Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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exclusive
I. adjective Date: 1515 1. a. excluding or having power to exclude b. limiting or limited to possession, control, or use by a single individual or group 2. a. ...
exclusive disjunction
noun Date: 1942 a compound proposition in logic that is true when one and only one of its constituent statements is true — see truth table table
exclusive economic zone
noun Date: 1975 the area of sea and seabed extending from the shore of a country claiming exclusive rights to it
exclusive of
preposition Date: 1722 not taking into account
exclusively
adverb see exclusive I
exclusiveness
noun see exclusive I
exclusivism
noun Date: 1834 the practice of excluding or of being exclusive • exclusivist noun or adjective
exclusivist
noun or adjective see exclusivism
exclusivity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1926 1. the quality or state of being exclusive 2. exclusive rights or services
excogitate
transitive verb Etymology: Latin excogitatus, past participle of excogitare, from ex- + cogitare to cogitate Date: circa 1530 to think out ; devise • excogitation noun ...
excogitation
noun see excogitate
excogitative
adjective see excogitate
excommunicate
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin excommunicatus, past participle of excommunicare, from Latin ex- + Late Latin communicare to communicate Date: ...
excommunication
noun Date: 15th century 1. an ecclesiastical censure depriving a person of the rights of church membership 2. exclusion from fellowship in a group or community • ...
excommunicative
adjective see excommunication
excommunicator
noun see excommunicate I
excoriate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin excoriatus, past participle of excoriare, from Latin ex- + corium skin, hide — more at cuirass ...
excoriation
noun see excoriate
excrement
noun Etymology: Latin excrementum, from excernere Date: 1533 waste matter discharged from the body; especially feces • excremental adjective • excrementitious adjective
excremental
adjective see excrement
excrementitious
adjective see excrement
excrescence
noun Date: 15th century 1. a projection or outgrowth especially when abnormal 2. a disfiguring, extraneous, or unwanted mark or part ; blot 3. by-product 2
excrescency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1545 excrescence
excrescent
adjective Etymology: Latin excrescent-, excrescens, present participle of excrescere to grow out, from ex- + crescere to grow — more at crescent Date: 1633 1. forming an ...
excrescently
adverb see excrescent
excreta
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, neuter plural of excretus Date: 1853 waste matter (as feces) eliminated or separated from the body • excretal adjective
excretal
adjective see excreta
excrete
transitive verb (excreted; excreting) Etymology: Latin excretus, past participle of excernere to sift out, discharge, from ex- + cernere to sift — more at certain Date: 1620 ...
excreter
noun see excrete
excretion
noun Date: 1578 1. the act or process of excreting 2. something excreted; especially metabolic waste products (as urea and carbon dioxide) that are eliminated from the body
excretory
adjective Date: circa 1681 of, relating to, or functioning in excretion
excruciate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin excruciatus, past participle of excruciare, from ex- + cruciare to crucify, from cruc-, crux cross Date: circa 1570 1. to ...
excruciating
adjective Date: 1599 1. causing great pain or anguish ; agonizing
excruciatingly
adverb see excruciating
excruciation
noun see excruciate
exculpate
transitive verb (-pated; -pating) Etymology: Medieval Latin exculpatus, past participle of exculpare, from Latin ex- + culpa blame Date: circa 1681 to clear from alleged ...
exculpation
noun see exculpate
exculpatory
adjective Date: 1781 tending or serving to exculpate
excurrent
adjective Etymology: Latin excurrent-, excurrens, present participle of excurrere to run out, extend, from ex- + currere to run — more at car Date: 1826 1. characterized by ...
excursion
noun Etymology: Latin excursion-, excursio, from excurrere Date: circa 1587 1. a. a going out or forth ; expedition b. (1) a usually brief pleasure trip (2) a ...
excursionist
noun Date: 1830 a person who goes on an excursion
excursive
adjective Date: 1659 constituting a digression ; characterized by digression • excursively adverb • excursiveness noun
excursively
adverb see excursive
excursiveness
noun see excursive
excursus
noun (plural excursuses; also excursus) Etymology: Latin, digression, from excurrere Date: 1803 an appendix or digression that contains further exposition of some point or ...
