Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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dew point
noun Date: 1826 the temperature at which a vapor (as water) begins or would begin to condense
dew worm
noun Date: 1599 night crawler
dewar
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Sir James Dewar Date: 1939 a glass or metal container made like a vacuum bottle that is used especially for storing liquefied gases ...
Dewar
biographical name Sir James 1842-1923 Scottish chemist & physicist
Dewar flask
noun see dewar
dewater
transitive verb Date: circa 1909 to remove water from • dewaterer noun
dewaterer
noun see dewater
dewberry
noun Date: circa 1578 1. any of several sweet edible berries related to and resembling blackberries 2. a trailing or decumbent bramble (genus Rubus) that bears dewberries
dewclaw
noun Date: 1576 a vestigial digit not reaching to the ground on the foot of a mammal; also a claw or hoof terminating such a digit — see cow illustration
dewdrop
noun Date: 13th century a drop of dew
Dewey
I. biographical name George 1837-1917 American admiral II. biographical name John 1859-1952 American philosopher & educator • Deweyan adjective III. biographical name ...
Dewey decimal classification
noun Etymology: Melvil Dewey Date: 1924 a system of classifying books and other publications whereby main classes are designated by a 3-digit number and subdivisions are ...
Dewey decimal system
noun see Dewey decimal classification
Deweyan
adjective see Dewey II
dewfall
noun Date: 1622 formation of dew; also the time when dew begins to deposit
dewily
adverb see dewy
dewiness
noun see dewy
dewlap
noun Date: 14th century 1. loose skin hanging under the neck of an animal — see cow illustration 2. loose flesh on the human throat • dewlapped adjective
dewlapped
adjective see dewlap
dewless
adjective see dew
deworm
transitive verb Date: 1926 to rid (as a dog) of worms ; worm 4 • dewormer noun
dewormer
noun see deworm
Dewsbury
geographical name town N England in West Yorkshire S of Leeds population 48,339
dewy
adjective (dewier; -est) Date: before 12th century 1. moist with, affected by, or suggestive of dew 2. innocent, unsophisticated • dewily adverb • dewiness noun
dewy-eyed
adjective Date: 1938 naively innocent and trusting
dex
noun Date: 1961 the sulfate of dextroamphetamine
dexamethasone
noun Etymology: dexa- (blend of deca- and hexa-) + methyl + -a- (perhaps from pregnane, a parent compound of corticoid hormones) + -sone (as in cortisone) Date: 1958 a ...
Dexedrine
trademark — used for a preparation of the sulfate of dextroamphetamine
dexfenfluramine
noun Etymology: dextrorotatory Date: 1987 the dextrorotatory form of fenfluramine formerly used to treat obesity but withdrawn due to its association with heart valve disease ...
dexies
noun plural Etymology: Dexedrine + -ie + 1-s Date: 1956 tablets or capsules of the sulfate of dextroamphetamine
dexter
adjective Etymology: Latin; akin to Old High German zeso situated on the right, Greek dexios Date: 1562 1. relating to or situated on the right 2. being or relating to the ...
dexterity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French dexterité, from Latin dexteritat-, dexteritas, from dexter Date: 1518 1. mental skill or quickness ; ...
dexterous
also dextrous adjective Etymology: Latin dextr-, dexter on the right side, skillful Date: 1609 1. mentally adroit and skillful ; clever 2. done with dexterity ; artful ...
dexterously
adverb see dexterous
dexterousness
noun see dexterous
dextr-
or dextro- combining form Etymology: Latin dextr-, dexter 1. right ; on or toward the right 2. (usually dextro-) dextrorotatory
dextral
adjective Date: 1646 of or relating to the right ; inclined to the right: as a. right-handed 3 b. of a gastropod shell having the whorls coiling clockwise down the spire ...
dextran
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1879 any of numerous glucose biopolymers of variable molecular weight that are produced especially by the ...
dextranase
noun Date: circa 1949 a hydrolase that prevents tooth decay by breaking down dextran and eliminating dental plaque
dextrin
also dextrine noun Etymology: French dextrine, from dextr- Date: 1838 any of various water-soluble gummy polysaccharides (C6H10O5)n obtained from starch by the action of ...
dextrine
noun see dextrin
dextro
adjective Etymology: dextr- Date: 1889 dextrorotatory
dextro-
combining form see dextr-
dextroamphetamine
noun Date: 1943 the dextrorotatory sulfate of amphetamine
dextromethorphan
noun Etymology: dextr- + methyl + morphinan parent substance of morphine alkaloids, from morphine + 3-an Date: 1967 a nonaddictive cough suppressant C18H25NO that is widely ...
