Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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fauve
I. noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: French, literally, wild animal, from fauve tawny, wild, from Old French falve tawny, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German ...
fauvism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1922 a movement in painting typified by the work of Matisse and characterized by vivid colors, free treatment of form, and a resulting ...
fauvist
noun or adjective see fauvism
faux
adjective Etymology: French, false Date: 1975 imitation, ersatz
faux bonhomme
foreign term Etymology: French pretended good fellow
faux pas
noun (plural faux pas) Etymology: French, literally, false step Date: 1676 blunder; especially a social blunder
faux-naïf
or faux-naif adjective Etymology: French, literally, falsely naive Date: 1948 spuriously or affectedly childlike ; artfully simple
faux-naif
adjective see faux-naïf
fava bean
noun Etymology: Italian, from Latin faba bean Date: 1928 broad bean
fave
noun Date: 1938 favorite • fave adjective
favela
also favella noun Etymology: Brazilian Portuguese favela, perhaps from Favela, hill outside Rio de Janeiro Date: 1946 a settlement of jerry-built shacks lying on the ...
favella
noun see favela
favism
noun Date: circa 1927 a condition especially of males of Mediterranean descent that is marked by the development of hemolytic anemia upon consumption of broad beans or ...
favonian
adjective Etymology: Latin favonianus, from Favonius, the west wind Date: circa 1681 of or relating to the west wind ; mild
favor
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin, from favēre to be favorable; perhaps akin to Old High German gouma attention, Old Church Slavic gověti to ...
favorable
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. disposed to favor ; partial b. expressing approval ; commendatory c. giving a result that is in one's favor d. affirmative ...
favorableness
noun see favorable
favorably
adverb see favorable
favored
adjective Date: 15th century 1. having an appearance or features of a particular kind 2. endowed with special advantages or gifts 3. providing preferential treatment
favorer
noun see favor II
favorite
I. noun Etymology: Italian favorito, past participle of favorire to favor, from favore favor, from Latin favor Date: 1583 1. one that is treated or regarded with special ...
favorite son
noun Date: 1788 1. one favored by the delegates of his state as presidential candidate at a national political convention 2. a famous person who is popular with hometown ...
favoritism
noun Date: 1763 1. the showing of special favor ; partiality 2. the state or fact of being a favorite
favour
chiefly British variant of favor
favus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, honeycomb Date: circa 1543 any of several contagious skin diseases caused by ascomycetous fungi (as Trichophyton schoenleinii) and ...
Fawkes
biographical name Guy 1570-1606 English conspirator
fawn
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English faunen, from Old English fagnian to rejoice, from fægen, fagan glad — more at fain Date: 13th century 1. to show affection ...
fawn lily
noun Date: circa 1894 dogtooth violet
fawner
noun see fawn I
fawningly
adverb see fawn I
fawny
adjective see fawn II
fax
noun Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1948 1. facsimile 2 2. a device used to send or receive facsimile communications 3. a facsimile communication • fax ...
fax modem
noun Date: 1986 a computer peripheral capable of sending data to or receiving data from a fax machine or another computer especially over phone lines
fay
I. verb Etymology: Middle English feien, from Old English fēgan; akin to Old High German fuogen to fit, Latin pangere to fasten — more at pact Date: before 12th century to ...
Fayetteville
geographical name 1. city NW Arkansas population 58,047 2. city SE central North Carolina on Cape Fear River population 121,015
Fayṣal
I. biographical name see Faisal I II. biographical name see Faisal II
faze
transitive verb (fazed; fazing) Etymology: alteration of feeze to drive away, frighten, from Middle English fesen, from Old English fēsian to drive away Date: 1830 to ...
FB
abbreviation 1. foreign body 2. freight bill
FBI
abbreviation Federal Bureau of Investigation
FC
abbreviation 1. fire control 2. follow copy 3. often not capitalized foot-candle
FCA
abbreviation Farm Credit Administration
FCC
abbreviation Federal Communications Commission
fcp
abbreviation foolscap
FD
abbreviation fire department
FDA
abbreviation Food and Drug Administration
FDIC
abbreviation Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
Fe
symbol Etymology: Latin ferrum iron
fealty
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English feute, fealtye, from Anglo-French feelté, fealté, from Latin fidelitat-, fidelitas — more at fidelity Date: 14th century 1. ...
fear
I. verb Etymology: Middle English feren, from Old English fǣran, from fǣr Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. archaic frighten 2. archaic to feel fear in ...
