Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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exteriorization
noun see exteriorize
exteriorize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1879 1. externalize 2. to bring out of the body (as for surgery) • exteriorization noun
exteriorly
adverb see exterior I
exterminate
transitive verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Latin exterminatus, past participle of exterminare, from ex- + terminus boundary — more at term Date: 1591 to get rid of ...
extermination
noun see exterminate
exterminator
noun see exterminate
exterminatory
adjective Date: 1790 of, relating to, or marked by extermination
extermine
transitive verb (-mined; -mining) Date: 1539 obsolete exterminate
extern
I. adjective Etymology: Middle French or Latin; Middle French externe, from Latin externus Date: 1530 archaic external II. noun also externe Date: 1823 a person connected ...
external
I. adjective Etymology: Latin externus external, from exter — more at exterior Date: 1542 1. a. capable of being perceived outwardly b. (1) having merely the ...
external combustion engine
noun Date: 1915 a heat engine (as a steam engine) that derives its heat from fuel consumed outside the cylinder
external degree
noun Date: 1928 a degree conferred on a student who has not attended the university but has passed the qualifying examination
external respiration
noun Date: 1940 exchange of gases between the external environment and a distributing system of the animal body (as the lungs of higher vertebrates or the tracheal tubes of ...
externalisation
British variant of externalization
externalise
British variant of externalize
externalism
noun Date: 1856 1. attention to externals; especially excessive preoccupation with externals 2. externality 1
externality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1673 1. the quality or state of being external or externalized 2. something that is external 3. a secondary or unintended consequence
externalization
noun Date: 1803 1. a. the action or process of externalizing b. the quality or state of being externalized 2. something externalized ; embodiment
externalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1852 1. to make external or externally manifest 2. to attribute to causes outside the self ; rationalize
externally
adverb see external I
externe
noun see extern II
externship
noun Date: 1945 a training program that is part of a course of study of an educational institution and is taken in private business
exteroceptive
adjective Etymology: exterior + -o- + -ceptive (as in receptive) Date: 1906 relating to, being, or activated by stimuli received by an organism from outside
exteroceptor
noun Date: 1906 a sense organ excited by exteroceptive stimuli
exterritorial
adjective Date: circa 1880 extraterritorial • exterritoriality noun
exterritoriality
noun see exterritorial
extinct
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin exstinctus, past participle of exstinguere Date: 15th century 1. a. no longer burning b. no longer active 2. no ...
extinction
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of making extinct or causing to be extinguished 2. the condition or fact of being extinct or extinguished; also the process of becoming ...
extinction coefficient
noun Date: 1902 a measure of the rate of diminution of transmitted light via scattering and absorption for a medium
extinctive
adjective Date: 1600 tending or serving to extinguish or make extinct
extinguish
transitive verb Etymology: Latin exstinguere (from ex- + stinguere to extinguish) + English -ish (as in abolish); akin to Latin instigare to incite — more at stick Date: ...
extinguishable
adjective see extinguish
extinguisher
noun see extinguish
extinguishment
noun see extinguish
extirpate
transitive verb (-pated; -pating) Etymology: Latin exstirpatus, past participle of exstirpare, from ex- + stirp-, stirps trunk, root Date: 1535 1. a. to destroy ...
extirpation
noun see extirpate
extirpator
noun see extirpate
extol
also extoll transitive verb (extolled; extolling) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin extollere, from ex- + tollere to lift up — more at tolerate Date: 15th century to ...
extoll
transitive verb see extol
extoller
noun see extol
extolment
noun see extol
extort
transitive verb Etymology: Latin extortus, past participle of extorquēre to wrench out, extort, from ex- + torquēre to twist — more at torture Date: 15th century to ...
extorter
noun see extort
extortion
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or practice of extorting especially money or other property; especially the offense committed by an official engaging in such practice 2. ...
extortionary
adjective Date: 1771 archaic extortionate 1
extortionate
adjective Date: 1757 1. characterized by extortion 2. excessive, exorbitant • extortionately adverb
extortionately
adverb see extortionate
extortioner
noun see extortion
extortionist
noun see extortion
extortive
adjective see extort
extra
I. adjective Etymology: probably short for extraordinary Date: 1757 1. a. more than is due, usual, or necessary ; additional b. subject to an additional charge 2. ...
