Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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digitization
noun see digitize
digitize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1953 to convert (as data or an image) to digital form • digitization noun • digitizer noun
digitizer
noun see digitize
digitizing tablet
noun Date: 1980 graphics tablet
digitonin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary digit- (from New Latin Digitalis) + saponin Date: 1875 a steroid saponin C56H92O29 occurring in the leaves and seeds of ...
digitoxigenin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, blend of digitoxin and -gen Date: circa 1909 a steroid lactone C23H34O4 obtained especially by hydrolysis of digitoxin
digitoxin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, blend of New Latin Digitalis and International Scientific Vocabulary toxin Date: circa 1883 a poisonous cardiotonic ...
diglyceride
noun Date: 1918 an ester formed from glycerol by reacting two of its hydroxyl groups with fatty acids
dignified
adjective Date: 1584 showing or expressing dignity
dignify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English dignifien, from Middle French dignifier, from Late Latin dignificare, from Latin dignus worthy — more at decent Date: ...
dignitary
noun (plural -taries) Date: 1603 one who possesses exalted rank or holds a position of dignity or honor • dignitary adjective
dignity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English dignete, from Anglo-French digneté, from Latin dignitat-, dignitas, from dignus Date: 13th century 1. the quality or state of ...
digoxin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary dig- (from New Latin Digitalis) + toxin Date: circa 1930 a poisonous cardiotonic steroid C41H64O14 obtained from a ...
digraph
noun Date: 1780 1. a group of two successive letters whose phonetic value is a single sound (as ea in bread or ng in sing) or whose value is not the sum of a value borne by ...
digraphic
adjective see digraph
digraphically
adverb see digraph
digress
intransitive verb Etymology: Latin digressus, past participle of digredi, from dis- + gradi to step — more at grade Date: 1529 to turn aside especially from the main subject ...
digression
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or an instance of digressing in a discourse or other usually organized literary work 2. archaic a going aside • digressional adjective ...
digressional
adjective see digression
digressionary
adjective see digression
digressive
adjective Date: circa 1611 characterized by digressions • digressively adverb • digressiveness noun
digressively
adverb see digressive
digressiveness
noun see digressive
dihedral
noun Date: circa 1911 1. dihedral angle 2. the angle between an aircraft supporting surface (as a wing) and a horizontal transverse line
dihedral angle
noun Etymology: di- + -hedral Date: 1826 a figure formed by two intersecting planes
dihybrid
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1907 of, relating to, involving, or being an individual or strain that is heterozygous at two genetic loci • ...
dihydr-
or dihydro- combining form combined with two atoms of hydrogen
dihydro-
combining form see dihydr-
dihydroergotamine
noun Date: 1945 a hydrogenated derivative C33H37N5O5 of ergotamine that is used in the treatment of migraine
dihydrotestosterone
noun Date: 1965 a biologically active metabolite C19H30O2 of testosterone having similar androgenic activity
dihydroxy-
combining form containing two hydroxyl groups
dihydroxyacetone
noun Date: 1895 a glyceraldehyde isomer C3H6O3 used especially to stain the skin to simulate a tan
Dijon
geographical name city E France population 151,636
Dijon mustard
noun Etymology: Dijon, France Date: 1938 a prepared mustard made from dark mustard seeds, white wine, and spices
dik-dik
noun (plural dik-diks or dik-dik) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1883 any of a genus (Madoqua) of small antelopes of eastern and southern Africa having an elongated snout
dike
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, probably from Old Norse dīk ditch and Middle Low German dīk dam; akin to Old English dīc ditch — more at ditch Date: 13th century 1. ...
diker
noun see dike II
Diksmuide
or Dixmuide or Dixmude geographical name town W Belgium in West Flanders N of Ieper population 15,273
diktat
noun Etymology: German, literally, something dictated, from New Latin dictatum, from Latin, neuter of dictatus, past participle of dictare to dictate Date: 1933 1. a harsh ...
