Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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farceur
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from farcer to joke, from Old French, from farce Date: 1781 1. joker, wag 2. a writer or actor of farce
farci
or farcie adjective Etymology: French, from past participle of farcir Date: 1903 stuffed especially with forcemeat
farcical
adjective Date: 1716 1. of, relating to, or resembling farce ; ludicrous 2. laughably inept ; absurd • farcicality noun • farcically adverb
farcicality
noun see farcical
farcically
adverb see farcical
farcie
adjective see farci
farcy
noun Etymology: Middle English farsin, farsi, from Anglo-French farcin, from Late Latin farcimen, from Latin, sausage, from farcire Date: 15th century glanders; especially ...
fard
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French farder, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German faro colored — more at perch Date: 15th century 1. to paint ...
fardel
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, ultimately from Arabic farda part, bundle Date: 14th century 1. bundle 2. burden
fare
I. intransitive verb (fared; faring) Etymology: Middle English faren, from Old English faran; akin to Old High German faran to go, Latin portare to carry, Greek peran to pass ...
fare-thee-well
also fare-you-well noun Date: 1884 1. the utmost degree 2. a state of perfection
fare-you-well
noun see fare-thee-well
farewell
I. verb imperative Date: 14th century get along well — used interjectionally to or by one departing II. noun Date: 14th century 1. a wish of well-being at parting ; ...
Farewell, Cape
geographical name cape Greenland at S tip
farfal
noun see farfel
farfalle
noun Etymology: Italian, plural of farfalla, literally, butterfly Date: 1941 butterfly-shaped pasta
farfel
or farfal noun Etymology: Yiddish farfl (plural), from Middle High German varveln noodles, noodle soup Date: 1892 noodles in the form of pellets or granules
farfetchedness
noun see far-fetched
Fargo
geographical name city E North Dakota on Red River population 90,599
farina
noun Etymology: Latin, meal, flour, from far spelt — more at barley Date: 14th century 1. a fine meal of vegetable matter (as cereal grains) used chiefly for puddings or ...
Farina
biographical name Salvatore 1846-1918 Italian novelist
farinaceous
adjective Date: 1646 1. having a mealy texture or surface 2. containing or rich in starch
farinha
noun Etymology: Portuguese, flour, cassava meal, from Latin farina Date: 1726 cassava meal
farkleberry
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1765 a shrub or small tree (Vaccinium arboreum) of the heath family of the southeastern United States having a small hard black berry ...
farl
noun Etymology: contraction of Scots fardel, literally, fourth part, from Middle English (Scots), from ferde del, from ferde fourth + del part Date: 1686 Scottish a small ...
Farley
biographical name James Aloysius 1888-1976 American politician
farm
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English ferme, from Anglo-French, from fermer to fix, rent, from Latin firmare to make firm, from firmus firm Date: 14th ...
farm out
transitive verb Date: circa 1600 1. to turn over (as a job) for performance by another usually under contract 2. a. to put (as children) into the hands of another for ...
Farman
biographical name Henri 1874-1958 & his brother Maurice 1877-1964 French pioneer aviators & airplane manufacturers
farmer
noun Date: 14th century 1. a person who pays a fixed sum for some privilege or source of income 2. a person who cultivates land or crops or raises animals or fish 3. ...
Farmer
I. biographical name Fannie Merritt 1857-1915 American cookery expert II. biographical name James Leonard 1920-1999 American civil rights leader
farmer cheese
noun Date: 1949 a pressed unripened cheese similar to but drier and firmer than cottage cheese
farmer's lung
noun Date: 1945 an acute pulmonary disorder characterized by sudden onset, fever, cough, expectoration, and breathlessness that results from the inhalation of spores in dust ...
farmerette
noun Date: 1902 a woman who is a farmer or farmhand
Farmers Branch
geographical name city NE Texas population 27,508
farmhand
noun Date: 1843 1. a farm laborer; especially a hired laborer on a farm 2. a player on a farm team
farmhouse
noun Date: 1598 a dwelling on a farm
farming
noun Date: 1659 the practice of agriculture or aquaculture
Farmington
geographical name 1. town N Connecticut W of Hartford population 23,641 2. city NW New Mexico population 37,844
Farmington Hills
geographical name city SE Michigan population 82,111
farmland
noun Date: 1638 land used or suitable for farming
farmstead
noun Date: 1807 the buildings and adjacent service areas of a farm; broadly a farm with its buildings
farmwife
noun Date: 1874 a farmer's wife
farmwork
noun see farmworker
farmworker
noun Date: 1941 farmhand 1 • farmwork noun
farmyard
noun Date: 1723 land around or enclosed by farm buildings; especially barnyard
Farnese
biographical name Alessandro 1545-1592 Duke of Parma Italian general in Spanish service
faro
noun (plural faros) Etymology: probably alteration of earlier pharaoh, translation of French pharaon Date: 1731 a gambling game in which players bet on cards drawn from a ...
