Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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femininely
adverb see feminine I
feminineness
noun see feminine I
femininity
noun Date: 14th century 1. the quality or nature of the female sex 2. effeminacy 3. women, womankind
feminise
British variant of feminize
feminism
noun Date: 1895 1. the theory of the political, economic, and social equality of the sexes 2. organized activity on behalf of women's rights and interests • feminist noun ...
feminist
noun or adjective see feminism
feministic
adjective see feminism
feminity
noun Date: 14th century femininity
feminization
noun see feminize
feminize
transitive verb (-nized; -nizing) Date: 1652 1. to give a feminine quality to 2. to cause (a male or castrate) to take on feminine characters (as by implantation of ovaries ...
femme
also fem noun Etymology: probably from French femme woman, from Old French feme, from Latin femina Date: 1957 1. woman 1a 2. a lesbian who is notably or stereotypically ...
femme de chambre
foreign term Etymology: French chambermaid ; lady's maid
femme fatale
noun (plural femmes fatales) Etymology: French, literally, disastrous woman Date: 1912 1. a seductive woman who lures men into dangerous or compromising situations 2. a ...
femoral
adjective Date: circa 1771 of or relating to the femur or thigh
femoral artery
noun Date: circa 1771 the chief artery of the thigh lying in its anterior inner part
femto-
combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Danish or Norwegian femten fifteen, from Old Norse fimmtān; akin to Old English fīftēne fifteen one ...
femtosecond
noun Date: 1976 one quadrillionth of a second
femur
noun (plural femurs or femora) Etymology: New Latin femor-, femur, from Latin, thigh Date: circa 1726 1. the proximal bone of the hind or lower limb that extends from the ...
Fen
geographical name river 300 miles (483 kilometers) N China in central Shanxi flowing SSE into the Huang
fen
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English fenn; akin to Old High German fenna fen, Sanskrit paṅka mud Date: before 12th century low land that is covered wholly ...
fen-phen
noun Etymology: fenfluramine + phentermine Date: 1994 a former diet drug combination of phentermine with either fenfluramine or dexfenfluramine — called also phen-fen
fence
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English fens, short for defens defense Date: 14th century 1. archaic a means of protection ; defense 2. a. a barrier ...
fence-mending
noun Date: 1947 the rehabilitating of a deteriorated political relationship
fence-sitter
noun see fence-sitting
fence-sitting
noun Date: 1904 a state of indecision or neutrality with respect to conflicting positions • fence-sitter noun
fenceless
adjective see fence I
fencelessness
noun see fence I
fencer
noun see fence II
fencerow
noun Date: 1842 the land occupied by a fence including the uncultivated area on each side
fencing
noun Date: 1578 1. the art or practice of attack and defense with the foil, épee, or saber 2. a. (1) fence 2a (2) the fences of a property or region b. ...
fend
I. verb Etymology: Middle English fenden, short for defenden Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. defend 2. to keep or ward off ; repel — often used with off 3. ...
fender
noun Date: 13th century a device that protects: as a. (1) a cushion (as foam rubber or a wood float) between a boat and a dock or between two boats that lessens shock ...
fender bender
noun Date: circa 1962 a minor automobile accident
fendered
adjective see fender
fenderless
adjective see fender
Fénelon
biographical name François de Salignac de La Mothe- 1651-1715 French prelate & writer
fenestra
noun (plural fenestrae) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, window Date: circa 1737 1. a small anatomical opening (as in a bone): as a. oval window — called also fenestra ...
fenestra cochleae
noun see fenestra
fenestra ovalis
noun see fenestra
fenestra rotunda
noun see fenestra
fenestral
adjective see fenestra
fenestrate
adjective Etymology: Latin fenestratus, from fenestra Date: 1835 fenestrated
fenestrated
adjective Date: circa 1852 having one or more openings or pores
fenestration
noun Date: 1846 1. the arrangement, proportioning, and design of windows and doors in a building 2. an opening in a surface (as a wall or membrane) 3. the operation of ...
fenfluramine
noun Etymology: fen- (alteration of phen-) + -flur- (alteration of fluor-) + amine Date: 1965 an anorectic amphetamine derivative C12H16F3N with little stimulant effect on ...
feng shui
noun Etymology: Chinese (Beijing) fēngshui geomantic omen, literally, wind-water Date: 1797 a Chinese geomantic practice in which a structure or site is chosen or configured ...