Fear, Cape
geographical name cape SE North Carolina at mouth of Cape Fear River
fearer
noun see fear I
fearful
adjective Date: 14th century 1. causing or likely to cause fear, fright, or alarm especially because of dangerous quality 2. a. full of fear b. indicating or ...
fearfully
adverb see fearful
fearfulness
noun see fearful
fearless
adjective Date: 1540 free from fear ; brave • fearlessly adverb • fearlessness noun
fearlessly
adverb see fearless
fearlessness
noun see fearless
fearmonger
noun Date: 1939 scaremonger • fearmongering noun
fearmongering
noun see fearmonger
fearsome
adjective Date: 1768 1. a. causing fear b. intense, extreme 2. timid, timorous • fearsomely adverb • fearsomeness noun
fearsomely
adverb see fearsome
fearsomeness
noun see fearsome
feasibility
noun see feasible
feasible
adjective Etymology: Middle English faisible, from Anglo-French faisable, from fais-, stem of faire to make, do, from Latin facere — more at do Date: 15th century 1. ...
feasibly
adverb see feasible
feast
I. noun Etymology: Middle English feste, from Anglo-French, from Latin festa, plural of festum festival, from neuter of festus solemn, festal; akin to Latin feriae holidays, ...
Feast of Tabernacles
Date: 14th century Sukkoth
feaster
noun see feast II
feat
I. noun Etymology: Middle English fait, fet, from Anglo-French, from Latin factum, from neuter of factus, past participle of facere to make, do — more at do Date: 14th ...
Feather
geographical name river 100 miles (161 kilometers) N central California flowing S into Sacramento River
feather
I. noun Etymology: Middle English fether, from Old English; akin to Old High German federa wing, Latin petere to go to, seek, Greek petesthai to fly, piptein to fall, pteron ...
feather bed
noun Date: before 12th century 1. a feather mattress 2. a bed having a feather mattress
feather one's nest
phrasal to provide for oneself especially financially by unethically exploiting a position of trust
feather star
noun Date: 1862 any of an order (Comatulida) of free-swimming stalkless crinoids
featherbed
I. adjective Date: 1938 calling for, sanctioning, or resulting from featherbedding II. verb Date: 1949 intransitive verb 1. a. to require that more workers be ...
featherbedding
noun Date: 1921 the requiring of an employer usually under a union rule or safety statute to hire more employees than are needed or to limit production
featherbrain
noun Date: 1668 a foolish scatterbrained person • featherbrained adjective
featherbrained
adjective see featherbrain
feathered
adjective see feather I
featheredge
noun Date: 1616 a very thin sharp edge; especially one that is easily broken or bent over • featheredge transitive verb
featherhead
noun Date: 1788 a foolish person ; featherbrain • featherheaded adjective
featherheaded
adjective see featherhead
feathering
noun Date: 1721 1. a covering of feathers ; plumage 2. a fringe of hair (as on the legs of a dog) — see dog illustration
featherless
adjective see feather I
featherlight
adjective Date: circa 1837 extremely light
featherstitch
noun Date: 1835 an embroidery stitch consisting of a line of diagonal blanket stitches worked alternately to the left and right • featherstitch verb
featherweight
noun Date: 1812 1. one that is very light in weight; especially a boxer in a weight division having a maximum limit of 126 pounds for professionals and 125 pounds for ...
feathery
adjective Date: 1580 resembling, suggesting, or covered with feathers; especially extremely light
featly
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English fetly, from fete feat (adjective) Date: 14th century 1. in a graceful manner ; nimbly 2. in a suitable manner ; properly 3. with skill ...
feature
I. noun Etymology: Middle English feture, from Anglo-French, from Latin factura act of making, from factus, past participle of facere to make — more at do Date: 14th century ...
featured
adjective Date: 15th century 1. having facial features of a particular kind — used in combination 2. displayed, advertised, or presented as a special attraction
featureless
adjective see feature I
featurette
noun Date: 1940 a short film; especially a short documentary film about the making of a full-length movie
Feb
abbreviation February
febri-
combining form Etymology: Late Latin, from Latin febris fever
febrific
adjective Date: 1710 archaic feverish
febrifuge
noun Etymology: French fébrifuge, probably from New Latin *febrifuga, from Late Latin febrifuga, febrifugia centaury, from febri- + Late Latin -fuga -fuge Date: 1686 ...
