Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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expansionary
adjective Date: 1936 tending toward expansion
expansionism
noun Date: 1899 a policy or practice of expansion and especially of territorial expansion by a nation • expansionist noun • expansionist also expansionistic adjective
expansionist
I. noun see expansionism II. adjective see expansionism
expansionistic
adjective see expansionism
expansive
adjective Date: 1651 1. having a capacity or a tendency to expand 2. causing or tending to cause expansion 3. a. characterized by high spirits, generosity, or readiness ...
expansively
adverb see expansive
expansiveness
noun see expansive
expansivity
noun Date: 1837 the quality or state of being expansive; especially the capacity to expand
expat
noun Date: 1962 chiefly British an expatriate person ; expatriate
expatiate
intransitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin exspatiatus, past participle of exspatiari to wander, digress, from ex- + spatium space, course Date: 1538 1. to move ...
expatiation
noun see expatiate
expatriate
I. verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Medieval Latin expatriatus, past participle of expatriare to leave one's own country, from Latin ex- + patria native country, from feminine of ...
expatriation
noun see expatriate I
expatriatism
noun Date: 1937 the fact or state of being an expatriate
expect
verb Etymology: Latin exspectare to look forward to, from ex- + spectare to look at, frequentative of specere to look — more at spy Date: 1560 intransitive verb 1. archaic ...
expectable
adjective see expect
expectably
adverb see expect
expectance
noun Date: 1603 expectancy
expectancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1600 1. a. the act, action, or state of expecting b. the state of being expected 2. a. something expected b. the expected amount ...
expectant
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. characterized by expectation 2. expecting the birth of a child • expectantly adverb II. noun Date: 1609 one who is looking forward ...
expectantly
adverb see expectant I
expectation
noun Date: 1540 1. the act or state of expecting ; anticipation 2. a. something expected b. basis for expecting ; assurance c. prospects of inheritance — ...
expectational
adjective see expectation
expectative
adjective Date: 15th century of, relating to, or constituting an object of expectation
expected value
noun Date: 1915 1. the sum of the values of a random variable with each value multiplied by its probability of occurrence 2. the integral of the product of a probability ...
expectedly
adverb see expect
expectedness
noun see expect
expectorant
noun Date: 1782 an agent that promotes the discharge or expulsion of mucus from the respiratory tract; broadly an antitussive agent • expectorant adjective
expectorate
verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Latin expectoratus, past participle of expectorare to banish from the mind (taken to mean literally “to expel from the chest”), from ex- + ...
expectoration
noun see expectorate
expedience
noun Date: 1548 expediency
expediency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1597 1. the quality or state of being suited to the end in view ; suitability, fitness 2. obsolete a. haste, dispatch b. an enterprise ...
expedient
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin expedient-, expendiens, present participle of expedire to extricate, prepare, be ...
expediential
adjective see expediency
expediently
adverb see expedient I
expedite
transitive verb (-dited; -diting) Etymology: Latin expeditus, past participle of expedire Date: 15th century 1. to execute promptly 2. to accelerate the process or progress ...
expediter
also expeditor noun Date: 1891 one that expedites; specifically one employed to ensure efficient movement of goods or supplies in a business
expedition
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. a journey or excursion undertaken for a specific purpose b. the group of persons making such a journey 2. efficient promptness ; speed ...
expeditionary
adjective Date: 1817 of, relating to, or being an expedition; also sent on military service abroad
expeditioner
noun see expedition
expeditious
adjective Date: 1599 characterized by or acting promptly and efficiently Synonyms: see fast • expeditiously adverb • expeditiousness noun
expeditiously
adverb see expeditious
expeditiousness
noun see expeditious
expeditor
noun see expediter
expel
transitive verb (expelled; expelling) Etymology: Middle English expellen, from Latin expellere, from ex- + pellere to drive — more at felt Date: 14th century 1. to force ...
expellable
adjective see expel
expellee
noun Date: 1888 a person who is expelled especially from a native or adopted country
expend
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin expendere to weigh out, expend, from ex- + pendere to weigh — more at spin Date: 15th century 1. to pay out ; spend ...
expendability
noun see expendable I
expendable
I. adjective Date: 1805 that may be expended: as a. normally used up or consumed in service b. more easily or economically replaced than rescued, salvaged, or ...
expender
noun see expend
expenditure
noun Etymology: irregular from expend Date: 1769 1. the act or process of expending 2. something expended ; disbursement, expense
expense
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French, from Late Latin expensa, from Latin, feminine of expensus, past participle of expendere Date: ...