extra point
noun Date: circa 1949 a point gained on a conversion in football
extra-
prefix Etymology: Latin, from extra, adverb & preposition, outside, except, beyond, from exter being on the outside — more at exterior outside ; beyond
extra-base hit
noun Date: circa 1949 a hit in baseball that lets the batter take more than one base
extra-virgin
adjective Date: 1980 being a virgin olive oil that is lowest in acidity and highest in quality
extracellular
adjective Date: 1867 situated or occurring outside a cell or the cells of the body • extracellularly adverb
extracellularly
adverb see extracellular
extrachromosomal
adjective Date: 1940 situated or controlled by factors outside the chromosome
extracorporeal
adjective Date: 1865 occurring or based outside the living body • extracorporeally adverb
extracorporeally
adverb see extracorporeal
extracranial
adjective Date: circa 1884 situated or occurring outside the cranium
extract
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin extractus, past participle of extrahere, from ex- + trahere to draw Date: 15th century 1. a. to draw forth (as by ...
extractability
noun see extract I
extractable
adjective see extract I
extraction
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of extracting something 2. ancestry, origin 3. something extracted
extractive
I. adjective Date: 1599 1. a. of, relating to, or involving extraction b. tending toward or resulting in withdrawal of natural resources by extraction with no provision ...
extractively
adverb see extractive I
extractor
noun Date: 1597 one that extracts; especially the mechanism in a firearm that dislodges a spent cartridge from the chamber
extracurricular
adjective Date: 1925 1. not falling within the scope of a regular curriculum; specifically of or relating to officially or semiofficially approved and usually organized ...
extraditable
adjective Date: 1881 1. subject or liable to extradition 2. making one liable to extradition
extradite
transitive verb (-dited; -diting) Etymology: back-formation from extradition Date: 1864 1. to deliver up to extradition 2. to obtain the extradition of
extradition
noun Etymology: French, from ex- + Latin tradition-, traditio act of handing over — more at treason Date: 1839 the surrender of an alleged criminal usually under the ...
extrados
noun (plural extradoses or extrados) Etymology: French, from Latin extra + French dos back — more at dossier Date: 1772 the exterior curve of an arch — see arch ...
extraembryonic
adjective Date: 1901 situated outside the embryo; especially developed from the zygote but not part of the embryo
extragalactic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1851 originating or existing outside the Milky Way galaxy; also of or relating to extragalactic space
extrahepatic
adjective Date: circa 1923 situated or originating outside the liver
extrajudicial
adjective Date: 1630 1. a. not forming a valid part of regular legal proceedings b. delivered without legal authority ; private 2a(2)
extrajudicially
adverb see extrajudicial
extralegal
adjective Date: 1644 not regulated or sanctioned by law • extralegally adverb
extralegally
adverb see extralegal
extralimital
adjective Date: 1874 not present in a given area — used of kinds of organisms (as species)
extralinguistic
adjective Date: 1927 lying outside the province of linguistics • extralinguistically adverb
extralinguistically
adverb see extralinguistic
extraliterary
adjective Date: 1945 lying outside the field of literature
extrality
noun Etymology: by contraction Date: 1925 extraterritoriality
extralogical
adjective Date: 1833 not guided or determined by considerations of logic
extramarital
adjective Date: 1925 of, relating to, or being sexual intercourse between a married person and someone other than his or her spouse ; adulterous
extramundane
adjective Etymology: Late Latin extramundanus, from Latin extra + mundus the world Date: 1665 situated in or relating to a region beyond the material world
extramural
adjective Date: 1854 1. existing or functioning outside or beyond the walls, boundaries, or precincts of an organized unit (as a school or hospital) 2. chiefly British of, ...
extramurally
adverb see extramural
extramusical
adjective Date: 1923 lying outside the province of music
extraneous
adjective Etymology: Latin extraneus — more at strange Date: 1638 1. existing on or coming from the outside 2. a. not forming an essential or vital part b. ...
