Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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deridingly
adverb see deride
derision
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Late Latin derision-, derisio, from Latin deridēre Date: 14th century 1. a. the use of ridicule or scorn to show ...
derisive
adjective Date: circa 1662 expressing or causing derision • derisively adverb • derisiveness noun
derisively
adverb see derisive
derisiveness
noun see derisive
derisory
adjective Date: 1618 1. expressing derision ; derisive 2. worthy of derision; especially laughably small
deriv
abbreviation see der
derivable
adjective Date: 1653 capable of being derived
derivate
noun Date: 1660 derivative
derivation
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. (1) the formation of a word from another word or base (as by the addition of a usually noninflectional affix) (2) an act of ...
derivational
adjective see derivation
derivative
I. noun Date: 15th century 1. a word formed by derivation 2. something derived 3. the limit of the ratio of the change in a function to the corresponding change in its ...
derivatively
adverb see derivative II
derivativeness
noun see derivative II
derivatization
noun Date: 1967 the conversion of a chemical compound into a derivative (as for identification) • derivatize transitive verb
derivatize
transitive verb see derivatization
derive
verb (derived; deriving) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French deriver, from Latin derivare, literally, to draw off (water), from de- + rivus stream — more at run Date: ...
derived
adjective Date: 1969 being, possessing, or marked by a character (as the large brain in humans) not present in the ancestral form
deriver
noun see derive
derm
abbreviation dermatologist; dermatology
derm-
or derma- or dermo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek derm-, dermo-, from derma, from derein to skin — more at tear skin
derma-
combining form see derm-
dermabrasion
noun Date: circa 1954 surgical removal of skin blemishes or imperfections (as scars or tattoos) by abrasion (as with sandpaper or wire brushes)
dermal
adjective Date: circa 1803 1. of or relating to skin and especially to the dermis ; cutaneous 2. epidermal
dermat-
or dermato- combining form Etymology: Greek, from dermat-, derma skin
dermatitis
noun (plural dermatitides or dermatitises) Date: 1876 inflammation of the skin
dermato-
combining form see dermat-
dermatoglyphic
adjective see dermatoglyphics
dermatoglyphics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: dermat- + Greek glyphein to carve + English -ics — more at cleave Date: 1926 1. skin patterns; especially ...
dermatologic
adjective see dermatology
dermatological
adjective see dermatology
dermatologist
noun see dermatology
dermatology
noun Date: 1819 a branch of medicine dealing with the skin, its structure, functions, and diseases • dermatologic or dermatological adjective • dermatologist noun
dermatomal
adjective see dermatome
dermatome
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary dermat- + -ome Date: 1910 the lateral wall of a somite from which the dermis is produced • dermatomal adjective
dermatomyositis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1899 an inflammatory disease of skin and muscle marked especially by muscular weakness and skin rash
dermatophyte
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1882 a fungus parasitic on the skin or skin derivatives (as hair or nails)
dermatosis
noun (plural dermatoses) Date: 1864 a disease of the skin
dermestid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek dermēstēs, a leather-eating worm, literally, skin eater, from derm- + edmenai to eat — more at eat Date: circa 1888 any of a family ...
dermis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin -dermis Date: circa 1830 the sensitive vascular inner mesodermic layer of the skin — called also corium, cutis — see hair ...
dermo-
combining form see derm-
dermoid
noun see dermoid cyst
dermoid cyst
noun Date: 1872 a cystic tumor often of the ovary that contains skin and skin derivatives (as hair or teeth) — called also dermoid
Derna
geographical name — see Darnah
dernier cri
noun Etymology: French, literally, last cry Date: 1896 the newest fashion
derogate
verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin derogatus, past participle of derogare, from Latin, to annul (a law), detract, from de- + rogare to ask, propose ...
derogation
noun see derogate
derogative
adjective see derogate
derogatorily
adverb see derogatory
derogatory
adjective Date: circa 1503 1. detracting from the character or standing of something — often used with to, towards, or of 2. expressive of a low opinion ; disparaging ...
derrick
noun Etymology: obsolete derrick hangman, gallows, from Derick, name of 17th century English hangman Date: circa 1752 1. a hoisting apparatus employing a tackle rigged at the ...