Faroe Islands
geographical name see Faeroe Islands
Faroese
variant of Faeroese
farouche
adjective Etymology: French, wild, shy, from Old French, alteration of forasche, from Late Latin forasticus living outside, from Latin foras outdoors; akin to Latin fores door ...
Farouk I
Arabic Fārūq al-Awwal biographical name 1920-1965 king of Egypt (1936-52; abdicated)
Farquhar
biographical name George 1678-1707 British dramatist
Farquhar Islands
geographical name island group NW Indian Ocean NE of Madagascar belonging to Seychelles
farraginous
adjective Date: 1615 consisting of a farrago
farrago
noun (plural -goes) Etymology: Latin farragin-, farrago mixed fodder, mixture, from far spelt — more at barley Date: 1632 a confused mixture ; hodgepodge
Farragut
biographical name David Glasgow 1801-1870 American admiral
Farrakhan
biographical name Louis Abdul 1933- originally Louis Eugene Walcott American religious leader
Farrar
I. biographical name Frederic William 1831-1903 English clergyman & writer II. biographical name Geraldine 1882-1967 American soprano
Farrell
I. biographical name James Thomas 1904-1979 American novelist II. biographical name Suzanne 1945- American dancer
farrier
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English ferrour, from Anglo-French ferrour blacksmith, from ferrer to shoe (horses), from Vulgar Latin *ferrare, from Latin ferrum iron ...
farrow
I. verb Etymology: Middle English farwen, from Old English *feargian, from Old English fearh young pig; akin to Old High German farah young pig, Latin porcus pig Date: 13th ...
Farrukhabad
geographical name city N India in Uttar Pradesh on the Ganges WNW of Lucknow population 160,927
Fársala
geographical name — see Pharsalus
farseeing
adjective Date: 1598 farsighted 1
Farsi
noun Etymology: Persian fārsī, from Fārs Persia Date: 1878 Persian 2b
farside
noun Date: 15th century the farther side; especially the side of the moon away from the earth
farsighted
adjective Date: 1609 1. a. seeing or able to see to a great distance b. having or showing foresight or good judgment ; sagacious 2. affected with hyperopia • ...
farsightedly
adverb see farsighted
farsightedness
noun Date: circa 1829 1. the quality or state of being farsighted 2. hyperopia
fart
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English ferten, farten; akin to Old High German ferzan to break wind, Old Norse freta, Greek perdesthai, Sanskrit pardate he breaks wind ...
farther
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English ferther, alteration of further Date: 14th century 1. at or to a greater distance or more advanced point 2. to a greater degree or ...
farthermost
adjective Date: 15th century most distant ; farthest
farthest
I. adjective Date: 14th century most distant especially in space or time II. adverb Date: 15th century 1. to or at the greatest distance in space or time 2. to the ...
farthing
noun Etymology: Middle English ferthing, from Old English fēorthung (akin to Middle High German vierdunc fourth part), from Old English fēortha fourth Date: before 12th ...
farthingale
noun Etymology: modification of Middle French verdugale, from Old Spanish verdugado, from verdugo young shoot of a tree, from verde green, from Latin viridis — more at ...
Faruk
biographical name variant of farouk
Fārūq al-Awwal
biographical name see Farouk I
FAS
abbreviation 1. fetal alcohol syndrome 2. firsts and seconds 3. free alongside ship
fas est et ab hoste doceri
foreign term Etymology: Latin it is right to learn even from an enemy
fasc
abbreviation fascicle
fasces
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Latin, from plural of fascis bundle; akin to Latin fascia Date: 1598 a bundle of rods and among them an ax with ...
fascia
noun (plural fasciae or -cias) Etymology: Italian, from Latin, band, bandage; akin to Middle Irish basc necklace Date: 1563 1. a flat usually horizontal member of a building ...