febrile
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin febrilis, from Latin febris fever Date: 1651 marked or caused by fever ; feverish
February
noun (plural -aries or -arys) Etymology: Middle English Februarie, from Old English Februarius, from Latin, from Februa, plural, feast of purification Date: before 12th ...
fec
abbreviation Etymology: Latin fecit he made it
fecal
adjective Date: 1541 of, relating to, or constituting feces
feces
noun plural Etymology: Middle English, from Latin faec-, faex (singular) dregs Date: 14th century bodily waste discharged through the anus ; excrement
Fechner
biographical name Gustav Theodor 1801-1887 German physicist & psychologist
feckless
adjective Etymology: Scots, from feck effect, majority, from Middle English (Scots) fek, alteration of Middle English effect Date: circa 1585 1. weak, ineffective 2. ...
fecklessly
adverb see feckless
fecklessness
noun see feckless
feckly
adverb Etymology: feck + -ly Date: 1768 chiefly Scottish almost, nearly
feculence
noun see feculent
feculent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin faeculentus, from faec-, faex Date: 15th century foul with impurities ; fecal • feculence noun
fecund
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin fecundus — more at feminine Date: 15th century 1. fruitful in offspring or vegetation ; prolific 2. ...
fecundate
transitive verb (-dated; -dating) Etymology: Latin fecundatus, past participle of fecundare, from fecundus Date: circa 1631 1. to make fecund 2. impregnate • fecundation ...
fecundation
noun see fecundate
fecundity
noun see fecund
fed
abbreviation federal; federation
Fed
noun Etymology: short for federal Date: 1916 1. often not capitalized a federal agent, officer, or official — usually used in plural 2. a. Federal Reserve Board b. ...
fed up
adjective Date: 1900 tired, sated, or disgusted beyond endurance
fedayee
noun (plural fedayeen) Etymology: Arabic fidā'ī, literally, one who sacrifices himself Date: 1955 a member of an Arab commando group operating especially against Israel — ...
federal
adjective Etymology: Latin foeder-, foedus compact, league; akin to Latin fidere to trust — more at bide Date: 1660 1. archaic of or relating to a compact or treaty 2. ...
Federal
noun Date: 1861 1. a supporter of the United States government in the Civil War; especially a soldier in the federal armies 2. fed 1 — usually used in plural
Federal Capital Territory
geographical name — see Australian Capital Territory
federal case
noun Date: 1955 big deal
federal court
noun Date: 1789 a court established by a federal government; especially one established under the constitution and laws of the United States
federal district
noun Date: circa 1934 a district set apart as the seat of the central government of a federation
Federal District
geographical name 1. (or Portuguese Distrito Federal) district E central Brazil including capital city of Brasília area 2245 square miles (5814 square kilometers), population ...
federal district court
noun Date: 1948 a district trial court of law and equity that hears cases under federal jurisdiction
federal funds
noun plural Date: 1950 reserve funds lent overnight by one Federal Reserve bank to another
Federal Reserve bank
noun Date: 1914 one of 12 reserve banks set up under the Federal Reserve Act to hold reserves and discount commercial paper for affiliated banks in their respective districts
Federal Reserve Board
noun Date: 1920 a 7-member board of governors overseeing the Federal Reserve System
Federal Reserve System
noun Date: 1919 the central banking system of the United States consisting of 12 districts with a Federal Reserve bank in the principal commercial city of each district
Federal Way
geographical name city W Washington NE of Tacoma population 83,259
federalese
noun Date: 1944 bureaucratese
federalism
noun Date: 1787 1. a. often capitalized the distribution of power in an organization (as a government) between a central authority and the constituent units — compare ...
federalist
noun Date: 1787 1. an advocate of federalism: as a. often capitalized an advocate of a federal union between the American colonies after the Revolution and of the adoption ...
federalization
noun Date: circa 1860 1. the act of federalizing 2. the state of being federalized
federalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1801 1. to unite in or under a federal system 2. to bring under the jurisdiction of a federal government
federally
adverb see federal
federate
I. adjective Etymology: Latin foederatus, from foeder-, foedus Date: 1710 united in an alliance or federation ; federated II. transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1580 to ...
federated church
noun Date: 1898 a local church uniting two or more congregations that maintain different denominational ties — compare union church
Federated Malay States
geographical name former British protectorate (1895-1945) comprising the Malay states of Negeri Sembilan, Pahang, Perak, & Selangor capital Kuala Lumpur
federation
noun Date: 1787 1. an encompassing political or societal entity formed by uniting smaller or more localized entities: as a. a federal government b. a union of ...
