Слова на букву deco-elec (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву deco-elec (6389)

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diploe
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek diploē, from diploos double Date: 1597 cancellous bony tissue between the external and internal layers of the skull • diploic ...
diploic
adjective see diploe
diploid
I. adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1908 having two haploid sets of homologous chromosomes • diploidy noun II. noun Date: 1908 a single ...
diploidy
noun see diploid I
diploma
noun (plural diplomas) Etymology: Latin, passport, diploma, from Greek diplōma folded paper, passport, from diploun to double, from diploos Date: 1622 1. plural also diplomata ...
diploma mill
noun Date: 1914 a usually unregulated institution of higher education granting degrees with few or no academic requirements
diplomacy
noun Date: 1796 1. the art and practice of conducting negotiations between nations 2. skill in handling affairs without arousing hostility ; tact
diplomat
noun Etymology: French diplomate, back-formation from diplomatique Date: 1813 one employed or skilled in diplomacy
diplomate
noun Date: 1879 a person who holds a diploma; especially a physician qualified to practice in a medical specialty by advanced training and experience in the specialty ...
diplomatic
adjective Etymology: in sense 1, from New Latin diplomaticus, from Latin diplomat-, diploma; in other senses, from French diplomatique connected with documents regulating ...
diplomatically
adverb see diplomatic
diplomatist
noun Date: 1768 diplomat
diplophase
noun Date: circa 1925 a diploid phase in a life cycle
diplopia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1811 a disorder of vision in which two images of a single object are seen (as from unequal action of the eye muscles) — called also ...
diplopic
adjective see diplopia
diplopod
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek dipl- + pod-, pous foot — more at foot Date: circa 1864 millipede
diplotene
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1925 a stage of meiotic prophase which follows the pachytene and during which the paired homologous chromosomes begin ...
dipnet
transitive verb see dip net
dipnoan
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek dipnoos having two breathing apertures, from di- + pnoē breath, from pnein to breathe — more at sneeze Date: 1883 lungfish
dipodic
adjective see dipody
dipody
noun (plural -dies) Etymology: Late Latin dipodia, from Greek, from dipod-, dipous having two feet, from di- + pod-, pous Date: circa 1844 a prosodic unit or measure of two ...
dipolar
adjective see dipole
dipole
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1912 1. a. a pair of equal and opposite electric charges or magnetic poles of opposite sign separated especially ...
dipole moment
noun Date: 1926 the moment produced by a magnetic or electric dipole; especially the product of the distance between the two poles and the magnitude of either pole
dippable
adjective see dip I
dipper
noun Date: 1611 1. one that dips: as a. a worker who dips articles b. something (as a long-handled cup) used for dipping c. slang pickpocket 2. any of a genus ...
dipperful
noun see dipper
dippiness
noun see dippy
dippy
adjective (dippier; -est) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1899 foolish • dippiness noun
dipshit
noun Date: 1962 usually vulgar a stupid or incompetent person
dipso
noun (plural dipsos) Etymology: by shortening Date: 1880 one affected with dipsomania
dipsomania
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek dipsa thirst + Late Latin mania Date: circa 1844 an uncontrollable craving for alcoholic liquors • dipsomaniac noun • ...
dipsomaniac
noun see dipsomania
dipsomaniacal
adjective see dipsomania
dipstick
noun Date: 1927 1. a graduated rod for indicating depth (as of oil in a crankcase) 2. [euphemism for dipshit] nitwit 3. a chemically sensitive strip of paper used to ...
dipteran
adjective Etymology: ultimately from Greek dipteros two-winged, from di- + pteron wing — more at feather Date: circa 1842 of, relating to, or being a fly (sense 2a) • ...
dipterocarp
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek dipteros + -karpos -carpous Date: circa 1876 any of a family (Dipterocarpaceae) of tall hardwood tropical trees chiefly of southeastern ...
dipterous
adjective see dipteran
diptych
noun Etymology: Late Latin diptycha, plural, from Greek, from neuter plural of diptychos folded in two, from di- + ptychē fold Date: 1622 1. a 2-leaved hinged tablet folding ...
diquat
noun Etymology: di- + quaternary Date: 1960 a powerful herbicide and plant desiccant C12H12Br2N2 used especially to control aquatic weeds and to desiccate aerial plant parts ...
dir
abbreviation 1. direction 2. director
Dirac
biographical name Paul Adrien Maurice 1902-1984 English physicist
dirdum
noun Etymology: Middle English (northern dialect) durdan, durdum uproar, of Celtic origin; akin to Welsh dwrdd noise, clamor, Middle Irish dordán humming, droning Date: circa ...
dire
adjective (direr; direst) Etymology: Latin dirus; akin to Greek deinos terrifying, Sanskrit dveṣṭi he hates Date: 1565 1. a. exciting horror b. dismal, oppressive ...
