Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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destructive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. causing destruction ; ruinous 2. designed or tending to hurt or destroy • destructively adverb • destructiveness noun
destructive distillation
noun Date: circa 1831 decomposition of a substance (as wood, coal, or oil) by heat in a closed container and collection of the volatile products produced
destructively
adverb see destructive
destructiveness
noun see destructive
destructivity
noun Date: 1902 capacity for destruction
desuetude
noun Etymology: Middle English dissuetude, from Latin desuetudo, from desuescere to become unaccustomed, from de- + suescere to become accustomed; akin to Latin sodalis comrade ...
desulfurization
noun Date: 1854 the removal of sulfur or sulfur compounds (as from coal or flue gas) • desulfurize transitive verb
desulfurize
transitive verb see desulfurization
desultorily
adverb see desultory
desultoriness
noun see desultory
desultory
adjective Etymology: Latin desultorius, literally, of a circus rider who leaps from horse to horse, from desilire to leap down, from de- + salire to leap — more at sally Date: ...
det
abbreviation 1. detached; detachment 2. detail 3. determine
detach
transitive verb Etymology: French détacher, from Old French destachier, from des- de- + -tachier (as in atachier to attach) Date: 1686 1. to separate especially from a larger ...
detachability
noun see detach
detachable
adjective see detach
detachably
adverb see detach
detached
adjective Date: circa 1706 1. standing by itself ; separate, unconnected; especially not sharing any wall with another building 2. exhibiting an aloof objectivity usually ...
detached service
noun Date: 1835 military service away from one's assigned organization
detachedly
adverb see detached
detachedness
noun see detached
detachment
noun Date: 1669 1. the action or process of detaching ; separation 2. a. the dispatch of a body of troops or part of a fleet from the main body for a special mission or ...
detail
I. noun Etymology: French détail, from Old French detail slice, piece, from detaillier to cut in pieces, from de- + taillier to cut — more at tailor Date: 1603 1. extended ...
detail man
noun Date: 1928 a sales representative of a drug manufacturer who introduces new drugs especially to physicians and pharmacists
detailed
adjective Date: 1740 marked by abundant detail or by thoroughness in treating small items or parts Synonyms: see circumstantial • detailedly adverb • detailedness ...
detailedly
adverb see detailed
detailedness
noun see detailed
detailer
noun see detail II
detailing
noun Date: 1970 the act or process of meticulously cleaning and refurbishing an automobile
Detaille
biographical name (Jean-Baptiste-) Édouard 1848-1912 French painter
detain
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English deteynen, from Anglo-French deteign-, stem of detenir, modification of Latin detinēre, from de- + tenēre to hold — more at thin ...
detainee
noun Date: circa 1928 a person held in custody especially for political reasons
detainer
noun Etymology: Anglo-French detenour, alteration of detenir Date: 1619 1. the act of keeping something in one's possession; specifically the withholding from the rightful ...
detainment
noun see detain
detd
abbreviation determined
detect
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin detectus, past participle of detegere to uncover, detect, from de- + tegere to cover — more at thatch Date: 1574 transitive verb ...
detectability
noun see detect
detectable
adjective see detect
detection
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of detecting ; the state or fact of being detected 2. the process of demodulating
detective
I. adjective Date: 1732 1. fitted for or used in detecting something 2. of or relating to detectives or their work • detectivelike adjective II. noun Date: 1849 ...
detectivelike
adjective see detective I
detector
noun Date: 1541 one that detects: as a. a device for detecting the presence of electromagnetic waves or of radioactivity b. a rectifier of high-frequency current used ...
detent
noun Etymology: French détente, from Middle French destente, from destendre to slacken, from Old French, from des- de- + tendre to stretch, from Latin tendere — more at thin ...
détente
or detente noun Etymology: French Date: 1908 1. the relaxation of strained relations or tensions (as between nations); also a policy promoting this 2. a period of détente
detente
noun see détente
detention
noun Etymology: Middle English detencion, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin detention-, detentio, from detinēre to detain Date: 15th century 1. the act or ...
