Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>
Díaz de Vivar
biographical name — see cid
Díaz Ordaz
biographical name Gustavo 1911-1979 president of Mexico (1964-70)
diazepam
noun Etymology: benzodiazepine + -am (of unknown origin) Date: circa 1961 a tranquilizer C16H13ClN2O used especially to relieve anxiety and tension and as a muscle relaxant
diazinon
noun Etymology: from Diazinon, a trademark Date: 1957 a cholinesterase-inhibiting organophosphate insecticide C12H21N2O3PS
diazo
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary diaz-, diazo-, from di- + az- Date: 1878 1. a. relating to or containing the group N2 composed of two nitrogen ...
diazonium
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary di- + az- + -onium Date: 1895 the monovalent cation N2+ that is composed of two nitrogen atoms united to carbon in an ...
diazotization
noun see diazotize
diazotize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary di- + azote nitrogen + -ize — more at az- Date: circa 1889 to convert (a compound) into a ...
dibasic
adjective Date: 1857 having two replaceable hydrogen atoms — used of acids
dibber
noun Date: 1658 dibble
dibble
I. noun Etymology: Middle English debylle Date: 15th century a small hand implement used to make holes in the ground for plants, seeds, or bulbs II. transitive verb (dibbled; ...
dibenzofuran
noun Date: 1940 a highly toxic chemical compound C12H8O that is used in chemical synthesis and as an insecticide and is a hazardous pollutant when chlorinated
dibs
noun plural Etymology: short for dibstones jacks, from obsolete dib to dab Date: 1812 1. slang money especially in small amounts 2. claim, rights
dibutyl phthalate
noun Etymology: phthalic acid + 1-ate Date: 1925 a colorless oily ester C16H22O4 used chiefly as a solvent, plasticizer, pesticide, and repellent (as for chiggers and mites)
dicalcium silicate
noun Date: 1925 a calcium silicate 2CaO•SiO2 that is an essential ingredient of portland cement
dicamba
noun Etymology: perhaps from dichlor- + Cambilene + Banlene (two commercial preparations containing dicamba) Date: 1965 a systemic herbicide C8H6Cl2O3
dicarboxylic
adjective Date: circa 1890 containing two carboxyl groups in the molecule
dicast
noun Etymology: Greek dikastēs, from dikazein to judge, from dikē judgment — more at diction Date: 1820 an ancient Athenian performing the functions of both judge and ...
dice
I. noun (plural dice) Etymology: Middle English dyce, from dees, dyce, plural of dee die — more at die Date: 14th century 1. a. die 1 b. a gambling game played with ...
dicentric
adjective Date: 1937 having two centromeres • dicentric noun
dicer
noun see dice II
dicey
adjective (dicier; -est) Etymology: 1dice + -y Date: 1950 risky, unpredictable
dich-
or dicho- combining form Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from dicha; akin to Greek di- in two ; apart
dichasium
noun (plural dichasia) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek dichasis halving, from dichazein to halve, from dicha Date: 1875 a cymose inflorescence that produces two main axes
dichlor-
or dichloro- combining form containing two atoms of chlorine
dichloro-
combining form see dichlor-
dichlorobenzene
noun Date: 1873 any of three isomeric compounds C6H4Cl2; especially paradichlorobenzene
dichlorodifluoromethane
noun Date: 1936 a chlorofluoromethane CCl2F2
dichloroethane
noun Date: 1936 a colorless toxic liquid compound C2H4Cl2 that is used chiefly as a solvent
dichlorvos
noun Etymology: dichlor- + vinyl + phosphate Date: 1957 an organophosphorus insecticide and anthelmintic C4H7Cl2O4P used especially in veterinary medicine — called also ...
dicho-
combining form see dich-
dichogamous
adjective see dichogamy
dichogamy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: German Dichogamie, from dich- + -gamie -gamy Date: 1862 the production of male and female reproductive elements at different times by a ...