Dire Dawa
geographical name city E Ethiopia population 121,887
dire wolf
noun Date: 1925 a large extinct wolflike mammal (Canis dirus) known from Pleistocene deposits of North America
direct
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French directer, from Latin directus straight, from past participle of dirigere to direct — more at dress Date: 14th century ...
direct action
noun Date: 1912 action that seeks to achieve an end directly and by the most immediately effective means (as boycott or strike)
direct broadcast satellite
noun Date: 1975 a television broadcasting system in which satellite transmissions are received by a dish antenna at the viewing location (as a home)
direct current
noun Date: 1849 an electric current flowing in one direction only and substantially constant in value — abbreviation DC
direct deposit
noun Date: 1974 a method of payment in which money is transferred directly to the payee's account without the use of checks or cash
direct examination
noun Date: circa 1859 the first examination of a witness by the party calling the witness — compare cross-examination
direct lighting
noun Date: 1928 lighting in which the greater part of the light goes directly from the source to the area lit
direct mail
noun Date: circa 1923 printed matter (as circulars) prepared for soliciting business or contributions and mailed directly to individuals
direct marketing
noun Date: 1961 marketing by means of direct communication with consumers (as through catalogs and telemarketing)
direct object
noun Date: 1879 a word or phrase denoting the goal or the result of the action of a verb
direct primary
noun Date: 1900 a primary in which nominations of candidates for office are made by direct vote
direct product
noun Date: circa 1925 Cartesian product; especially a group that is the Cartesian product of two other groups
direct sum
noun Date: circa 1928 Cartesian product — compare direct product
direct tax
noun Date: 1770 a tax exacted directly from the taxpayer
direct variation
noun Date: circa 1949 1. mathematical relationship between two variables that can be expressed by an equation in which one variable is equal to a constant times the other 2. ...
direct-response
adjective Date: 1976 of or relating to direct marketing
directed
adjective Date: 1891 1. subject to supervision or regulation 2. having a positive or negative sense • directedness noun
directedness
noun see directed
direction
noun Date: 15th century 1. guidance or supervision of action or conduct ; management 2. archaic superscription 3. a. an explicit instruction ; order b. assistance in ...
direction angle
noun Date: 1882 an angle made by a given line with an axis of reference; specifically such an angle made by a straight line with the three axes of a rectangular Cartesian ...
direction cosine
noun Date: circa 1889 any of the cosines of the three angles between a directed line in space and the positive direction of the axes of a rectangular Cartesian coordinate ...
direction finder
noun Date: 1913 a radio receiving device for determining the direction of incoming radio waves that typically consists of a coil antenna rotating freely on a vertical axis
directional
adjective Date: 1842 1. of, relating to, or indicating direction in space: a. suitable for detecting the direction from which radio signals come or for sending out radio ...
directionality
noun see directional
directionless
adjective see direction
directionlessness
noun see direction
directive
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. serving or intended to guide, govern, or influence 2. serving to point direction; specifically directional 1b 3. of or relating to ...
directivity
noun Date: 1928 the property of being directional
directly
I. adverb Date: 15th century 1. a. in a direct manner b. in immediate physical contact c. in the manner of direct variation 2. a. without delay ; immediately ...
directly proportional
adjective Date: 1796 related by direct variation — compare inversely proportional
directness
noun Date: 1598 1. the character of being accurate in course or aim 2. strict pertinence ; straightforwardness
Directoire
adjective Etymology: French, from Directoire, the group of five officials who governed France from 1795-99, from directeur director Date: 1864 of, relating to, or imitative of ...
director
noun Date: 15th century one who directs: as a. the head of an organized group or administrative unit (as a bureau or school) b. one of a group of persons entrusted with ...
director's chair
noun Etymology: from its use by motion-picture directors on the set Date: 1953 a lightweight folding armchair with a back and seat usually of cotton duck
director's cut
noun Date: 1981 a version of a motion picture that is edited according to the director's wishes and that usually includes scenes cut from the version created for general ...