Derrida
biographical name Jacques 1930- French philosopher & critic • Derridean also Derridian adjective
Derridean
adjective see Derrida
Derridian
adjective see Derrida
derriere
or derrière noun Etymology: French derrière, from Old French derrier back part, rear, from derier, adverb, behind, from Late Latin deretro, from Latin de from + retro back ...
derrière
noun see derriere
derring-do
noun Etymology: Middle English dorring don daring to do, from dorring (gerund of dorren to dare) + don to do Date: 1579 daring action ; daring
derringer
noun Etymology: Henry Deringer died 1869 American inventor Date: 1853 a short-barreled pocket pistol
derris
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek, skin, from derein to skin — more at tear Date: 1919 1. a preparation chiefly of ground derris roots used as an ...
Derry
geographical name 1. city SE New Hampshire SE of Manchester population 34,021 2. (or Londonderry) district NW Northern Ireland, established 1974 area 148 square miles (383 ...
dervish
noun Etymology: Turkish derviş, literally, beggar, from Persian darvīsh Date: 1585 1. a member of a Muslim religious order noted for devotional exercises (as bodily ...
Derwent
geographical name river more than 105 miles (170 kilometers) Australia in Tasmania flowing SE into Tasman Sea
Derwent Water
geographical name lake NW England in Lake District in Cumbria
Derzhavin
biographical name Gavrila Romanovich 1743-1816 Russian poet
DES
noun Date: 1970 diethylstilbestrol
Des Moines
geographical name 1. river 327 miles (526 kilometers) Iowa flowing SE into Mississippi River 2. city capital of Iowa on Des Moines River population 198,682 3. city W ...
Des Plaines
geographical name 1. river 150 miles (241 kilometers) NE Illinois flowing S to unite with Kankakee River forming Illinois River 2. city NE Illinois NW of Chicago population ...
Des Prez
biographical name Josquin — see Josquin des Prez
des-
prefix Etymology: French dés-, from Old French des- — more at de- de- 6 — especially before vowels
desacralization
noun see desacralize
desacralize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1911 to divest of sacred qualities or status • desacralization noun
Desaguadero
geographical name — see Salado
Desai
biographical name Morarji Ranchhodji 1896-1995 prime minister of India (1977-79)
Desaix de Veygoux
biographical name Louis-Charles-Antoine 1768-1800 French general
desalinate
transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Date: 1949 desalt • desalination noun • desalinator noun
desalination
noun see desalinate
desalinator
noun see desalinate
desalinization
noun see desalinize
desalinize
transitive verb (-nized; -nizing) Date: 1934 desalt • desalinization noun
desalt
transitive verb Date: circa 1904 to remove salt from • desalter noun
desalter
noun see desalt
desanctification
noun see desanctify
desanctify
transitive verb Date: 1956 desacralize • desanctification noun
Desargues
biographical name Gérard or Girard 1591-1661 French mathematician
descant
I. noun also discant Etymology: Middle English dyscant, from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French descaunt, from Medieval Latin discantus, from Latin dis- + cantus song ...
Descartes
biographical name René 1596-1650 L. Renatus Cartesius French mathematician & philosopher
descend
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French descendre, from Latin descendere, from de- + scandere to climb — more at scan Date: 13th century intransitive verb 1. to ...
descendant
I. adjective also descendent Etymology: Middle English dessendaunte, from Anglo-French descendant, from Latin descendent-, descendens, present participle of descendere Date: ...
descendent
I. adjective see descendant I II. noun see descendant II
descender
noun Date: 1802 the part of a lowercase letter (as p) that descends below the main body of the letter; also a letter that has such a part
descendible
adjective see descend
descension
noun Date: 15th century archaic descent 2
descent
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French descente, from Anglo-French descendre Date: 14th century 1. a. derivation from an ancestor ; birth, lineage b. ...