expense account
noun Date: 1922 an account of expenses reimbursable to an employee; also the right of charging expenses to such an account
expensive
adjective Date: circa 1610 1. involving high cost or sacrifice 2. a. commanding a high price and especially one that is not based on intrinsic worth or is beyond a ...
expensively
adverb see expensive
expensiveness
noun see expensive
experience
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin experientia act of trying, from experient-, experiens, present participle of experiri to try, from ex- + -periri ...
experienced
adjective Date: 1567 made skillful or wise through experience ; practiced
experiential
adjective Date: 1658 relating to, derived from, or providing experience ; empirical • experientially adverb
experientially
adverb see experiential
experiment
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French esperiment, from Latin experimentum, from experiri Date: 14th century 1. a. test, trial b. a tentative procedure ...
experiment station
noun Date: 1874 an establishment for scientific research (as in agriculture) where experiments are carried out, studies of practical application are made, and information is ...
experimental
adjective Date: 15th century 1. of, relating to, or based on experience or experiment 2. a. serving the ends of or used as a means of experimentation b. relating to ...
experimentalism
noun Date: circa 1834 reliance on or advocacy of experimental or empirical principles and procedures; specifically instrumentalism
experimentalist
noun Date: 1762 one who experiments; specifically a person conducting scientific experiments
experimentally
adverb see experimental
experimentation
noun see experiment II
experimenter
noun see experiment II
expert
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin expertus, from past participle of experiri Date: 14th century 1. obsolete ...
expert system
noun Date: 1977 computer software that attempts to mimic the reasoning of a human specialist
expertise
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, expertness, from expert Date: 1868 1. expert opinion or commentary 2. the skill of an expert
expertism
noun Date: 1886 expertise 2
expertize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1889 intransitive verb to give a professional opinion usually after careful study transitive verb to examine and give expert judgment on
expertly
adverb see expert I
expertness
noun see expert I
experto crede
or experto credite foreign term Etymology: Latin believe one who has had experience ; trust me
experto credite
foreign term see experto crede
expiable
adjective see expiate
expiate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin expiatus, past participle of expiare to atone for, from ex- + piare to atone for, appease, from pius faithful, pious Date: circa 1500 ...
expiation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of making atonement 2. the means by which atonement is made
expiator
noun see expiate
expiatory
adjective Date: 15th century serving to expiate
expiration
noun Date: 1526 1. a. the last emission of breath ; death b. (1) the act or process of releasing air from the lungs through the nose or mouth ; exhalation (2) ...
expiration date
noun Date: circa 1946 1. the date after which something (as a credit card) is no longer in effect 2. the date after which a product (as food or medicine) should not be sold ...
expiratory
adjective Date: circa 1847 of, relating to, or employed in the expiration of air from the lungs
expire
verb (expired; expiring) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Anglo-French espirer to breathe out, from Latin exspirare, from ex- + spirare to breathe Date: ...
expiry
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1752 expiration: as a. exhalation of breath b. death c. termination; especially the termination of a time or period fixed by law, contract, ...
explain
verb Etymology: Middle English explanen, from Latin explanare, literally, to make level, from ex- + planus level, flat — more at floor Date: 15th century transitive verb ...
explain away
transitive verb Date: 1704 1. to get rid of by or as if by explanation 2. to minimize the significance of by or as if by explanation
explain oneself
phrasal to clarify one's statements or the reasons for one's conduct
explainable
adjective see explain
explainer
noun see explain
explanation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or process of explaining 2. something that explains
explanative
adjective Date: circa 1616 explanatory • explanatively adverb
explanatively
adverb see explanative
explanatorily
adverb see explanatory
explanatory
adjective Date: 1618 serving to explain • explanatorily adverb
explant
I. transitive verb Etymology: ex- + -plant (as in implant) Date: 1915 to remove (living tissue) especially to a medium for tissue culture • explantation noun II. noun ...
explantation
noun see explant I
expletive
I. noun Date: 1612 1. a. a syllable, word, or phrase inserted to fill a vacancy (as in a sentence or a metrical line) without adding to the sense; especially a word (as ...
expletory
adjective Date: 1672 expletive
explicable
adjective Date: 1556 capable of being explained • explicably adverb
explicably
adverb see explicable
explicate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Latin explicatus, past participle of explicare, literally, to unfold, from ex- + plicare to fold — more at ply Date: 1531 1. ...
