoch an doris
Scottish & Irish variant of doch-an-dorris
deodar
also deodara noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu devadār, deodār, from Sanskrit devadāru, literally, timber of the gods, from deva god + dāru wood — more at deity, tree Date: ...
deodara
noun see deodar
deodorant
noun Date: 1869 a preparation that destroys or masks unpleasant odors • deodorant adjective
deodorization
noun see deodorize
deodorize
transitive verb Date: 1856 1. to eliminate or prevent the offensive odor of 2. to make (something unpleasant or reprehensible) more acceptable • deodorization noun • ...
deodorizer
noun see deodorize
deontic
adjective Etymology: Greek deont-, deon that which is obligatory, from neuter of present participle of dein to lack, be needful — more at deuter- Date: 1951 of or relating ...
deontological
adjective see deontology
deontologist
noun see deontology
deontology
noun Date: 1826 the theory or study of moral obligation • deontological adjective • deontologist noun
deoxidation
noun see deoxidize
deoxidize
transitive verb Date: 1794 to remove especially elemental oxygen from • deoxidation noun • deoxidizer noun
deoxidizer
noun see deoxidize
deoxy
also desoxy adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1931 containing less oxygen in the molecule than the compound from which it is derived — usually ...
deoxygenate
transitive verb Date: 1799 to remove especially molecular oxygen from • deoxygenation noun
deoxygenated
adjective Date: 1799 having the hemoglobin in the reduced state
deoxygenation
noun see deoxygenate
deoxyribonuclease
noun Date: 1946 DNase
deoxyribonucleic acid
noun Etymology: deoxyribose + nucleic acid Date: 1938 DNA
deoxyribonucleotide
noun Date: 1958 a nucleotide that contains deoxyribose and is a constituent of DNA
deoxyribose
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1938 a pentose sugar C5H10O4 that is a structural element of DNA
dep
abbreviation 1. depart; departure 2. department 3. deponent 4. deposed 5. deposit 6. depot 7. deputy
depart
verb Etymology: Middle English, to divide, part company, from Anglo-French departir, from de- + partir to divide, from Latin partire, from part-, pars part Date: 13th century ...
departed
adjective Date: 14th century 1. bygone 2. having died especially recently Synonyms: see dead
departee
noun Date: 1943 a person who is departing or who has departed
department
noun Etymology: French département, from Old French, act of dividing, from departir Date: 1735 1. a. a distinct sphere ; province
department store
noun Date: 1887 a store having separate sections for a wide variety of goods
departmental
adjective see department
departmentalization
noun see departmentalize
departmentalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: circa 1895 to divide into departments • departmentalization noun
departmentally
adverb see department
departure
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. (1) the act or an instance of departing (2) archaic death b. a setting out (as on a new course) 2. divergence 2
depauperate
adjective Etymology: Middle English depauperat, from Medieval Latin depauperatus, past participle of depauperare to impoverish, from Latin de- + pauperare to impoverish, from ...
depend
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French dependre, modification of Latin dependēre, from de- + pendēre to hang — more at pendant Date: 15th century 1. ...
dependability
noun see dependable
dependable
adjective Date: 1735 capable of being depended on ; reliable • dependability noun • dependableness noun • dependably adverb
dependableness
noun see dependable
dependably
adverb see dependable
dependance
noun see dependence
dependant
noun see dependent II
dependence
also dependance noun Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being dependent; especially the quality or state of being influenced or determined by or subject to another ...
dependency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1594 1. dependence 1 2. something that is dependent on something else; especially a territorial unit under the jurisdiction of a nation but not ...
dependent
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English dependant, from Anglo-French, present participle of dependre Date: 14th century 1. hanging down 2. a. determined or conditioned by ...
dependent variable
noun Date: circa 1852 a mathematical variable whose value is determined by that of one or more other variables in a function
dependently
adverb see dependent I
depersonalization
noun Date: 1906 1. a. an act or process of depersonalizing b. the quality or state of being depersonalized 2. a psychopathological syndrome characterized by loss of ...