detention home
noun Date: circa 1930 a house of detention for juvenile delinquents usually under the supervision of a juvenile court
deter
transitive verb (deterred; deterring) Etymology: Latin deterrēre, from de- + terrēre to frighten — more at terror Date: circa 1547 1. to turn aside, discourage, or prevent ...
deterge
transitive verb (deterged; deterging) Etymology: French or Latin; French déterger, from Latin detergēre, from de- + tergēre to wipe Date: circa 1623 to wash off ; ...
detergency
noun Date: 1710 cleansing quality or power
detergent
I. adjective Date: 1616 that cleanses ; cleansing II. noun Date: 1676 a cleansing agent: as a. soap b. any of numerous synthetic water-soluble or liquid organic ...
deterger
noun see deterge
deteriorate
verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Late Latin deterioratus, past participle of deteriorare, from Latin deterior worse, from de- + -ter (suffix as in Latin uter which of two) + ...
deterioration
noun Date: circa 1658 the action or process of deteriorating ; the state of having deteriorated Synonyms: deterioration, degeneration, decadence, decline mean the falling ...
deteriorative
adjective see deteriorate
determent
noun see deter
determinable
adjective Date: 15th century 1. capable of being determined, definitely ascertained, or decided upon 2. liable to be terminated ; terminable • determinableness noun ...
determinableness
noun see determinable
determinably
adverb see determinable
determinacy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1873 1. the quality or state of being determinate 2. a. the state of being definitely and unequivocally characterized ; exactness b. the ...
determinant
noun Date: 1686 1. an element that identifies or determines the nature of something or that fixes or conditions an outcome 2. a square array of numbers bordered on the left ...
determinantal
adjective see determinant
determinate
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin determinatus, past participle of determinare Date: 14th century 1. having defined limits 2. definitely settled 3. ...
determinately
adverb see determinate
determinateness
noun see determinate
determination
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. a judicial decision settling and ending a controversy b. the resolving of a question by argument or reasoning 2. archaic termination 3. ...
determinative
adjective Date: 1655 having power or tendency to determine ; tending to fix, settle, or define something Synonyms: see conclusive • determinative noun
determinator
noun Date: 1556 determiner
determine
verb (determined; determining) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French determiner, from Latin determinare, from de- + terminare to limit, from terminus boundary, limit — ...
determined
adjective Date: 1513 1. having reached a decision ; firmly resolved 2. a. showing determination b. characterized by determination • determinedly adverb • ...
determinedly
adverb see determined
determinedness
noun see determined
determiner
noun Date: circa 1530 one that determines: as a. gene b. a word (as an article, possessive, demonstrative, or quantifier) that makes specific the denotation of a noun ...
determinism
noun Date: 1846 1. a. a theory or doctrine that acts of the will, occurrences in nature, or social or psychological phenomena are causally determined by preceding events or ...
determinist
noun or adjective see determinism
deterministic
adjective see determinism
deterministically
adverb see determinism
deterrability
noun see deter
deterrable
adjective see deter
deterrence
noun Date: 1861 the act or process of deterring: as a. the inhibition of criminal behavior by fear especially of punishment b. the maintenance of military power for the ...
deterrent
adjective Etymology: Latin deterrent-, deterrens, present participle of deterrēre to deter Date: 1829 1. serving to deter 2. relating to deterrence • deterrent noun ...
deterrently
adverb see deterrent
detersive
adjective Etymology: Middle French detersif, from Latin detersus, past participle of detergēre to deterge Date: 1586 detergent • detersive noun
detest
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French detester or Latin detestari; Middle French detester, from Latin detestari, literally, to curse while calling a deity to witness, from ...
detestable
adjective Date: 15th century arousing or meriting intense dislike ; abominable • detestableness noun • detestably adverb
detestableness
noun see detestable
detestably
adverb see detestable
detestation
noun Date: 15th century 1. extreme hatred or dislike ; abhorrence, loathing 2. an object of hatred or contempt
detester
noun see detest
dethrone
transitive verb Date: 1609 to remove from a throne or place of power or prominence • dethronement noun • dethroner noun
dethronement
noun see dethrone
dethroner
noun see dethrone
detick
transitive verb Date: 1925 to remove ticks from • deticker noun
deticker
noun see detick
detinue
noun Etymology: Middle English detenewe, from Anglo-French detenue detention, from feminine of detenu, past participle of detenir to detain Date: 15th century 1. a common-law ...