Feng Yü-hsiang
biographical name 1882-1948 Chinese general
Fengtien
geographical name 1. — see Liaoning 2. — see Shenyang
Fenian
noun Etymology: Fen- (probably in part from Middle Irish Féni freeholders, legendary settlers of Ireland, in part from Irish fiann, genitive singular féinne band of warriors) ...
Fenianism
noun see Fenian
fenland
noun Date: before 12th century an area of low often marshy ground
Fenn
biographical name John Bennett 1917- American chemist
fennec
noun Etymology: Arabic fanak Date: 1790 a small pale-fawn fox (Vulpes zerda syn. Fennecus zerda) with large ears that inhabits the deserts of northern Africa and Arabia
fennel
noun Etymology: Middle English fenel, from Old English finugl, from Vulgar Latin *fenuculum, from Latin feniculum fennel, irregular diminutive of fenum hay Date: before 12th ...
fenny
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. having the characteristics of a fen ; boggy 2. archaic peculiar to or found in a fen
fentanyl
noun Etymology: probably alteration of phenethyl, a monovalent radical derived from ethylbenzine, from phen- + ethyl Date: 1964 a synthetic opioid narcotic analgesic ...
fenugreek
noun Etymology: Middle English fenugrek, from Anglo-French fenugrec, from Latin fenum Graecum, literally, Greek hay Date: 14th century a leguminous annual Eurasian herb ...
feoffee
noun Date: 15th century one to whom a feoffment is made
feoffer
noun see feoffor
feoffment
noun Etymology: Middle English feffement, from Anglo-French, from feffer, feoffer to invest with a fee, from fieu, fé fee Date: 14th century the granting of a fee
feoffor
or feoffer noun Date: 15th century one who makes a feoffment
FEPA
abbreviation Fair Employment Practices Act
FEPC
abbreviation Fair Employment Practices Commission
fer-de-lance
noun (plural fer-de-lance) Etymology: French, literally, lance iron, spearhead Date: 1880 a large extremely venomous pit viper (Bothrops atrox) of Central and South ...
ferae naturae
adjective Etymology: Latin, of a wild nature Date: circa 1661 wild by nature and not usually tamed
feral
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin feralis, from Latin fera wild animal, from feminine of ferus wild — more at fierce Date: 1604 1. of, relating to, or suggestive of a ...
Ferber
biographical name Edna 1887-1968 American writer
Ferdinand I
I. biographical name 1503-1564 Holy Roman emperor (1558-64) II. biographical name 1861-1948 king of Bulgaria (1908-18) III. biographical name 1016(or 1018)-1065 the Great king ...
Ferdinand II
I. biographical name 1578-1637 king of Bohemia (1617-19; 1620-27) & of Hungary (1618-25); Holy Roman emperor (1619-37) II. biographical name of Aragon or V of Castile ...
Ferdinand III
biographical name 1608-1657 king of Hungary (1625-47); Holy Roman emperor (1637-57)
Ferdinand VII
biographical name 1784-1833 king of Spain (1808; 1814-33)
Ferdowsī
biographical name see Firdawsī
fere
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English gefēra; akin to Old English faran to go, travel — more at fare Date: before 12th century 1. archaic companion 1 2. ...
Fergana
geographical name valley W central Asia in the Tian Shan in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, & Uzbekistan SE of Tashkent
feria
I. noun Etymology: Medieval Latin — more at fair Date: 15th century a weekday of a church calendar on which no feast falls • ferial adjective II. noun Etymology: ...
ferial
adjective see feria I
ferine
adjective Etymology: Latin ferinus, from fera Date: 1640 feral
ferity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Latin feritas, from ferus Date: 1534 archaic the quality or state of being feral; also barbarity
ferlie
also ferly noun (plural ferlies) Etymology: Middle English, from ferly strange, from Old English fǣrlīc unexpected, from fǣr sudden danger — more at fear Date: 13th ...
ferly
noun see ferlie
Fermanagh
geographical name 1. district SW Northern Ireland, established 1974 area 724 square miles (1875 square kilometers), population 54,062 2. traditional county W Northern Ireland
Fermat
biographical name Pierre de 1601-1665 French mathematician
Fermat's last theorem
noun Etymology: Pierre de Fermat Date: 1847 a theorem in number theory: the equation xⁿ + yⁿ = zⁿ has no solutions when x, y, z, and n are all positive integers and n ...
fermata
noun Etymology: Italian, literally, stop, from fermare to stop, from Latin firmare to make firm Date: circa 1859 a prolongation at the discretion of the performer of a ...
ferment
I. verb Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to undergo fermentation 2. to be in a state of agitation or intense activity transitive verb 1. to cause to undergo ...