depersonalize
transitive verb Date: 1866 1. to deprive of the sense of personal identity 2. to make impersonal
Depew
biographical name Chauncey Mitchell 1834-1928 American lawyer & politician
dephosphorylate
transitive verb see dephosphorylation
dephosphorylation
noun Date: 1931 the process of removing phosphate groups from an organic compound (as ATP) by hydrolysis; also the resulting state • dephosphorylate transitive verb
depict
transitive verb Etymology: Latin depictus, past participle of depingere, from de- + pingere to paint — more at paint Date: 15th century 1. to represent by or as if by a ...
depicter
noun see depict
depiction
noun see depict
depigmentation
noun Date: 1889 loss of normal pigmentation
depilate
transitive verb see depilation
depilation
noun Etymology: Middle French or Medieval Latin; Middle French, from Medieval Latin depilation-, depilatio, from Latin depilare, from de- + pilus hair — more at pile Date: ...
depilatory
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1606 an agent for removing hair, wool, or bristles • depilatory adjective
deplane
intransitive verb Date: 1923 to disembark from an airplane
depletable
adjective see deplete
deplete
transitive verb (depleted; depleting) Etymology: Latin depletus, past participle of deplēre, from de- + plēre to fill — more at full Date: 1807 1. to empty of a principal ...
depleter
noun see deplete
depletion
noun see deplete
depletive
adjective see deplete
deplorable
adjective Date: 1612 1. lamentable 2. deserving censure or contempt ; wretched • deplorableness noun • deplorably adverb
deplorableness
noun see deplorable
deplorably
adverb see deplorable
deplore
transitive verb (deplored; deploring) Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French deplorer, from Latin deplorare, from de- + plorare to wail Date: 1559 1. a. to feel ...
deplorer
noun see deplore
deploringly
adverb see deplore
deploy
verb Etymology: French déployer, literally, to unfold, from Old French desploier, from des- dis- + ploier, plier to fold — more at ply Date: 1616 transitive verb 1. ...
deployable
adjective see deploy
deployment
noun see deploy
depolarization
noun see depolarize
depolarize
transitive verb Date: 1818 1. to cause to become partially or wholly unpolarized 2. to prevent or remove polarization of (as a dry cell or cell membrane) • ...
depolarizer
noun see depolarize
depoliticization
noun see depoliticize
depoliticize
transitive verb Date: 1937 to remove the political character of ; take out of the realm of politics • depoliticization noun
depolymerization
noun see depolymerize
depolymerize
verb Date: circa 1909 transitive verb to decompose (macromolecules) into simpler compounds (as monomers) intransitive verb to undergo decomposition into simpler ...
depone
verb (deponed; deponing) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin deponere, from Latin, to put down, from de- + ponere to put — more at position Date: 15th century ...
deponent
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin deponent-, deponens, from Latin, present participle of deponere Date: 15th century occurring with passive or middle voice forms but with ...
depopulate
transitive verb Etymology: Latin depopulatus, past participle of depopulari, from de- + populari to ravage Date: 1548 1. obsolete ravage 2. to reduce greatly the population ...
depopulation
noun see depopulate
deport
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French deporter, from Latin deportare to carry away, from de- + portare to carry — more at fare Date: 1598 1. to behave or comport ...
deportable
adjective Date: 1891 1. punishable by deportation 2. subject to deportation
deportation
noun Date: 1595 1. an act or instance of deporting 2. the removal from a country of an alien whose presence is unlawful or prejudicial
deportee
noun Date: 1865 one who has been deported or is under sentence of deportation
deportment
noun Date: 1601 the manner in which one conducts oneself ; behavior Synonyms: see bearing
deposal
noun Date: 14th century an act of deposing from office
depose
verb (deposed; deposing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French deposer, from Late Latin deponere (perfect indicative deposui), from Latin, to put down Date: 14th century ...
deposit
I. verb (deposited; depositing) Etymology: Latin depositus, past participle of deponere Date: 1624 transitive verb 1. to place especially for safekeeping or as a pledge; ...
depositary
noun (plural -taries) Date: 1605 1. a person to whom something is entrusted 2. depository 2
deposition
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act of removing from a position of authority 2. a. a testifying especially before a court b. declaration; specifically testimony taken ...