dil
abbreviation dilute
Dilantin
trademark — used for phenytoin
dilapidate
verb (-dated; -dating) Etymology: Latin dilapidatus, past participle of dilapidare to squander, destroy, from dis- + lapidare to pelt with stones, from lapid-, lapis stone ...
dilapidated
adjective Date: 1565 decayed, deteriorated, or fallen into partial ruin especially through neglect or misuse
dilapidation
noun see dilapidate
dilatability
noun see dilate
dilatable
adjective see dilate
dilatancy
noun Date: 1565 the property of being dilatant
dilatant
adjective Date: 1885 increasing in viscosity and setting to a solid as a result of deformation by expansion, pressure, or agitation
dilatation
noun Date: 14th century 1. amplification in writing or speech 2. a. the condition of being stretched beyond normal dimensions especially as a result of overwork, disease, ...
dilatational
adjective see dilatation
dilate
verb (dilated; dilating) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French dilater, from Latin dilatare, literally, to spread wide, from dis- + latus wide — more at latitude Date: ...
dilated
adjective Date: 15th century 1. expanded laterally; especially being flat and widened 2. expanded normally or abnormally in all dimensions
dilation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or action of dilating ; the state of being dilated ; expansion, dilatation 2. the action of stretching or enlarging an organ or part of the ...
dilative
adjective Date: 1634 causing dilation ; tending to dilate
dilatometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1883 an instrument for measuring expansion • dilatometric adjective • dilatometry noun
dilatometric
adjective see dilatometer
dilatometry
noun see dilatometer
dilator
noun see dilate
dilatorily
adverb see dilatory
dilatoriness
noun see dilatory
dilatory
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French dilatorie, Late Latin dilatorius, from Latin differre (past participle dilatus) to postpone, differ — more at differ, ...
dildo
noun (plural dildos; also dildoes) Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1593 an object serving as a penis substitute for vaginal insertion
dilemma
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Late Greek dilēmmat-, dilēmma, probably back-formation from Greek dilēmmatos involving two assumptions, from di- + lēmmat-, lēmma assumption ...
dilemmatic
adjective see dilemma
dilettante
noun (plural -tantes or dilettanti) Etymology: Italian, from present participle of dilettare to delight, from Latin dilectare — more at delight Date: 1748 1. an admirer or ...
dilettantish
adjective see dilettante
dilettantism
noun see dilettante
Dili
or Dilli geographical name city & port N Timor capital of East Timor
diligence
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin diligentia, from diligent-, diligens Date: 14th century 1. a. persevering application ; assiduity b. ...
diligent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin diligent-, diligens, from present participle of diligere to esteem, love, from di- (from dis- apart) + legere ...
diligently
adverb see diligent
Dill
biographical name Sir John Greer 1881-1944 British general
dill pickle
noun Date: 1904 a pickle seasoned with fresh dill
dill weed
noun Date: 1933 dill 1
dilled
adjective see dill
Dilli
geographical name see Dili
Dillon
biographical name John 1851-1927 Irish nationalist politician
dilly
noun (plural dillies) Etymology: obsolete dilly, adjective, delightful, perhaps by shortening & alteration from delightful Date: 1935 one that is remarkable or outstanding
dilly bag
noun Etymology: Yagara (Australian aboriginal language of Queensland) dili coarse grass, fiber bag Date: 1867 an Australian mesh bag made of native fibers
dillydally
intransitive verb Etymology: reduplication of dally Date: 1741 to waste time by loitering or delaying ; dawdle
diltiazem
noun Etymology: probably from International Scientific Vocabulary dilator + benzothiazepin, tricyclic compound structurally similar to benzodiazepine + -m (as in diazepam) ...
diluent
noun Etymology: Latin diluent-, diluens, present participle of diluere Date: circa 1721 a diluting agent (as the vehicle in a medicinal preparation)
dilute
I. transitive verb (diluted; diluting) Etymology: Latin dilutus, past participle of diluere to wash away, dilute, from di- + lavere to wash — more at lye Date: circa 1555 1. ...
