Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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eventless
adjective see event
eventual
adjective Date: 1683 1. archaic contingent, conditional 2. taking place at an unspecified later time ; ultimately resulting
eventuality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1759 a possible event or outcome ; possibility
eventually
adverb Date: circa 1680 at an unspecified later time ; in the end
eventuate
intransitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1789 to come out finally ; result, come about
ever
adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ǣfre Date: before 12th century 1. always 2. a. at any time b. in any way 3. — used as an intensive
ever and anon
phrasal from time to time ; occasionally
everblooming
adjective Date: 1838 blooming more or less continuously throughout the growing season
everduring
adjective Date: 15th century archaic everlasting
Everest, Mount
or Tibetan Chomolungma geographical name mountain 29,035 feet (8850 meters) S Asia on border between Nepal & Tibet in the Himalayas; highest in the world
Everett
I. biographical name Edward 1794-1865 American clergyman, orator, & statesman II. geographical name 1. city E Massachusetts N of Boston population 38,073 2. city NW central ...
everglade
noun Etymology: the Everglades, Fla. Date: 1823 a swampy grassland especially in southern Florida usually containing saw grass and at least seasonally covered by slowly ...
Everglades
geographical name swamp region S Florida S of Lake Okeechobee; now partly drained; SW part forms Everglades National Park
evergreen
I. adjective Date: 1574 1. having foliage that remains green and functional through more than one growing season — compare deciduous 1 2. retaining freshness or interest ; ...
evergreen oak
noun Date: 1673 any of various oaks (as a live oak, a holm oak, or a tan oak) with foliage that persists for two years so that the plant is more or less continuously green
everlasting
I. adjective Date: 13th century 1. lasting or enduring through all time ; eternal 2. a. (1) continuing for a long time or indefinitely (2) having or being flowers ...
everlastingly
adverb see everlasting I
everlastingness
noun see everlasting I
evermore
adverb Date: 13th century 1. forever, always 2. in the future
eversible
adjective see eversion
eversion
noun Date: 1751 1. the act of turning inside out ; the state of being turned inside out 2. the condition (as of the foot) of being turned or rotated outward • eversible ...
evert
transitive verb Etymology: Latin evertere, from e- + vertere to turn — more at worth Date: 1533 1. overthrow, upset 2. to subject to eversion
every
adjective Etymology: Middle English everich, every, from Old English ǣfre ǣlc, from ǣfre ever + ǣlc each Date: before 12th century 1. a. being each individual or part ...
every inch
phrasal to the utmost degree
every now and again
phrasal see every now and then
every now and then
or every now and again or every so often phrasal at intervals ; occasionally
every so often
phrasal see every now and then
every which way
adverb Etymology: probably by folk etymology from Middle English everich way every way Date: 1824 1. in every direction 2. in a disorderly manner ; irregularly
everybody
pronoun Date: 15th century everyone
everyday
adjective Date: circa 1623 encountered or used routinely or typically ; ordinary • everydayness noun
everydayness
noun see everyday
everyman
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Everyman, allegorical character in The Summoning of Everyman, 15th century English morality play Date: 1906 the typical or ordinary ...
everyone
pronoun Date: 13th century every person ; everybody
everyplace
adverb Date: circa 1917 everywhere
everything
pronoun Date: 14th century 1. a. all that exists b. all that relates to the subject 2. all that is important 3. all sorts of other things — used to indicate ...
everywhere
adverb Date: 13th century in every place or part
everywoman
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: after everyman Date: 1945 the typical or ordinary woman
Evesham
geographical name town W central England in Worcester S of Birmingham in Vale of Evesham population 15,271
evg
abbreviation evening
Évian
or Évian-les-Bains geographical name commune E France on Lake Geneva; health resort population 7027
Évian-les-Bains
geographical name see Évian
evict
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin evictus, past participle of evincere, from Latin, to vanquish, win a point — more at evince Date: 15th century 1. ...
