Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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Ellora
geographical name village W India in central Maharashtra NW of Aurangabad; site of Ellora Caves (temples excavated out of rock cliffs)
Ellore
geographical name see Eluru
Ellsworth
I. biographical name Lincoln 1880-1951 American explorer II. biographical name Oliver 1745-1807 American jurist; chief justice United States Supreme Court (1796-1800)
Ellsworth Land
geographical name region W Antarctica on Bellingshausen Sea
Ellsworth Mountains
geographical name range Antarctica S of Ellsworth Land
elm
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German elme elm, Latin ulmus Date: before 12th century 1. any of a genus (Ulmus of the family Ulmaceae, the ...
elm bark beetle
noun Date: circa 1909 either of two beetles (family Scolytidae) that are vectors for the fungus causing Dutch elm disease: a. one (Hylurgopinus rufipes) native to eastern ...
elm leaf beetle
noun Date: 1881 a small yellow to greenish black-striped Old World chrysomelid beetle (Pyrrhalta luteola) that in the larval and adult stage is a leaf-eating pest of elms in ...
Elman
biographical name Mischa 1891-1967 American (Russian-born) violinist
Elmhurst
geographical name city NE Illinois W of Chicago population 42,762
Elmira
geographical name city S New York population 30,940
Elmwood Park
geographical name village NE Illinois population 25,405
elocution
noun Etymology: Middle English elocucioun, from Latin elocution-, elocutio, from eloqui Date: 15th century 1. a style of speaking especially in public 2. the art of ...
elocutionary
adjective see elocution
elocutionist
noun see elocution
elodea
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek helōdēs marshy, from helos marsh; akin to Sanskrit saras pond Date: circa 1868 any of a small American genus (Elodea) of ...
eloign
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English eloynen, from Anglo-French esloigner, eloigner, from es- ex- (from Latin ex-) + luin, loing (adverb) far, from Latin longe, from longus ...
elongate
I. verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Late Latin elongatus, past participle of elongare, to withdraw, from Latin e- + longus Date: 1578 transitive verb to extend the length ...
elongated
adjective see elongate II
elongation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the angular distance of a celestial body from another around which it revolves or from a particular point in the sky 2. a. the state of being ...
elope
intransitive verb (eloped; eloping) Etymology: Anglo-French aloper, esloper to abduct, run away Date: 1628 1. to slip away ; escape 2. a. to run away from one's ...
elopement
noun see elope
eloper
noun see elope
eloquence
noun Date: 14th century 1. discourse marked by force and persuasiveness; also the art or power of using such discourse 2. the quality of forceful or persuasive ...
eloquent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin eloquent-, eloquens, from present participle of eloqui to speak out, from e- + loqui to speak Date: 14th ...
eloquently
adverb see eloquent
Elphinstone
I. biographical name Mountstuart 1779-1859 British statesman in India II. biographical name William 1431-1514 Scottish bishop & statesman
Elsass
geographical name — see Alsace
else
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English elles, from Old English; akin to Latin alius other, alter other of two, Greek allos other Date: before 12th century 1. a. in a ...
Elsene
geographical name — see Ixelles
elsewhere
adverb Etymology: Middle English elleswher, from Old English elles hwær Date: before 12th century in or to another place
eluant
or eluent noun Etymology: Latin eluent-, eluens, present participle of eluere Date: 1941 a solvent used in eluting
eluate
noun Etymology: Latin eluere + English 1-ate Date: 1932 the washings obtained by eluting
elucidate
verb (-dated; -dating) Etymology: Late Latin elucidatus, past participle of elucidare, from Latin e- + lucidus lucid Date: circa 1568 transitive verb to make lucid ...
elucidation
noun see elucidate
elucidative
adjective see elucidate
elucidator
noun see elucidate
elude
transitive verb (eluded; eluding) Etymology: Latin eludere, from e- + ludere to play — more at ludicrous Date: 1667 1. to avoid adroitly ; evade 2. to escape the ...
eluent
noun see eluant
Elul
noun Etymology: Hebrew Ĕlūl Date: 1535 the 12th month of the civil year or the 6th month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar — see month table
Eluru
or formerly Ellore geographical name city SE India in E Andhra Pradesh population 212,918
elusion
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin elusion-, elusio, from Late Latin, deception, from Latin eludere Date: 1617 an act of eluding
elusive
adjective Date: 1719 tending to elude: as a. tending to evade grasp or pursuit b. hard to comprehend or define c. hard to isolate or identify • elusively ...