dichondra
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from di- + Greek chondros grain — more at grind Date: 1947 any of a genus (Dichondra) of chiefly tropical perennial herbs of the ...
dichotic
adjective Etymology: dich- + 2-otic Date: circa 1911 relating to or involving the presentation of a stimulus to one ear that differs in some respect (as pitch, loudness, ...
dichotically
adverb see dichotic
dichotomist
noun Date: circa 1592 one that dichotomizes
dichotomization
noun see dichotomize
dichotomize
verb (-mized; -mizing) Etymology: Late Latin dichotomos Date: 1606 transitive verb to divide into two parts, classes, or groups intransitive verb to exhibit dichotomy ...
dichotomous
adjective Etymology: Late Latin dichotomos, from Greek, from dich- + temnein to cut — more at tome Date: 1752 1. dividing into two parts 2. relating to, involving, or ...
dichotomous key
noun Date: circa 1889 a key for the identification of organisms based on a series of choices between alternative characters
dichotomously
adverb see dichotomous
dichotomousness
noun see dichotomous
dichotomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: Greek dichotomia, from dichotomos Date: 1610 1. a division into two especially mutually exclusive or contradictory groups or entities ; also ...
dichroic
adjective Etymology: Greek dichroos two-colored, from di- + chrōs color, literally, skin Date: circa 1859 1. having the property of dichroism 2. dichromatic
dichroism
noun Date: 1819 the property of some crystals and solutions of absorbing one of two plane-polarized components of transmitted light more strongly than the other; also the ...
dichromat
noun Etymology: back-formation from dichromatic Date: circa 1909 one affected with dichromatism
dichromate
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1864 a usually orange to red chromium salt containing the anion Cr2O72- — called also bichromate
dichromatic
adjective Date: circa 1847 1. having or exhibiting two colors 2. of, relating to, or exhibiting dichromatism
dichromatism
noun Date: circa 1901 partial color blindness in which only two colors are perceptible
dichroscope
noun Date: 1857 an instrument for examining crystals for dichroism
dick
noun Etymology: Dick, nickname for Richard Date: 1553 1. chiefly British fellow, chap 2. usually vulgar penis 3. [by shortening & alteration] detective
Dick
biographical name George Frederick 1881-1967 & Gladys Henry 1881-1963 American physicians
Dick test
noun Etymology: George F. Dick and Gladys H. Dick Date: 1925 a test to determine susceptibility or immunity to scarlet fever by an injection of scarlet fever toxin
dickcissel
noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1886 a common migratory black-throated finch (Spiza americana of the family Cardinalidae) of the central United States
dickens
noun Etymology: euphemism Date: 1598 devil, deuce
Dickens
biographical name Charles John Huffam 1812-1870 pseudonym Boz English novelist • Dickensian adjective
Dickensian
adjective see Dickens
dicker
I. noun Etymology: Middle English dyker, from Latin decuria quantity of ten, from decem ten — more at ten Date: 14th century the number or quantity of 10 especially of ...
dickey
or dicky; also dickie noun (plural dickeys or dickies) Etymology: Dicky, nickname for Richard Date: 1807 1. any of various articles of clothing: as a. a man's separate or ...
Dickey
biographical name James Lafayette 1923-1997 American poet, novelist, & critic
dickey bird
or dicky bird noun Date: 1781 a small bird
dickhead
noun Etymology: dick (penis) + head Date: 1964 usually vulgar a stupid or contemptible person
dickie
noun see dickey
Dickinson
I. biographical name Emily Elizabeth 1830-1886 American poet II. biographical name John 1732-1808 American statesman
dicky
noun see dickey
dicky bird
noun see dickey bird
diclinous
adjective Date: 1828 having the stamens and pistils in separate flowers
dicot
noun Date: 1877 dicotyledon
dicotyledon
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1727 any of a class or subclass (Magnoliopsida or Dicotyledoneae) of angiospermous plants that produce an embryo with two cotyledons and ...