fermentable
adjective see ferment I
fermentation
noun Date: 1601 1. a. a chemical change with effervescence b. an enzymatically controlled anaerobic breakdown of an energy-rich compound (as a carbohydrate to carbon ...
fermentative
adjective Date: 1661 1. causing or producing a substance that causes fermentation 2. of, relating to, or produced by fermentation
fermenter
noun Date: 1918 1. an organism that causes fermentation 2. (or fermentor) an apparatus for carrying out fermentation
fermentor
noun see fermenter 2
fermi
noun Etymology: Enrico Fermi Date: 1955 a unit of length equal to 10-13 centimeter
Fermi
biographical name Enrico 1901-1954 American (Italian-born) physicist
fermion
noun Etymology: Enrico Fermi + English 2-on Date: 1947 a particle (as an electron, proton, or neutron) whose spin quantum number is an odd multiple of 1/2 — compare boson ...
fermionic
adjective see fermion
fermium
noun Etymology: Enrico Fermi Date: 1955 a radioactive metallic element produced artificially (as by bombardment of plutonium with neutrons) — see element table
fern
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English fearn; akin to Old High German farn fern, Sanskrit parṇa wing, leaf Date: before 12th century any of a division ...
fern bar
noun Date: 1976 a bar or restaurant fashionably decorated with green plants and especially ferns
fern seed
noun Date: 1596 the dustlike asexual spores of ferns formerly thought to be seeds and believed to make the possessor invisible
Fernández
biographical name Juan circa 1536-circa 1604 Spanish navigator
Fernández de Córdoba
biographical name Gonzalo 1453-1515 El Gran Capitán Spanish soldier & statesman
Fernando de Noronha
geographical name island Brazil in the Atlantic NE of city of Natal area 10 square miles (26 square kilometers)
Fernando Póo
geographical name — see Bioko
fernery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1840 1. a place or stand where ferns grow 2. a collection of growing ferns
fernlike
adjective see fern
ferny
adjective see fern
ferocious
adjective Etymology: Latin feroc-, ferox, literally, fierce looking, from ferus + -oc-, -ox (akin to Greek ōps eye) — more at eye Date: 1646 1. exhibiting or given to ...
ferociously
adverb see ferocious
ferociousness
noun see ferocious
ferocity
noun Date: 1606 the quality or state of being ferocious
Ferrara
geographical name commune N Italy in Emilia-Romagna NE of Bologna near the Po population 137,336
ferredoxin
noun Etymology: Latin ferrum + English redox + -in Date: 1962 any of a group of iron- and sulfur-containing proteins that function as electron carriers in photosynthetic and ...
Ferrero
biographical name Guglielmo 1871-1943 Italian historian & author
ferret
I. noun Etymology: Middle English furet, ferret, from Anglo-French firet, furet, from Vulgar Latin *furittus, literally, little thief, diminutive of Latin fur thief — more ...
ferreter
noun see ferret II
ferreting
noun see ferret III
ferrety
adjective see ferret I
ferri-
combining form Etymology: Latin, from ferrum 1. iron 2. ferric iron
ferriage
noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century 1. the fare paid for a ferry passage 2. the act or business of transporting by ferry
ferric
adjective Date: 1799 1. of, relating to, or containing iron 2. being or containing iron usually with a valence of three
ferric ammonium citrate
noun Date: circa 1924 a complex salt containing varying amounts of iron and used especially for making blueprints
ferric chloride
noun Date: 1869 a deliquescent dark salt FeCl3 that readily hydrates to the yellow-orange form and that is used especially for etching, in sewage treatment, and as an ...
ferric oxide
noun Date: 1851 the red or black oxide of iron Fe2O3 found in nature as hematite and as rust and also obtained synthetically and used especially in magnetic materials, as a ...
ferricyanide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1845 1. the trivalent anion Fe(CN)63- 2. a compound containing the ferricyanide anion; especially the red salt ...
ferriferous
adjective Date: 1811 containing or yielding iron
ferrimagnet
noun see ferrimagnetic
ferrimagnetic
adjective Date: 1951 of or relating to a substance (as ferrite) characterized by magnetization in which two types of ions of unequal magnetic moment are polarized in opposite ...
ferrimagnetically
adverb see ferrimagnetic
ferrimagnetism
noun see ferrimagnetic
Ferris wheel
noun Etymology: G. W. G. Ferris died 1896 American engineer Date: 1893 an amusement device consisting of a large upright power-driven wheel carrying seats that remain ...
ferrite
noun Date: 1851 1. any of several magnetic substances that consist essentially of ferric oxide combined with the oxides of one or more other metals (as manganese, nickel, or ...
ferritic
adjective see ferrite
ferritin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, alteration of ferratin, iron-containing protein, from Latin ferratus bound with iron (from ferrum) + International ...