elusively
adverb see elusive
elusiveness
noun see elusive
elute
transitive verb (eluted; eluting) Etymology: Latin elutus, past participle of eluere to wash out, from e- + lavere to wash — more at lye Date: 1731 extract; specifically ...
elution
noun see elute
elutriate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin elutriatus, past participle of elutriare to put in a vat, perhaps from *elutrum vat, from Greek elytron reservoir, literally, ...
elutriation
noun see elutriate
elutriator
noun see elutriate
eluvial
adjective see eluviation
eluviated
adjective see eluviation
eluviation
noun Etymology: eluvial of eluviation (from e- + -luvial—as in alluvial) + -ation Date: 1899 the transportation of dissolved or suspended material within the soil by the ...
elver
noun Etymology: alteration of eelfare migration of eels Date: circa 1640 a young eel; specifically a small immature catadromous eel chiefly of fresh and brackish water
elves
plural of elf
elvish
adjective Date: 13th century 1. of or relating to elves 2. mischievous
Ely
geographical name town E England in N central Cambridgeshire
Ely, Isle of
geographical name district & former administrative county (capital Ely) E England in Cambridgeshire — see Cambridgeshire
Elyot
biographical name Sir Thomas 1490?-1546 English scholar & diplomat
Elyria
geographical name city NE Ohio SW of Cleveland population 55,953
elysian
adjective Usage: often capitalized Date: 1579 1. of or relating to Elysium 2. blissful, delightful
elysian fields
noun plural Usage: often capitalized E Date: 1579 Elysium
Elysium
noun (plural -siums or Elysia) Etymology: Latin, from Greek Ēlysion Date: 1567 1. the abode of the blessed after death in classical mythology 2. paradise 2
Elytis
biographical name Odysseus 1911-1996 Greek poet
elytron
noun (plural elytra) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, sheath, wing cover, from eilyein to roll, wrap — more at voluble Date: 1774 one of the anterior wings in beetles and ...
Elzevier
biographical name see Elzevir
Elzevir
or Elzevier biographical name family of Dutch printers including especially Lodewijk or Louis 1546?-1617, his son Bonaventura 1583-1652, & his grandson Abraham 1592-1652
em
noun Date: 13th century 1. the letter m 2. the width of a piece of type about as wide as it is tall used as a unit of measure of typeset matter
EM
abbreviation 1. electromagnetic 2. electron microscope; electron microscopy 3. end matched 4. engineer of mines 5. enlisted man
em-
— see en-
emaciate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin emaciatus, past participle of emaciare, from e- + macies leanness, from macer lean — more at meager Date: 1646 intransitive verb to ...
emaciation
noun see emaciate
emalangeni
plural of lilangeni
emanate
verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Latin emanatus, past participle of emanare, from e- + manare to flow Date: 1756 intransitive verb to come out from a source transitive ...
emanation
noun Date: 1570 1. a. the action of emanating b. the origination of the world by a series of hierarchically descending radiations from the Godhead through intermediate ...
emanative
adjective see emanation
emancipate
transitive verb (-pated; -pating) Etymology: Latin emancipatus, past participle of emancipare, from e- + mancipare to transfer ownership of, from mancip-, manceps contractor, ...
emancipation
noun Date: 1631 the act or process of emancipating • emancipationist noun
emancipationist
noun see emancipation
emancipator
noun see emancipate
emancipatory
adjective see emancipate
emarginate
adjective Etymology: Latin emarginatus, past participle of emarginare to deprive of a margin, from e- + margin-, margo margin Date: 1794 having the margin notched • ...
emargination
noun see emarginate
emasculate
transitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin emasculatus, past participle of emasculare, from e- + masculus male — more at male Date: 1607 1. to deprive of strength, ...
emasculation
noun see emasculate
emasculator
noun see emasculate
embalm
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English embaumen, from Anglo-French enbaumer, enbasmer, from en- + basme balm — more at balm Date: 14th century 1. to treat (a dead body) ...
embalmer
noun see embalm
embalmment
noun see embalm
embank
transitive verb Date: 1576 to enclose or confine by an embankment
embankment
noun Date: 1786 1. a raised structure (as of earth or gravel) used especially to hold back water or to carry a roadway 2. the action of embanking
embarcadero
noun (plural -ros) Etymology: Spanish, from embarcado, past participle of embarcar to embark, from em- (from Latin in-) + barca bark, from Late Latin Date: 1846 West a ...