extraneously
adverb see extraneous
extraneousness
noun see extraneous
extranet
noun Date: 1995 a network (as of a company) similar to an intranet that also allows access by certain others (as customers or suppliers)
extranuclear
adjective Date: 1887 1. situated in or affecting the parts of a cell external to the nucleus ; cytoplasmic 2. situated outside the nucleus of an atom
extraocular muscle
noun Date: 1939 any of six small voluntary muscles that pass between the eyeball and the orbit and control the movement of the eyeball in relation to the orbit
extraordinaire
adjective Etymology: French Date: 1940 extraordinary — used postpositively
extraordinarily
adverb see extraordinary
extraordinariness
noun see extraordinary
extraordinary
adjective Etymology: Middle English extraordinarie, from Latin extraordinarius, from extra ordinem out of course, from extra + ordinem, accusative of ordin-, ordo order Date: ...
extrapolate
verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin extra outside + English -polate (as in interpolate) — more at extra- Date: 1874 transitive verb 1. to infer (values of a variable ...
extrapolation
noun see extrapolate
extrapolative
adjective see extrapolate
extrapolator
noun see extrapolate
extrapyramidal
adjective Date: circa 1902 situated outside of the pyramidal tracts; also involving descending nerve tracts other than the pyramidal tracts
extrasensory
adjective Date: 1934 residing beyond or outside the ordinary senses
extrasensory perception
noun Date: 1934 perception (as in telepathy, clairvoyance, and precognition) that involves awareness of information about events external to the self not gained through the ...
extrasolar
adjective Date: 1872 originating or existing outside the solar system
extrasystole
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1900 a premature beat of one of the chambers of the heart that leads to momentary arrhythmia
extraterrestrial
I. adjective Date: 1848 originating, existing, or occurring outside the earth or its atmosphere II. noun Date: 1950 an extraterrestrial being
extraterritorial
adjective Date: 1869 existing or taking place outside the territorial limits of a jurisdiction
extraterritoriality
noun Date: 1836 exemption from the application or jurisdiction of local law or tribunals
extratextual
adjective Date: 1961 of, relating to, or being something outside a literary text
extratropical cyclone
noun Date: 1923 a cyclone in the middle or high latitudes often containing a cold front that extends toward the equator for hundreds of miles
extrauterine
adjective Date: 1709 situated or occurring outside the uterus
extravagance
noun Date: 1640 1. a. an instance of excess or prodigality; specifically an excessive outlay of money b. something extravagant
extravagancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1625 extravagance
extravagant
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Medieval Latin extravagant-, extravagans, from Latin extra- + vagant-, vagans, present participle of vagari to ...
extravagantly
adverb see extravagant
extravaganza
noun Etymology: Italian estravaganza, literally, extravagance, from estravagante extravagant, from Medieval Latin extravagant-, extravagans Date: 1754 1. a literary or ...
extravagate
intransitive verb (-gated; -gating) Date: circa 1755 archaic to go beyond proper limits
extravasate
verb (-sated; -sating) Etymology: Latin extra + vas vessel Date: 1668 transitive verb to force out or cause to escape from a proper vessel or channel intransitive verb ...
extravasation
noun see extravasate
extravascular
adjective Date: 1804 not occurring or contained in body vessels
extravehicular
adjective Date: 1965 taking place outside a vehicle (as a spacecraft)
extraversion
noun see extroversion
extravert
I. noun see extrovert II. adjective see extrovert
extraverted
adjective see extrovert
Extremadura
geographical name region & old province W Spain bordering on Portugal; area included in present Cáceres & Badajoz provinces
extreme
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin extremus, superlative of exter, exterus being on the outside — more at exterior Date: 15th century 1. ...