depositional
adjective see deposition
depositor
noun see deposit I
depository
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1656 1. depositary 1 2. a place where something is deposited especially for safekeeping
depository library
noun Date: circa 1930 a library designated to receive United States government publications
depot
noun Etymology: French dépôt, from Middle French depost, from Medieval Latin depositum, from Latin, neuter of depositus Date: 1795 1. a. a place for storing goods or ...
depr
abbreviation 1. depreciation 2. depression
depravation
noun see deprave
deprave
transitive verb (depraved; depraving) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French depraver, from Latin depravare to pervert, from de- + pravus crooked, bad Date: 14th century ...
depraved
adjective Date: 14th century marked by corruption or evil; especially perverted • depravedly adverb • depravedness noun
depravedly
adverb see depraved
depravedness
noun see depraved
depravement
noun see deprave
depraver
noun see deprave
depravity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1641 1. a corrupt act or practice 2. the quality or state of being depraved
deprecate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Latin deprecatus, past participle of deprecari to avert by prayer, from de- + precari to pray — more at pray Date: 1628 1. a. ...
deprecatingly
adverb see deprecate
deprecation
noun see deprecate
deprecatorily
adverb see deprecatory
deprecatory
adjective Date: 1586 1. seeking to avert disapproval ; apologetic 2. serving to deprecate ; disapproving • deprecatorily adverb
depreciable
adjective see depreciate
depreciate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin depretiatus, past participle of depretiare, from Latin de- + pretium price — more at price Date: 15th century ...
depreciatingly
adverb see depreciate
depreciation
noun see depreciate
depreciative
adjective see depreciate
depreciator
noun see depreciate
depreciatory
adjective see depreciate
depredate
verb (-dated; -dating) Etymology: Late Latin depraedatus, past participle of depraedari, from Latin de- + praedari to plunder — more at prey Date: 1626 transitive verb to ...
depredation
noun see depredate
depredator
noun see depredate
depredatory
adjective see depredate
deprenyl
noun Etymology: perhaps from International Scientific Vocabulary dimethyl + propionic acid + phenyl + ethyl Date: 1975 a monoamine oxidase inhibitor C13H17N used especially to ...
depress
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French depresser, from Latin depressus, past participle of deprimere to press down, from de- + premere to press — more at ...
depressant
noun Date: 1876 one that depresses; specifically an agent that reduces a bodily functional activity or an instinctive desire (as appetite) • depressant adjective
depressed
adjective Date: 1598 1. low in spirits ; sad; especially affected by psychological depression 2. a. vertically flattened b. having the central part lower than the ...
depressible
adjective see depress
depressing
adjective Date: 1629 that depresses; especially causing emotional depression • depressingly adverb
depressingly
adverb see depressing
depression
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the angular distance of a celestial object below the horizon b. the size of an angle of depression 2. an act of depressing or a state of ...
Depression glass
noun Etymology: Great Depression of 1929 to circa 1939 Date: 1971 tinted glassware machine-produced during the 1930s
depressive
I. adjective Date: 1620 1. tending to depress 2. of, relating to, marked by, or affected by psychological depression • depressively adverb II. noun Date: 1937 one ...
depressively
adverb see depressive I
depressor
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Latin deprimere Date: 1611 one that depresses: as a. a muscle that draws down a part — compare levator b. a device for pressing down ...
depressurization
noun see depressurize
depressurize
transitive verb Date: 1944 to release pressure from • depressurization noun
deprivation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the state of being deprived ; privation; especially removal from an office, dignity, or benefice 2. an act or instance of depriving ; loss
deprive
transitive verb (deprived; depriving) Etymology: Middle English depriven, from Anglo-French depriver, from Medieval Latin deprivare, from Latin de- + privare to deprive — more ...
deprived
adjective Date: circa 1552 marked by deprivation especially of the necessities of life or of healthful environmental influences
deprogram
transitive verb Date: 1973 to dissuade or try to dissuade from strongly held convictions (as religious beliefs) or a firmly established or innate behavior • deprogrammer ...