diluteness
noun see dilute II
diluter
noun see dilute I
dilution
noun Date: 1646 1. the action of diluting ; the state of being diluted 2. something (as a solution) that is diluted 3. a lessening of real value (as of equity) by a ...
dilutive
adjective see dilute I
dilutor
noun see dilute I
diluvial
or diluvian adjective Etymology: Late Latin diluvialis, from Latin diluvium deluge — more at deluge Date: circa 1656 of, relating to, or brought about by a flood
diluvian
adjective see diluvial
dim
I. adjective (dimmer; dimmest) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English dimm; akin to Old High German timber dark Date: before 12th century 1. a. emitting or having a ...
dim bulb
noun Date: 1927 slang dimwit
dim sum
noun (plural dim sums; also dim sum) Etymology: Chinese (Guangdong) dímsām, from dím dot, speck + sām heart Date: 1948 traditional Chinese food consisting of a variety of ...
dim-witted
adjective Date: 1934 not mentally bright ; stupid • dim-wittedly adverb • dim-wittedness noun
dim-wittedly
adverb see dim-witted
dim-wittedness
noun see dim-witted
DiMaggio
biographical name Joseph Paul 1914-1999 the Yankee Clipper American baseball player
dime
noun Etymology: Middle English, tenth part, tithe, from Anglo-French disme, dime, from Latin decima, from feminine of decimus tenth, from decem ten — more at ten Date: ...
dime bag
noun see dime
dime novel
noun Date: 1864 a usually paperback melodramatic novel; especially one popular in the United States from about the mid-19th century to the early 20th often featuring a Western ...
dime store
noun Date: circa 1928 five-and-ten
dime-store
adjective Date: 1938 1. inexpensive 2. tawdry, second-rate
dimenhydrinate
noun Etymology: dimethyl + amine + hydr- + amine + 1-ate Date: circa 1950 a crystalline antihistamine C24H28ClN5O3 used especially to prevent nausea (as in motion sickness)
dimension
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin dimension-, dimensio, from dimetiri to measure out, from dis- + metiri to measure — more at measure Date: ...
dimensional
adjective see dimension I
dimensionality
noun see dimension I
dimensionally
adverb see dimension I
dimensionless
adjective see dimension I
dimer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1926 a compound formed by the union of two radicals or two molecules of a simpler compound; specifically a ...
dimercaprol
noun Etymology: di- + mercaptan + propane + 1-ol Date: 1947 a compound C3H8OS2 developed as an antidote against lewisite and used to treat arsenic, mercury, and gold poisoning ...
dimeric
adjective see dimer
dimerization
noun see dimer
dimerize
transitive verb see dimer
dimeter
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek dimetros, adjective, being a dimeter, from di- + metron measure — more at measure Date: 1589 a line of verse consisting of two ...
dimethoate
noun Etymology: dimethyl + thio acid + 1-ate Date: 1960 an organophosphorous insecticide and miticide C5H12NO3PS2 used especially on crops and ornamental plants
dimethyl
adjective containing two methyl groups in the molecule — often used in combination
dimethyl sulfoxide
noun Date: 1964 a compound C2H6SO obtained as a by-product in wood-pulp manufacture and used as a solvent and in medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent — called also DMSO
dimethylhydrazine
noun Date: 1961 either of two flammable corrosive isomeric liquids C2H8N2 which are methylated derivatives of hydrazine and of which one is used as a rocket fuel
dimethylnitrosamine
noun Date: 1965 a carcinogenic nitrosamine C2H6N2O that occurs especially in tobacco smoke
dimethyltryptamine
noun Date: 1966 a naturally occurring or easily synthesized hallucinogenic drug C12H16N2 that is chemically similar to but shorter acting than psilocybin — called also DMT
dimin
abbreviation diminuendo
diminish
verb Etymology: Middle English deminishen, alteration of diminuen, from Anglo-French diminuer, from Late Latin diminuere, alteration of Latin deminuere, from de- + minuere to ...