dicotyledonous
adjective see dicotyledon
dicoumarin
noun Date: 1886 dicumarol
dicoumarol
noun see dicumarol
dicrotic
adjective Etymology: Greek dikrotos, from di- + krotos rattling noise, beat Date: circa 1811 1. of the pulse having a double beat 2. being or relating to the second part of ...
dicrotism
noun see dicrotic
dict
abbreviation dictionary
Dictaphone
trademark — used for a dictating machine
dictate
I. verb (dictated; dictating) Etymology: Latin dictatus, past participle of dictare to assert, dictate, frequentative of dicere to say — more at diction Date: 1581 ...
dictating machine
noun Date: 1907 a machine used especially for the recording of human speech for transcription
dictation
noun Date: 1651 1. a. prescription b. arbitrary command 2. a. (1) the act or manner of uttering words to be transcribed (2) material that is dictated or ...
dictator
noun Etymology: Latin, from dictare Date: 14th century 1. a. a person granted absolute emergency power; especially one appointed by the senate of ancient Rome b. one ...
dictatorial
adjective Date: 1701 1. a. of, relating to, or befitting a dictator b. ruled by a dictator 2. oppressive to or arrogantly overbearing toward others • dictatorially ...
dictatorially
adverb see dictatorial
dictatorialness
noun see dictatorial
dictatorship
noun Date: 1542 1. the office of dictator 2. autocratic rule, control, or leadership 3. a. a form of government in which absolute power is concentrated in a dictator or ...
diction
noun Etymology: Latin diction-, dictio speaking, style, from dicere to say; akin to Old English tēon to accuse, Latin dicare to proclaim, dedicate, Greek deiknynai to show, ...
dictional
adjective see diction
dictionally
adverb see diction
dictionary
noun (plural -naries) Etymology: Medieval Latin dictionarium, from Late Latin diction-, dictio word, from Latin, speaking Date: 1526 1. a reference source in print or ...
dictum
noun (plural dicta; also dictums) Etymology: Latin, from neuter of dictus, past participle of dicere Date: 1599 1. a noteworthy statement: as a. a formal pronouncement of a ...
dicty-
or dictyo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek dikty-, diktyo-, from diktyon, from dikein to throw net
dictyo-
combining form see dicty-
dictyosome
noun Date: 1893 any of the membranous or vesicular structures making up the Golgi apparatus
dictyostele
noun Date: circa 1902 a stele in which the vascular cylinder is broken up into a longitudinal series or network of vascular strands around a central pith (as in many ferns)
dicumarol
also dicoumarol noun Etymology: di- + coumarin + 1-ol Date: 1942 a crystalline compound C19H12O6 originally obtained from spoiled sweet clover hay and used to delay clotting ...
dicynodont
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek di- + kyn-, kyōn dog + odont-, odous tooth — more at hound, tooth Date: 1854 any of a suborder (Dicynodontia) of small herbivorous ...
did
past of do
didact
noun Etymology: back-formation from didactic Date: 1954 a didactic person
didactic
adjective Etymology: Greek didaktikos, from didaskein to teach Date: 1658 1. a. designed or intended to teach b. intended to convey instruction and information as well ...
didactical
adjective see didactic
didactically
adverb see didactic
didacticism
noun see didactic
didactics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1800 systematic instruction ; pedagogy
didanosine
noun Etymology: alteration of dideoxyinosine, an alternate name, from di- + deoxy + inosine, a nucleoside Date: 1990 ddI
diddle
verb (diddled; diddling) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1786 transitive verb 1. chiefly dialect to move with short rapid motions 2. to waste (as time) in trifling 3. ...
diddler
noun see diddle
diddly
noun Date: 1964 slang diddly-squat
diddly-squat
noun Etymology: probably alteration of doodly-squat Date: 1963 slang the least amount ; anything at all
Diderot
biographical name Denis 1713-1784 French encyclopedist
didgeridoo
also didjeridoo noun Etymology: probably of imitative origin Date: 1919 a large bamboo or wooden trumpet of the Australian aborigines
didjeridoo
noun see didgeridoo
didn't
Date: 1675 did not
dido
noun (plural didoes or didos) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1807 1. a mischievous or capricious act ; prank, antic — often used in the phrase cut didoes 2. something ...