evictee
noun Date: 1879 an evicted person
eviction
noun see evict
evictor
noun see evict
evidence
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. a. an outward sign ; indication b. something that furnishes proof ; testimony; specifically something legally submitted to a tribunal to ...
evident
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin evident-, evidens, from e- + vident-, videns, present participle of vidēre to see — more at wit Date: 14th ...
evidential
adjective Date: circa 1641 evidentiary 1 • evidentially adverb
evidentially
adverb see evidential
evidentiary
adjective Date: 1810 1. being, relating to, or affording evidence 2. conducted so that evidence may be presented
evidently
adverb Date: 1609 1. in an evident manner ; clearly, obviously 2. on the basis of available evidence
evil
I. adjective (eviler or eviller; evilest or evillest) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English yfel; akin to Old High German ubil evil Date: before 12th century 1. a. ...
evil eye
noun Date: before 12th century an eye or glance held capable of inflicting harm; also a person believed to have such an eye or glance
evil-minded
adjective Date: 1531 having an evil disposition or evil thoughts • evil-mindedly adverb • evil-mindedness noun
evil-mindedly
adverb see evil-minded
evil-mindedness
noun see evil-minded
evildoer
noun Date: 14th century one who does evil
evildoing
noun Date: 14th century the act or action of doing evil
evilly
adverb see evil I
evilness
noun see evil I
evince
transitive verb (evinced; evincing) Etymology: Latin evincere to vanquish, win a point, from e- + vincere to conquer — more at victor Date: 1604 1. to constitute outward ...
evincible
adjective see evince
eviscerate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin evisceratus, past participle of eviscerare, from e- + viscera viscera Date: 1599 transitive verb 1. a. to take out the entrails ...
evisceration
noun see eviscerate
evitable
adjective Etymology: Latin evitabilis, from evitare to avoid, from e- + vitare to shun Date: 1502 capable of being avoided
evocable
adjective Date: 1886 capable of being evoked
evocation
noun Etymology: Latin evocation-, evocatio, from evocare Date: 1633 1. the act or fact of evoking ; summoning: as a. the summoning of a spirit b. imaginative recreation ...
evocative
adjective Date: 1657 evoking or tending to evoke an especially emotional response • evocatively adverb • evocativeness noun
evocatively
adverb see evocative
evocativeness
noun see evocative
evocator
noun see evocation
evoke
transitive verb (evoked; evoking) Etymology: French évoquer, from Latin evocare, from e- + vocare to call — more at vocation Date: circa 1622 1. to call forth or up: as ...
evolute
noun Date: circa 1736 the locus of the center of curvature or the envelope of the normals of a curve
evolution
noun Etymology: Latin evolution-, evolutio unrolling, from evolvere Date: 1622 1. one of a set of prescribed movements 2. a. a process of change in a certain direction ; ...
evolutionarily
adverb see evolution
evolutionary
adjective see evolution
evolutionary psychologist
noun see evolutionary psychology
evolutionary psychology
noun Date: 1890 the study of human cognition and behavior with respect to their evolutionary origins • evolutionary psychologist noun
evolutionism
noun see evolution
evolutionist
noun or adjective see evolution
evolvable
adjective see evolve
evolve
verb (evolved; evolving) Etymology: Latin evolvere to unroll, from e- + volvere to roll — more at voluble Date: 1775 transitive verb 1. emit 2. a. derive, educe ...
evolvement
noun see evolve
Évora
geographical name city S central Portugal population 34,851
Évreux
geographical name commune N France WNW of Paris population 51,452
Evripos
geographical name narrow strait E Greece between Euboea & mainland
Évros
geographical name — see Maritsa
evulsion
noun Etymology: Latin evulsion-, evulsio, from evellere to pluck out, from e- + vellere to pluck — more at vulnerable Date: circa 1611 extraction
Evvoia
geographical name see Euboea
evzone
noun Etymology: Modern Greek euzōnos, from Greek, active, literally, well girt, from eu- + zōnē girdle — more at zone Date: 1897 a member of a select Greek infantry unit ...