Deschanel
biographical name Paul-Eugène-Louis 1855-1922 French statesman; president of France (1920)
Deschutes
geographical name river 250 miles (402 kilometers) central & N Oregon E of Cascade Range flowing N into Columbia River
descramble
transitive verb Date: 1957 unscramble 2 • descrambler noun
descrambler
noun see descramble
describable
adjective see describe
describe
transitive verb (described; describing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin describere, from de- + scribere to write — more at scribe Date: 15th century 1. to represent or ...
describer
noun see describe
description
noun Etymology: Middle English descripcioun, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin description-, descriptio, from describere Date: 14th century 1. a. an act ...
descriptive
adjective Date: 1723 1. serving to describe 2. a. referring to, constituting, or grounded in matters of observation or experience b. factually grounded or ...
descriptively
adverb see descriptive
descriptiveness
noun see descriptive
descriptor
noun Date: 1933 something (as a word or characteristic feature) that serves to describe or identify; especially a word or phrase (as an index term) used to identify an item ...
descry
I. transitive verb (descried; descrying) Etymology: Middle English descrien to proclaim, reveal, from Anglo-French *descrier, alteration of Old French decrier — more at decry ...
Desdemona
noun Date: circa 1605 the wife of Othello in Shakespeare's Othello
desecrate
transitive verb (-crated; -crating) Etymology: de- + -secrate (as in consecrate) Date: 1675 1. to violate the sanctity of ; profane 2. to treat disrespectfully, ...
desecrater
noun see desecrate
desecration
noun Date: circa 1717 an act or instance of desecrating ; the state of being desecrated
desecrator
noun see desecrate
desegregate
verb Date: 1944 transitive verb to eliminate segregation in; specifically to free of any law, provision, or practice requiring isolation of the members of a particular race ...
desegregation
noun Date: 1951 1. the action or an instance of desegregating 2. the state of being desegregated
deselect
transitive verb Date: 1965 dismiss, reject
desensitization
noun see desensitize
desensitize
transitive verb Date: 1898 1. to make (a sensitized or hypersensitive individual) insensitive or nonreactive to a sensitizing agent 2. to make emotionally insensitive or ...
desensitizer
noun see desensitize
Deseret
geographical name provisional state of the United States S of 42d parallel & W of the Rockies organized 1849 by Mormons
desert
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin desertum, from Latin, neuter of desertus, past participle of deserere to desert, from de- + serere to join ...
desert locust
noun Date: 1944 a destructive migratory locust (Schistocerca gregaria) of southwestern Asia and parts of northern Africa
desert soil
noun Date: circa 1938 a soil that develops under sparse shrub vegetation in warm to cool arid climates with a light-colored surface soil usually underlain by calcareous ...
desert tortoise
noun Date: 1933 a large burrowing land tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) of arid regions of the southwestern United States and adjacent Mexico
desert varnish
noun Date: circa 1898 a dark coating which is found on rocks after long exposure in desert regions and whose color is due to iron and manganese oxides
deserter
noun see desert IV
desertic
adjective see desert I
desertification
noun Date: 1974 the process of becoming desert (as from land mismanagement or climate change) • desertify transitive verb
desertify
transitive verb see desertification
desertion
noun Date: 1591 1. an act of deserting; especially the abandonment without consent or legal justification of a person, post, or relationship and the associated duties and ...
desertlike
adjective see desert I
deserve
verb (deserved; deserving) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French deservir, from Latin deservire to devote oneself to, from de- + servire to serve Date: 13th century ...