explication
noun see explicate
explication de texte
noun (plural explications de texte) Etymology: French, literally, explanation of text Date: 1935 a method of literary criticism involving a detailed analysis of a work
explicative
adjective Date: 1649 serving to explicate; specifically serving to explain logically what is contained in the subject • explicatively adverb
explicatively
adverb see explicative
explicator
noun see explicate
explicatory
adjective Date: 1625 explicative
explicit
adjective Etymology: French or Medieval Latin; French explicite, from Medieval Latin explicitus, from Latin, past participle of explicare Date: 1607 1. a. fully revealed ...
explicitly
adverb see explicit
explicitness
noun see explicit
explode
verb (exploded; exploding) Etymology: Latin explodere to drive off the stage by clapping, from ex- + plaudere to clap Date: 1605 transitive verb 1. archaic to drive from ...
exploded
adjective Date: 1944 showing the parts separated but in correct relationship to each other
exploder
noun see explode
exploit
I. noun Etymology: Middle English espleit, expleit, exploit furtherance, outcome, from Anglo-French, from Latin explicitum, neuter of explicitus, past participle Date: circa ...
exploitability
noun see exploit II
exploitable
adjective see exploit II
exploitation
noun Date: 1803 an act or instance of exploiting
exploitative
adjective Date: 1885 exploiting or tending to exploit; especially unfairly or cynically using another person or group for profit or advantage • exploitatively adverb
exploitatively
adverb see exploitative
exploiter
noun see exploit II
exploitive
adjective Date: 1921 exploitative
exploration
noun Date: 1537 the act or an instance of exploring • explorational adjective
explorational
adjective see exploration
explorative
adjective Date: 1738 exploratory • exploratively adverb
exploratively
adverb see explorative
exploratory
adjective Date: 1620 of, relating to, or being exploration
explore
verb (explored; exploring) Etymology: Latin explorare, from ex- + plorare to cry out Date: 1585 transitive verb 1. a. to investigate, study, or analyze ; look into ...
explorer
noun Date: 1602 1. one that explores; especially a person who travels in search of geographical or scientific information 2. capitalized a member of a coed scouting program ...
explosion
noun Etymology: Latin explosion-, explosio act of driving off by clapping, from explodere Date: 1667 1. the act or an instance of exploding 2. a large-scale, rapid, or ...
explosive
I. adjective Date: 1667 1. a. relating to, characterized by, or operated by explosion b. resulting from or as if from an explosion 2. a. tending to explode ...
explosively
adverb see explosive I
explosiveness
noun see explosive I
expo
noun (plural expos) Date: 1913 exposition 3
exponent
noun Etymology: Latin exponent-, exponens, present participle of exponere — more at expose Date: 1706 1. a symbol written above and to the right of a mathematical ...
exponential
adjective Date: 1704 1. of or relating to an exponent 2. involving a variable in an exponent 3. expressible or approximately expressible by an exponential function; ...
exponential function
noun Date: 1879 a mathematical function in which an independent variable appears in one of the exponents — called also exponential
exponentially
adverb see exponential
exponentiation
noun Date: 1903 the mathematical operation of raising a quantity to a power — called also involution
export
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin exportare, from ex- + portare to carry — more at fare Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to carry away ; remove 2. to ...
exportability
noun see export I
exportable
adjective see export I
exportation
noun Date: 1601 the act of exporting; also a commodity exported
exporter
noun Date: 1623 one that exports; specifically a wholesaler who sells to merchants or industrial consumers in foreign countries
expose
transitive verb (exposed; exposing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French exposer, from Latin exponere to set forth, explain (perfect indicative exposui), from ex- + ...
exposé
also expose noun Etymology: French exposé, from past participle of exposer Date: 1803 1. a formal statement of facts 2. an exposure of something discreditable
exposed
adjective Date: circa 1623 1. open to view 2. not shielded or protected; also not insulated Synonyms: see liable
exposer
noun see expose
exposit
transitive verb Etymology: Latin expositus, past participle of exponere Date: 1882 expound
exposition
noun Date: 14th century 1. a setting forth of the meaning or purpose (as of a writing) 2. a. discourse or an example of it designed to convey information or explain what ...
expositional
adjective see exposition
expositive
adjective Date: 15th century descriptive, expository
expositor
noun Etymology: Middle English expositour, from Anglo-French expositur, from Late Latin expositor, from Latin exponere Date: 14th century a person who explains ; commentator
expository
adjective Date: 1628 of, relating to, or containing exposition
expostulate
verb Etymology: Latin expostulatus, past participle of expostulare to demand, dispute, from ex- + postulare to ask for — more at postulate Date: 1573 transitive verb ...