Federation of Malaya
geographical name see Malaya 3
Federation of Malaysia
geographical name see Malaysia 2
federative
adjective Date: 1690 of, relating to, or formed by federation • federatively adverb
federatively
adverb see federative
fedn
abbreviation federation
fedora
noun Etymology: Fédora (1882), drama by V. Sardou Date: 1891 a low soft felt hat with the crown creased lengthwise
fee
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French fé, fief, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English feoh cattle, property, Old High German fihu cattle; akin to Latin pecus ...
fee simple
noun (plural fees simple) Date: 14th century a fee without limitation to any class of heirs or restrictions on transfer of ownership
fee splitting
noun Date: 1943 payment by a specialist (as a doctor or a lawyer) of a part of his or her fee to the person who made the referral
fee tail
noun (plural fees tail) Etymology: Middle English fee taille, from Anglo-French fé taillé entailed fee Date: 15th century a fee limited to a particular class of heirs
fee-for-service
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1945 separate payment to a health-care provider for each medical service rendered to a patient
feeble
adjective (feebler; feeblest) Etymology: Middle English feble, from Anglo-French, from Latin flebilis lamentable, wretched, from flēre to weep — more at bleat Date: 12th ...
feebleminded
adjective Date: 1534 1. obsolete irresolute, vacillating 2. mentally deficient 3. foolish, stupid • feeblemindedly adverb • feeblemindedness noun
feeblemindedly
adverb see feebleminded
feeblemindedness
noun see feebleminded
feebleness
noun see feeble
feeblish
adjective Date: 1674 somewhat feeble
feebly
adverb see feeble
feed
I. verb (fed; feeding) Etymology: Middle English feden, from Old English fēdan; akin to Old English fōda food — more at food Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. ...
feed dog
noun Date: 1858 a notched piece of metal on a sewing machine that feeds material into position under the needle
feedback
noun Date: 1919 1. the return to the input of a part of the output of a machine, system, or process (as for producing changes in an electronic circuit that improve performance ...
feedback inhibition
noun Date: 1960 inhibition of an enzyme controlling an early stage of a series of biochemical reactions by the end product when it reaches a critical concentration
feeder
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 14th century 1. one that feeds: as a. one that fattens livestock for slaughter b. a device or apparatus for supplying food 2. one ...
feeding frenzy
noun Date: 1973 a frenzy of eating; also the excited pursuit of something by a group
feedlot
noun Date: 1889 a plot of land on which livestock are fattened for market
feedstock
noun Date: 1932 raw material supplied to a machine or processing plant
feedstuff
noun Date: 1856 feed 2a; also any of the constituent nutrients of an animal ration
feel
I. verb (felt; feeling) Etymology: Middle English felen, from Old English fēlan; akin to Old High German fuolen to feel, Latin palpare to caress Date: before 12th century ...
feel like
phrasal to have an inclination for
feel one's oats
phrasal to act in a newly self-confident and often self-important manner
feel up
transitive verb Date: 1930 to touch or fondle (someone) for sexual pleasure
feel-good
adjective Date: 1977 1. relating to or promoting an often specious sense of satisfaction or well-being 2. cheerfully sentimental ; lighthearted
feeler
noun Date: 1526 one that feels: as a. a tactile process (as a tentacle) of an animal b. something (as a proposal) ventured to ascertain the views of others
feeler gauge
noun Date: 1925 a thin metal strip or wire of known thickness used as a gauge
feeling
I. noun Date: 12th century 1. a. (1) the one of the basic physical senses of which the skin contains the chief end organs and of which the sensations of touch and ...
feelingly
adverb see feeling II
feelingness
noun see feeling II
feet
plural of foot
feet of clay
Etymology: from the feet of the idol in Danish 2:33 Date: 1814 a character flaw that is usually not readily apparent
feetfirst
adverb Date: circa 1833 with the feet foremost
feeze
noun Etymology: Middle English veze, from fesen, vesen to drive away — more at faze Date: 14th century 1. chiefly dialect rush 2. dialect a state of alarm or excitement
Fehling's solution
noun Etymology: Hermann Fehling died 1885 German chemist Date: 1873 a blue solution of Rochelle salt and copper sulfate used as an oxidizing agent in a test for sugars and ...