directorate
noun Date: 1837 1. the office of director 2. a. a board of directors (as of a corporation) b. membership on a board of directors 3. an executive staff (as of a ...
directorial
adjective Date: 1770 1. serving to direct 2. of or relating to a director or to theatrical or motion-picture direction 3. of, relating to, or administered by a directory
directorship
noun see director
directory
I. adjective Date: 15th century serving to direct; specifically providing advisory but not compulsory guidance II. noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English directorie ...
directress
noun Date: 1580 a woman who is a director
directrice
noun Etymology: French, from Medieval Latin directric-, directrix Date: 1631 directress
directrix
noun (plural directrixes; also directrices) Etymology: Medieval Latin, feminine of Late Latin director, from Latin dirigere Date: 1622 1. archaic directress 2. a fixed curve ...
direful
adjective Date: 1565 1. dreadful 2. ominous • direfully adverb
direfully
adverb see direful
direly
adverb see dire
direness
noun see dire
dirge
noun Etymology: Middle English dirige, the Office of the Dead, from the first word of a Late Latin antiphon, from Latin, imperative of dirigere to direct — more at dress Date: ...
dirgelike
adjective see dirge
dirham
noun Etymology: Arabic, from Latin drachma drachma Date: 1788 1. — see money table 2. — see dinar, riyal at money table
dirigible
I. adjective Etymology: Latin dirigere Date: 1581 capable of being steered II. noun Etymology: dirigible (balloon) Date: 1885 airship
dirigisme
noun Etymology: French, from diriger to direct (from Latin dirigere) + -isme -ism Date: 1947 economic planning and control by the state • dirigiste adjective
dirigiste
adjective see dirigisme
dirigo
foreign term Etymology: Latin I direct — motto of Maine
dirk
I. noun Etymology: Scots durk Date: 1557 a long straight-bladed dagger II. transitive verb Date: 1599 to stab with a dirk
Dirksen
biographical name Everett McKinley 1896-1969 American politician
dirl
intransitive verb Etymology: perhaps alteration of thirl Date: 1513 Scottish tremble, quiver
dirndl
noun Etymology: short for German Dirndlkleid, from German dialect Dirndl girl + German Kleid dress Date: 1937 1. a dress style with tight bodice, short sleeves, low neck, and ...
dirt
noun Etymology: Middle English drit, from Old Norse; akin to Old English drītan to defecate Date: 13th century 1. a. excrement b. a filthy or soiling substance (as mud, ...
dirt bike
noun Date: 1970 a usually lightweight motorcycle designed for operation on unpaved surfaces
dirt cheap
adjective or adverb Date: 1819 exceedingly cheap
dirt farmer
noun Date: 1920 a farmer who earns a living by farming the land especially without the help of hired hands or tenants
dirt-poor
adjective Date: 1937 suffering extreme poverty
dirtbag
noun Date: circa 1967 slang a dirty, unkempt, or contemptible person
dirtily
adverb see dirty I
dirtiness
noun see dirty I
dirty
I. adjective (dirtier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. a. not clean or pure b. likely to befoul or defile with dirt c. contaminated with infecting organisms d. ...
dirty laundry
noun Date: 1967 private matters whose public exposure brings distress and embarrassment — called also dirty linen
dirty linen
noun see dirty laundry
dirty old man
noun Date: 1932 a lecherous older man
dirty pool
noun Date: 1918 underhanded or unsportsmanlike conduct
dirty rice
noun Date: 1954 a Cajun dish of white rice cooked with chopped or ground giblets
dirty tricks
noun plural Date: 1963 underhanded stratagems for obtaining secret information about or sabotaging an enemy or for discrediting an opponent (as in politics) • dirty ...
dirty trickster
noun see dirty tricks
dirty word
noun Date: circa 1774 a word, expression, or idea that is disagreeable or unpopular in a particular frame of reference
Dis
noun Etymology: Latin Date: 1567 the Roman god of the underworld — compare Pluto
dis
I. transitive verb also diss (dissed; dissing) Etymology: short for disrespect Date: 1982 1. slang to treat with disrespect or contempt ; insult 2. slang to find fault with ...
dis aliter visum
foreign term Etymology: Latin the Gods decreed otherwise
dis-
prefix Etymology: Middle English dis-, des-, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French des-, dis-, from Latin dis-, literally, apart; akin to Old English te- apart, Latin duo two ...