fascia board
noun see fascia
fascial
adjective see fascia
fasciated
adjective Date: circa 1835 1. exhibiting fasciation 2. arranged in fascicles
fasciation
noun Date: 1677 a malformation of plant stems commonly manifested as enlargement and flattening as if several stems were fused
fascicle
noun Etymology: Latin fasciculus, diminutive of fascis Date: 15th century 1. a small or slender bundle (as of pine needles or nerve fibers) 2. one of the divisions of a ...
fascicled
adjective see fascicle
fascicular
adjective Date: 1816 of, relating to, or consisting of fascicles or fasciculi • fascicularly adverb
fascicularly
adverb see fascicular
fasciculate
also fasciculated adjective Date: 1794 fascicular
fasciculated
adjective see fasciculate
fasciculation
noun Date: 1938 muscular twitching involving the simultaneous contraction of contiguous groups of muscle fibers
fascicule
noun Etymology: French, from Latin fasciculus Date: 1880 fascicle 2
fasciculus
noun (plural fasciculi) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin Date: 1713 1. a slender bundle of anatomical fibers (as nerve fibers) 2. fascicle 2
fasciitis
also fascitis noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1893 inflammation of a fascia (as from infection or injury) — compare necrotizing fasciitis
fascinate
verb (fascinated; fascinating) Etymology: Latin fascinatus, past participle of fascinare, from fascinum evil spell Date: 1598 transitive verb 1. obsolete bewitch 2. ...
fascinating
adjective Date: 1638 extremely interesting or charming ; captivating • fascinatingly adverb
fascinatingly
adverb see fascinating
fascination
noun Date: 1605 1. a. the quality or power of fascinating b. something fascinating 2. the state of being fascinated ; the state of feeling an intense interest in ...
fascinator
noun Date: 1750 1. one that fascinates 2. a woman's lightweight head scarf usually of crochet or lace
fascine
noun Etymology: French, from Latin fascina, from fascis Date: circa 1688 a long bundle of sticks of wood bound together and used for such purposes as filling ditches and ...
fascioliasis
noun (plural fascioliases) Etymology: New Latin, from Fasciola, genus of flukes + -iasis Date: 1890 infestation with or disease caused by liver flukes (Fasciola hepatica or ...
fascism
noun Etymology: Italian fascismo, from fascio bundle, fasces, group, from Latin fascis bundle & fasces fasces Date: 1921 1. often capitalized a political philosophy, ...
fascist
noun or adjective see fascism
Fascista
noun (plural Fascisti) Etymology: Italian, from fascio Date: 1921 a member of an Italian political organization under Mussolini governing Italy 1922-1943 according to the ...
fascistic
adjective see fascism
fascistically
adverb see fascism
fascitis
noun see fasciitis
fash
verb Etymology: Middle French fascher, from Vulgar Latin *fastidiare to disgust, from Latin fastidium disgust — more at fastidious Date: 1533 chiefly Scottish vex • ...
fashion
I. noun Etymology: Middle English facioun, fasoun shape, manner, from Anglo-French façun, fauschoun, from Latin faction-, factio act of making, faction, from facere to make — ...
fashion plate
noun Date: 1851 1. an illustration of a clothing style 2. a person who dresses in the latest fashions
fashionability
noun see fashionable I
fashionable
I. adjective Date: circa 1580 1. conforming to the custom, fashion, or established mode 2. of or relating to the world of fashion • fashionability noun • ...
fashionableness
noun see fashionable I
fashionably
adverb see fashionable I
fashioner
noun see fashion II
fashionista
noun Etymology: 1fashion + -ista (as in Sandinista) Date: 1993 a designer, promoter, or follower of the latest fashions
fashionmonger
noun Date: 1599 one that studies, imitates, or sets the fashion
Fashoda
geographical name — see Kodok
fast
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English fæst; akin to Old High German festi firm, Old Norse fastr, Armenian hast Date: before 12th century 1. a. firmly ...
fast and loose
adverb Date: 1580 1. in a reckless or irresponsible manner 2. in a craftily deceitful way
fast break
noun Date: 1938 a quick offensive drive toward a goal (as in basketball) in an attempt to score before the opponent's defense is set up • fast-break intransitive verb
fast food
noun see fast-food
fast lane
noun Date: 1933 1. a traffic lane intended for vehicles traveling at higher speeds 2. a way of life marked by a fast pace and usually the pursuit of immediate ...