expostulation
noun Date: 1540 an act or an instance of expostulating • expostulatory adjective
expostulatory
adjective see expostulation
exposure
noun Date: 1605 1. the fact or condition of being exposed: as a. the condition of being presented to view or made known b. the condition of being unprotected ...
exposure meter
noun Date: 1891 a device for indicating correct photographic exposure under varying conditions of illumination
expound
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French espundre, expondre, from Latin exponere to explain — more at expose Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to set ...
expounder
noun see expound
express
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French expres, from Latin expressus, past participle of exprimere to press out, express, from ex- + premere to press — more ...
Express Mail
service mark — used for overnight delivery of mail
expressage
noun Date: 1857 a carrying of parcels by express; also a charge for such carrying
expresser
noun see express IV
expressible
adjective see express IV
expression
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. an act, process, or instance of representing in a medium (as words) ; utterance b. (1) something that manifests, embodies, or ...
expressional
adjective see expression
expressionism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: circa 1901 a theory or practice in art of seeking to depict the subjective emotions and responses that objects and events arouse in the ...
expressionist
noun or adjective see expressionism
expressionistic
adjective see expressionism
expressionistically
adverb see expressionism
expressionless
adjective Date: 1831 lacking expression • expressionlessly adverb • expressionlessness noun
expressionlessly
adverb see expressionless
expressionlessness
noun see expressionless
expressive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. of or relating to expression 2. serving to express, utter, or represent 3. effectively conveying meaning or feeling • ...
expressively
adverb see expressive
expressiveness
noun see expressive
expressivity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1934 1. the relative capacity of a gene to affect the phenotype of the organism of which it is a part 2. the quality of being expressive
expressly
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in an express manner ; explicitly 2. for the express purpose ; particularly, specifically
expressman
noun Date: 1839 a person employed in the express business
expresso
variant of espresso
expressway
noun Date: 1944 a high-speed divided highway for through traffic with access partially or fully controlled
expropriate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Medieval Latin expropriatus, past participle of expropriare, from Latin ex- + proprius own Date: 1611 1. to deprive of possession ...
expropriation
noun Date: 15th century the act of expropriating or the state of being expropriated; specifically the action of the state in taking or modifying the property rights of an ...
expropriator
noun see expropriate
expt
abbreviation experiment
exptl
abbreviation experimental
expulse
transitive verb (expulsed; expulsing) Date: 15th century expel
expulsion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French expulsioun, from Latin expulsion-, expulsio, from expellere to expel Date: 15th century the act of expelling ; the state of ...
expulsive
adjective see expulsion
expunction
noun Etymology: Latin expungere Date: 1606 the act of expunging ; the state of being expunged ; erasure
expunge
transitive verb (expunged; expunging) Etymology: Latin expungere to mark for deletion by dots, from ex- + pungere to prick — more at pungent Date: 1602 1. to strike out, ...
expunger
noun see expunge
expurgate
transitive verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Latin expurgatus, past participle of expurgare, from ex- + purgare to purge Date: 1678 to cleanse of something morally harmful, ...
expurgation
noun see expurgate
expurgator
noun see expurgate
expurgatorial
adjective Date: 1807 relating to expurgation or an expurgator ; expurgatory
expurgatory
adjective Date: 1625 serving to purify from something morally harmful, offensive, or erroneous
expwy
abbreviation expressway
exquisite
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English exquisit, from Latin exquisitus, past participle of exquirere to search out, from ex- + quaerere to seek Date: 15th century 1. ...
exquisitely
adverb see exquisite I
exquisiteness
noun see exquisite I
exrx
abbreviation executrix
exsanguinate
transitive verb see exsanguination
exsanguination
noun Etymology: Latin exsanguinatus drained of blood, from ex- + sanguin-, sanguis blood Date: circa 1909 the action or process of draining or losing blood • exsanguinate ...
exscind
transitive verb Etymology: Latin exscindere, from ex- + scindere to cut, tear — more at shed Date: 1662 to cut off or out ; excise
exsert
transitive verb Etymology: Latin exsertus, past participle of exserere — more at exert Date: 1816 to thrust out • exsertion noun
exserted
adjective Date: 1816 projecting beyond an enclosing organ or part
exsertion
noun see exsert
exsiccate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin exsiccatus, past participle of exsiccare, from ex- + siccare to dry, from siccus dry — more at sack ...