excusable
adjective see excuse I
excusableness
noun see excuse I
excusably
adverb see excuse I
excusatory
adjective Date: 1535 making or containing excuse
excuse
I. transitive verb (excused; excusing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French escuser, excuser, from Latin excusare, from ex- + causa cause, explanation Date: 13th ...
excuser
noun see excuse I
exec
noun Date: 1896 1. executive officer 2. executive
execrable
adjective Date: 14th century 1. deserving to be execrated ; detestable 2. very bad ; wretched • execrableness noun • execrably adverb
execrableness
noun see execrable
execrably
adverb see execrable
execrate
transitive verb (-crated; -crating) Etymology: Latin exsecratus, past participle of exsecrari to put under a curse, from ex + sacr-, sacer sacred Date: 1531 1. to declare to ...
execration
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of cursing or denouncing; also the curse so uttered 2. an object of curses ; something detested
execrative
adjective see execrate
execrator
noun see execrate
executable
adjective see execute
executant
noun Date: 1846 one who executes or performs; especially one skilled in the technique of an art ; performer
execute
verb (-cuted; -cuting) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French executer, from execucion execution Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to carry out fully ; put ...
execution
noun Etymology: Middle English execucion, from Anglo-French, from Latin exsecution-, exsecutio, from exsequi to execute, from ex- + sequi to follow — more at sue Date: 14th ...
executioner
noun Date: 1536 one who executes; especially one who puts to death
executive
I. adjective Date: 1649 1. a. of or relating to the execution of the laws and the conduct of public and national affairs b. belonging to the branch of government that is ...
executive agreement
noun Date: 1942 an agreement between the United States and a foreign government made by the executive branch of the government either alone or with Congressional approval and ...
executive council
noun Date: 1775 1. a council constituted to advise or share in the functions of a political executive 2. a council that exercises supreme executive power
executive officer
noun Date: 1776 the officer second in command of a military or naval organization or vessel
executive order
noun Date: 1862 regulation 2b
executive privilege
noun Date: 1940 exemption from legally enforced disclosure of communications within the executive branch of government when such disclosure would adversely affect the ...
executive secretary
noun Date: 1915 a secretary having administrative duties; especially an official responsible for administering the activities and business affairs of an organization
executive session
noun Date: 1840 a usually closed session (as of a legislative body) that functions as an executive council (as of the United States Senate when considering appointments or the ...
executor
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin exsecutor, from exsequi Date: 13th century 1. a. one who executes something b. obsolete executioner 2. ...
executorial
adjective see executor
executory
adjective Date: 1592 1. designed or of such a nature as to be executed in time to come or to take effect on a future contingency 2. relating to administration
executrix
noun (plural executrices or executrixes) Date: 15th century a woman who is an executor
exedra
noun (plural exedrae) Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from ex- + hedra seat — more at sit Date: 1659 1. a room (as in a temple or house) in ancient Greece and Rome used for ...
exegesis
noun (plural exegeses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek exēgēsis, from exēgeisthai to explain, interpret, from ex- + hēgeisthai to lead — more at seek Date: 1619 ...
exegete
noun Etymology: Greek exēgētēs, from exēgeisthai Date: circa 1736 one who practices exegesis
exegetic
adjective see exegetical
exegetical
also exegetic adjective Etymology: Greek exēgētikos, from exēgeisthai Date: circa 1623 of or relating to exegesis ; explanatory
exegetist
noun Date: 1848 exegete
exemplar
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from exemplum example Date: 15th century one that serves as a model or example: as a. an ideal model b. a typical or ...
exemplarily
adverb see exemplary
exemplariness
noun see exemplary
exemplarity
noun see exemplary
exemplary
adjective Date: circa 1507 1. a. serving as a pattern b. deserving imitation ; commendable ; also deserving imitation because of excellence 2. serving as a ...
exempli gratia
adverb Etymology: Latin Date: 1602 for example
exemplification
noun Date: 1510 1. a. the act or process of exemplifying b. example, case in point 2. an exemplified copy of a document
exemplify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English exemplifien, from Anglo-French exemplifier, from Medieval Latin exemplificare, from Latin exemplum Date: 15th century ...