embargo
I. noun (plural -goes) Etymology: Spanish, from embargar to bar, from Vulgar Latin *imbarricare, from Latin in- + Vulgar Latin *barra bar Date: 1593 1. an order of a ...
embark
verb Etymology: Middle French embarquer, from Old Occitan embarcar, from em- (from Latin in-) + barca bark Date: 1533 intransitive verb 1. to go on board a vehicle for ...
embarkation
noun see embark
embarkment
noun see embark
Embarras
or Embarrass geographical name river 185 miles (298 kilometers) E Illinois flowing SE into the Wabash
embarras de choix
or embarras du choix foreign term Etymology: French embarrassing variety of choice
embarras de richesse
foreign term see embarras de richesses
embarras de richesses
or embarras de richesse foreign term Etymology: French embarrassing surplus of riches ; confusing abundance
embarras du choix
foreign term see embarras de choix
embarrass
verb Etymology: French embarrasser, from Spanish embarazar, from Portuguese embaraçar, from em- (from Latin in-) + baraça noose Date: 1672 transitive verb 1. a. to ...
Embarrass
geographical name see Embarras
embarrassable
adjective see embarrass
embarrassedly
adverb Date: 1883 with embarrassment
embarrassingly
adverb Date: circa 1864 to an embarrassing degree ; so as to cause embarrassment
embarrassment
noun Date: 1729 1. a. something that embarrasses b. an excessive quantity from which to select — used especially in the phrase embarrassment of riches 2. the state ...
embassage
noun Date: 1526 1. the message or commission entrusted to an ambassador 2. archaic embassy
embassy
noun (plural -sies) Etymology: Middle French ambassee, ultimately of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German ambaht service Date: 1534 1. a body of diplomatic ...
embattle
transitive verb (embattled; embattling) Etymology: Middle English embatailen, from Anglo-French embatailler, from en- + batailler to battle Date: 14th century 1. to arrange ...
embattled
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. ready to fight ; prepared to give battle b. engaged in battle, conflict, or controversy 2. a. being a site of battle, ...
embattlement
noun Date: 15th century 1. battlement 2. the state of being embattled
embay
transitive verb Date: 1582 to trap or catch in or as if in a bay
embayment
noun Date: 1815 1. formation of a bay 2. a bay or a conformation resembling a bay
Embden
noun Etymology: Emden, Germany Date: 1903 any of a breed of large white domestic geese with an orange bill and deep orange shanks and toes
embed
also imbed verb (embedded; also imbedded; embedding; also imbedding) Date: circa 1794 transitive verb 1. a. to enclose closely in or as if in a matrix b. to make ...
embedded
adjective Date: 1961 occurring as a grammatical constituent (as a verb phrase or clause) within a like constituent • embedding noun
embedding
noun see embedded
embedment
noun see embed
embellish
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French embeliss-, stem of embelir, from en- + bel beautiful — more at beauty Date: 14th century 1. to make beautiful ...
embellisher
noun see embellish
embellishment
noun Date: 1591 1. the act or process of embellishing 2. something serving to embellish 3. ornament 5
ember
noun Etymology: Middle English eymere, from Old Norse eimyrja; akin to Old English ǣmerge ashes, Latin urere to burn Date: 14th century 1. a glowing fragment (as of coal) ...
ember day
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ymbrendæg, from ymbrene circuit, anniversary + dæg day Date: before 12th century a Wednesday, Friday, or Saturday ...
embezzle
transitive verb (embezzled; embezzling) Etymology: Middle English embesilen, from Anglo-French embesiller to make away with, from en- + besiller to steal, plunder Date: 15th ...
embezzlement
noun see embezzle
embezzler
noun see embezzle
embitter
transitive verb Date: 15th century 1. to excite bitter feelings in 2. to make bitter • embitterment noun
embitterment
noun see embitter
emblaze
I. transitive verb (emblazed; emblazing) Date: 15th century 1. to illuminate especially by a blaze 2. to set ablaze II. transitive verb (emblazed; emblazing) Etymology: en- ...
emblazon
transitive verb (emblazoned; emblazoning) Date: 1589 1. a. to inscribe or adorn with or as if with heraldic bearings or devices b. to inscribe (as heraldic bearings) on ...
emblazoner
noun see emblazon
emblazonment
noun see emblazon
emblazonry
noun Date: 1667 1. emblazoned figures ; brilliant decoration 2. the act or art of emblazoning
emblem
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin emblema inlaid work, from Greek emblēmat-, emblēma, from emballein to insert, from en- + ballein to throw — more at devil ...