disability
noun Date: 1557 1. a. the condition of being disabled b. inability to pursue an occupation because of a physical or mental impairment; also a program providing financial ...
disable
transitive verb (disabled; disabling) Date: 15th century 1. to deprive of legal right, qualification, or capacity 2. to make incapable or ineffective; especially to deprive ...
disabled
adjective Date: 1633 incapacitated by illness or injury; also physically or mentally impaired in a way that substantially limits activity especially in relation to employment ...
disablement
noun see disable
disabuse
transitive verb Etymology: French désabuser, from dés- dis- + abuser to abuse Date: circa 1611 to free from error, fallacy, or misconception
disaccharidase
noun Date: 1961 an enzyme (as maltase or lactase) that hydrolyzes disaccharides
disaccharide
noun Date: 1889 any of a class of sugars (as sucrose) that yields on hydrolysis two monosaccharide molecules
disaccord
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English disacorden, from Anglo-French desacorder, from desacord disagreement, from des- dis- + acord accord Date: 15th century clash, ...
disaccustom
transitive verb Etymology: Middle French desaccoustumer, from Old French desacostumer, from des- dis- + acostomer to accustom Date: 1530 to free from a habit
disadvantage
I. noun Etymology: Middle English disavauntage, from Anglo-French desavantage, from des- dis- + avantage advantage Date: 14th century 1. loss or damage especially to ...
disadvantaged
adjective Date: 1879 lacking in the basic resources or conditions (as standard housing, medical and educational facilities, and civil rights) believed to be necessary for an ...
disadvantagedness
noun see disadvantaged
disadvantageous
adjective Date: 1603 1. constituting a disadvantage 2. derogatory, disparaging • disadvantageously adverb • disadvantageousness noun
disadvantageously
adverb see disadvantageous
disadvantageousness
noun see disadvantageous
disaffect
transitive verb Date: 1635 to alienate the affection or loyalty of; also to fill with discontent and unrest
disaffected
adjective Date: 1632 discontented and resentful especially against authority ; rebellious
disaffiliate
verb Date: circa 1870 transitive verb disassociate intransitive verb to terminate an affiliation • disaffiliation noun
disaffiliation
noun see disaffiliate
disaffirm
transitive verb Date: 1531 1. to refuse to confirm ; annul, repudiate 2. contradict • disaffirmance noun
disaffirmance
noun see disaffirm
disaggregate
verb Date: circa 1828 transitive verb to separate into component parts intransitive verb to break up or apart • disaggregation noun • disaggregative adjective
disaggregation
noun see disaggregate
disaggregative
adjective see disaggregate
disagree
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, to refuse assent, from Anglo-French desagreer, from des- dis- + agreer to agree Date: 15th century 1. to fail to agree 2. to ...
disagreeable
adjective Date: 15th century 1. causing discomfort ; unpleasant, offensive 2. marked by ill temper ; peevish • disagreeableness noun • disagreeably adverb
disagreeableness
noun see disagreeable
disagreeably
adverb see disagreeable
disagreement
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of disagreeing 2. a. the state of being at variance ; disparity b. quarrel
disallow
transitive verb Date: 14th century 1. to deny the force, truth, or validity of 2. to refuse to allow • disallowance noun
disallowance
noun see disallow
disambiguate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1963 to establish a single semantic or grammatical interpretation for • disambiguation noun
disambiguation
noun see disambiguate
disannul
transitive verb Date: 15th century annul, cancel
disappear
verb Date: 15th century intransitive verb 1. to pass from view 2. to cease to be ; pass out of existence or notice transitive verb to cause the disappearance of • ...
disappearance
noun see disappear
disappoint
verb Etymology: Middle English disapointen to dispossess, from Middle French desapointer, from des- dis- + appointer to arrange — more at appoint Date: 15th century ...
disappointed
adjective Date: 1537 1. defeated in expectation or hope 2. obsolete not adequately equipped • disappointedly adverb
disappointedly
adverb see disappointed
disappointing
adjective Date: 1530 failing to meet expectations • disappointingly adverb
disappointingly
adverb see disappointing
disappointment
noun Date: 1604 1. the act or an instance of disappointing ; the state or emotion of being disappointed 2. one that disappoints
disapprobation
noun Date: 1647 the act or state of disapproving ; the state of being disapproved ; condemnation
disapproval
noun Date: 1662 disapprobation, censure
disapprove
verb Date: 1614 transitive verb 1. to pass unfavorable judgment on 2. to refuse approval to ; reject intransitive verb to feel or express disapproval • disapprover ...