detn
abbreviation 1. detention 2. determination
detonability
noun see detonable
detonable
adjective Date: 1884 capable of being detonated • detonability noun
detonatable
adjective see detonate
detonate
verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: French détoner to explode, from Latin detonare to expend thunder, from de- + tonare to thunder — more at thunder Date: 1729 intransitive ...
detonation
noun Date: 1686 1. the action or process of detonating 2. rapid combustion in an internal combustion engine that results in knocking
detonative
adjective see detonate
detonator
noun Date: 1822 a device or small quantity of explosive used for detonating a high explosive
detour
I. noun Etymology: French détour, from Old French destor, from destorner to divert, from des- de- + torner to turn — more at turn Date: 1738 a deviation from a direct ...
detox
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1973 1. detoxification from an intoxicating or addictive substance 2. a detox program or facility • detox verb
detoxicant
noun see detoxicate
detoxicate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: de- + 2intoxicate Date: 1867 1. detoxify 1 2. detoxify 2 • detoxicant noun • detoxication noun
detoxication
noun see detoxicate
detoxification
noun see detoxify
detoxify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Date: circa 1905 1. a. to remove a harmful substance (as a poison or toxin) or the effect of such from b. to render (a harmful substance) ...
detract
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin detractus, past participle of detrahere to pull down, disparage, from de- + trahere to draw Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. ...
detraction
noun Date: 14th century 1. a lessening of reputation or esteem especially by envious, malicious, or petty criticism ; belittling, disparagement 2. a taking away • ...
detractive
adjective see detraction
detractively
adverb see detraction
detractor
noun see detract
detrain
verb Date: 1881 intransitive verb to get off a railroad train transitive verb to remove from a railroad train • detrainment noun
detrainment
noun see detrain
detribalization
noun see detribalize
detribalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1920 to cause to lose tribal identity ; acculturate • detribalization noun
detriment
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin detrimentum, from deterere to wear away, impair, from de- + terere to rub — more at ...
detrimental
I. adjective Date: 1590 obviously harmful ; damaging Synonyms: see pernicious • detrimentally adverb II. noun Date: 1831 an undesirable or harmful person or thing
detrimentally
adverb see detrimental I
detrital
adjective see detritus
detrition
noun Date: 1674 a wearing off or away
detritivore
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary detritus + -i- + -vore (from Latin -vorus -vorous) Date: 1959 an organism (as an earthworm or a fungus) that feeds on dead ...
detritus
noun (plural detritus) Etymology: French détritus, from Latin detritus, past participle of deterere Date: 1802 1. loose material (as rock fragments or organic particles) that ...
Detroit
geographical name 1. river 31 miles (50 kilometers) Ontario & SE Michigan connecting Lake Erie & Lake Saint Clair 2. city SE Michigan on Detroit River population 951,270 ...
Detroiter
noun see Detroit
Detskoe Selo
geographical name — see Pushkin
detumescence
noun Etymology: Latin detumescere to become less swollen, from de- + tumescere to swell — more at tumescent Date: 1678 subsidence or diminution of swelling or erection ...
detumescent
adjective see detumescence
Deucalion
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Deukaliōn Date: 1565 a survivor with his wife Pyrrha of a great flood by which Zeus destroys the rest of the human race
deuce
I. noun Etymology: Middle English dewes, from Anglo-French deus two, from Latin duos, accusative masculine of duo two — more at two Date: 15th century 1. a. (1) the ...
deuced
adjective Date: 1782 damned, confounded • deuced or deucedly adverb
deucedly
adverb see deuced
deuces wild
noun Date: 1927 a card game (as poker) in which each deuce may represent any card designated by its holder
Deurne
geographical name commune N Belgium, E suburb of Antwerp
Deus absconditus
foreign term Etymology: Latin hidden God ; God unknowable by the human mind
deus ex machina
noun Etymology: New Latin, a god from a machine, translation of Greek theos ek mēchanēs Date: 1697 1. a god introduced by means of a crane in ancient Greek and Roman drama ...