diminishable
adjective see diminish
diminished
adjective Date: circa 1751 of a musical interval made one half step less than perfect or minor
diminishing returns
noun plural Date: 1815 1. a rate of yield that beyond a certain point fails to increase in proportion to additional investments of labor or capital 2. benefits that beyond a ...
diminishment
noun see diminish
diminuendo
adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, literally, diminishing, from Late Latin diminuendum, gerund of diminuere Date: 1775 decrescendo • diminuendo noun
diminution
noun Etymology: Middle English diminucioun, from Anglo-French diminutiun, from Medieval Latin diminution-, diminutio, alteration of Latin deminution-, deminutio, from deminuere ...
diminutive
I. noun Etymology: Middle English diminutif, from Medieval Latin diminutivum, alteration of Late Latin deminutivum, from neuter of deminutivus, adjective, from deminutus, past ...
diminutively
adverb see diminutive II
diminutiveness
noun see diminutive II
Dimitrios
biographical name 1914-1991 Dimitrios Papadopoulos archbishop of Constantinople and ecumenical patriarch (1972-91)
Dimitrovgrad
geographical name city S Bulgaria on the Maritsa ESE of Plovdiv population 56,882
dimity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: alteration of Middle English demyt, from Medieval Latin dimitum, from Middle Greek dimitos of double thread, from Greek di- + mitos warp thread ...
dimly
adverb see dim I
DIMM
abbreviation dual in-line memory module
dimmable
adjective see dim I
dimmer
noun Date: circa 1896 1. a device for regulating the intensity of an electric lighting unit 2. low beam
dimness
noun see dim I
dimorphic
adjective Date: 1859 1. a. dimorphous 1 b. occurring in two distinct forms 2. combining qualities of two kinds of individuals in one
dimorphism
noun Date: 1832 the condition or property of being dimorphic or dimorphous: as a. the existence of two different forms (as of color or size) of a species especially in the ...
dimorphous
adjective Etymology: Greek dimorphos having two forms, from di- + -morphos -morphous Date: 1832 1. crystallizing in two different forms 2. dimorphic 1b
dimout
noun Date: 1942 a restriction limiting the use or showing of lights at night especially during the threat of an air raid; also a condition of partial darkness produced by this ...
dimple
I. noun Etymology: Middle English dympull; akin to Old High German tumphilo whirlpool, Old English dyppan to dip — more at dip Date: 15th century 1. a slight natural ...
dimply
adjective see dimple I
dimwit
noun Date: 1921 a stupid or mentally slow person
DIN
abbreviation Etymology: German Deutsche Industrie-Normen German Industrial Standards
din
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English dyne; akin to Old Norse dynr din, Sanskrit dhvanati it roars Date: before 12th century 1. a loud continued noise; ...
dinar
noun Etymology: Arabic dīnār, from Late Greek dēnarion denarius, from Latin denarius — more at denier Date: 1634 1. a gold coin formerly used in countries of southwest ...
Dinaric Alps
geographical name range of E Alps W Slovenia, W Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, & Montenegro; highest point 8274 feet (2522 meters)
dine
I. verb (dined; dining) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French disner, diner to eat, have a meal, from Vulgar Latin *disjejunare to break one's fast, from Latin dis- + ...
dine out
intransitive verb Date: 1736 to eat a meal away from home
dine out on
phrasal to use as a subject for dining table conversation
diner
noun Date: 1815 1. a person who dines (as in a restaurant) 2. a. dining car b. a restaurant usually resembling a dining car in shape
diner-out
noun (plural diners-out) Date: 1808 a person who dines out
Dinesen
biographical name Isak 1885-1962 pseudonym of Karen Christence Dinesen, Baroness Blixen-Finecke Danish author
dinette
noun Date: 1925 a small space usually off a kitchen used for informal dining; also furniture for such a space
ding
I. verb Etymology: probably imitative Date: 1582 transitive verb to dwell on with tiresome repetition intransitive verb 1. to make a ringing sound ; clang 2. to ...