extreme unction
noun Date: 15th century a sacrament in which a priest anoints and prays for the recovery and salvation of a critically ill or injured person
extreme value
noun see extremum
extremely
adverb Date: 1509 1. in an extreme manner 2. to an extreme extent
extremely high frequency
noun Date: 1952 a radio frequency in the highest range of the radio spectrum — see radio frequency table
extremely low frequency
noun Date: 1966 a radio frequency in the lowest range of the radio spectrum — see radio frequency table
extremeness
noun see extreme I
extremism
noun Date: 1865 1. the quality or state of being extreme 2. advocacy of extreme measures or views ; radicalism • extremist noun or adjective
extremist
noun or adjective see extremism
extremity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century 1. a. the farthest or most remote part, section, or point
extremophile
noun Date: 1989 an organism that lives under extreme environmental conditions (as in a hot spring or ice cap)
extremum
noun (plural extrema) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, neuter of extremus Date: 1904 a maximum or a minimum of a mathematical function — called also extreme value
extricable
adjective see extricate
extricate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Latin extricatus, past participle of extricare, from ex- + tricae trifles, perplexities Date: 1601 1. a. archaic unravel b. ...
extrication
noun see extricate
extrinsic
adjective Etymology: French & Late Latin; French extrinsèque, from Late Latin extrinsecus, from Latin, adverb, from without; akin to Latin exter outward and to Latin sequi to ...
extrinsic factor
noun Date: 1938 vitamin B12
extrinsically
adverb see extrinsic
extro-
prefix Etymology: alteration of Latin extra- outward — compare intro-
extrorse
adjective Etymology: probably from New Latin *extrorsus, from Late Latin, adverb, outward, from Latin extra- + -orsus (as in introrsus) — more at introrse Date: 1858 facing ...
extroversion
or extraversion noun Etymology: German Extraversion, from Latin extra- + versus, past participle of vertere to turn — more at worth Date: 1915 the act, state, or habit of ...
extrovert
also extravert noun Etymology: modification of German extravertiert, from Latin extra- + vertere Date: 1918 one whose personality is characterized by extroversion; broadly a ...
extroverted
adjective see extrovert
extrudability
noun see extrude
extrudable
adjective see extrude
extrude
verb (extruded; extruding) Etymology: Latin extrudere, from ex- + trudere to thrust — more at threat Date: 1566 transitive verb 1. to force, press, or push out 2. to ...
extruder
noun see extrude
extrusion
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin extrusion-, extrusio, from Latin extrudere Date: 1540 the act or process of extruding; also a form or product produced by this process
extrusive
adjective Date: 1816 relating to or formed by geological extrusion from the earth in a molten state or as volcanic ash
exuberance
noun Date: 1631 1. the quality or state of being exuberant 2. an exuberant act or expression
exuberant
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin exuberant-, exuberans, present participle of exuberare to be abundant, from ex- + uber fruitful, from uber ...
exuberantly
adverb see exuberant
exuberate
intransitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 15th century 1. archaic to have something in abundance ; overflow 2. to become exuberant ; show exuberance
exudate
noun Date: 1876 exuded matter
exudation
noun Date: 1612 1. the process of exuding 2. exudate • exudative adjective
exudative
adjective see exudation
exude
verb (exuded; exuding) Etymology: Latin exsudare, from ex- + sudare to sweat — more at sweat Date: 1574 intransitive verb 1. to ooze out 2. to undergo diffusion ...
exult
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle French exulter, from Latin exsultare, literally, to leap up, from ex- + saltare to leap — more at saltation Date: 1548 1. obsolete to ...
exultance
noun Date: 1650 exultation
exultancy
noun Date: 1621 exultation
exultant
adjective Date: 1653 filled with or expressing great joy or triumph ; jubilant • exultantly adverb
exultantly
adverb see exultant
exultation
noun Date: 15th century the act of exulting ; the state of being exultant
exultingly
adverb see exult
Exuma
geographical name islands in central Bahamas S of Exuma Sound (SE of New Providence Island); chief island Great Exuma
exurb
noun Etymology: ex- + suburb Date: 1955 a region or settlement that lies outside a city and usually beyond its suburbs and that often is inhabited chiefly by well-to-do ...
exurban
adjective see exurb
exurbanite
noun Date: 1955 one who lives in an exurb
exurbia
noun Date: 1955 the generalized region of exurbs
exuviae
noun plural Etymology: Latin, from exuere to take off, from ex- + -uere to put on; akin to Old Church Slavic obuti to put on (footwear) Date: 1653 sloughed off natural ...
exuvial
adjective see exuviae
exuviation
noun Date: 1839 the process of molting
eyas
noun Etymology: Middle English, alteration (by incorrect division of a neias) of neias, from Anglo-French niais taken in the nest, from Vulgar Latin *nidax nestling, from Latin ...