emblematic
also emblematical adjective Date: 1645 of, relating to, or constituting an emblem ; symbolic, representative • emblematically adverb
emblematical
adjective see emblematic
emblematically
adverb see emblematic
emblematize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1615 to represent by or as if by an emblem ; symbolize
emblements
noun plural Etymology: Middle English emblayment, from Anglo-French emblaement, from emblaer to sow with grain, from en- + bleé grain, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English ...
embodier
noun see embody
embodiment
noun Date: 1828 1. one that embodies something 2. the act of embodying ; the state of being embodied
embody
transitive verb (embodied; embodying) Date: circa 1548 1. to give a body to (a spirit) ; incarnate 2. a. to deprive of spirituality b. to make concrete and ...
embolden
transitive verb Date: 15th century to instill with boldness or courage
embolectomy
noun (plural -mies) Date: 1923 surgical removal of an embolus
embolic
adjective Date: 1866 of or relating to an embolus or embolism
embolisation
British variant of embolization
embolism
noun Etymology: Middle English embolisme, from Medieval Latin embolismus, from Greek embol- (from emballein to insert, intercalate) — more at emblem Date: 14th century 1. ...
embolismic
adjective see embolism
embolization
noun Date: 1942 the process or state in which a blood vessel or organ is obstructed by the lodgment of a material mass (as an embolus)
embolus
noun (plural emboli) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek embolos wedge-shaped object, stopper, from emballein Date: 1859 an abnormal particle (as an air bubble) circulating in ...
embonpoint
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from en bon point in good condition Date: 1670 plumpness of person ; stoutness
embosom
transitive verb Date: circa 1590 1. archaic to take into or place in the bosom 2. to shelter closely ; enclose
emboss
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English embosen to become exhausted from being hunted, ultimately from Anglo-French bois woods Date: 14th century archaic to drive (as ...
embossable
adjective see emboss II
embosser
noun see emboss II
embossment
noun see emboss II
embouchure
noun Etymology: French, from (s')emboucher to flow into, from en- + bouche mouth — more at debouch Date: 1760 1. the position and use of the lips, tongue, and teeth in ...
embourgeoisement
noun Etymology: French, from embourgeoiser to make bourgeois, from em- + bourgeois Date: 1937 a shift to bourgeois values and practices
embowed
adjective Date: 15th century bent like a bow ; arched
embowel
transitive verb (-eled or -elled; -eling or -elling) Date: 1521 1. disembowel 2. obsolete enclose
embower
transitive verb Date: 1580 to shelter or enclose in or as if in a bower
embrace
I. verb (embraced; embracing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French embracer, from en- + brace pair of arms — more at brace Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. ...
embraceable
adjective see embrace I
embracement
noun see embrace I
embraceor
noun Etymology: Anglo-French embraseour, from embraser to set on fire, from en- + brase, brese live coals, from Old French breze — more at braise Date: 15th century one ...
embracer
noun see embrace I
embracery
noun (plural -eries) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French embraceour Date: 15th century an attempt to influence a jury corruptly
embracingly
adverb see embrace I
embracive
adjective Date: 1855 1. disposed to embrace 2. inclusive, comprehensive
embrangle
transitive verb (-gled; embrangling) Etymology: en- + brangle (squabble) Date: 1664 embroil • embranglement noun
embranglement
noun see embrangle
embrasure
noun Etymology: French, from obsolete embraser to widen an opening Date: 1702 1. an opening with sides flaring outward in a wall or parapet of a fortification usually for ...
embrittle
verb (-brittled; embrittling) Date: 1902 transitive verb to make brittle intransitive verb to become brittle • embrittlement noun
embrittlement
noun see embrittle
embrocation
noun Etymology: Middle English embrocacioun, from Middle French embrocacion, from Medieval Latin embrocation-, embrocatio, from Late Latin embrocare to rub with lotion, from ...
embroider
verb (embroidered; embroidering) Etymology: alteration of Middle English embroderen, from Anglo-French embrouder, from en- + brosder, brouder to embroider, of Germanic origin; ...
embroiderer
noun see embroider
embroidery
noun (plural -deries) Date: 14th century 1. a. the art or process of forming decorative designs with hand or machine needlework b. a design or decoration formed by or as ...