deserved
adjective Date: circa 1552 of, relating to, or being that which one deserves • deservedly adverb • deservedness noun
deservedly
adverb see deserved
deservedness
noun see deserved
deserver
noun see deserve
deserving
I. noun Date: 14th century desert, merit II. adjective Date: 1549 meritorious, worthy; especially meriting financial aid
desex
transitive verb Date: 1911 1. castrate, spay 2. to eliminate perceived sexism from 3. desexualize 2
desexualization
noun see desexualize
desexualize
transitive verb Date: 1894 1. to deprive of sexual characters or power 2. to divest of sexual quality • desexualization noun
deshabille
variant of dishabille
desiccant
noun Date: 1676 a drying agent (as calcium chloride)
desiccate
verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Latin desiccatus, past participle of desiccare to dry up, from de- + siccare to dry, from siccus dry — more at sack Date: 1575 transitive ...
desiccation
noun see desiccate
desiccative
adjective see desiccate
desiccator
noun see desiccate
desiderate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin desideratus, past participle of desiderare to desire — more at desire Date: 1645 to entertain or express a wish to have or ...
desideration
noun see desiderate
desiderative
adjective see desiderate
desideratum
noun (plural desiderata) Etymology: Latin, neuter of desideratus Date: 1652 something desired as essential
design
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, to outline, indicate, mean, from Anglo-French & Medieval Latin; Anglo-French designer to designate, from Medieval Latin designare, from Latin, ...
designate
I. adjective Etymology: Latin designatus, past participle of designare Date: 1629 chosen but not yet installed II. transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Date: 1639 1. to ...
designated driver
noun Date: 1982 a person chosen to abstain from intoxicants (as alcohol) so as to transport others safely who are not abstaining
designated hitter
noun Date: 1973 1. a baseball player designated at the start of the game to bat in place of the pitcher without causing the pitcher to be removed from the game 2. ...
designation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of indicating or identifying 2. appointment to or selection for an office, post, or service 3. a distinguishing name, sign, or title 4. ...
designative
adjective see designate II
designator
noun see designate II
designatory
adjective see designate II
designedly
adverb see design I
designee
noun Date: 1925 one that is designated
designer
I. noun Date: 1662 one that designs: as a. one who creates and often executes plans for a project or structure b. one that creates and manufactures a new product ...
designer drug
noun Date: 1983 a synthetic version of a controlled substance (as heroin) that is produced with a slightly altered molecular structure to avoid having it classified as an ...
designing
adjective Date: 1653 1. practicing forethought 2. crafty, scheming
designment
noun Date: 1583 obsolete plan, purpose
desipere in loco
foreign term Etymology: Latin to indulge in trifling at the proper time
desipramine
noun Etymology: desmethyl (from des- + methyl) + imipramine Date: 1965 a tricyclic antidepressant C18H22N2
desirability
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1824 1. plural desirable conditions 2. the quality, fact, or degree of being desirable
desirable
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. having pleasing qualities or properties ; attractive 2. worth seeking or doing as advantageous, beneficial, or wise ; advisable • ...
desirableness
noun see desirable I
desirably
adverb see desirable I
desire
I. verb (desired; desiring) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French desirer, from Latin desiderare, from de- + sider-, sidus heavenly body Date: 13th century transitive ...
desirous
adjective Date: 14th century impelled or governed by desire • desirously adverb • desirousness noun
desirously
adverb see desirous
desirousness
noun see desirous
desist
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French desister, from Latin desistere, from de- + sistere to stand, stop; akin to Latin stare to stand — more at stand ...
desistance
noun see desist
desk
noun Etymology: Middle English deske, from Medieval Latin desca, modification of Old Italian desco table, from Latin discus dish, disc — more at dish Date: 14th century 1. ...
desk jockey
noun Date: 1980 a person whose job involves working at a desk
deskbound
adjective Date: 1944 restricted to work at a desk
deskman
noun Date: 1913 a person who works at a desk; specifically a newspaperman who processes news and prepares copy
desktop
I. noun Date: 1925 1. the top of a desk; also an area or window on a computer screen in which icons are arranged in a manner analogous to objects on top of a desk 2. a ...
desktop publishing
noun Date: 1984 the production of printed matter by means of a desktop computer having a layout program that integrates text and graphics
desm-
or desmo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from desmos, from dein to bind — more at diadem bond ; ligament
desmid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek desmos Date: 1862 any of numerous unicellular or colonial green algae (order Zygnematales, especially family Desmidiaceae)
desmo-
combining form see desm-
desmosomal
adjective see desmosome
desmosome
noun Date: circa 1932 a specialized structure of the cell membrane especially of an epithelial cell that serves as a zone of adhesion to anchor contiguous cells together • ...