Fast of Esther
Date: 1887 a Jewish fast day observed the day before Purim in commemoration of a fast proclaimed by Queen Esther
fast track
noun Date: 1975 1. a course leading to rapid advancement or success 2. a course of expedited consideration or approval
fast-break
intransitive verb see fast break
fast-food
adjective Date: 1951 1. of, relating to, or specializing in food that can be prepared and served quickly 2. designed for ready availability, use, or consumption and with ...
fast-forward
I. noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1948 1. a function of an electronic device that advances a recording at a higher than normal speed 2. a state or an instance of rapid ...
fast-lane
adjective see fast lane
fast-pitch
noun Date: 1967 softball which is played with 9 or 10 players on each side and in which pitches are thrown with speed and base stealing is allowed — compare slow-pitch
fast-talk
transitive verb Date: 1946 to influence or persuade by fluent, facile, and usually deceptive or tricky talk • fast-talker noun
fast-talker
noun see fast-talk
fast-track
I. adjective Date: 1967 1. of, relating to, or moving along a fast track 2. of, relating to, or being a construction procedure in which work on a building begins before ...
fast-tracker
noun see fast-track II
fast-twitch
adjective Date: 1970 of, relating to, or being muscle fiber that contracts quickly especially during brief high-intensity physical activity requiring strength — compare ...
fastback
noun Date: 1954 an automobile with a roof having a long curving downward slope to the rear; also the back of such an automobile
fastball
noun Date: 1899 a baseball pitch thrown at full speed and often rising slightly as it nears the plate • fastballer noun
fastballer
noun see fastball
fasten
verb (fastened; fastening) Etymology: Middle English fastnen, from Old English fæstnian to make fast; akin to Old High German festinōn to make fast, Old English fæst fast ...
fastener
noun see fasten
fastening
noun Date: 12th century something that fastens ; fastener
fastidious
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin fastidiosus, from fastidium disgust, probably from fastus arrogance (probably akin to Latin fastigium top) + taedium irksomeness ...
fastidiously
adverb see fastidious
fastidiousness
noun see fastidious
fastigiate
adjective Etymology: probably from New Latin *fastigiatus, from Latin fastigium — more at bristle Date: 1662 narrowing toward the top; especially having upright usually ...
fastness
noun Date: before 12th century 1. the quality or state of being fast: as a. the quality or state of being fixed b. the quality or state of being swift c. colorfast ...
fastuous
adjective Etymology: Latin fastuosus, from fastus arrogance Date: 1638 1. haughty, arrogant 2. ostentatious, showy
fat
I. adjective (fatter; fattest) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English fǣtt, past participle of fǣtan to cram; akin to Old High German feizit fat Date: before 12th ...
fat body
noun Date: 1869 a fatty tissue especially of nearly mature insect larvae that serves as a food reserve
fat cat
noun Date: 1928 1. a. a wealthy contributor to a political campaign fund b. a wealthy and privileged person c. big shot 2. a lethargic complacent person • ...
fat cell
noun Date: 1845 one of the fat-laden cells making up adipose tissue
fat depot
noun Date: 1946 adipose tissue
fat farm
noun Date: 1969 a health spa that specializes in weight reduction
Fat Tuesday
noun Date: 1866 Mardi Gras 1a
fat-cat
adjective see fat cat
fat-tailed sheep
noun Date: 1842 a coarse-wooled mutton sheep that has great quantities of fat on each side of the tail bones
fat-witted
adjective Date: 1596 stupid, idiotic
fata morgana
noun Etymology: Italian, literally, Morgan le Fay (sorceress of Arthurian legend) Date: 1801 mirage
Fata viam invenient
foreign term Etymology: Latin the Fates will find a way
fatal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin fatalis, from fatum fate Date: 14th century 1. obsolete fated 2. fateful 3. a. of or relating to fate b. ...
fatalism
noun Date: 1678 a doctrine that events are fixed in advance so that human beings are powerless to change them; also a belief in or attitude determined by this doctrine • ...
fatalist
noun see fatalism
fatalistic
adjective see fatalism
fatalistically
adverb see fatalism
fatality
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle French fatalité, from Late Latin fatalitat-, fatalitas, from Latin fatalis Date: 15th century 1. a. the quality or state of causing ...
fatally
adverb Date: 15th century 1. in a way determined by fate 2. in a manner suggesting fate or an act of fate: as a. in a manner resulting in death ; mortally b. beyond ...