embroil
transitive verb Etymology: French embrouiller, from Middle French, from en- + brouiller to jumble, from Old French brooilier, from Vulgar Latin *brodiculare — more at broil ...
embroilment
noun see embroil
embrown
transitive verb Date: 1667 1. darken 2. to cause to turn brown
embrue
variant of imbrue
embry-
or embryo- combining form Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from embryon embryo
embryo
noun (plural embryos) Etymology: Medieval Latin embryon-, embryo, from Greek embryon, from en- + bryein to swell; akin to Greek bryon catkin Date: 1548 1. a. archaic a ...
embryo sac
noun Date: 1844 the female gametophyte of a seed plant consisting of a thin-walled sac within the nucellus that contains the egg nucleus and other nuclei which give rise to ...
embryo transfer
noun Date: 1966 a procedure used especially in animal breeding in which an embryo from a superovulated female is removed and reimplanted in the uterus of another female — ...
embryo transplant
noun see embryo transfer
embryo-
combining form see embry-
embryogenesis
noun Date: 1830 the formation and development of the embryo • embryogenetic adjective
embryogenetic
adjective see embryogenesis
embryogenic
adjective see embryogeny
embryogeny
noun (plural -nies) Date: 1835 embryogenesis • embryogenic adjective
embryoid
noun Date: circa 1927 a mass of plant or animal tissue that resembles an embryo • embryoid adjective
embryological
adjective see embryology
embryologically
adverb see embryology
embryologist
noun see embryology
embryology
noun Etymology: French embryologie Date: circa 1847 1. a branch of biology dealing with embryos and their development 2. the features and phenomena exhibited in the ...
embryon-
or embryoni- combining form Etymology: Medieval Latin embryon-, embryo embryo
embryonal
adjective Date: 1652 embryonic 1
embryonated
adjective Date: 1687 having an embryo
embryoni-
combining form see embryon-
embryonic
adjective Date: circa 1841 1. of or relating to an embryo 2. being in an early stage of development ; incipient, rudimentary • embryonically adverb
embryonic disk
noun Date: circa 1938 1. a. blastodisc b. blastoderm 2. the part of the inner cell mass of a blastocyst from which the embryo of a placental mammal develops — called ...
embryonic membrane
noun Date: 1947 a structure (as the amnion) that derives from the fertilized ovum but does not form a part of the embryo
embryonic shield
noun see embryonic disk
embryonically
adverb see embryonic
embryophyte
noun Date: circa 1909 any of a subkingdom (Embryophyta) of plants in which the embryo is retained within maternal tissue and which include the bryophytes and tracheophytes
emcee
I. noun Etymology: MC Date: circa 1933 master of ceremonies II. verb (emceed; emceeing) Date: 1937 transitive verb to act as master of ceremonies of intransitive ...
Emden
geographical name city & port NW Germany at mouth of Ems River population 51,103
emend
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin emendare — more at amend Date: 15th century to correct usually by textual alterations Synonyms: see correct • ...
emendable
adjective see emend
emendation
noun Date: 1536 1. the act or practice of emending 2. an alteration designed to correct or improve
emender
noun see emend
emer
abbreviation emeritus
emerald
I. noun Etymology: Middle English emerallde, from Anglo-French esmeralde, from Vulgar Latin *smaralda, from Latin smaragdus, from Greek smaragdos Date: 14th century 1. a rich ...
emerald cut
noun Date: 1926 a rectangular cut for a gem having a series of parallel facets on each side and at each corner
emerald green
noun Date: 1646 1. a clear bright green resembling that of the emerald 2. any of various strong greens
emerge
intransitive verb (emerged; emerging) Etymology: Latin emergere, from e- + mergere to plunge — more at merge Date: 1563 1. to become manifest ; become known 2. to rise ...
emergence
noun Date: 1704 1. the act or an instance of emerging 2. any of various superficial outgrowths of plant tissue usually formed from both epidermis and immediately underlying ...
emergency
noun (plural -cies) Usage: often attributive Date: circa 1631 1. an unforeseen combination of circumstances or the resulting state that calls for immediate action 2. an ...
emergency brake
noun Date: 1900 a brake (as on an automobile) that can be used for stopping in the event of failure of the main brakes and to keep the vehicle from rolling when parked
emergency medical technician
noun Date: 1980 EMT
emergency medicine
noun Date: 1966 a medical specialty concerned with the care and treatment of acutely ill or injured patients who need immediate medical attention
emergency room
noun Date: 1964 a hospital room or area staffed and equipped for the reception and treatment of persons requiring immediate medical care
emergent
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin emergent-, emergens, present participle of emergere Date: 1593 1. a. arising unexpectedly b. calling for prompt ...