EW
abbreviation enlisted woman
Ewald
biographical name Johannes 1743-1781 Danish poet & dramatist
ewe
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ēowu; akin to Old High German ouwi ewe, Latin ovis sheep, Greek ois Date: before 12th century the female of the sheep ...
Ewe
noun (plural Ewe; also Ewes) Etymology: Ewe eβe, βe, a self-designation Date: 1861 a people of Ghana and Togo speaking a Kwa language; also the language itself
ewe-neck
noun Date: 1820 a thin neck with a concave arch occurring as a defect in dogs and horses • ewe-necked adjective
ewe-necked
adjective see ewe-neck
Ewell
biographical name Richard Stoddert 1817-1872 American Confederate general
ewer
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French ewer, ewier, from Latin aquarium water source, neuter of aquarius of water, from aqua water — more at island Date: 14th ...
Ewig-Weibliche
foreign term Etymology: German eternal feminine
Ewing's sarcoma
noun Etymology: James Ewing died 1943 American pathologist Date: 1927 a malignant bone tumor especially of a long bone or the pelvis
Ex
abbreviation Exodus
ex
I. preposition Etymology: Latin Date: circa 1755 1. out of ; from: as a. from a specified place or source b. from a specified dam 2. free from ; without: as a. ...
ex animo
foreign term Etymology: Latin from the heart ; sincerely
ex cathedra
adverb or adjective Etymology: New Latin, literally, from the chair Date: 1693 by virtue of or in the exercise of one's office or position
ex gratia
adjective or adverb Etymology: New Latin Date: 1769 as a favor ; not compelled by legal right
ex hypothesi
adverb Etymology: New Latin, from a hypothesis Date: 1603 according to assumptions made ; by hypothesis
ex libris
noun (plural ex libris) Etymology: New Latin, from the books; used before the owner's name on bookplates Date: 1880 bookplate
ex mero motu
foreign term Etymology: Latin out of mere impulse ; of one's own accord
ex necessitate rei
foreign term Etymology: Latin from the necessity of the case
ex nihilo
adverb or adjective Etymology: Latin Date: 1656 from or out of nothing
ex nihilo nihil fit
foreign term Etymology: Latin from nothing nothing is produced
ex officio
adverb or adjective Etymology: Late Latin Date: 1533 by virtue or because of an office
ex parte
adverb or adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin Date: 1672 1. on or from one side or party only — used of legal proceedings 2. from a one-sided or partisan point of view
ex pede Herculem
foreign term Etymology: Latin from the foot (we may judge of the size of) Hercules ; from a part we may judge of the whole
ex post facto
I. adverb Etymology: Late Latin, literally, from a thing done afterward Date: 1621 after the fact ; retroactively II. adjective Date: 1787 done, made, or formulated after ...
ex ungue leonem
foreign term Etymology: Latin from the claw (we may judge of) the lion ; from a part we may judge of the whole
ex vi termini
foreign term Etymology: Latin from the force of the term
ex-
I. prefix Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin (also, prefix with perfective and causative value), from ex out of, from; akin to Greek ...
ex-directory
adjective Etymology: Latin ex out of — more at ex- Date: 1936 British not listed in a telephone book ; unlisted
ex-voto
I. noun (plural ex-votos) Etymology: Latin ex voto according to a vow Date: 1787 a votive offering II. adjective Date: 1823 votive
exa-
combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, modification of Greek hexa- hexa- quintillion (1018)
exacerbate
transitive verb (-bated; -bating) Etymology: Latin exacerbatus, past participle of exacerbare, from ex- + acerbus harsh, bitter, from acer sharp — more at edge Date: 1660 ...
exacerbation
noun see exacerbate
exact
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, to require as payment, from Latin exactus, past participle of exigere to drive out, demand, measure, from ex- + agere to drive — ...
exact differential
noun Date: 1825 a differential expression of the form X1dx1 +…+ Xndxn where the X's are the partial derivatives of a function f(x1,…, xn) with respect to x1,…, xn ...