Feiffer
biographical name Jules 1929- American cartoonist & writer
feign
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French feign-, stem of feindre, from Latin fingere to shape, feign — more at dough Date: 13th century intransitive verb ...
feigned
adjective Date: 14th century 1. fictitious 2. not genuine or real
feigner
noun see feign
feijoa
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from João da Silva Feijó died 1824 Brazilian naturalist Date: 1898 the green round or oval juicy fruit of a shrub or small tree ...
Feininger
biographical name Lyonel Charles Adrian 1871-1956 American painter
feint
I. noun Etymology: French feinte, from Old French, from feint, past participle of feindre Date: 1644 something feigned; specifically a mock blow or attack on or toward one ...
feirie
adjective Etymology: Middle English (Scots) fery, from Old English fēre able to go; akin to Old English faran to travel, fare Date: before 12th century Scottish nimble, ...
feist
also fice or fyce noun Etymology: obsolete fisting hound, from obsolete fist to break wind Date: 1770 chiefly dialect a small dog
feistiness
noun see feisty
feisty
adjective (feistier; -est) Date: 1896 1. chiefly Southern & Midland a. full of nervous energy ; fidgety b. touchy, quarrelsome c. exuberantly frisky 2. having or ...
Feke
biographical name Robert circa 1705-circa 1750 American painter
felafel
variant of falafel
feldsher
noun Etymology: Russian fel'dsher, from German Feldscher, Feldscherer field surgeon, from Feld field + Scherer barber, surgeon Date: 1877 a medical or surgical practitioner ...
feldspar
noun Etymology: modification of obsolete German Feldspath (now Feldspat), from German Feld field + obsolete German Spath (now Spat) spar Date: 1772 any of a group of ...
feldspathic
adjective Etymology: feldspath (variant of feldspar), from obsolete German Date: circa 1828 relating to or containing feldspar
felicific
adjective Etymology: Latin felic-, felix Date: 1865 causing or intended to cause happiness
felicific calculus
noun Date: 1945 a method of determining the rightness of an action by balancing the probable pleasures and pains that it would produce
felicitate
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin felicitatus, past participle of felicitare to make happy, from Latin felicitas Date: 1605 obsolete made happy II. transitive verb (-tated; ...
felicitation
noun see felicitate II
felicitator
noun see felicitate II
felicitous
adjective Date: 1789 1. very well suited or expressed ; apt 2. pleasant, delightful Synonyms: see fit • felicitously adverb • felicitousness noun
felicitously
adverb see felicitous
felicitousness
noun see felicitous
felicity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English felicite, from Anglo-French felicité, from Latin felicitat-, felicitas, from felic-, felix fruitful, happy — more at feminine ...
felid
noun Etymology: New Latin Felidae, family name, from Felis, genus of cats, from Latin, cat Date: circa 1889 cat 1b • felid adjective
feline
adjective Etymology: Latin felinus, from felis Date: 1681 1. of, relating to, or affecting cats or the cat family 2. resembling a cat: as a. sleekly graceful b. sly, ...
feline distemper
noun Date: 1942 panleukopenia
feline panleukopenia
noun Date: circa 1943 panleukopenia
felinely
adverb see feline
felinity
noun see feline
felix culpa
foreign term Etymology: Latin fortunate fault — used especially of original sin in relation to the consequent coming of Christ
fell
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German fel skin, Latin pellis Date: before 12th century 1. skin, hide, pelt 2. a thin tough membrane ...
fella
noun Etymology: alteration of fellow Date: 1816 fellow, man
fellable
adjective see fell II
fellah
noun (plural fellahin; also fellaheen) Etymology: Arabic fallāḥ Date: 1743 a peasant or agricultural laborer in an Arab country (as Egypt)
fellate
verb (fellated; fellating) Etymology: back-formation from fellatio Date: 1941 transitive verb to perform fellatio on intransitive verb to fellate someone • fellator ...