dextrorotatory
adjective Date: circa 1872 turning clockwise or toward the right; specifically rotating the plane of polarization of light toward the right — compare levorotatory
dextrose
noun Date: circa 1869 dextrorotatory glucose
dextrous
adjective see dexterous
dey
noun Etymology: French, from Turkish dayı, literally, maternal uncle Date: 1659 a ruling official of the Ottoman Empire in northern Africa
Dez
geographical name river 250 miles (402 kilometers) W Iran flowing S to the Karun
Dezhnev, Cape
or Russian Mys Dezhneva geographical name cape NE Russia in Asia at E end of Chukchi Peninsula
DF
abbreviation 1. damage free 2. direction finder; direction finding
DFA
abbreviation doctor of fine arts
DFC
abbreviation Distinguished Flying Cross
dft
abbreviation 1. defendant 2. draft
dg
abbreviation decigram
DG
abbreviation 1. [Late Latin Dei gratia] by the grace of God 2. director general
DH
I. noun (plural DHs) Date: 1973 designated hitter 1 II. intransitive verb (DHed; DHing) Date: 1975 to play as a designated hitter in a baseball game III. abbreviation ...
DHA
abbreviation docosahexaenoic acid
Dhahran
geographical name town SE Saudi Arabia on Persian Gulf near Bahrain Islands population 12,500
Dhaka
or Dacca geographical name city capital of Bangladesh population 3,637,892
dharma
noun Etymology: Sanskrit; akin to Latin firmus firm Date: 1796 1. Hinduism an individual's duty fulfilled by observance of custom or law 2. Hinduism & Buddhism a. the ...
dharmic
adjective see dharma
dharna
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu dharnā, from Sanskrit dharaṇa{mudot} support, prop; akin to Latin firmus firm Date: 1747 a fast held at the door of an offender in India as an ...
Dhaulagiri, Mount
geographical name mountain 26,810 feet (8172 meters) W central Nepal in the Himalayas
DHEA
abbreviation dehydroepiandrosterone
Dhílos
geographical name see Delos
DHL
abbreviation doctor of Hebrew letters; doctor of Hebrew literature
dhole
noun Etymology: perhaps from Kannada tōḷa wolf Date: circa 1827 a wild dog (Cuon alpinus) occurring from India to southern Siberia
dhoti
noun (plural dhotis) Etymology: Hindi & Urdu dhotī Date: 1614 a loincloth worn by men in some parts of India
dhow
noun Etymology: Arabic dāwa Date: 1785 an Arab lateen-rigged boat usually having a long overhang forward, a high poop, and a low waist
Dhu'l-Hijja
noun Etymology: Arabic Dhū-al-ḥijja, literally, the one of the pilgrimage Date: circa 1771 the 12th month of the Islamic year — see month table
Dhu'l-Qadah
noun Etymology: Arabic Dhū-al-qa‘da, literally, the one of the sitting Date: circa 1771 the 11th month of the Islamic year — see month table
dhurrie
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu darī Date: 1880 a thick flat-woven cotton or wool cloth or rug made in India
DI
abbreviation drill instructor
di-
combining form Etymology: Latin, from Greek; akin to Old English twi- 1. twice ; twofold ; double 2. containing two atoms, radicals, or groups
dia
abbreviation diameter
DIA
abbreviation Defense Intelligence Agency
dia-
also di- prefix Etymology: Latin, from Greek, through, apart, from dia; akin to Latin dis- through ; across
diabase
noun Etymology: French, probably from Greek diabasis act of crossing over, from diabainein to cross over, from dia- + bainein to go — more at come Date: circa 1816 1. archaic ...
diabasic
adjective see diabase
diabetes
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek diabētēs diabetes insipidus, from diabainein to walk with the legs apart, cross over Date: 15th century any of various abnormal conditions ...
diabetes insipidus
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, bland diabetes Date: circa 1846 a disorder of the pituitary gland characterized by intense thirst and by the excretion of large amounts ...
diabetes mellitus
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, honey-sweet diabetes Date: 1830 a variable disorder of carbohydrate metabolism caused by a combination of hereditary and environmental ...
diabetic
I. adjective Date: 1799 1. of or relating to diabetes or diabetics 2. affected with diabetes 3. occurring in or caused by diabetes 4. suitable for diabetics II. ...
diabetogenic
adjective Date: circa 1903 producing diabetes
diabetologist
noun Date: 1970 a specialist in diabetes
diablerie
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, from dïable devil, from Late Latin diabolus — more at devil Date: 1751 1. black magic ; sorcery 2. a. a representation in ...