Deus Ramos
biographical name João de 1830-1896 Portuguese poet
Deus vult
foreign term Etymology: Latin God wills it — rallying cry of the First Crusade
Deut
abbreviation Deuteronomy
deuter-
or deutero- combining form Etymology: Greek deuter-, deutero-, from deuteros; probably akin to Greek dein to lack, Sanskrit doṣa fault, lack second ; secondary
deuteragonist
noun Etymology: Greek deuteragōnistēs, from deuter- + agōnistēs combatant, actor — more at protagonist Date: 1855 1. the actor taking the part of second importance in a ...
deuteranomalous
adjective Etymology: New Latin deuteranomalia (from deuter- + Latin anomalia anomaly) abnormal trichromatism + English -ous Date: 1911 exhibiting partial loss of green color ...
deuteranomaly
noun see deuteranomalous
deuteranope
noun Date: 1902 an individual affected with deuteranopia
deuteranopia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from deuter- + 2a- + -opia; from the blindness to green, regarded as the second primary color Date: circa 1901 color blindness marked by usually ...
deuteranopic
adjective see deuteranopia
deuterate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1947 to introduce deuterium into (a compound) • deuteration noun
deuteration
noun see deuterate
deuterium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek deuteros second Date: 1933 an isotope of hydrogen that has one proton and one neutron in its nucleus and that has twice the mass of ...
deuterium oxide
noun Date: 1934 heavy water 1
deutero-
combining form see deuter-
deuterocanonical
adjective Etymology: New Latin deuterocanonicus, from deuter- + Late Latin canonicus canonical Date: 1684 of, relating to, or constituting the books of Scripture contained in ...
deuteron
noun Date: 1933 a deuterium nucleus
Deuteronomic
adjective Date: 1857 of or relating to the book of Deuteronomy, its style, or its contents
Deuteronomist
noun Date: 1862 any of the writers or editors of a Deuteronomic body of source material often distinguished in the earlier books of the Old Testament • Deuteronomistic ...
Deuteronomistic
adjective see Deuteronomist
deuterostome
noun Etymology: New Latin Deuterostomia, group name, from deuter- + Greek stoma mouth — more at stomach Date: 1950 any of a major division (Deuterostomia) of the animal ...
Deutsche Demokratische Republik
geographical name — see Germany
deutsche mark
also deutschmark noun Etymology: German, German mark Date: 1948 the basic monetary unit of West Germany from 1948 to 1990 and of reunited Germany from 1990 to 2001
Deutschland
geographical name — see Germany
deutschmark
noun see deutsche mark
deutzia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Jean Deutz died 1784? Dutch patron of botanical research Date: 1837 any of a genus (Deutzia) of the saxifrage family of ornamental shrubs with ...
dev
abbreviation deviation
devaluate
verb Date: 1898 devalue
devaluation
noun Date: 1914 1. an official reduction in the exchange value of a currency by a lowering of its gold equivalency or its value relative to another currency 2. a lessening ...
devalue
verb Date: 1918 transitive verb 1. to institute the devaluation of (money) 2. to lessen the value of intransitive verb to institute devaluation
Devanagari
noun Etymology: Sanskrit devanāgarī, from deva divine + nāgarī (writing) of the city — more at deity Date: 1781 an alphabet usually employed for Sanskrit and also used ...
devastate
transitive verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Latin devastatus, past participle of devastare, from de- + vastare to lay waste — more at waste Date: 1638 1. to bring to ruin ...
devastatingly
adverb see devastate
devastation
noun see devastate
devastative
adjective see devastate
devastator
noun see devastate
devein
transitive verb Date: 1953 to remove the dark dorsal vein from (shrimp)
develop
verb Etymology: French développer, from Old French desveloper, desvoluper to unwrap, expose, from des- de- + envoloper to enclose — more at envelop Date: 1750 transitive ...