ding-a-ling
noun Etymology: reduplication of 1ding Date: circa 1935 nitwit, kook
ding-dong
I. noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1611 1. the ringing sound produced by repeated strokes especially on a bell 2. nitwit, kook II. intransitive verb Date: 1659 1. to ...
dingbat
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1904 1. a typographical symbol or ornament (as •, ¶, or ✠) 2. nitwit, kook
dinge
noun Etymology: back-formation from dingy Date: 1846 the condition of being dingy
dinger
noun Etymology: perhaps from ding to strike + 2-er Date: 1974 home run 1
dinghy
noun (plural dinghies) Etymology: Bengali ḍiṅgi, Urdu ḍīngī & Hindi ḍieṁgī Date: 1810 1. an East Indian rowboat or sailboat 2. a. a small boat carried on or ...
dingily
adverb see dingy
dinginess
noun see dingy
dingle
noun Etymology: Middle English, deep hollow Date: 13th century a small wooded valley ; dell
Dingle Bay
geographical name inlet of the Atlantic SW Ireland
dingo
noun (plural dingoes) Etymology: Dharuk (Australian aboriginal language of the Port Jackson area) diŋgu Date: 1789 a wild dog (Canis dingo) of Australia having a tan or ...
dingus
noun Etymology: Dutch or German; Dutch dinges, probably from German Dings, from genitive of Ding thing, from Old High German — more at thing Date: 1876 doodad 2
Dingwall
geographical name burgh N Scotland NW of Inverness population 4815
dingy
adjective (dingier; -est) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1691 1. dirty, unclean 2. shabby, squalid • dingily adverb • dinginess noun
dining car
noun Date: 1838 a railroad car in which meals are served
dining room
noun Date: 1601 a room used for eating meals
dinitro
adjective containing two nitro groups — often used in combination
dinitrobenzene
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1873 any of three isomeric toxic compounds C6H4(NO2)2
dinitrophenol
noun Date: 1873 any of six isomeric crystalline compounds C6H4N2O5 some of whose derivatives are pesticides
dink
I. noun Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1903 dinghy II. noun Etymology: dink to hit with a drop shot, probably of imitative origin Date: 1939 drop shot III. ...
Dinka
noun (plural Dinkas; also Dinka) Etymology: probably ultimately from Dinka jieŋ, a self-designation Date: 1861 1. a member of a pastoral people of the Nile Valley in south ...
dinkey
or dinky noun (plural dinkeys or dinkies) Etymology: probably from dinky Date: 1874 a small locomotive
dinkum
I. adjective Etymology: English dialect dinkum, noun, work, share of work Date: 1905 Australian & New Zealand authentic, genuine — often used with fair II. adverb Date: ...
dinky
adjective (dinkier; -est) Etymology: Scots dink neat Date: 1880 overly or unattractively small ; also British attractively small ; cute
dinner
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English diner, from Anglo-French disner, diner meal, from disner to dine Date: 13th century 1. a. the principal meal of the ...
dinner jacket
noun Date: 1891 a jacket for formal evening wear • dinner-jacketed adjective
dinner theater
noun Date: 1960 a restaurant in which a play is presented after the meal is over
dinner-jacketed
adjective see dinner jacket
dinnerless
adjective see dinner
dinnertime
noun Date: 14th century the customary time for dinner
dinnerware
noun Date: 1895 tableware other than flatware
dino
noun (plural dinos) Date: 1936 1. dinosaur 1 2. dinosaur 2
dinoflagellate
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek dinos rotation, eddy + New Latin flagellum Date: 1889 any of an order (Dinoflagellata) of chiefly marine planktonic usually solitary ...
dinosaur
noun Etymology: New Latin Dinosaurus, genus name, from Greek deinos terrifying + sauros lizard — more at dire Date: 1841 1. any of a group (Dinosauria) of extinct often ...