exemplum
noun (plural exempla) Etymology: Latin Date: 1890 1. example, model 2. an anecdote or short narrative used to point a moral or sustain an argument
exempt
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin exemptus, past participle of eximere to take out — more at example Date: 14th century 1. obsolete set ...
exemption
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of exempting or state of being exempt ; immunity 2. one that exempts or is exempted; especially a source or amount of income exempted ...
exenterate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin exenteratus, past participle of exenterare to disembowel, modification of Greek exenterizein, from ex- + enteron intestine — ...
exenteration
noun see exenterate
exercisable
adjective see exercise II
exercise
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French exercice, from Latin exercitium, from exercitare to train, exercise, frequentative of exercēre to train, occupy, from ex- + ...
exercise bicycle
noun Date: 1976 stationary bicycle
exercise bike
noun Date: 1977 stationary bicycle
exerciser
noun Date: 1552 1. one that exercises 2. an apparatus for use in physical exercise
exercitation
noun Etymology: Middle English exercitacioun, from Latin exercitation-, exercitatio, from exercitare Date: 14th century exercise
Exercycle
trademark — used for a stationary bicycle
exergonic
adjective Etymology: exo- + Greek ergon work — more at work Date: 1940 exothermic
exergue
noun Etymology: French, from New Latin exergum, from Greek ex out of + ergon work Date: 1697 a space on a coin, token, or medal usually on the reverse below the central part ...
exert
transitive verb Etymology: Latin exsertus, past participle of exserere to thrust out, from ex- + serere to join — more at series Date: circa 1630 1. a. to put forth (as ...
exertion
noun Date: 1677 the act or an instance of exerting; especially a laborious or perceptible effort
exertional
adjective Date: 1959 precipitated by physical exertion
Exeter
geographical name city SW England capital of Devon population 101,100
exeunt
Etymology: Latin, they go out, from exire to go out — more at exit Date: 15th century — used as a stage direction to specify that all or certain named characters leave ...
exfoliant
noun Date: 1983 a mechanical or chemical agent (as an abrasive skin wash or salicylic acid) that is applied to the skin to remove dead cells from the surface
exfoliate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Late Latin exfoliatus, past participle of exfoliare to strip of leaves, from Latin ex- + folium leaf — more at blade Date: 1612 transitive ...
exfoliation
noun see exfoliate
exfoliative
adjective see exfoliate
exfoliator
noun Date: 1980 exfoliant
exhalant
or exhalent adjective Date: 1771 bearing out or outward ; emissive
exhalation
noun Date: 14th century 1. something exhaled or given off ; emanation 2. an act of exhaling
exhale
verb (exhaled; exhaling) Etymology: Middle English exalen, from Latin exhalare, from ex- + halare to breathe Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to rise or be given off ...
exhalent
adjective see exhalant
exhaust
I. verb Etymology: Latin exhaustus, past participle of exhaurire, from ex- + haurire to draw; akin to Middle High German œsen to empty, Greek auein to take Date: 1531 ...
exhauster
noun see exhaust I
exhaustibility
noun see exhaust I
exhaustible
adjective see exhaust I
exhaustion
noun Date: 1615 the act or process of exhausting ; the state of being exhausted
exhaustive
adjective Date: circa 1789 testing all possibilities or considering all elements ; thorough • exhaustively adverb • exhaustiveness noun • exhaustivity noun
exhaustively
adverb see exhaustive
exhaustiveness
noun see exhaustive
exhaustivity
noun see exhaustive
exhaustless
adjective Date: 1614 not to be exhausted ; inexhaustible • exhaustlessly adverb • exhaustlessness noun
exhaustlessly
adverb see exhaustless
exhaustlessness
noun see exhaustless
exhbn
abbreviation exhibition
exhibit
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin exhibitus, past participle of exhibēre, from ex- + habēre to have, hold — more at give Date: 15th century transitive verb ...