Diablo, Mount
geographical name mountain 3849 feet (1173 meters) central California at N end of Diablo Range
diabolic
adjective see diabolical
diabolical
or diabolic adjective Etymology: Middle English deabolik, from Middle French diabolique, from Late Latin diabolicus, from diabolus Date: 14th century of, relating to, or ...
diabolically
adverb see diabolical
diabolicalness
noun see diabolical
diabolism
noun Date: 1614 1. dealings with or possession by the devil 2. belief in or worship of devils 3. evil character or conduct • diabolist noun
diabolist
noun see diabolism
diabolize
transitive verb (-lized; -lizing) Date: 1702 to represent as or make diabolical
diachronic
adjective Date: 1922 of, relating to, or dealing with phenomena (as of language or culture) as they occur or change over a period of time • diachronically adverb
diachronically
adverb see diachronic
diachrony
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary dia- + -chrony (as in synchrony) Date: circa 1939 1. diachronic analysis 2. change extending through time
diacid
I. adjective or diacidic Date: 1866 able to react with two molecules of a monobasic acid or one of a dibasic acid to form a salt or ester — used especially of bases II. ...
diacidic
adjective see diacid I
diaconal
adjective Etymology: Late Latin diaconalis, from diaconus deacon — more at deacon Date: circa 1611 of or relating to a deacon or deaconess
diaconate
noun Date: circa 1751 1. the office or period of office of a deacon or deaconess 2. an official body of deacons
diacritic
noun Date: 1866 a mark near or through an orthographic or phonetic character or combination of characters indicating a phonetic value different from that given the unmarked or ...
diacritical
also diacritic adjective Etymology: Greek diakritikos separative, from diakrinein to distinguish, from dia- + krinein to separate — more at certain Date: 1749 1. serving as ...
diadelphous
adjective Etymology: di- + -adelphous Date: 1807 united by filaments into two fascicles — used of stamens
diadem
noun Etymology: Middle English diademe, from Anglo-French, from Latin diadema, from Greek diadēma, from diadein to bind around, from dia- + dein to bind; akin to Sanskrit dāman ...
diadromous
adjective Date: circa 1949 of a fish migratory between salt and fresh waters
diaeresis
or dieresis noun (plural diaereses) Etymology: Late Latin diaeresis, from Greek diairesis, literally, division, from diairein to divide, from dia- + hairein to take Date: circa ...
diaeretic
adjective see diaeresis
diag
abbreviation 1. diagonal 2. diagram
diagenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1886 1. recombination or rearrangement of constituents (as of a chemical or mineral) resulting in a new product 2. the conversion (as ...
diagenetic
adjective see diagenesis
diagenetically
adverb see diagenesis
diageotropic
adjective Date: 1880 tending to grow at right angles to the line of gravity
Diaghilev
biographical name Sergey Pavlovich 1872-1929 Russian ballet producer & art critic
diagnosable
adjective see diagnose
diagnose
verb (-nosed; -nosing) Etymology: back-formation from diagnosis Date: circa 1859 transitive verb 1. a. to recognize (as a disease) by signs and symptoms b. to ...
diagnoseable
adjective see diagnose
diagnosis
noun (plural diagnoses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek diagnōsis, from diagignōskein to distinguish, from dia- + gignōskein to know — more at know Date: 1655 1. a. ...
diagnosis related group
noun Date: 1977 DRG
diagnostic
I. adjective also diagnostical Date: 1625 1. a. of, relating to, or used in diagnosis b. using the methods of or yielding a diagnosis 2. serving to distinguish or ...
diagnostical
adjective see diagnostic I
diagnostically
adverb see diagnostic I
diagnostician
noun see diagnostic II
diagonal
I. adjective Etymology: Latin diagonalis, from Greek diagōnios from angle to angle, from dia- + gōnia angle; akin to Greek gony knee — more at knee Date: 1563 1. a. ...
diagonal matrix
noun Date: 1927 a diagonalized matrix
diagonalizable
adjective see diagonalize
diagonalization
noun see diagonalize
diagonalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1942 to put (a matrix) in a form with all the nonzero elements along the diagonal from upper left to lower right • diagonalizable ...