Dinosaur National Monument
geographical name reservation NW Colorado & NE Utah at junction of Green & Yampa rivers containing rich fossil deposits
dinosaurian
adjective see dinosaur
dinosauric
adjective see dinosaur
dint
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English dynt; akin to Old Norse dyntr noise Date: before 12th century 1. archaic blow, stroke 2. force, power 3. dent II II. ...
dinucleotide
noun Date: circa 1927 a nucleotide consisting of two units each composed of a phosphate, a pentose, and a nitrogen base
Dinwiddie
biographical name Robert 1693-1770 English colonial administrator in America
diocesan
noun Date: 15th century a bishop having jurisdiction over a diocese
diocese
noun (plural dioceses) Etymology: Middle English diocise, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin diocesis, alteration of dioecesis, from Latin, administrative division, from Greek ...
Diocletian
biographical name 245-316 Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus Roman emperor (284-305)
diode
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1919 an electronic device that has two electrodes or terminals and is used especially as a rectifier
dioecious
adjective Etymology: ultimately from Greek di- + oikos Date: 1752 1. having male reproductive organs in one individual and female in another 2. having staminate and ...
dioecism
noun see dioecious
dioecy
noun see dioecious
Diogenes
biographical name died circa 320 B.C. Greek Cynic philosopher
diol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1920 a compound containing two hydroxyl groups
diolefin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1909 diene
Diomede Islands
geographical name islands in Bering Strait comprising Big Diomede (Russia) & Little Diomede (United States)
Diomedes
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Diomēdēs Date: 14th century one of the Greek heroes of the Trojan War
Dionysia
noun plural Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from neuter plural of dionysios of Dionysus, from Dionysos Date: 1812 ancient Greek festival observances held in seasonal cycles in ...
Dionysiac
adjective Etymology: Latin dionysiacus, from Greek dionysiakos, from Dionysos Date: 1844 Dionysian 2 • Dionysiac noun
Dionysian
adjective Date: 1607 1. a. of or relating to Dionysius b. of or relating to the theological writings once mistakenly attributed to Dionysius the Areopagite 2. a. ...
Dionysius
I. biographical name circa 430-367 B.C. the Elder Greek tyrant of Syracuse (405-367) II. biographical name the Younger tyrant of Syracuse (367-356; 346-343 B.C.)
Dionysius Exiguus
biographical name circa 500-circa 560 Christian monk
Dionysius of Alexandria
biographical name Saint circa 200-circa 265 theologian & bishop of Alexandria (247)
Dionysius of Halicarnassus
biographical name flourished circa 20 B.C. Greek scholar
Dionysus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Dionysos Date: 1812 Bacchus
Diophantine equation
noun Etymology: Diophantus, 3d century A.D. Greek mathematician Date: circa 1928 an indeterminate polynomial equation which has integral coefficients and for which it is ...
diopside
noun Etymology: French, from di- + Greek opsis appearance — more at optic Date: circa 1808 a green to white mineral that consists of pyroxene containing little or no ...
diopsidic
adjective see diopside
diopter
noun Etymology: diopter (an optical instrument), from Middle French dioptre, from Latin dioptra, from Greek, from dia- + opsesthai to be going to see — more at optic Date: ...
dioptric
adjective Etymology: Greek dioptrikos of a diopter (instrument), from dioptra Date: 1653 refractive; specifically assisting vision by refracting and focusing light
diorama
noun Etymology: French, from dia- + -orama (as in panorama, from English) Date: 1823 1. a scenic representation in which a partly translucent painting is seen from a distance ...
dioramic
adjective see diorama
diorite
noun Etymology: French, irregular from Greek diorizein to distinguish, from dia- + horizein to define — more at horizon Date: 1826 a granular crystalline igneous rock ...
dioritic
adjective see diorite
Dioscuri
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, from Greek Dioskouroi, literally, sons of Zeus, from Dios (genitive of Zeus; akin to Latin divus divine) + kouroi, plural of kouros, koros boy ...