exhibition
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or instance of exhibiting 2. British a grant drawn from the funds of a school or university to help maintain a student 3. a public ...
exhibitioner
noun Date: 1679 British one who holds a grant from a school or university
exhibitionism
noun Date: 1893 1. a. a perversion in which sexual gratification is obtained from the indecent exposure of one's genitals (as to a stranger) b. an act of such exposure ...
exhibitionist
noun or adjective see exhibitionism
exhibitionistic
adjective see exhibitionism
exhibitionistically
adverb see exhibitionism
exhibitive
adjective see exhibit I
exhibitor
noun see exhibit I
exhibitory
adjective see exhibit I
exhilarate
transitive verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Latin exhilaratus, past participle of exhilarare, from ex- + hilarare to gladden, from hilarus cheerful — more at hilarious Date: ...
exhilaratingly
adverb see exhilarate
exhilaration
noun Date: 1622 1. the action of exhilarating 2. the feeling or the state of being exhilarated
exhilarative
adjective see exhilarate
exhort
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French exorter, from Latin exhortari, from ex- + hortari to incite — more at yearn Date: 15th century transitive verb to incite ...
exhortation
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or instance of exhorting 2. language intended to incite and encourage
exhortative
adjective Date: 15th century serving to exhort
exhortatory
adjective Date: 15th century using exhortation ; exhortative
exhorter
noun see exhort
exhumation
noun see exhume
exhume
transitive verb (exhumed; exhuming) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin exhumare, from Latin ex out of + humus earth — more at ex-, humble Date: 15th century 1. ...
exhumer
noun see exhume
exigence
noun Date: 15th century exigency
exigency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1581 1. that which is required in a particular situation — usually used in plural 2. a. the quality or state of being exigent b. a state ...
exigent
adjective Etymology: Latin exigent-, exigens, present participle of exigere to demand — more at exact Date: 1629 1. requiring immediate aid or action 2. requiring or ...
exigently
adverb see exigent
exiguity
noun (plural -ities) Date: circa 1626 the quality or state of being exiguous ; scantiness
exiguous
adjective Etymology: Latin exiguus, from exigere Date: 1651 excessively scanty ; inadequate • exiguously adverb • exiguousness noun
exiguously
adverb see exiguous
exiguousness
noun see exiguous
exile
I. noun Etymology: Middle English exil, from Anglo-French essil, exil, from Latin exilium, from exul, exsul an exile Date: 14th century 1. a. the state or a period of ...
exilic
adjective see exile I
eximious
adjective Etymology: Latin eximius, from eximere to take out — more at example Date: 1547 archaic choice, excellent
exine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary ex- + in- fibrous tissue, from Greek in-, is tendon Date: circa 1884 the outer of the two major layers forming the walls ...
exist
intransitive verb Etymology: Latin exsistere to come into being, exist, from ex- + sistere to stand, stop; akin to Latin stare to stand — more at stand Date: circa 1568 1. ...
existence
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. obsolete reality as opposed to appearance b. reality as presented in experience c. (1) the totality of existent things (2) a ...
existent
adjective Etymology: Latin exsistent-, exsistens, present participle of exsistere Date: 1561 1. having being ; existing 2. existing now ; present • existent noun
existential
adjective Date: 1693 1. of, relating to, or affirming existence 2. a. grounded in existence or the experience of existence ; empirical b. having being in time and ...
existential operator
noun see existential quantifier
existential quantifier
noun Date: 1936 a quantifier (as for some in “for some x, 2x + 5 = 8”) that asserts that there exists at least one value of a variable — called also existential operator
existentialism
noun Date: 1941 a chiefly 20th century philosophical movement embracing diverse doctrines but centering on analysis of individual existence in an unfathomable universe and ...
existentialist
I. noun Date: 1942 an adherent of existentialism II. adjective Date: 1946 of or relating to existentialism or existentialists • existentialistic adjective • ...
existentialistic
adjective see existentialist II
existentialistically
adverb see existentialist II
existentially
adverb see existential
exit
I. Etymology: Latin, he goes out, from exire to go out, from ex- + ire to go — more at issue Date: 1538 — used as a stage direction to specify who goes off stage II. ...