Eyck, van
biographical name Hubert or Huybrecht circa 1370-1426 & his brother Jan before 1395-1441 Flemish painters
eye
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ēage; akin to Old High German ouga eye, Latin oculus, Greek ōps eye, face, Sanskrit akṣi eye Date: before 12th century ...
eye bank
noun Date: 1944 a storage place for human corneas from the newly dead for transplant to the eyes of those blind from corneal defects
eye candy
noun Date: 1981 something superficially attractive to look at
eye chart
noun Date: 1943 a chart read at a fixed distance for purposes of testing sight; especially one with rows of letters or objects of decreasing size
eye contact
noun Date: 1955 visual contact with another person's eyes
eye lens
noun Date: 1871 the lens nearest the eye in an eyepiece
eye lift
noun Date: 1974 blepharoplasty
eye rhyme
noun Date: 1871 an imperfect rhyme that appears to have identical vowel sounds from similarity of spelling (as move and love)
eye shadow
noun Date: 1930 a cosmetic cream or powder in one of various colors that is applied to the eyelids to accent the eyes
eye socket
noun Date: circa 1844 orbit I
eye view
noun Date: circa 1771 point of view
eye-catcher
noun Date: 1923 something that arrests the eye • eye-catching adjective • eye-catchingly adverb
eye-catching
adjective see eye-catcher
eye-catchingly
adverb see eye-catcher
eye-opener
noun Date: 1817 1. a drink intended to wake one up 2. something startling, surprising, or enlightening • eye-opening adjective
eye-opening
adjective see eye-opener
eye-popping
adjective see eyepopper
eyeball
I. noun Date: 1582 1. the more or less globular capsule of the vertebrate eye formed by the sclera and cornea together with their contained structures 2. plural people who ...
eyeball-to-eyeball
adverb or adjective Date: 1962 face-to-face
eyebar
noun Date: circa 1889 a metal bar having a closed loop at one or both ends
eyeblink
noun Date: 1867 1. a brief period of time ; instant 2. blink 3
eyebolt
noun Date: 1769 a bolt with a looped head
eyebright
noun Date: 1533 any of a genus (Euphrasia) of semiparasitic herbs of the snapdragon family with spikelike racemes
eyebrow
noun Date: 15th century the ridge over the eye or the hair growing on it
eyebrow pencil
noun Date: 1881 a cosmetic pencil for the eyebrows
eyecup
noun Date: circa 1874 1. a small oval cup with a rim curved to fit the orbit of the eye used for applying liquid remedies to the eyes 2. optic cup 3. a usually rubber cup ...
eyed
adjective Date: 14th century having an eye or eyes especially of a specified kind or number — often used in combination
eyedness
noun Etymology: -eyed (as in right-eyed, left-eyed) Date: 1924 preference for the use of one eye instead of the other (as in using a monocular microscope)
eyedropper
noun Date: 1926 dropper 2
eyedrops
noun plural Date: 1926 a medicated solution for the eyes applied in drops
eyeful
noun Date: circa 1864 1. a full or completely satisfying view 2. one that is visually attractive; especially a strikingly beautiful woman
eyeglass
noun Date: 1593 1. a. eyepiece b. a lens worn to aid vision; specifically monocle c. plural glasses, spectacles 2. eyecup 1
eyeglasses
noun see glass I
eyehole
noun Date: 1637 1. orbit I 2. peephole
eyelash
noun Date: 1752 1. the fringe of hair edging the eyelid — usually used in plural 2. a single hair of the eyelashes 3. hairbreadth
eyeless
adjective see eye I
eyelet
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English oilet, from Anglo-French oillet, diminutive of oil eye, from Latin oculus Date: 14th century 1. a. a small hole designed to ...