fatback
noun Date: 1903 the strip of fat from the back of a hog carcass usually cured by drying and salting
fate
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French, from Latin fatum, literally, what has been spoken, from neuter of fatus, past participle of fari ...
fated
adjective Date: 1542 decreed, controlled, or marked by fate
fateful
adjective Date: circa 1720 1. having a quality of ominous prophecy 2. a. involving momentous consequences ; decisive b. deadly, catastrophic 3. controlled by ...
fatefully
adverb see fateful
fatefulness
noun see fateful
fath
abbreviation fathom
fathead
noun Date: 1842 a stupid person • fatheaded adjective • fatheadedly adverb • fatheadedness noun
fatheaded
adjective see fathead
fatheadedly
adverb see fathead
fatheadedness
noun see fathead
father
I. noun Etymology: Middle English fader, from Old English fæder; akin to Old High German fater father, Latin pater, Greek patēr Date: before 12th century 1. a. a man who ...
Father Christmas
noun Date: 1658 British Santa Claus
father figure
noun Date: 1934 a person often of particular power or influence who serves as an emotional substitute for a father
father image
noun Date: 1937 an idealization of one's father often projected onto someone to whom one looks for guidance and protection
Father Time
noun Date: 1590 time personified especially as a bearded old man holding a scythe and an hourglass
Father's Day
noun Date: 1927 the third Sunday in June appointed for the honoring of fathers
father-in-law
noun (plural fathers-in-law) Date: 14th century 1. the father of one's spouse 2. archaic stepfather
fatherhood
noun see father I
fatherland
noun Date: 12th century 1. the native land or country of one's father or ancestors 2. one's native land or country
fatherless
adjective see father I
fatherlike
adjective or adverb see father I
fatherliness
noun see fatherly
fatherly
adjective Date: 15th century 1. of, relating to, or befitting a father 2. resembling a father (as in affection or care) • fatherliness noun • fatherly adverb
fathom
I. noun Etymology: Middle English fadme, from Old English fæthm outstretched arms, length of the outstretched arms; akin to Old Norse fathmr fathom, Latin patēre to be open, ...
Fathom Five National Marine Park
geographical name reservation Canada in SE Ontario off N tip of Bruce Peninsula
fathomable
adjective see fathom II
Fathometer
trademark — used for a sonic depth finder
fathomless
adjective Date: 1638 incapable of being fathomed ; immeasurable • fathomlessly adverb • fathomlessness noun
fathomlessly
adverb see fathomless
fathomlessness
noun see fathomless
fatidic
or fatidical adjective Etymology: Latin fatidicus, from fatum fate + dicere to say — more at diction Date: 1607 of or relating to prophecy
fatidical
adjective see fatidic
fatigability
noun see fatigable
fatigable
adjective Date: 1556 susceptible to fatigue • fatigability noun
fatigue
I. noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from fatiguer to fatigue, from Latin fatigare; akin to Latin affatim sufficiently Date: 1669 1. a. labor b. manual or ...
fatiguingly
adverb see fatigue II
Fátima
geographical name village central Portugal NNE of Lisbon
Fāṭimah
biographical name circa 606-633 az-Zahrā' (‘Shining One’) daughter of Muḥammad
fatless
adjective see fat III
fatling
noun Date: circa 1534 a young animal fattened for slaughter
fatly
adverb Date: 15th century 1. richly 2. in the manner of one that is fat 3. in a smug manner ; complacently
fatness
noun see fat I
Fatshan
geographical name — see Foshan
fatshedera
noun Etymology: New Latin Fatsia, genus of shrubs + Hedera, genus of vines (from Latin, ivy) Date: 1948 an ornamental foliage plant (× Fatshedera lizei) with lobed glossy ...
fatso
noun (plural fatsoes) Etymology: probably from Fats, nickname for a fat person + -o Date: 1944 often disparaging a fat person
fatstock
noun Date: 1812 chiefly British livestock that is fat and ready for market
fatten
verb (fattened; fattening) Date: circa 1552 transitive verb 1. a. to make fat, fleshy, or plump; especially to feed (as a stock animal) for slaughter b. to make ...
fattener
noun see fatten
fatti maschii, parole femine
foreign term Etymology: Italian deeds are males, words are females ; deeds are more effective than words — motto of Maryland, where it is generally interpreted as meaning ...