developable
adjective see develop
developed
adjective Date: 1940 having a relatively high level of industrialization and standard of living
developer
noun Date: 1796 one that develops: as a. a chemical used to develop exposed photographic materials b. a person who develops real estate c. a person or company that ...
developing
adjective Date: 1963 underdeveloped 2
development
noun Date: 1756 1. the act, process, or result of developing 2. the state of being developed 3. a developed tract of land; especially one with houses built on it
developmental
adjective Date: 1849 1. a. of, relating to, or being development ; broadly experimental 2 b. serving economic development 2. designed to assist growth or bring ...
developmentally
adverb see developmental
developmentally disabled
adjective Date: 1975 having a physical or mental disability that becomes apparent in childhood and prevents, impedes, or limits normal development
Deventer
geographical name commune E Netherlands population 68,004
deverbal
adjective Date: 1943 deverbative
deverbative
adjective Date: 1930 1. derived from a verb 2. used in derivation from a verb • deverbative noun
Devereux
biographical name Robert 1566-1601 2d Earl of Essex English soldier & courtier
devest
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French desvestir, from Medieval Latin disvestire, from Latin dis- + vestire to clothe — more at vest Date: 1563 divest
deviance
noun Date: 1944 deviant quality, state, or behavior
deviancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1947 deviance
deviant
adjective Date: 15th century deviating especially from an accepted norm • deviant noun
deviate
I. verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Late Latin deviatus, past participle of deviare, from Latin de- + via way — more at way Date: circa 1633 intransitive verb 1. to stray ...
deviation
noun Date: 15th century an act or instance of deviating: as a. deflection of the needle of a compass caused by local magnetic influences (as in a ship) b. the difference ...
deviationism
noun see deviation
deviationist
noun or adjective see deviation
deviator
noun see deviate I
deviatory
adjective see deviate I
device
noun Etymology: Middle English devis, devise, from Anglo-French, division, plan, from deviser to divide, regulate, tell — more at devise Date: 14th century 1. something ...
devil
I. noun Etymology: Middle English devel, from Old English dēofol, from Late Latin diabolus, from Greek diabolos, literally, slanderer, from diaballein to throw across, slander, ...
Devil Mountain
geographical name — see auyan-tepui
devil theory
noun Date: 1937 a theory of history: political and social crises arise from the deliberate actions of evil or misguided leaders rather than as a natural result of conditions
devil to pay
phrasal severe consequences — used with the
devil's advocate
noun Etymology: translation of New Latin advocatus diaboli Date: 1760 1. a Roman Catholic official whose duty is to examine critically the evidence on which a demand for ...
devil's claw
noun Date: circa 1900 any of several herbs (genus Proboscidea syn. Martynia of the family Martyniaceae) of the southwestern United States and Mexico that have edible pods ...
devil's club
noun Date: circa 1889 a spiny western North American shrub (Oplopanax horridus) of the ginseng family having large lobed leaves and stems covered with dense sharp prickles
devil's darning needle
noun Date: 1809 1. dragonfly 2. damselfly
devil's food cake
noun Date: 1905 a rich chocolate cake
Devil's Island
or French Île du Diable geographical name island French Guiana in the Safety Islands group; former penal colony
devil's paintbrush
noun Date: 1900 orange hawkweed; broadly any of various hawkweeds that are naturalized weeds in the eastern United States
devil-may-care
adjective Date: 1837 easygoing, carefree
devilfish
noun Date: 1709 1. manta ray 2. octopus; broadly any large cephalopod
devilish
adjective Date: 15th century 1. resembling or befitting a devil: as a. evil, sinister b. mischievous, roguish 2. extreme • devilish adverb • devilishly ...
devilishly
adverb see devilish
devilishness
noun see devilish
devilment
noun Date: 1771 mischief
devilry
or deviltry noun (plural -ries or -tries) Date: 14th century 1. a. action performed with the help of the devil ; witchcraft b. wickedness c. mischief 2. an act of ...