exact science
noun Date: 1843 a science (as physics, chemistry, or astronomy) whose laws are capable of accurate quantitative expression
exacta
noun Etymology: American Spanish (quiniela) exacta exact quiniela Date: 1964 perfecta
exactable
adjective see exact I
exacter
noun see exact I
exacting
adjective Date: 1634 1. tryingly or unremittingly severe in making demands 2. requiring careful attention and precision Synonyms: see onerous • exactingly adverb • ...
exactingly
adverb see exacting
exactingness
noun see exacting
exaction
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the act or process of exacting b. extortion 2. something exacted; especially a fee, reward, or contribution demanded or levied with ...
exactitude
noun Date: 1734 the quality or an instance of being exact ; exactness
exactly
adverb Date: 1612 1. a. in a manner or measure or to a degree or number that strictly conforms to a fact or condition b. in every respect ; altogether, entirely ...
exactness
noun see exact II
exactor
noun see exact I
exaggerate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin exaggeratus, past participle of exaggerare, literally, to heap up, from ex- + agger heap, from aggerere to carry toward, from ad- + gerere ...
exaggeratedly
adverb see exaggerate
exaggeratedness
noun see exaggerate
exaggeration
noun see exaggerate
exaggerative
adjective see exaggerate
exaggerator
noun see exaggerate
exaggeratory
adjective see exaggerate
exalt
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin exaltare, from ex- + altus high — more at old Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to raise in rank, power, or character 2. ...
exaltation
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act of exalting ; the state of being exalted 2. an excessively intensified sense of well-being, power, or importance 3. an increase in ...
exalté
foreign term Etymology: French emotionally excited or elated ; fanatic
exaltedly
adverb see exalt
exalter
noun see exalt
exam
noun Date: 1872 examination
examen
noun Etymology: Latin, tongue of a balance, examination, from exigere — more at exact Date: 1606 1. examination 2. a critical study
examinable
adjective see examine
examinant
noun Date: 1588 1. examinee 2. one who examines ; examiner
examination
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of examining ; the state of being examined 2. an exercise designed to examine progress or test qualification or knowledge 3. ...
examinational
adjective see examination
examine
verb (examined; examining) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French examiner, from Latin examinare, from examen Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to inspect ...
examinee
noun Date: 1788 a person who is examined
examiner
noun see examine
example
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French essample, example, from Latin exemplum, from eximere to take out, from ex- + emere to take — more at redeem Date: 14th ...
exanimate
adjective Etymology: Latin exanimatus, past participle of exanimare to deprive of life or spirit, from ex- + anima breath, soul — more at animate Date: circa 1534 1. ...
exanthem
also exanthema noun (plural -thems; also exanthemata or -themas) Etymology: Late Latin exanthema, from Greek exanthēma, from exanthein to bloom, break out, from ex- + anthos ...
exanthema
noun see exanthem
exanthematic
adjective see exanthem
exanthematous
adjective see exanthem
exaptation
noun Etymology: 1ex- + adaptation Date: 1981 preadaptation
exarch
I. noun Etymology: Late Latin exarchus, from Late Greek exarchos, from Greek, leader, from exarchein to begin, take the lead, from ex- + archein to rule, begin — more at ...
exarchal
adjective see exarch I
exarchate
noun see exarch I
exarchy
noun see exarch I
exasperate
I. transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin exasperatus, past participle of exasperare, from ex- + asper rough — more at asperity Date: 1534 1. a. to excite the ...
exasperatedly
adverb see exasperate I
exasperatingly
adverb see exasperate I
exasperation
noun Date: 1547 1. the state of being exasperated 2. the act or an instance of exasperating
exc
abbreviation 1. excellent 2. except
Excalibur
noun Etymology: Middle English Excalaber, from Anglo-French Escalibor, from Medieval Latin Caliburnus Date: 15th century the sword of King Arthur
excavate
verb (-vated; -vating) Etymology: Latin excavatus, past participle of excavare, from ex- + cavare to make hollow — more at cavatina Date: 1599 transitive verb 1. to form ...