diagonally
adverb Date: 1541 in a diagonal manner
diagram
I. noun Etymology: Greek diagramma, from diagraphein to mark out by lines, from dia- + graphein to write — more at carve Date: 1619 1. a graphic design that explains rather ...
diagrammable
adjective see diagram I
diagrammatic
adjective see diagram I
diagrammatical
adjective see diagram I
diagrammatically
adverb see diagram I
diakinesis
noun (plural diakineses) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1902 the final stage of the meiotic prophase marked by contraction of the bivalents
dial
I. noun Etymology: Middle English dyal, from Medieval Latin dialis clock wheel revolving daily, from Latin dies day — more at deity Date: 15th century 1. the face of a ...
dial tone
noun Date: 1923 a tone emitted by a telephone as a signal that the system is ready for dialing
dial-up
adjective Date: 1961 relating to or being a standard telephone line used for computer communications; also accessible via a standard telephone line
dialect
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle French dialecte, from Latin dialectus, from Greek dialektos conversation, dialect, from dialegesthai to converse — more at ...
dialect atlas
noun Date: 1925 linguistic atlas
dialect geography
noun Date: 1926 linguistic geography
dialectal
adjective see dialect
dialectally
adverb see dialect
dialectic
noun Etymology: Middle English dialetik, from Anglo-French dialetiqe, from Latin dialectica, from Greek dialektikē, from feminine of dialektikos of conversation, from dialektos ...
dialectical
also dialectic adjective Date: 1548 1. a. of, relating to, or in accordance with dialectic b. practicing, devoted to, or employing dialectic 2. of, relating to, or ...
dialectical materialism
noun Date: 1927 the Marxist theory that maintains the material basis of a reality constantly changing in a dialectical process and the priority of matter over mind — compare ...
dialectically
adverb see dialectical
dialectician
noun Date: circa 1693 1. one who is skilled in or practices dialectic 2. a student of dialects
dialectological
adjective see dialectology
dialectologically
adverb see dialectology
dialectologist
noun Date: circa 1874 a specialist in dialectology
dialectology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1864 1. the systematic study of dialect 2. the body of data available for study of a dialect • ...
dialer
noun see dial II
diallel
adjective Etymology: Greek diallēlos reciprocating, from dia through + allēlōn one another — more at allelo- Date: 1920 relating to or being the crossing of each of ...
dialog
noun see dialogue I
dialog box
noun Date: 1984 a window on a computer screen for choosing options or inputting information
dialogic
or dialogical adjective Date: 1833 of, relating to, or characterized by dialogue • dialogically adverb
dialogical
adjective see dialogic
dialogically
adverb see dialogic
dialogist
noun Date: 1651 1. a writer of dialogues 2. one who participates in a dialogue • dialogistic adjective
dialogistic
adjective see dialogist
dialogue
I. noun also dialog Etymology: Middle English dialoge, from Anglo-French dialogue, from Latin dialogus, from Greek dialogos, from dialegesthai to converse, from dia- + legein to ...
dialysate
also dialyzate noun Date: circa 1867 the material that passes through the membrane in dialysis
dialyse
chiefly British variant of dialyze
dialyser
chiefly British variant of dialyzer
dialysis
noun (plural dialyses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, separation, from dialyein to dissolve, from dia- + lyein to loosen — more at lose Date: 1861 1. the separation of ...
dialytic
adjective see dialysis
dialyzable
adjective see dialyze
dialyzate
noun see dialysate
dialyze
verb (-lyzed; -lyzing) Date: 1861 transitive verb to subject to dialysis intransitive verb to undergo dialysis • dialyzable adjective
dialyzer
noun Date: 1861 an apparatus in which dialysis is carried out
diam
abbreviation diameter
diamagnetic
adjective Date: 1846 having a magnetic permeability less than that of a vacuum ; slightly repelled by a magnet • diamagnetism noun
diamagnetism
noun see diamagnetic
diamanté
noun Etymology: French, adjective, like a diamond, from diamant diamond, from Middle French Date: 1904 a sparkling decoration (as of sequins) or material decorated with this
Diamantina
geographical name 1. intermittent river maximum length 560 miles (901 kilometers) E central Australia in SW Queensland flowing SW into Warburton Creek 2. city E Brazil in ...
diameter
noun Etymology: Middle English diametre, from Middle French, from Latin diametros, from Greek, from dia- + metron measure — more at measure Date: 14th century 1. a chord ...