deprogrammer
noun see deprogram
dept
abbreviation department
Deptford
geographical name former metropolitan borough SE London, England, now part of Lewisham
depth
noun (plural depths) Etymology: Middle English, from dep deep Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) a deep place in a body of water (2) a part that is far from the outside ...
depth bomb
noun see depth charge
depth charge
noun Date: 1917 an antisubmarine weapon that consists essentially of a drum filled with explosives which is dropped near a target and descends to a predetermined depth where it ...
depth of field
Date: 1911 the range of distances of the object in front of an image-forming device (as a camera lens) measured along the axis of the device throughout which the image has ...
depth perception
noun Date: circa 1911 the ability to judge the distance of objects and the spatial relationship of objects at different distances
depth psychology
noun Date: 1924 psychoanalysis; also psychology concerned especially with the unconscious mind
depthless
adjective see depth
deputation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of appointing a deputy 2. a group of people appointed to represent others
depute
transitive verb (deputed; deputing) Etymology: Middle English, to appoint, from Anglo-French deputer, from Late Latin deputare to assign, from Latin, to consider (as), from de- + ...
deputization
noun see deputize
deputize
verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: circa 1736 transitive verb to appoint as deputy intransitive verb to act as deputy • deputization noun
deputy
noun (plural -ties) Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French deputé, past participle of deputer Date: 15th century 1. a. a person appointed ...
der
or deriv abbreviation derivation; derivative
der Geist der stets verneint
foreign term Etymology: German the spirit that ever denies — applied originally to Mephistopheles
deracinate
transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Middle French desraciner, from des- de- + racine root, from Late Latin radicina, from Latin radic-, radix — more at root Date: ...
deracination
noun see deracinate
derail
verb Etymology: French dérailler to throw off the track, from dé- de- + rail, from English Date: 1850 transitive verb 1. to cause to run off the rails 2. a. to ...
derailleur
noun Etymology: French dérailleur, from dérailler Date: 1930 a mechanism for shifting gears on a bicycle that operates by moving the chain from one set of exposed gears to ...
derailment
noun see derail
Derain
biographical name André 1880-1954 French painter
derange
transitive verb (deranged; deranging) Etymology: French déranger, from Old French desrengier, from des- de- + reng line, row — more at rank Date: 1769 1. to disturb the ...
derangement
noun see derange
derate
transitive verb Date: 1947 to lower the rated capability of (as electrical or mechanical apparatus) because of deterioration or inadequacy
Derbe
geographical name ancient town S Asia Minor in S Lycaonia on border of Cilicia; exact site unknown
Derbend
geographical name see Derbent
Derbent
or Derbend geographical name city S Russia in Europe in Dagestan on Caspian Sea population 81,500
derby
noun (plural derbies) Etymology: Edward Stanley died 1834, 12th earl of Derby Date: 1796 1. any of several horse races held annually and usually restricted to ...
Derby
geographical name city N central England in Derbyshire population 214,000
Derbys
abbreviation Derbyshire
Derbyshire
or Derby geographical name county N central England capital Matlock area 1052 square miles (2725 square kilometers), population 914,600
derealization
noun Date: 1942 a feeling of altered reality (as that occurring in schizophrenia or in some drug reactions) in which one's surroundings appear unreal or unfamiliar
deregulate
transitive verb see deregulation
deregulation
noun Date: 1963 the act or process of removing restrictions and regulations • deregulate transitive verb
derelict
I. adjective Etymology: Latin derelictus, past participle of derelinquere to abandon, from de- + relinquere to leave — more at relinquish Date: 1649 1. abandoned especially ...
dereliction
noun Date: 1597 1. a. an intentional abandonment b. the state of being abandoned 2. a recession of water leaving permanently dry land 3. a. intentional or ...
derepress
transitive verb Date: 1960 to activate (a gene or enzyme) by releasing from a blocked state • derepression noun
derepression
noun see derepress
deride
transitive verb (derided; deriding) Etymology: Latin deridēre, from de- + ridēre to laugh Date: circa 1526 1. to laugh at contemptuously 2. to subject to usually bitter or ...
derider
noun see deride

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