excavation
noun Date: circa 1611 1. the action or process of excavating 2. a cavity formed by cutting, digging, or scooping • excavational adjective
excavational
adjective see excavation
excavator
noun Date: circa 1815 one that excavates; especially a power-operated shovel
exceed
verb Etymology: Middle English exceden, from Middle French exceder, from Latin excedere, from ex- + cedere to go Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to extend outside of ...
exceedance
also exceedence noun Date: circa 1956 an act or instance of exceeding especially a limit or amount
exceedence
noun see exceedance
exceeding
adjective Date: 15th century exceptional in amount, quality, or degree
exceedingly
also exceeding adverb Date: 1535 to an extreme degree ; extremely
excel
verb (excelled; excelling) Etymology: Middle English excellen, from Latin excellere, from ex- + -cellere to rise, project; akin to Latin collis hill — more at hill Date: 15th ...
excellence
noun Date: 14th century 1. the quality of being excellent 2. an excellent or valuable quality ; virtue 3. excellency 2
excellency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 15th century 1. excellence; especially outstanding or valuable quality — usually used in plural 2. — used as a title for high dignitaries of ...
excellent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin excellent-, excellens, from present participle of excellere Date: 14th century 1. archaic superior 2. ...
excellently
adverb see excellent
excelsior
I. noun Etymology: trade name, from Latin, higher, comparative of excelsus high, from past participle of excellere Date: 1868 fine curled wood shavings used especially for ...
except
I. preposition also excepting Date: 14th century with the exclusion or exception of II. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French excepter, from Latin exceptare, ...
except for
preposition Date: 15th century 1. with the exception of 2. were it not for
excepting
I. preposition see except I II. conjunction see except III
exceptio probat regulam de rebus non exceptis
foreign term Etymology: Latin an exception establishes the rule as to things not excepted
exception
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of excepting ; exclusion 2. one that is excepted; especially a case to which a rule does not apply 3. question, objection 4. an ...
exceptionability
noun see exceptionable
exceptionable
adjective Date: 1691 being likely to cause objection ; objectionable • exceptionability noun • exceptionably adverb
exceptionably
adverb see exceptionable
exceptional
adjective Date: 1787 1. forming an exception ; rare 2. better than average ; superior 3. deviating from the norm: as a. having above or below average intelligence ...
exceptionalism
noun Date: 1929 the condition of being different from the norm; also a theory expounding the exceptionalism especially of a nation or region • exceptionalist adjective
exceptionalist
adjective see exceptionalism
exceptionality
noun see exceptional
exceptionally
adverb Date: 1703 in an exceptional manner ; to an exceptional degree; especially more than average or usual
exceptionalness
noun see exceptional
exceptis excipiendis
foreign term Etymology: Latin with the proper or necessary exceptions
exceptive
adjective see except II
excerpt
I. transitive verb Etymology: Latin excerptus, past participle of excerpere, from ex- + carpere to gather, pluck — more at harvest Date: 15th century 1. to select (a ...
excerpter
noun see excerpt I
excerption
noun see excerpt I
excerptor
noun see excerpt I
excess
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French exces, from Late Latin excessus, from Latin, departure, projection, from excedere to exceed ...
excessive
adjective Date: 14th century exceeding what is usual, proper, necessary, or normal • excessively adverb • excessiveness noun Synonyms: excessive, immoderate, ...
excessively
adverb see excessive
excessiveness
noun see excessive
exch
abbreviation exchange; exchanged
exchange
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English exchaunge, from Anglo-French eschange, from eschanger to exchange, from Vulgar Latin *excambiare, from Latin ex- + ...
exchange rate
noun Date: 1855 the ratio at which the principal unit of two currencies may be traded
exchange student
noun Date: circa 1930 a student from one country received into an institution in another country in exchange for one sent to an institution in the home country of the first
exchangeability
noun see exchange II
exchangeable
adjective see exchange II
exchanger
noun see exchange II
Exchangite
noun Etymology: (National) Exchange (club) Date: circa 1934 a member of a major national service club
exchequer
noun Etymology: Middle English escheker, from Anglo-French, chessboard, counting table, exchequer — more at checker Date: 14th century 1. capitalized a department or office ...