exit poll
noun Date: 1980 a poll taken (as by news media) of voters leaving the voting place that is usually used for predicting the winners • exit polling noun
exit polling
noun see exit poll
exitless
adjective see exit II
exitus acta probat
foreign term Etymology: Latin the outcome justifies the deed
Exmoor
I. noun Etymology: Exmoor, England Date: 1808 1. any of a breed of horned sheep of Devonshire in England valued especially for mutton 2. any of a breed of hardy ponies ...
exo-
or ex- combining form Etymology: Greek exō out, outside, from ex out of — more at ex- 1. outside ; outer — compare ect-, end- 2. turning out
exobiological
adjective see exobiology
exobiologist
noun see exobiology
exobiology
noun Date: 1960 a branch of biology concerned with the search for life outside the earth and with the effects of extraterrestrial environments on living organisms • ...
exocarp
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1845 the outermost layer of the pericarp of a fruit — see endocarp illustration
exocrine
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary exo- + Greek krinein to separate — more at certain Date: circa 1911 producing, being, or relating to a secretion ...
exocrine gland
noun Date: circa 1927 a gland (as a salivary gland or part of the pancreas) that releases a secretion external to or at the surface of an organ by means of a canal or duct
exocyclic
adjective Date: 1913 situated outside of a ring in a chemical structure
exocytosis
noun (plural exocytoses) Etymology: New Latin, from exo- + cyt- + -osis Date: 1963 the release of cellular substances (as secretory products) contained in cell vesicles by ...
exocytotic
adjective see exocytosis
Exod
abbreviation Exodus
exodermis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1889 a layer of the outer living cortical cells of plants that takes over the functions of the epidermis in roots lacking secondary ...
exodontia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from 1ex- + -odontia Date: 1913 a branch of dentistry that deals with the extraction of teeth • exodontist noun
exodontist
noun see exodontia
exodus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Exodos, literally, road out, from ex- + hodos road Date: before 12th century 1. capitalized the mainly narrative second book of canonical ...
exoenzyme
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1908 an extracellular enzyme
exoergic
adjective Date: 1942 releasing energy ; exothermic
exoerythrocytic
adjective Date: 1942 occurring outside the red blood cells — used especially of stages of malaria parasites
exogamic
adjective see exogamy
exogamous
adjective see exogamy
exogamy
noun (plural -mies) Date: 1865 marriage outside of a specific group especially as required by custom or law • exogamous or exogamic adjective
exogenous
adjective Etymology: French exogène exogenous, from exo- + -gène (from Greek -genēs born) — more at -gen Date: 1830 1. produced by growth from superficial tissue 2. ...
exogenously
adverb see exogenous
exon
noun Etymology: expressed sequence + 2-on Date: circa 1978 a polynucleotide sequence in a nucleic acid that codes information for protein synthesis and that is copied and ...
exonerate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin exoneratus, past participle of exonerare to unburden, from ex- + oner-, onus load Date: 1524 1. to ...
exoneration
noun see exonerate
exonerative
adjective see exonerate
exonic
adjective see exon
exonuclease
noun Date: 1963 an enzyme that breaks down a nucleic acid by removing nucleotides one by one from the end of a chain — compare endonuclease
exonumia
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, from exo- + English numismatic + New Latin -ia Date: 1962 numismatic items (as tokens, medals, or scrip) other than coins and paper money
exopeptidase
noun Date: 1936 any of a group of enzymes that hydrolyze peptide bonds formed by the terminal amino acids of peptide chains ; peptidase — compare endopeptidase
exophthalmic
adjective see exophthalmos
exophthalmos
also exophthalmus noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek exophthalmos having prominent eyes, from ex out + ophthalmos eye; akin to Greek ōps eye — more at eye Date: 1872 ...
exophthalmus
noun see exophthalmos
exor
abbreviation executor
exorbitance
noun Date: 1609 1. an exorbitant action or procedure; especially excessive or gross deviation from rule, right, or propriety 2. the tendency or disposition to be exorbitant
exorbitant
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin exorbitant-, exorbitans, present participle of exorbitare to deviate, from Latin ex- + orbita track of a wheel, rut, from ...