Devils Postpile
geographical name lava formation E central California SE of Yosemite National Park in Devils Postpile National Monument
Devils Tower
or Mato Tepee geographical name columnar rock formation NE Wyoming rising 865 feet (264 meters) in Devils Tower National Monument
deviltry
noun see devilry
devilwood
noun Date: 1818 a small tree (Osmanthus americanus) of the olive family that is native to the southern United States
devious
adjective Etymology: Latin devius, from de from + via way — more at de-, way Date: 1599 1. a. wandering, roundabout b. moving without a fixed course ; errant 2. ...
deviously
adverb see devious
deviousness
noun see devious
devisable
adjective see devise I
devise
I. transitive verb (devised; devising) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French deviser, diviser, to divide, distinguish, invent, from Vulgar Latin *divisare, frequentative ...
devisee
noun Date: 1543 one to whom a devise of property is made
deviser
noun see devise I
devisor
noun Date: 1543 one who devises property in a will
devitalization
noun see devitalize
devitalize
transitive verb Date: 1849 to deprive of life, vigor, or effectiveness • devitalization noun
devitrification
noun see devitrify
devitrify
transitive verb Etymology: French dévitrifier, from dé- de- + vitrifier to vitrify Date: 1832 to deprive of glassy luster and transparency; especially to change (as a ...
devocalize
transitive verb Date: 1877 devoice
devoice
transitive verb Date: 1932 to pronounce (as a sometimes or formerly voiced sound) without vibration of the vocal cords
devoid
adjective Etymology: Middle English, past participle of devoiden to dispel, from Anglo-French *desvoider, from des- dis- + voider to empty — more at void Date: 15th century ...
devoir
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English dever, devoir, from Anglo-French, from deveir, devoer to owe, be obliged, from Latin debēre — more at debt Date: 14th century 1. ...
devolution
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin devolution-, devolutio, from Latin devolvere Date: 1545 1. transference (as of rights, powers, property, or responsibility) to another; ...
devolutionary
adjective see devolution
devolutionist
noun see devolution
devolve
verb (devolved; devolving) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin devolvere, from de- + volvere to roll — more at voluble Date: 15th century transitive verb to pass on (as ...
devon
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Devon, England Date: 1834 any of an English breed of vigorous red cattle used for meat and milk
Devon
I. abbreviation Devonshire II. geographical name or Devonshire county SW England capital Exeter area 2686 square miles (6957 square kilometers), population 998,200
Devon Island
geographical name island Nunavut, Canada, in E Parry Islands N of Baffin Island area 20,861 square miles (54,239 square kilometers)
Devon rex
noun Etymology: Devon, England Date: 1972 any of a breed of large-eared cats having a very short wavy or curly coat with sparse guard hairs
Devonian
adjective Etymology: Devon, England Date: 1612 1. of or relating to Devonshire, England 2. of, relating to, or being the period of the Paleozoic era between the Silurian and ...
Devonshire
biographical name dukes of — see Cavendish
Devonshire cream
noun Date: 1791 clotted cream
devote
transitive verb (devoted; devoting) Etymology: Latin devotus, past participle of devovēre, from de- + vovēre to vow Date: 1586 1. to commit by a solemn act 2. to give ...
devoted
adjective Date: 1586 characterized by loyalty and devotion • devotedly adverb • devotedness noun
devotedly
adverb see devoted
devotedness
noun see devoted
devotee
noun Date: 1645 an ardent follower, supporter, or enthusiast (as of a religion, art form, or sport)
devotement
noun see devote
devotion
noun Date: 13th century 1. a. religious fervor ; piety b. an act of prayer or private worship — usually used in plural c. a religious exercise or practice other than ...
devotional
I. adjective Date: 1648 of, relating to, or characterized by devotion • devotionally adverb II. noun Date: 1659 a short worship service
devotionally
adverb see devotional I
devour
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French devour-, stem of devorer, from Latin devorare, from de- + vorare to devour — more at voracious Date: 14th century ...
devourer
noun see devour
devout
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin devotus, from Latin, past participle of devovēre Date: 13th century 1. devoted to religion or to ...
devoutly
adverb see devout
devoutness
noun see devout
dew
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English dēaw; akin to Old High German tou dew, Greek thein to run Date: before 12th century 1. moisture condensed upon the surfaces ...
DEW
abbreviation distant early warning

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