disapprover
noun see disapprove
disapprovingly
adverb see disapprove
disarm
verb Etymology: Middle English desarmen, literally, to divest of arms, from Anglo-French desarmer, from des- dis- + armer to arm Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. ...
disarmament
noun see disarm
disarmer
noun see disarm
disarming
adjective Date: 1839 allaying criticism or hostility ; ingratiating • disarmingly adverb
disarmingly
adverb see disarming
disarrange
transitive verb Date: 1744 to disturb the arrangement or order of • disarrangement noun
disarrangement
noun see disarrange
disarray
I. noun Date: 15th century 1. a lack of order or sequence ; confusion, disorder 2. disorderly dress ; dishabille II. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English disarayen, ...
disarticulate
verb Date: 1830 intransitive verb to become disjointed transitive verb disjoint • disarticulation noun
disarticulation
noun see disarticulate
disassemble
verb Date: 1903 transitive verb to take apart intransitive verb 1. to come apart 2. disperse, scatter • disassembly noun
disassembly
noun see disassemble
disassociate
transitive verb Date: 1603 to detach from association ; dissociate • disassociation noun
disassociation
noun see disassociate
disaster
noun Etymology: Middle French & Old Italian; Middle French desastre, from Old Italian disastro, from dis- (from Latin) + astro star, from Latin astrum — more at astral Date: ...
disaster area
noun Date: 1953 an area officially declared to be the scene of an emergency created by a disaster and therefore qualified to receive certain types of governmental aid (as ...
disastrous
adjective Date: 1594 1. attended by or causing suffering or disaster ; calamitous 2. terrible, horrendous • disastrously adverb
disastrously
adverb see disastrous
disavow
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English desavowen, from Anglo-French desavouer, from des- dis- + avouer to avow Date: 14th century 1. to deny responsibility for ; repudiate ...
disavowable
adjective see disavow
disavowal
noun see disavow
disband
verb Etymology: Middle French desbander, from des- dis- + bande band Date: 1591 transitive verb to break up the organization of ; dissolve intransitive verb to break up ...
disbandment
noun see disband
disbar
transitive verb Date: 1633 to expel from the bar or the legal profession ; deprive (an attorney) of legal status and privileges • disbarment noun
disbarment
noun see disbar
disbelief
noun Date: 1672 the act of disbelieving ; mental rejection of something as untrue
disbelieve
verb Date: circa 1644 transitive verb to hold not worthy of belief ; not believe intransitive verb to withhold or reject belief • disbeliever noun
disbeliever
noun see disbelieve
disbenefit
noun Date: 1968 something disadvantageous or objectionable ; drawback
disbud
transitive verb Date: 1727 1. to thin out flower buds in order to improve the quality of bloom of 2. to dehorn (cattle) by destroying the undeveloped horn bud
disburden
verb Date: 1532 transitive verb 1. a. to rid of a burden b. unburden 2. unload intransitive verb discharge • disburdenment noun
disburdenment
noun see disburden
disburse
transitive verb (disbursed; disbursing) Etymology: Middle French desbourser, from Old French desborser, from des- dis- + borse purse, from Medieval Latin bursa Date: 1530 1. ...
disbursement
noun Date: 1596 the act of disbursing; also funds paid out
disburser
noun see disburse
disc
I. variant of disk II. abbreviation discount
disc brake
noun Date: 1904 a brake that operates by the action of a frictional material pressed against the sides of a rotating disc by a caliper
disc jockey
or disk jockey noun Date: 1941 an announcer of a radio show of popular recorded music; also one who plays recorded music for dancing at a nightclub or party
disc-
or disci- or disco- combining form Etymology: Latin, from Greek disk-, disko-, from diskos 1. disk 2. phonograph record
discalced
adjective Etymology: part translation of Latin discalceatus, from dis- + calceatus, past participle of calceare to put on shoes, from calceus shoe, from calc-, calx heel Date: ...
discant
variant of descant
discard
I. verb Date: circa 1586 transitive verb 1. to get rid of especially as useless or unwanted 2. a. to remove (a playing card) from one's hand b. to play (any ...