fellatio
also fellation noun Etymology: New Latin fellation-, fellatio, from Latin felare, fellare, literally, to suck — more at feminine Date: circa 1893 oral stimulation of the ...
fellation
noun see fellatio
fellator
noun see fellate
feller
noun see fell II
Fellini
biographical name Federico 1920-1993 Italian film director • Felliniesque adjective
Felliniesque
adjective see Fellini
fellmonger
noun Etymology: 1fell Date: 1530 British one who removes hair or wool from hides in preparation for leather making • fellmongered adjective, British • fellmongering ...
fellmongered
adjective see fellmonger
fellmongering
noun see fellmonger
fellmongery
noun see fellmonger
fellness
noun see fell IV
felloe
noun see felly
fellow
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English felawe, from Old English fēolaga, from Old Norse fēlagi, from fēlag partnership, from fē cattle, money + lag act of ...
fellow feeling
noun Date: 1686 a feeling of community of interest or of mutual understanding
fellow man
noun Date: 1667 a kindred human being
fellow servant
noun Date: 1900 an employee working with another employee under such circumstances that each one if negligent may expose the other to harm which the employer cannot reasonably ...
fellow traveler
noun Etymology: translation of Russian poputchik Date: 1925 a person who sympathizes with and often furthers the ideals and program of an organized group (as the Communist ...
fellow-traveling
adjective see fellow traveler
fellowly
adjective Date: 13th century sociable • fellowly adverb
fellowship
I. noun Date: before 12th century 1. companionship, company 2. a. community of interest, activity, feeling, or experience b. the state of being a fellow or associate ...
Felltham
biographical name Owen 1602?-1668 English writer
felly
or felloe noun (plural fellies or felloes) Etymology: Middle English fely, felive, from Old English felg; akin to Old High German felga felly, Old English fealg piece of plowed ...
felo-de-se
noun (plural felones-de-se or felos-de-se) Etymology: Medieval Latin felo de se, fello de se, literally, evildoer in respect to oneself Date: 1607 1. a person who commits ...
felon
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French felun, fel evildoer, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German fillen to beat, whip, fel skin — more at fell ...
felonious
adjective Date: 1567 1. archaic very evil ; villainous 2. of, relating to, or having the nature of a felony • feloniously adverb • feloniousness noun
feloniously
adverb see felonious
feloniousness
noun see felonious
felonry
noun Date: 1837 felons; especially the convict population of a penal colony
felony
noun (plural -nies) Date: 14th century 1. an act on the part of a feudal vassal involving the forfeiture of his fee 2. a. a grave crime formerly differing from a ...
felsite
noun Etymology: felspar + -ite Date: 1794 a dense igneous rock consisting almost entirely of feldspar and quartz • felsitic adjective
felsitic
adjective see felsite
felspar
chiefly British variant of feldspar
felt
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German filz felt, Latin pellere to drive, beat Date: before 12th century 1. a. a cloth made of wool ...
felt-tip
noun Date: 1956 a pen having a writing point made of felt • felt-tip also felt-tipped adjective
felt-tipped
adjective see felt-tip
felting
noun Date: 1686 1. the process of making felt 2. felt
feltlike
adjective see felt I
felucca
noun Etymology: Italian feluca Date: 1615 a narrow fast lateen-rigged sailing vessel chiefly of the Mediterranean area
fem
abbreviation female; feminine
FEMA
abbreviation Federal Emergency Management Agency
female
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) of, relating to, or being the sex that bears young or produces eggs (2) pistillate b. (1) composed of members of ...
female circumcision
noun see female genital mutilation
female genital mutilation
noun Date: 1979 clitoridectomy especially as a cultural rite sometimes with removal of the labia that is now outlawed in many nations including the U.S. — abbreviation FGM; ...
femaleness
noun see female I
feminazi
noun Etymology: blend of feminist and Nazi Date: 1989 usually disparaging an extreme or militant feminist
feminine
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French feminin, from Latin femininus, from femina woman; akin to Old English delu nipple, Latin filius son, felix, fetus, & ...

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