exorbitantly
adverb see exorbitant
exorcise
also exorcize transitive verb (-cised; also -cized; -cising; also -cizing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French exorciscer, from Late Latin exorcizare, from Greek ...
exorciser
noun see exorcise
exorcism
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or practice of exorcising 2. a spell or formula used in exorcising • exorcist noun • exorcistic or exorcistical adjective
exorcist
noun see exorcism
exorcistic
adjective see exorcism
exorcistical
adjective see exorcism
exorcize
transitive verb see exorcise
exordial
adjective see exordium
exordium
noun (plural -diums or exordia) Etymology: Latin, from exordiri to begin, from ex- + ordiri to begin — more at order Date: 1577 a beginning or introduction especially to a ...
exoskeletal
adjective see exoskeleton
exoskeleton
noun Date: 1847 1. an external supportive covering of an animal (as an arthropod) 2. bony or horny parts of a vertebrate produced from epidermal tissues 3. an artificial ...
exosphere
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1949 the outer fringe region of the atmosphere of the earth or a celestial body (as a planet) • exospheric ...
exospheric
adjective see exosphere
exospore
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1859 an asexual spore cut off from a parent sporophore by the formation of septa
exostosis
noun (plural exostoses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek exostōsis, from ex out of + osteon bone — more at ex-, osseous Date: 1736 a spur or bony outgrowth from a bone or ...
exoteric
adjective Etymology: Latin & Greek; Latin exotericus, from Greek exōterikos, literally, external, from exōterō more outside, comparative of exō outside — more at exo- ...
exoterically
adverb see exoteric
exothermal
adjective Date: 1906 exothermic • exothermally adverb
exothermally
adverb see exothermal
exothermic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1884 characterized by or formed with evolution of heat • exothermically adverb • exothermicity noun
exothermically
adverb see exothermic
exothermicity
noun see exothermic
exotic
I. adjective Etymology: Latin exoticus, from Greek exōtikos, from exō Date: 1599 1. introduced from another country ; not native to the place where found 2. archaic ...
exotic shorthair
noun Date: 1974 any of a breed of stocky short-haired domestic cats developed in the United States by crossing American shorthairs and Persians
exotica
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, neuter plural of exoticus Date: 1828 things excitingly different or unusual; especially literary or artistic items having an ...
exotically
adverb see exotic I
exoticism
also exotism noun Date: 1827 the quality or state of being exotic
exoticness
noun see exotic I
exotism
noun see exoticism
exotoxin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1920 a soluble poisonous substance produced during growth of a microorganism and released into the surrounding medium
exp
abbreviation 1. expense 2. experience 3. experiment; experimental 4. exponent 5. export 6. express
expand
verb Etymology: Middle English expaunden, from Latin expandere, from ex- + pandere to spread — more at fathom Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to open up ; unfold ...
expandability
noun see expand
expandable
adjective see expand
expanded
adjective Date: 1875 of a typeface extended
expanded metal
noun Date: 1890 sheet metal cut and expanded into a lattice and used especially as lath
expanded plastic
noun Date: 1945 lightweight cellular plastic used especially as insulation and protective packing material — called also foamed plastic, plastic foam
expander
noun Date: 1862 one that expands; specifically any of several colloidal substances (as dextran) of high molecular weight used as a blood or plasma substitute for increasing ...
expanse
noun Etymology: New Latin expansum, from Latin, neuter of expansus, past participle of expandere Date: 1637 1. firmament 2. great extent of something spread out
expansibility
noun see expansible
expansible
adjective Date: circa 1691 capable of being expanded • expansibility noun
expansion
noun Date: 1611 1. expanse 2. the act or process of expanding 3. the quality or state of being expanded 4. the increase in volume of working fluid (as steam) in an ...
expansion card
noun Date: 1982 a circuit board connecting to a motherboard which expands the capabilities of a computer
expansion slot
noun Date: 1980 a socket on the motherboard of a computer into which an expansion card may be inserted
expansional
adjective see expansion

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