diametral
adjective see diameter
diametric
or diametrical adjective Date: 1553 1. of, relating to, or constituting a diameter ; located at the diameter 2. completely opposed ; being at opposite extremes • ...
diametrical
adjective see diametric
diametrically
adverb see diametric
diamide
noun Date: 1866 a compound containing two amido groups
diamine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1866 a compound containing two amino groups
diammonium phosphate
noun Date: circa 1929 a white crystalline compound (NH4)2HPO4 used especially as a fertilizer and as a fire retardant
Diamond
or Kumgang geographical name mountains SE North Korea; highest 5374 feet (1638 meters)
diamond
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English diamaunde, from Middle French diamand, from Late Latin diamant-, diamas, alteration of Latin adamant-, adamas hardest ...
Diamond Bar
geographical name city S California E of Los Angeles population 56,287
Diamond Head
geographical name promontory Hawaii on Oahu Island in SE Honolulu
diamond in the rough
Date: 1785 one having exceptional qualities or potential but lacking refinement or polish
diamondback
adjective Date: 1887 having marks like diamonds or lozenges on the back
diamondback moth
noun Date: 1891 a nearly cosmopolitan moth (Plutella xylostella of the family Plutellidae) whose larva is a pest on cruciferous plants
diamondback rattler
noun see diamondback rattlesnake
diamondback rattlesnake
noun Date: 1894 either of two large and deadly rattlesnakes (Crotalus adamanteus of the southeastern United States and C. atrox of the south central and southwestern United ...
diamondback terrapin
noun Date: 1887 any of several terrapins (genus Malaclemys) formerly widely distributed in salt marshes along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts but now much restricted
diamondiferous
adjective Date: 1870 containing diamonds
Diana
noun Etymology: Latin Date: 13th century an ancient Italian goddess of the forest and of childbirth who was identified with Artemis by the Romans
dianthus
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek dios heavenly + anthos flower — more at deity, anthology Date: circa 1766 pink II,1
diapason
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from Greek (hē) dia pasōn (chordōn symphōnia), literally, the concord through all the notes, from dia through + pasōn, genitive ...
diapause
noun Etymology: Greek diapausis pause, from diapauein to pause, from dia- + pauein to stop Date: 1893 a period of physiologically enforced dormancy between periods of activity
diapausing
adjective Date: 1944 undergoing diapause
diapedesis
noun (plural diapedeses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek diapēdēsis, literally, act of leaping through, from diapēdan to leap through, from dia- + pēdan to leap Date: 1625 ...
diaper
I. noun Etymology: Middle English diapre, from Anglo-French diaspre, from Medieval Latin diasprum Date: 14th century 1. a fabric with a distinctive pattern: a. a rich silk ...
diaper rash
noun skin irritation of the diaper-covered area of an infant especially from exposure to feces and urinary ammonia
diaphaneity
noun Date: 15th century the quality or state of being diaphanous
diaphanous
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin diaphanus, from Greek diaphanēs, from diaphainein to show through, from dia- + phainein to show — more at fancy Date: 1614 1. ...
diaphanously
adverb see diaphanous
diaphanousness
noun see diaphanous
diaphone
noun Date: 1906 a fog signal similar to a siren but producing a blast of two tones
diaphorase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary diaphor- (from Greek diaphoros different, from diapherein to differ, from dia- + pherein to carry) + -ase — more at bear ...
diaphoresis
noun (plural diaphoreses) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek diaphorēsis, from diaphorein to dissipate by perspiration, from dia- + phorein, frequentative of pherein to carry ...
diaphoretic
adjective Date: 15th century 1. having the power to increase perspiration 2. perspiring profusely • diaphoretic noun
diaphragm
noun Etymology: Middle English diafragma, from Late Latin diaphragma, from Greek, from diaphrassein to barricade, from dia- + phrassein to enclose Date: 14th century 1. a body ...
diaphragmatic
adjective see diaphragm
diaphragmatically
adverb see diaphragm
diaphyseal
adjective see diaphysis
diaphysial
adjective see diaphysis
diaphysis
noun (plural diaphyses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, spinous process of the tibia, from diaphyesthai to grow between, from dia- + phyein to bring forth — more at be ...
diapir
noun Etymology: French, probably from Greek diapeirein to drive through, from dia- + peirein to pierce; akin to Greek poros passage — more at fare Date: 1918 an anticlinal ...
diapiric
adjective see diapir
diapositive
noun Date: 1893 a positive photographic image on transparent material (as glass or film)
diapsid
adjective Etymology: ultimately from Greek di- + hapsid-, hapsis loop, arch — more at apsis Date: circa 1909 of, relating to, or including reptiles (as the crocodiles) with ...