excimer laser
noun Etymology: excited + dimer Date: 1973 a laser that uses a noble-gas halide to generate radiation usually in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum
excipient
noun Etymology: Latin excipient-, excipiens, present participle of excipere to take out, take up — more at except Date: circa 1753 a usually inert substance (as gum ...
excisable
adjective Date: 1689 subject to excise
excise
I. noun Etymology: obsolete Dutch excijs (now accijns), from Middle Dutch, probably modification of Old French assise session, assessment — more at assize Date: 15th century ...
exciseman
noun Date: 1647 an officer who inspects and rates articles liable to excise under British law
excision
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Latin excision-, excisio, from excidere Date: 1541 the act or procedure of removing by or as if by cutting out; especially surgical ...
excisional
adjective see excision
excitability
noun see excitable
excitable
adjective Date: 1609 1. capable of being readily roused into action or a state of excitement or irritability 2. capable of being activated by and reacting to stimuli • ...
excitableness
noun see excitable
excitant
adjective Date: 1607 tending to excite or augment • excitant noun
excitation
noun Date: 14th century excitement; especially the disturbed or altered condition resulting from stimulation of an individual, organ, tissue, or cell
excitative
adjective Date: 15th century tending to induce excitation (as of a neuron)
excitatory
adjective Date: 1803 exhibiting, resulting from, related to, or producing excitement or excitation
excite
transitive verb (excited; exciting) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French exciter, from Latin excitare, from ex- + citare to rouse — more at cite Date: 14th century ...
excited state
noun Date: 1927 a state of a physical system (as an atomic nucleus, an atom, or a molecule) that is higher in energy than the ground state
excitedly
adverb see excite
excitement
noun Date: 1604 1. something that excites or rouses 2. the action of exciting ; the state of being excited
exciter
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that excites 2. a. a generator or battery that supplies the electric current used to produce the magnetic field in another generator or ...
exciting
adjective Date: 1647 producing excitement • excitingly adverb
excitingly
adverb see exciting
exciton
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary excitation + 2-on Date: 1936 a mobile combination of an electron and a hole in an excited crystal (as of a semiconductor) ...
excitonic
adjective see exciton
excitor
noun Date: 1816 an afferent nerve arousing increased action of the part that it supplies
excl
abbreviation exclude; excluded; excluding
exclaim
verb Etymology: Middle French exclamer, from Latin exclamare, from ex- + clamare to cry out — more at claim Date: 1566 intransitive verb 1. to cry out or speak in strong ...
exclaimer
noun see exclaim
exclamation
noun Date: 14th century 1. a sharp or sudden utterance 2. vehement expression of protest or complaint
exclamation mark
noun see exclamation point
exclamation point
noun Date: 1824 1. a mark ! used especially after an interjection or exclamation to indicate forceful utterance or strong feeling 2. a distinctive indication of major ...
exclamatory
adjective Date: 1593 containing, expressing, using, or relating to exclamation
exclave
noun Etymology: ex- + -clave (as in enclave) Date: 1888 a portion of a country separated from the main part and constituting an enclave in respect to the surrounding territory
excludability
noun see excludable
excludable
or excludible adjective Date: 1916 subject to exclusion • excludability noun
exclude
transitive verb (excluded; excluding) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin excludere, from ex- + claudere to close — more at close Date: 14th century 1. a. to prevent ...
excluder
noun see exclude
excludible
adjective see excludable
exclusion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin exclusion-, exclusio, from excludere Date: 15th century 1. the act or an instance of excluding 2. the state of ...
exclusion principle
noun Date: 1926 a principle in physics: no two particles (as electrons) in an atom or molecule can have the same set of quantum numbers — called also Pauli exclusion ...
exclusionary
adjective see exclusion
exclusionary rule
noun Date: 1964 a legal rule that bars unlawfully obtained evidence from being used in court proceedings
exclusionist
noun Date: 1822 one who would exclude another from some right or privilege • exclusionist adjective

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