Dido
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Didō Date: 14th century a legendary queen of Carthage in Virgil's Aeneid who kills herself when Aeneas leaves her
didst
archaic past second singular of do
didymium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek didymos twin, from dyo two — more at two Date: 1842 a mixture of rare-earth elements made up chiefly of neodymium and praseodymium and ...
die
I. intransitive verb (died; dying) Etymology: Middle English dien, from or akin to Old Norse deyja to die; akin to Old High German touwen to die Date: 12th century 1. to pass ...
die hard
phrasal 1. to be long in dying 2. to continue resistance against hopeless odds
die off
intransitive verb Date: 1697 to die sequentially either singly or in numbers so that the total number is greatly diminished
die on the vine
phrasal to fail especially at an early stage through lack of support or enthusiasm
die out
intransitive verb Date: 1853 to become extinct
die Schweiz
geographical name see Switzerland
die-hard
adjective Date: 1922 strongly or fanatically determined or devoted ; especially strongly resisting change • diehard noun • die-hardism noun
die-hardism
noun see die-hard
die-off
noun Date: 1936 a sudden sharp decline of a population of animals or plants that is not caused directly by human activity
dieback
noun Date: circa 1886 a condition in woody plants in which peripheral parts are killed (as by parasites)
Diefenbaker
biographical name John George 1895-1979 prime minister of Canada (1957-63)
dieffenbachia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Ernst Dieffenbach died 1855 German naturalist Date: circa 1900 any of a genus (Dieffenbachia) of erect poisonous tropical American plants of ...
Diego Garcia
geographical name island in Indian Ocean, chief island of Chagos Archipelago
Diégo-Suarez
geographical name — see Antsiranana
diehard
noun see die-hard
diel
adjective Etymology: irregular from Latin dies day + English -al Date: circa 1935 involving a 24-hour period that usually includes a day and the adjoining night
dieldrin
noun Etymology: Diels-Alder reaction (an addition reaction forming a 6-membered ring), after Otto Diels & Kurt Alder Date: circa 1949 a white crystalline persistent toxic ...
dielectric
noun Etymology: dia- + electric Date: 1837 a nonconductor of direct electric current • dielectric adjective
dielectric constant
noun Date: 1875 permittivity
dielectric heating
noun Date: 1944 the rapid and uniform heating throughout a nonconducting material by means of a high-frequency electromagnetic field
Diels
biographical name Otto Paul Hermann 1876-1954 German chemist
Dien Bien Phu
geographical name village NW Vietnam
diencephalic
adjective see diencephalon
diencephalon
noun Etymology: New Latin, from dia- + encephalon Date: circa 1883 the posterior subdivision of the forebrain • diencephalic adjective
diene
noun Etymology: di- + -ene Date: 1917 a compound containing two double bonds between carbon atoms
Dieppe
geographical name city & port N France N of Rouen population 25,607
dieresis
variant of diaeresis
dies faustus
foreign term Etymology: Latin lucky day
dies infaustus
foreign term Etymology: Latin unlucky day
Dies Irae
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin, day of wrath; from the first words of the hymn Date: 1860 a medieval Latin hymn on the Day of Judgment sung in requiem masses
dies irae
foreign term Etymology: Latin day of wrath — used of the Judgment Day
diesel
noun Etymology: Rudolf Diesel Date: 1894 1. diesel engine 2. a vehicle driven by a diesel engine 3. diesel fuel
Diesel
biographical name Rudolf 1858-1913 German mechanical engineer
diesel engine
noun Date: 1894 an internal combustion engine in which air is compressed to a temperature sufficiently high to ignite fuel injected into the cylinder where the combustion and ...