Desmoulins
biographical name Camille 1760-1794 Lucie-Simplice-Camille-Benoît Desmoulins French revolutionary
Desna
geographical name river 550 miles (885 kilometers) SW Russia in Europe & N Ukraine flowing S into the Dnieper
desolate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English desolat, from Latin desolatus, past participle of desolare to abandon, from de- + solus alone Date: 14th century 1. devoid of ...
desolately
adverb see desolate I
desolateness
noun see desolate I
desolater
noun see desolate II
desolatingly
adverb see desolate II
desolation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the action of desolating 2. a. grief, sadness b. loneliness 3. devastation, ruin 4. barren wasteland
desolator
noun see desolate II
desorb
transitive verb Date: 1924 to remove (a sorbed substance) by the reverse of adsorption or absorption
desorption
noun Date: 1924 the process of desorbing
desoxy
adjective see deoxy
desoxy-
— see deoxy-
desoxyribonucleic acid
noun Date: 1931 DNA
despair
I. verb Etymology: Middle English despeiren, from Anglo-French desperer, from Latin desperare, from de- + sperare to hope; akin to Latin spes hope — more at speed Date: 14th ...
despairer
noun see despair I
despairing
adjective Date: 1589 given to, arising from, or marked by despair ; devoid of hope Synonyms: see despondent • despairingly adverb
despairingly
adverb see despairing
despatch
chiefly British variant of dispatch
desperado
noun (plural -does or -dos) Etymology: probably alteration of obsolete desperate desperado, from desperate, adjective Date: 1647 a bold or violent criminal; especially a ...
desperate
adjective Etymology: Latin desperatus, past participle of desperare Date: 15th century 1. a. having lost hope b. giving no ground for hope 2. a. moved by ...
desperately
adverb Date: circa 1547 1. in a desperate manner 2. extremely, terribly
desperation
noun Date: 14th century 1. loss of hope and surrender to despair 2. a state of hopelessness leading to rashness
despicable
adjective Etymology: Late Latin despicabilis, from Latin despicari to despise Date: 1553 deserving to be despised ; so worthless or obnoxious as to rouse moral indignation ...
despicableness
noun see despicable
despicably
adverb see despicable
despiritualize
transitive verb Date: 1840 to deprive of spiritual character or influence
despise
transitive verb (despised; despising) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French despis-, stem of despire, from Latin despicere, from de- + specere to look — more at spy ...
despisement
noun see despise
despiser
noun see despise
despite
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French despit, from Latin despectus, from despicere Date: 13th century 1. the feeling or attitude of despising ; contempt 2. ...
despiteful
adjective Date: 15th century expressing malice or hate • despitefully adverb • despitefulness noun
despitefully
adverb see despiteful
despitefulness
noun see despiteful
despiteous
adjective Date: 14th century archaic feeling or showing despite ; malicious • despiteously adverb, archaic
despiteously
adverb see despiteous
despoil
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English despoylen, from Anglo-French despoiller, from Latin despoliare, from de- + spoliare to strip, rob — more at spoil Date: 14th century ...
despoiler
noun see despoil
despoilment
noun see despoil
despoliation
noun Etymology: Late Latin despoliation-, despoliatio, from despoliare Date: circa 1657 the action or process of despoiling ; spoliation
despond
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Latin despondēre, from de- + spondēre to promise solemnly — more at spouse Date: 1655 to become despondent II. noun Date: 1678 ...