Diospolis
geographical name — see Thebes 1
dioxan
noun see dioxane
dioxane
also dioxan noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1912 a flammable toxic liquid diether C4H8O2 used especially as a solvent
dioxide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1847 an oxide (as carbon dioxide) containing two atoms of oxygen in the molecule
dioxin
noun Date: circa 1919 any of several persistent toxic heterocyclic hydrocarbons that occur especially as by-products of various industrial processes (as pesticide manufacture ...
DIP
abbreviation dual in-line package; dual in-line packaging
dip
I. verb (dipped; dipping) Etymology: Middle English dippen, from Old English dyppan; akin to Old High German tupfen to wash, Lithuanian dubus deep Date: before 12th century ...
dip net
noun Date: 1820 a bag net with a handle that is used especially to scoop fish from the water • dipnet transitive verb
dipeptidase
noun Date: 1927 any of various enzymes that hydrolyze dipeptides but not polypeptides
dipeptide
noun Date: 1903 a peptide that yields two molecules of amino acid on hydrolysis
diphasic
adjective Date: 1881 having two phases
diphenhydramine
noun Date: 1948 an antihistamine C17H21NO used especially in the form of its hydrochloride
diphenylamine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1872 a crystalline pleasant-smelling compound (C6H5)2NH used chiefly in the manufacture of dyes and as an indicator
diphenylhydantoin
noun Etymology: di- + phenyl + hydrogen + allantoin Date: 1937 phenytoin
diphosgene
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1918 a liquid compound C2Cl4O2 used as a poison gas in World War I
diphosphate
noun Date: 1826 a phosphate containing two phosphate groups
diphosphoglyceric acid
noun Date: 1959 a diphosphate of glyceric acid that is an important intermediate in photosynthesis and in glycolysis and fermentation
diphosphopyridine nucleotide
noun Date: 1938 NAD
diphtheria
noun Etymology: New Latin, from French diphthérie, from Greek diphthera leather; from the toughness of the false membrane Date: circa 1851 an acute febrile contagious ...
diphtherial
adjective see diphtheria
diphtheritic
adjective see diphtheria
diphtheroid
I. adjective Date: 1861 resembling diphtheria II. noun Date: 1908 a bacterium (especially genus Corynebacterium) that resembles the bacterium of diphtheria but does not ...
diphthong
noun Etymology: Middle English diptonge, from Middle French diptongue, from Late Latin dipthongus, from Greek diphthongos, from di- + phthongos voice, sound Date: 15th century ...
diphthongal
adjective see diphthong
diphthongization
noun see diphthongize
diphthongize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1867 intransitive verb of a simple vowel to change into a diphthong transitive verb to pronounce as a diphthong • diphthongization noun
diphy-
or diphyo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek diphy-, from diphyēs, from di- + phyein to bring forth — more at be double ; bipartite
diphyletic
adjective Date: 1902 derived from two lines of evolutionary descent
diphyo-
combining form see diphy-
diphyodont
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1854 marked by the successive development of deciduous and permanent sets of teeth
dipl-
or diplo- combining form Etymology: Greek, from diploos — more at double 1. double ; twofold 2. diploid
diplegia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1881 paralysis of corresponding parts on both sides of the body
diplo-
combining form see dipl-
diploblastic
adjective Date: circa 1885 having two germ layers — used of an embryo or lower invertebrate that lacks a true mesoderm
diplococcus
noun (plural diplococci) Etymology: New Latin, genus name Date: circa 1881 any of various encapsulated bacteria (as Streptococcus pneumoniae, a common cause of pneumonia) that ...
diplodocus
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from dipl- + Greek dokos beam, from dekesthai, dechesthai to receive; akin to Latin decēre to be fitting — more at decent Date: 1884 ...

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