diesel fuel
noun Date: 1949 a heavy mineral oil used as fuel in diesel engines
diesel-electric
adjective Date: 1914 of, relating to, or employing a diesel engine for driving an electric generator or for charging batteries
dieseling
noun Date: circa 1955 the continued operation of an internal combustion engine after the ignition is turned off
dieselization
noun see dieselize
dieselize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1925 to equip with a diesel engine or with diesel-electric locomotives • dieselization noun
diesis
noun (plural dieses) Etymology: probably from Italian, sharp (in music), symbol for a sharp, from Medieval Latin, quarter tone, from Latin, from Greek, from diiēnai to send ...
diester
noun Date: 1935 a compound containing two ester groups
diestock
noun Date: circa 1859 a stock to hold dies used for cutting threads
diestrous
adjective see diestrus
diestrus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from dia- + estrus Date: 1942 a period of sexual quiescence that intervenes between two periods of estrus • diestrous adjective
diet
I. noun Etymology: Middle English diete, from Anglo-French, from Latin diaeta, from Greek diaita, literally, manner of living, from diaitasthai to lead one's life Date: 13th ...
dietarily
adverb see dietary II
dietary
I. noun (plural dietaries) Date: 1838 the kinds and amounts of food available to or eaten by an individual, group, or population II. adjective Date: 1614 of or relating to ...
dietary law
noun Date: 1907 any of the laws observed by Orthodox Jews that permit or prohibit certain foods
dietary supplement
noun Date: 1967 a product taken orally that contains one or more ingredients (as vitamins or amino acids) that are intended to supplement one's diet and are not considered food
dieter
noun see diet II
dietetic
adjective Date: 1579 1. of or relating to diet 2. adapted for use in special diets • dietetically adverb
dietetically
adverb see dietetic
dietetics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1799 the science or art of applying the principles of nutrition to the diet
diether
noun Date: 1950 a compound containing two atoms of oxygen with ether linkages
diethyl ether
noun Date: circa 1930 ether 3a
diethyl zinc
noun Date: 1952 a volatile pyrophoric liquid compound C4H10Zn used especially to catalyze polymerization and to deacidify paper
diethylcarbamazine
noun Etymology: di- + ethyl + carboxy- + amide + azine Date: 1948 an anthelmintic administered in the form of its crystalline citrate C10H21N3O•C6H8O7 especially to control ...
diethylstilbestrol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1938 a colorless crystalline synthetic compound C18H20O2 used as a potent estrogen but contraindicated in pregnancy ...
dietician
noun see dietitian
dietitian
or dietician noun Etymology: dietitian irregular from 1diet + -ician Date: circa 1846 a specialist in dietetics
Dietrich
biographical name Marlene 1901?-1992 American (German-born) actress & singer
Dieu et mon droit
foreign term Etymology: French God and my right — motto on the British royal arms
Dieu vous garde
foreign term Etymology: French God keep you
Diez
biographical name Friedrich Christian 1794-1876 German philologist
diff
noun Date: 1896 slang difference
differ
intransitive verb (differed; differing) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French differer to postpone, be different, from Latin differre, from dis- + ...
difference
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the quality or state of being different b. an instance of differing in nature, form, or quality c. archaic a characteristic that ...
different
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin different-, differens, present participle of differre Date: 14th century 1. partly or totally unlike in nature, form, or ...
differentia
noun (plural differentiae) Etymology: Latin, difference, from different-, differens Date: 1551 an element, feature, or factor that distinguishes one entity, state, or class ...
differentiability
noun see differentiate
differentiable
adjective see differentiate
differential
I. adjective Date: 1647 1. a. of, relating to, or constituting a difference ; distinguishing b. making a distinction between individuals or classes c. based on or ...
differential calculus
noun Date: 1702 a branch of mathematics concerned chiefly with the study of the rate of change of functions with respect to their variables especially through the use of ...