despondence
noun Date: 1657 despondency
despondency
noun Date: 1653 the state of being despondent ; dejection, hopelessness
despondent
adjective Etymology: Latin despondent-, despondens, present participle of despondēre Date: circa 1699 feeling or showing extreme discouragement, dejection, or depression ...
despondently
adverb see despondent
despot
noun Etymology: Middle French despote, from Greek despotēs master, lord, autocrat, from des- (akin to domos house) + -potēs (akin to posis husband); akin to Sanskrit dampati ...
despotic
adjective Date: 1604 of, relating to, or characteristic of a despot • despotically adverb
despotically
adverb see despotic
despotism
noun Date: circa 1727 1. a. rule by a despot b. despotic exercise of power 2. a. a system of government in which the ruler has unlimited power ; absolutism b. a ...
Desprez
biographical name see Josquin des Prez
desquamate
intransitive verb (-mated; -mating) Etymology: Latin desquamatus, past participle of desquamare to scale, from de- + squama scale Date: 1828 to peel off in scales • ...
desquamation
noun see desquamate
Desroches
geographical name island NW Indian Ocean NNE of Madagascar belonging to Seychelles
Dessaix
biographical name Comte Joseph-Marie 1764-1834 French general
Dessalines
biographical name Jean-Jacques 1758?-1806 emperor as Jacques I of Haiti (1804-06)
Dessau
geographical name city central Germany NE of Halle population 95,097
dessert
noun Etymology: Middle French, from desservir to clear the table, from des- de- + servir to serve, from Latin servire Date: 1600 1. a usually sweet course or dish (as of ...
dessert wine
noun Date: 1773 a usually sweet wine typically served with dessert or afterward
dessertspoon
noun Date: 1754 1. a spoon intermediate in size between a teaspoon and a tablespoon for use in eating dessert 2. dessertspoonful
dessertspoonful
noun Date: 1839 1. as much as a dessertspoon will hold 2. chiefly British a unit of measure equal to about 2 1/2 fluid drams
destabilization
noun see destabilize
destabilize
transitive verb Date: 1924 1. to make unstable 2. to cause (as a government) to be incapable of functioning or surviving • destabilization noun
destain
transitive verb Date: 1927 to selectively remove stain from (a specimen for microscopic study)
destigmatize
transitive verb Date: 1973 to remove associations of shame or disgrace from
destination
noun Date: 14th century 1. the purpose for which something is destined 2. an act of appointing, setting aside for a purpose, or predetermining 3. a place to which one is ...
destine
transitive verb (destined; destining) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French destiner, from Latin destinare, from de- + -stinare (akin to Latin stare to stand) — more at ...
destiny
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Middle English destinee, from Anglo-French, from feminine of destiné, past participle of destiner Date: 14th century 1. something to which a ...
destitute
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin destitutus, past participle of destituere to abandon, deprive, from de- + statuere to set up — more at statute Date: 14th ...
destituteness
noun see destitute
destitution
noun Date: 15th century the state of being destitute; especially such extreme want as threatens life unless relieved Synonyms: see poverty
destrier
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French destrer, destrier, from destre right hand, from Latin dextra, from feminine of dexter Date: 14th century archaic warhorse; ...
destroy
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French destroy-, destrui-, stem of destrure, from Vulgar Latin *destrugere, alteration of Latin destruere, from de- + struere to build ...
destroyer
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that destroys 2. a small fast warship used especially to support larger vessels and usually armed with guns, depth charges, torpedoes, and ...
destroyer escort
noun Date: 1924 a warship similar to but smaller than a destroyer
destroying angel
noun Date: circa 1900 any of several very poisonous pure white amanita mushrooms (as Amanita verna or A. virosa) ; death cap
destructibility
noun see destructible
destructible
adjective Date: circa 1755 capable of being destroyed • destructibility noun
destruction
noun Etymology: Middle English destruccioun, from Anglo-French destruction, from Latin destruction-, destructio, from destruere Date: 14th century 1. the state or fact of ...
destructionist
noun Date: 1833 one who delights in or advocates destruction

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