eyelid
noun Date: 13th century either of the movable folds of skin and muscle that can be closed over the eyeball
eyelike
adjective see eye I
eyeliner
noun Date: 1947 makeup used to emphasize the contour of the eyes
eyen
archaic plural of eye
eyepiece
noun Date: 1790 the lens or combination of lenses at the eye end of an optical instrument
eyepopper
noun Date: 1941 something that excites, astonishes, or attracts the eye • eye-popping adjective
eyer
noun see eye II
eyes only
adjective Date: 1972 to be read only by the person addressed
eyeshade
noun Date: 1845 a visor that shields the eyes from strong light and is fastened on with a headband
eyeshot
noun Date: 1599 the range of the eye ; view
eyesight
noun Date: 13th century 1. sight 4a 2. archaic observation 1
eyesore
noun Date: 1530 something offensive to view
eyespot
noun Date: 1862 1. a spot of color 2. a. a simple visual organ of pigment or pigmented cells covering a sensory termination ; ocellus b. a small pigmented body of ...
eyestalk
noun Date: 1854 one of the movable peduncles bearing an eye at the tip in a decapod crustacean
eyestrain
noun Date: 1874 weariness or a strained state of the eye
eyestrings
noun plural Date: 1590 obsolete organic eye attachments formerly believed to break at death or blindness
eyetooth
noun Date: circa 1545 a canine tooth of the upper jaw
eyewash
noun Date: circa 1859 1. an eye lotion 2. misleading or deceptive statements, actions, or procedures
eyewear
noun Date: 1926 corrective or protective devices (as glasses or contact lenses) for the eyes
eyewink
noun Date: 1598 look, glance
eyewitness
noun Date: 1539 one who sees an occurrence or an object; especially one who gives a report on what he or she has seen
eyre
noun Etymology: Middle English eire, from Anglo-French, journey, eyre, from errer to travel — more at errant Date: 14th century a circuit traveled by an itinerant justice ...
Eyre Peninsula
geographical name peninsula Australia in S South Australia W of Spencer Gulf
Eyre, Lake
geographical name intermittent lake central Australia in NE South Australia
eyrie
chiefly British variant of aerie
eyrir
noun (plural aurar) Etymology: Icelandic, from Old Norse, money (in plural), probably from Latin aureus a gold coin Date: circa 1927 — see krona at money table
Eyzies, Les
geographical name — see Les Eyzies
Ez
or Ezr abbreviation Ezra
Ezech
abbreviation Ezechiel
Ezechiel
noun Etymology: Late Latin Date: before 12th century Ezekiel
Ezek
abbreviation Ezekiel
Ezekiel
I. noun Etymology: Late Latin Ezechiel, from Hebrew Yĕḥezqēl Date: 1568 1. a Hebrew priest and prophet of the sixth century B.C. 2. a prophetic book of canonical Jewish ...
Ezr
abbreviation see Ez
Ezra
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Hebrew ‘Ezrā Date: 1540 1. a Hebrew priest, scribe, and reformer of Judaism of the fifth century B.C. in Babylon and Jerusalem 2. a ...
F
I. abbreviation 1. Fahrenheit 2. farad 3. French 4. Friday II. symbol fluorine
f
I. noun (plural f's or fs) Usage: often capitalized, often attributive Date: before 12th century 1. a. the 6th letter of the English alphabet b. a graphic ...
F and A
abbreviation fore and aft
F clef
noun Date: 1596 bass clef
F distribution
noun Etymology: Sir Ronald Fisher died 1962 English geneticist and statistician Date: 1947 a probability density function that is used especially in analysis of variance ...
F layer
noun Date: 1928 the highest and most densely ionized regular layer of the ionosphere occurring at night within the F region
F region
noun Date: 1923 the highest region of the ionosphere occurring from 80 miles (130 kilometers) to more than 300 miles (500 kilometers)
f-number
noun Etymology: focal length Date: circa 1903 1. the ratio of the focal length to the aperture in an optical system 2. a number following the symbol f/ that expresses the ...
f-stop
noun Date: 1946 a camera lens aperture setting indicated by an f-number
F/X
or FX noun plural Etymology: letter names ef and ex representing effects Date: 1985 special effects

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