discardable
adjective see discard I
discarder
noun see discard I
discarnate
adjective Etymology: dis- + -carnate (as in incarnate) Date: 1895 having no physical body ; incorporeal
discern
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French discerner, from Latin discernere to separate, distinguish between, from dis- apart + cernere to sift — more at dis-, certain ...
discernable
adjective see discern
discerner
noun see discern
discernible
adjective see discern
discernibly
adverb see discern
discerning
adjective Date: 1589 showing insight and understanding ; discriminating • discerningly adverb
discerningly
adverb see discerning
discernment
noun Date: 1586 1. the quality of being able to grasp and comprehend what is obscure ; skill in discerning 2. an act of discerning Synonyms: discernment, discrimination, ...
discharge
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French descharger, from Late Latin discarricare, from Latin dis- + Late Latin carricare to load — more at charge Date: 14th ...
discharge lamp
noun Date: 1933 an electric lamp in which an enclosed gas or vapor glows or causes a phosphor coating on the lamp's inner surface to glow
discharge tube
noun Date: 1898 an electron tube which contains gas or vapor at low pressure and through which conduction takes place when a high voltage is applied
dischargeable
adjective see discharge I
dischargee
noun see discharge I
discharger
noun see discharge I
disci-
— see disc-
disciform
adjective Date: 1830 round or oval in shape
disciple
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English discipul & Anglo-French disciple, from Late Latin and Latin; Late Latin discipulus follower of Jesus Christ in his lifetime, from ...
discipleship
noun see disciple
disciplinable
adjective Date: 15th century 1. docile, teachable 2. subject to or deserving discipline
disciplinal
adjective see discipline I
disciplinarian
noun Date: 1639 one who disciplines or enforces order • disciplinarian adjective
disciplinarily
adverb see disciplinary
disciplinarity
noun see disciplinary
disciplinary
adjective Date: 1598 1. a. of or relating to discipline b. designed to correct or punish breaches of discipline 2. of or relating to a particular field of study ...
discipline
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin disciplina teaching, learning, from discipulus pupil Date: 13th century 1. punishment ...
disciplined
adjective Date: 14th century marked by or possessing discipline
discipliner
noun see discipline II
disclaim
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French disclaimer, from dis- + claimer to claim Date: 15th century intransitive verb 1. to make a disclaimer 2. a. obsolete ...
disclaimer
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. a denial or disavowal of legal claim ; relinquishment of or formal refusal to accept an interest or estate b. a writing that embodies a ...
disclamation
noun Date: 1592 renunciation, disavowal
disclimax
noun Date: 1935 a relatively stable ecological community often including kinds of organisms foreign to the region and displacing the climax because of disturbance especially by ...
disclose
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French desclos-, stem of desclore to open, unlock, reveal, from Medieval Latin disclaudere, from Latin dis- + claudere ...
discloser
noun see disclose I
disclosing
adjective Date: 1965 being or using an agent (as a tablet or liquid) that contains a usually red dye that stains dental plaque
disclosure
noun Date: 1567 1. the act or an instance of disclosing ; exposure 2. something disclosed ; revelation
disco
I. noun (plural discos) Etymology: short for discotheque Date: 1964 1. a nightclub for dancing to live and recorded music 2. popular dance music characterized by hypnotic ...
disco-
— see disc-
discographer
noun Date: 1941 a person who compiles discographies
discographic
adjective see discography
discographical
adjective see discography
discographically
adverb see discography
discography
noun (plural -phies) Etymology: French discographie, from disc- + -graphie -graphy Date: 1933 1. a descriptive list of recordings by category, composer, performer, or date of ...
discoid
adjective Etymology: Late Latin discoides quoit-shaped, from Greek diskoeidēs, from diskos disk Date: 1794 1. relating to or having a disk: as a. situated in the floral ...
discoidal
adjective Date: circa 1706 of, resembling, or producing a disk
discoidal cleavage
noun Date: circa 1909 meroblastic cleavage in which a disk of cells is produced at the animal pole of the zygote (as in bird eggs)
discolor
verb Etymology: Middle English discolouren, from Anglo-French desculurer, from Late Latin discolorari, from Latin discolor of another color, from dis- + color color Date: 14th ...
discoloration
noun Date: 1642 1. the act of discoloring ; the state of being discolored 2. a discolored spot or formation ; stain
discombobulate
transitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: probably alteration of discompose Date: circa 1916 upset, confuse • discombobulation noun
discombobulation
noun see discombobulate

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