Diarbekr
geographical name see Diyarbakir
diarchy
variant of dyarchy
diarist
noun Date: circa 1818 one who keeps a diary
diaristic
adjective Date: 1884 of, relating to, or characteristic of a diary
diarrhea
noun Etymology: Middle English diaria, from Late Latin diarrhoea, from Greek diarrhoia, from diarrhein to flow through, from dia- + rhein to flow — more at stream Date: 14th ...
diarrheal
adjective see diarrhea
diarrheic
adjective see diarrhea
diarrhetic
adjective see diarrhea
diarrhoea
chiefly British variant of diarrhea
diarthrosis
noun (plural diarthroses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek diarthrōsis, from diarthroun to joint, from dia- + arthroun to fasten by a joint, from arthron joint — more at ...
diary
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Latin diarium, from dies day — more at deity Date: 1581 1. a record of events, transactions, or observations kept daily or at frequent ...
Dias
biographical name Bartholomeu circa 1450-1500 Portuguese navigator
diaspora
noun Etymology: Greek, dispersion, from diaspeirein to scatter, from dia- + speirein to sow Date: 1881 1. capitalized a. the settling of scattered colonies of Jews outside ...
diaspore
noun Etymology: French, from Greek diaspora Date: 1805 a mineral consisting of aluminum hydrogen oxide
diasporic
adjective see diaspora
diastase
noun Etymology: French, from Greek diastasis separation, interval, from diistanai to separate, from dia- + histanai to cause to stand — more at stand Date: 1838 1. amylase; ...
diastatic
adjective Date: 1881 relating to or having the properties of diastase; especially converting starch into sugar
diastema
noun (plural -mas or diastemata) Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin, interval, from Greek diastēma, from diistanai Date: 1854 a space between teeth in a jaw
diastereoisomer
noun see diastereomer
diastereoisomeric
adjective see diastereomer
diastereoisomerism
noun see diastereomer
diastereomer
or diastereoisomer noun Date: 1936 a stereoisomer of a compound having two or more chiral centers that is not a mirror image of another stereoisomer of the same compound — ...
diastereomeric
adjective see diastereomer
diastole
noun Etymology: Greek diastolē dilatation, from diastellein to expand, from dia- + stellein to prepare, send Date: circa 1578 a rhythmically recurrent expansion; especially ...
diastolic
adjective see diastole
diastrophic
adjective see diastrophism
diastrophically
adverb see diastrophism
diastrophism
noun Etymology: Greek diastrophē twisting, from diastrephein to distort, from dia- + strephein to twist Date: 1890 tectonism • diastrophic adjective • diastrophically ...
diatessaron
noun Etymology: Greek (Euangelion) dia tessarōn, literally, Gospel out of four, from dia through, out of + tessarōn, genitive of tessares four — more at dia-, four Date: ...
diathermic
adjective see diathermy
diathermy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1909 the generation of heat in tissue by electric currents for medical or surgical purposes • diathermic adjective
diathesis
noun (plural diatheses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, literally, arrangement, from diatithenai to arrange, from dia- + tithenai to set — more at do Date: 1651 a ...
diathetic
adjective see diathesis
diatom
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek diatomos cut in half, from diatemnein to cut through, from dia- + temnein to cut — more at tome Date: 1845 any of a class ...
diatomaceous
adjective Date: 1847 consisting of or abounding in diatoms or their siliceous remains
diatomaceous earth
noun Date: 1883 a light friable siliceous material derived chiefly from diatom remains and used especially as a filter
diatomic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1859 consisting of two atoms ; having two atoms in the molecule
diatomite
noun Date: 1887 diatomaceous earth
diatonic
adjective Etymology: Late Latin diatonicus, from Greek diatonikos, from diatonos stretching, from diateinein to stretch out, from dia- + teinein to stretch — more at thin ...
diatonically
adverb see diatonic
diatribe
noun Etymology: Latin diatriba, from Greek diatribē pastime, discourse, from diatribein to spend (time), wear away, from dia- + tribein to rub — more at throw Date: 1581 1. ...
Díaz
I. biographical name Armando 1861-1928 Duca della Vittoria Italian general; marshal of Italy II. biographical name (José de la Cruz) Porfirio 1830-1915 Mexican general; ...

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