exsiccation
noun see exsiccate
exsolution
noun Date: 1921 the process of separating or precipitating from a solid crystalline phase
ext
abbreviation 1. extension 2. exterior 3. external; externally 4. extra 5. extract
extant
adjective Etymology: Latin exstant-, exstans, present participle of exstare to stand out, be in existence, from ex- + stare to stand — more at stand Date: 1545 1. archaic ...
extemporal
adjective Etymology: Latin extemporalis, from ex tempore Date: 1570 archaic extemporaneous • extemporally adverb
extemporally
adverb see extemporal
extemporaneity
noun Date: 1937 the quality or state of being extemporaneous
extemporaneous
adjective Etymology: Late Latin extemporaneus, from Latin ex tempore Date: 1673 1. a. (1) composed, performed, or uttered on the spur of the moment ; impromptu ...
extemporaneously
adverb see extemporaneous
extemporaneousness
noun see extemporaneous
extemporarily
adverb see extemporary
extemporary
adjective Date: 1596 extemporaneous • extemporarily adverb
extempore
adverb or adjective Etymology: Latin ex tempore, from ex + tempore, ablative of tempus time Date: circa 1553 in an extemporaneous manner
extemporisation
British variant of extemporization
extemporise
British variant of extemporize
extemporization
noun Date: circa 1860 1. the act of extemporizing ; improvisation 2. something extemporized
extemporize
verb (-rized; -rizing) Date: 1592 intransitive verb 1. to do something extemporaneously ; improvise; especially to speak extemporaneously 2. to get along in a makeshift ...
extemporizer
noun see extemporize
extend
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French estendre, from Latin extendere, from ex- + tendere to stretch — more at thin Date: 14th century ...
extendability
noun see extend
extendable
adjective see extend
extended
adjective Date: 15th century 1. drawn out in length especially of time 2. a. fully stretched out b. of a horse's gait performed with a greatly lengthened stride ...
extended family
noun Date: circa 1935 a family that includes in one household near relatives in addition to a nuclear family
extendedly
adverb see extended
extendedness
noun see extended
extender
noun Date: circa 1529 one that extends: as a. a substance added to a product especially in the capacity of a diluent, adulterant, or modifier b. an added ingredient used ...
extendible
adjective see extend
extensibility
noun see extensible
extensible
adjective Date: 1603 capable of being extended • extensibility noun
extensile
adjective Date: 1744 extensible
extension
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin extension-, extensio, from Latin extendere Date: 15th century 1. a. the action of extending ; state of being extended b. ...
extension agent
noun Date: 1949 county agent
extension cord
noun Date: 1944 an electric cord fitted with a plug at one end and a receptacle at the other
extensional
adjective Date: 1647 1. of, relating to, or marked by extension; specifically denotative 2. concerned with objective reality • extensionality noun • extensionally ...
extensionality
noun see extensional
extensionally
adverb see extensional
extensity
noun (plural -ties) Date: circa 1834 1. a. the quality of having extension b. degree of extension ; range 2. an attribute of sensation whereby space or size is ...
extensive
adjective Date: 1604 1. having wide or considerable extent 2. extensional 3. of, relating to, or constituting farming in which large areas of land are utilized with ...
extensively
adverb see extensive
extensiveness
noun see extensive
extensometer
noun Etymology: extension + -o- + -meter Date: 1887 an instrument for measuring minute deformations of test specimens caused by tension, compression, bending, or twisting
extensor
noun Date: 1615 a muscle serving to extend a bodily part (as a limb)
extent
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French estente, extente land valuation, from extendre, estendre to survey, evaluate, literally, to extend Date: 14th century 1. ...
extenuate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin extenuatus, past participle of extenuare, from ex- + tenuis thin — more at thin Date: 1529 1. a. archaic to make light ...
extenuation
noun Date: circa 1543 1. the act of extenuating or state of being extenuated; especially partial justification 2. something extenuating; especially a partial excuse
extenuator
noun see extenuate
extenuatory
adjective see extenuate
exterior
I. adjective Etymology: Latin, comparative of exter, exterus being on the outside, foreign, from ex Date: 1528 1. being on an outside surface ; situated on the outside 2. ...
exterior angle
noun Date: 1756 1. the angle between a side of a polygon and an extended adjacent side 2. an angle formed by a transversal as it cuts one of two lines and situated on the ...
exteriorise
British variant of exteriorize
exteriority
noun Date: 1611 the quality or state of being exterior or exteriorized ; externality

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