differential diagnosis
noun Date: circa 1860 the distinguishing of a disease or condition from others presenting with similar signs and symptoms
differential equation
noun Date: 1763 an equation containing differentials or derivatives of functions — compare partial differential equation
differential gear
noun Date: circa 1859 differential 3a
differential geometry
noun Date: circa 1909 a branch of mathematics using calculus to study the geometric properties of curves and surfaces
differentially
adverb see differential I
differentiate
verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1816 transitive verb 1. to obtain the mathematical derivative of 2. to mark or show a difference in ; constitute a difference that ...
differentiation
noun Date: 1802 1. the act or process of differentiating 2. development from the one to the many, the simple to the complex, or the homogeneous to the heterogeneous 3. a. ...
differently
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in a different manner 2. otherwise
differently abled
adjective Date: 1981 disabled, challenged — compare abled
differentness
noun see different I
difficile
adjective Etymology: French, literally, difficult Date: 1536 stubborn, unreasonable
difficult
adjective Etymology: Middle English, back-formation from difficulty Date: 14th century 1. hard to do, make, or carry out ; arduous 2. a. hard to deal with, manage, or ...
difficultly
adverb see difficult
difficulty
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English difficulte, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French difficulté, from Latin difficultas, from difficilis not easy, from dis- + ...
diffidence
noun Date: 14th century the quality or state of being diffident
diffident
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin diffident-, diffidens, present participle of diffidere to distrust, from dis- + fidere to trust — more at bide Date: 15th ...
diffidently
adverb see diffident
diffract
transitive verb Etymology: back-formation from diffraction Date: 1803 to cause to undergo diffraction
diffraction
noun Etymology: New Latin diffraction-, diffractio, from Latin diffringere to break apart, from dis- + frangere to break — more at break Date: 1671 a modification which ...
diffraction grating
noun Date: 1867 grating 3
diffractometer
noun Date: circa 1909 an instrument for analyzing the structure of a usually crystalline substance from the scattering pattern produced when a beam of radiation or particles ...
diffractometric
adjective see diffractometer
diffractometry
noun see diffractometer
diffuse
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin diffusus, past participle of diffundere to spread out, from dis- + fundere to pour — more at found Date: 15th century 1. ...
diffuse-porous
adjective Etymology: 1diffuse Date: circa 1902 having vessels more or less evenly distributed throughout an annual ring and not varying greatly in size — compare ...
diffusely
adverb see diffuse I
diffuseness
noun see diffuse I
diffuser
noun Date: circa 1679 1. one that diffuses: as a. a device (as a reflector) for distributing the light of a lamp evenly b. a screen (as of cloth or frosted glass) for ...
diffusible
adjective see diffuse II
diffusion
noun Date: 14th century 1. the action of diffusing ; the state of being diffused 2. prolixity, diffuseness 3. a. the process whereby particles of liquids, gases, or ...
diffusional
adjective see diffusion
diffusionism
noun see diffusionist
diffusionist
noun Date: 1893 an anthropologist who emphasizes the role of diffusion in the history of culture rather than independent invention or discovery • diffusionism noun • ...
diffusive
adjective Date: 1614 tending to diffuse ; characterized by diffusion • diffusively adverb • diffusiveness noun • diffusivity noun
diffusively
adverb see diffusive
diffusiveness
noun see diffusive
diffusivity
noun see diffusive
difunctional
adjective Date: 1943 of, relating to, or being a compound with two highly reactive sites in each molecule
dig
I. verb (dug; digging) Etymology: Middle English diggen Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. a. to break up, turn, or loosen (as earth) with an implement b. to ...
dig in
verb Date: 1827 transitive verb 1. to cover or incorporate by burying 2. to establish in a dug defensive position intransitive verb 1. to establish a defensive ...
dig in one's heels
phrasal to take or persist in an uncompromising position or attitude despite opposition
dig out
verb Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. find, unearth 2. to make hollow by digging intransitive verb take off 2a
dig up
transitive verb Date: 14th century find, unearth
digamy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: Late Latin digamia, from Late Greek, from Greek digamos married to two people, from di- + -gamos -gamous Date: 1635 a second marriage after the ...
digastric
adjective Etymology: New Latin digastricus, from di- + gastricus gastric Date: circa 1721 of, relating to, or being either of a pair of muscles that depress the lower jaw and ...