emergent evolution
noun Date: 1923 evolution that according to some theories involves the appearance of new characters and qualities at complex levels of organization (as the cell or organism) ...
emerging
adjective Date: 1646 emergent 4
emerita
adjective Etymology: Latin, feminine of emeritus Date: 1928 emeritus — used of a woman
emeritus
I. noun (plural emeriti) Date: 1750 one retired from professional life but permitted to retain as an honorary title the rank of the last office held II. adjective Etymology: ...
emersed
adjective Date: 1686 standing out of or rising above a surface (as of a fluid)
emersion
noun Etymology: Latin emersus, past participle of emergere Date: 1633 an act of emerging ; emergence
Emerson
biographical name Ralph Waldo 1803-1882 American essayist & poet • Emersonian adjective
Emersonian
adjective see Emerson
emery
noun (plural emeries) Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French esmeril, from Old Italian smiriglio, from Medieval Latin smiriglum, from Greek ...
emery board
noun Date: 1725 a cardboard nail file covered with emery
Emesa
geographical name — see Homs
emesis
noun (plural emeses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from emein Date: circa 1847 an act or instance of vomiting
emetic
noun Etymology: Latin emetica, from Greek emetikē, from feminine of emetikos causing vomiting, from emein to vomit — more at vomit Date: 1657 an agent that induces ...
emetically
adverb see emetic
emetine
noun Date: 1819 an emetic alkaloid C29H40N2O4 extracted from ipecac root and used especially to treat amebiasis
émeute
noun (plural émeutes) Etymology: French, from Old French esmeute act of starting, from feminine of esmeut, past participle of esmovoir to start — more at emotion Date: 1782 ...
emf
noun Etymology: electromotive force Date: 1868 potential difference
EMF
abbreviation electromagnetic field
EMG
abbreviation electromyogram; electromyograph; electromyography
emic
adjective Etymology: phonemic Date: 1954 of, relating to, or involving analysis of cultural phenomena from the perspective of one who participates in the culture being ...
emigrant
I. noun Date: 1735 1. one who emigrates 2. a migrant plant or animal II. adjective Date: 1773 departing or having departed from a country to settle elsewhere
emigrate
intransitive verb (-grated; -grating) Etymology: Latin emigratus, past participle of emigrare, from e- + migrare to migrate Date: 1766 to leave one's place of residence or ...
emigration
noun see emigrate
émigré
also emigré noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French émigré, from past participle of émigrer to emigrate, from Latin emigrare Date: 1792 emigrant; especially a ...
emigré
noun see émigré
Emilia
geographical name 1. district N Italy comprising the W part of Emilia-Romagna region 2. — see Emilia-Romagna
Emilia-Romagna
or formerly Emilia or ancient Aemilia geographical name region N Italy bounded by the Po, the Adriatic, & the Apennines capital Bologna area 8543 square miles (22,126 square ...
eminence
noun Date: 15th century 1. a position of prominence or superiority 2. one that is eminent, prominent, or lofty: as a. an anatomical protuberance (as on a bone) b. a ...
éminence grise
noun (plural éminences grises) Etymology: French, literally, gray eminence, nickname of Père Joseph (François du Tremblay) died 1638 French monk and diplomat, confidant of ...
eminency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1604 archaic eminence
eminent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin eminent-, eminens, present participle of eminēre to stand out, from e- + -minēre; ...
eminent domain
noun Date: 1738 a right of a government to take private property for public use by virtue of the superior dominion of the sovereign power over all lands within its ...
eminently
adverb Date: 1616 to a high degree ; very
emir
or amir; also ameer noun Etymology: Arabic amīr commander Date: 1595 a ruler, chief, or commander in Islamic countries
emirate
noun Date: 1847 the state or jurisdiction of an emir
emissary
noun (plural -saries) Etymology: Latin emissarius, from emissus, past participle of emittere Date: 1607 1. one designated as the agent of another ; representative 2. a ...
emission
noun Date: 1607 1. a. an act or instance of emitting ; emanation b. archaic publication c. a putting into circulation 2. a. something sent forth by emitting: as ...
emissive
adjective see emission
emissivity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1880 the relative power of a surface to emit heat by radiation ; the ratio of the radiant energy emitted by a surface to that emitted by a blackbody ...

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