fattiness
noun see fatty I
fattish
adjective Date: 14th century somewhat fat
fatty
I. adjective (fattier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. containing fat especially in unusual amounts ; also unduly stout ; corpulent 2. greasy 3. derived from or chemically ...
fatty acid
noun Date: 1838 1. any of numerous saturated aliphatic monocarboxylic acids CnH2n+1COOH (as acetic acid) including many that occur naturally usually in the form of esters in ...
fatty liver
noun Date: circa 1839 an abnormal condition of the liver marked by excess lipid accumulation in the hepatocytes and caused by injury, malnutrition, or toxins; also a liver ...
fatuity
noun (plural -ities) Etymology: Middle French fatuité foolishness, from Latin fatuitat-, fatuitas, from fatuus Date: 1538 1. a. something foolish or stupid b. ...
fatuous
adjective Etymology: Latin fatuus foolish Date: 1633 complacently or inanely foolish ; silly Synonyms: see simple • fatuously adverb • fatuousness noun
fatuously
adverb see fatuous
fatuousness
noun see fatuous
fatwa
noun Etymology: Arabic fatwā Date: circa 1889 a legal opinion or decree handed down by an Islamic religious leader
fatwood
noun Date: 1904 chiefly Southern lightwood
faubourg
noun Etymology: Middle English fabour, from Middle French fauxbourg, alteration of forsbourg, from Old French forsborc, from fors outside + borc town — more at bourg Date: ...
fauces
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Latin, plural, throat, fauces Date: 15th century the narrow passage from the mouth to the pharynx between the ...
faucet
noun Etymology: Middle English, bung, faucet, from Middle French fausset bung, perhaps from fausser to damage, from Late Latin falsare to falsify, from Latin falsus false Date: ...
faucial
adjective see fauces
faugh
interjection Date: 1542 — used to express contempt, disgust, or abhorrence
Faulkner
biographical name William Cuthbert 1897-1962 originally surname Falkner American novelist • Faulknerian also Faulkneresque adjective
Faulkneresque
adjective see Faulkner
Faulknerian
adjective see Faulkner
fault
I. noun Etymology: Middle English faute, falte, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *fallita, from feminine of fallitus, past participle of Latin fallere to deceive, ...
fault line
noun Date: 1869 something resembling a fault ; split, rift
fault tolerance
noun see fault-tolerant
fault-tolerant
adjective Date: 1975 relating to or being a computer or program with a self-contained backup system that allows continued operation when major components fail • fault ...
faultfinder
noun Date: 1558 one given to faultfinding
faultfinding
I. adjective Date: 1622 disposed to find fault ; captiously critical Synonyms: see critical II. noun Date: circa 1611 petty, nagging, or unreasonable criticism
faultily
adverb see faulty
faultiness
noun see faulty
faultless
adjective Date: 14th century having no fault ; irreproachable • faultlessly adverb • faultlessness noun
faultlessly
adverb see faultless
faultlessness
noun see faultless
faulty
adjective (faultier; -est) Date: 14th century marked by fault or defect ; imperfect • faultily adverb • faultiness noun
faun
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin faunus, from Faunus Date: 14th century a figure in Roman mythology similar to but gentler than the satyr
fauna
noun (plural faunas; also faunae) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin Fauna, sister of Faunus Date: 1771 animal life; especially the animals characteristic of a region, period, ...
faunal
adjective see fauna
faunally
adverb see fauna
faunistic
adjective Date: 1881 of or relating to zoogeography ; faunal • faunistically adverb
faunistically
adverb see faunistic
Faunus
noun Etymology: Latin Date: 1581 the Roman god of animals
Faure
biographical name (François-) Félix 1841-1899 French statesman; president of France (1895-99)
Fauré
biographical name Gabriel (-Urbain) 1845-1924 French composer
Faust
or Faustus noun Etymology: German Date: 1589 a magician of German legend who enters into a compact with the devil
Fausta
biographical name 289-326 Flavia Maximiana Fausta; wife of Constantine the Great Roman empress
Faustian
adjective Date: 1876 of, relating to, resembling, or suggesting Faust; especially made or done for present gain without regard for future cost or consequences
Faustus
noun see Faust
faute de mieux
adverb Etymology: French Date: 1766 for lack of something better or more desirable
fauteuil
noun (plural fauteuils) Etymology: French, from Old French faudestuel, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German faltistuol folding chair — more at faldstool Date: 1744 ...

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