Digby
biographical name Sir Kenelm 1603-1665 English naval commander, diplomat, & author
digenetic
adjective Etymology: New Latin Digenetica, subclass name (synonym of Digenea), from di- + genetica, neuter plural of geneticus genetic Date: circa 1883 of or relating to a ...
digerati
noun plural Etymology: digital + -erati (as in literati) Date: 1992 persons well versed in computer use and technology
digest
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, systematic arrangement of laws, from Latin digesta, from neuter plural of digestus, past participle of digerere to arrange, distribute, ...
digester
noun Date: 1614 1. one that digests or makes a digest 2. a vessel for digesting especially plant or animal materials
digestibility
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1740 1. the fitness of something for digestion 2. the percentage of a foodstuff taken into the digestive tract that is absorbed into the body
digestible
adjective Date: 14th century capable of being digested
digestif
noun Etymology: French, literally, digestive Date: 1934 an alcoholic drink (as brandy or a liqueur) usually taken after a meal
digestion
noun Date: 14th century the action, process, or power of digesting: as a. the process of making food absorbable by dissolving it and breaking it down into simpler chemical ...
digestive
I. noun Date: 14th century an aid to digestion especially of food II. adjective Date: 15th century 1. relating to or functioning in digestion 2. having the power to ...
digestive gland
noun Date: 1940 a gland secreting digestive enzymes
digestively
adverb see digestive II
digger
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. one that digs b. a tool or machine for digging 2. capitalized, usually disparaging, especially formerly a North American Indian (as a ...
digger wasp
noun Date: 1880 a burrowing wasp; especially any of numerous usually solitary wasps (superfamily Sphecoidea) that dig nest burrows in the soil and provision them with ...
diggings
noun plural Date: 1538 1. a place of excavating especially for ore, metals, or precious stones 2. material dug out 3. a. quarters, premises b. chiefly British ...
dight
transitive verb (dighted or dight; dighting) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English dihtan to arrange, compose, from Latin dictare to dictate, compose Date: 13th century ...
digit
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin digitus finger, toe; perhaps akin to Greek deiknynai to show — more at diction Date: 14th century 1. a. any of the Arabic ...
digital
adjective Etymology: Latin digitalis Date: circa 1656 1. of or relating to the fingers or toes 2. done with a finger 3. of, relating to, or using calculation by ...
digital camera
noun Date: 1976 a camera that records images as digital data instead of on film
digital computer
noun Date: 1947 a computer that operates with numbers expressed directly as digits — compare analog computer, hybrid computer
digital versatile disc
noun Date: 1995 DVD
digital video disc
noun Date: 1993 DVD
digitalin
noun Etymology: New Latin Digitalis Date: 1837 1. a white crystalline steroid glycoside C36H56O14 obtained from seeds especially of the common foxglove 2. a mixture of the ...
digitalis
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Latin, of a finger, from digitus; from its finger-shaped corolla Date: 1664 1. foxglove 2. the dried powdered leaf of the common ...
digitalization
noun Etymology: digitalis Date: circa 1882 the administration of digitalis until the desired physiological adjustment is attained; also the bodily state so produced
digitalize
I. transitive verb (-lized; -lizing) Etymology: digitalis Date: 1927 to subject to digitalization II. transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Etymology: digital Date: 1962 ...
digitally
adverb see digital
digitate
adjective Date: 1661 having divisions arranged like those of a bird's foot • digitately adverb
digitately
adverb see digitate
digiti-
combining form Etymology: French, from Latin digitus digit ; finger
digitigrade
adjective Etymology: French, from digiti- + -grade Date: 1824 walking on the digits with the posterior of the foot more or less raised

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.040 c;