Ferro
geographical name — see Hierro
ferro-
combining form Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin ferrum 1. iron 2. ferrous iron
ferro-cement
noun Date: 1956 a building material made of thin cement slabs reinforced with steel mesh
ferrocene
noun Etymology: ferro- + cycl- + -ene Date: 1952 a crystalline stable organometallic coordination compound (C5H5)2Fe; also an analogous compound with a heavy metal (as ...
ferroconcrete
noun Date: 1900 reinforced concrete
ferrocyanide
noun Date: circa 1826 1. the tetravalent anion Fe(CN)64- 2. a compound containing the ferrocyanide anion; especially the salt K4Fe(CN)6 used in making blue pigments (as ...
ferroelectric
adjective Date: 1935 of or relating to crystalline substances having spontaneous electric polarization reversible by an electric field • ferroelectric noun • ...
ferroelectricity
noun see ferroelectric
Ferrol, El
geographical name — see El Ferrol
ferromagnesian
adjective Date: 1852 containing iron and magnesium
ferromagnet
noun see ferromagnetic
ferromagnetic
adjective Date: 1896 of or relating to substances with an abnormally high magnetic permeability, a definite saturation point, and appreciable residual magnetism and ...
ferromagnetism
noun see ferromagnetic
ferromanganese
noun Date: 1864 an alloy of iron and manganese containing usually about 80 percent manganese and used in the manufacture of steel
ferrosilicon
noun Date: 1882 an alloy of iron and silicon containing 15 to 95 percent silicon and used for deoxidizing molten steel and making silicon steel and high-silicon cast iron
ferrotype
noun Date: 1844 1. a positive photograph made by a collodion process on a thin iron plate having a darkened surface — called also tintype 2. the process by which a ...
ferrous
adjective Etymology: New Latin ferrosus, from Latin ferrum Date: 1851 1. of, relating to, or containing iron 2. being or containing divalent iron
ferrous sulfate
noun Date: 1865 a salt obtained usually in its bluish-green hydrated form FeSO4•7H2O that is used especially in making inks, pigments, and other iron salts and in medicine ...
ferruginous
adjective Etymology: Latin ferrugineus, ferruginus, from ferrugin-, ferrugo iron rust, from ferrum Date: circa 1661 1. of, relating to, or containing iron 2. resembling ...
ferruginous hawk
noun a large hawk (Buteo regalis) of western North America that is typically rust-colored above and white below with long tapered wings
ferrule
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English virole, from Anglo-French, from Latin viriola, diminutive of viria bracelet, of Celtic origin; akin to Old Irish fiar oblique Date: ...
ferruled
adjective see ferrule
ferry
I. verb (ferried; ferrying) Etymology: Middle English ferien, from Old English ferian to carry, convey; akin to Old English faran to go — more at fare Date: before 12th ...
ferryboat
noun Date: 15th century a boat used to ferry passengers, vehicles, or goods
ferryman
noun Date: 15th century a person who operates a ferry
Ferryville
geographical name — see menzel-bourguiba
fertile
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French, from Latin fertilis, from ferre to carry, bear — more at bear Date: 15th century 1. a. ...
Fertile Crescent
geographical name semicircle of fertile land stretching from SE coast of Mediterranean around Syrian Desert N of Arabia to Persian Gulf
fertilely
adverb see fertile
fertileness
noun see fertile
fertility
noun Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being fertile 2. the birthrate of a population
fertilizable
adjective see fertilize
fertilization
noun Date: circa 1787 an act or process of making fertile: as a. the application of fertilizer b. (1) an act or process of fecundation, insemination, or pollination ...
fertilization membrane
noun Date: 1931 a resistant membranous layer in eggs of many animals that forms following fertilization by the thickening and separation of the vitelline membrane from the ...
fertilize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1621 to make fertile: as a. to apply a fertilizer to b. to cause the fertilization of • fertilizable adjective
fertilizer
noun Date: circa 1661 one that fertilizes; specifically a substance (as manure or a chemical mixture) used to make soil more fertile
ferula
noun see ferule
ferule
also ferula noun Etymology: Latin ferula giant fennel, ferule Date: 1566 1. an instrument (as a flat piece of wood like a ruler) used to punish children 2. school discipline
ferulic acid
noun Etymology: ferula Date: 1879 a white crystalline acid that is structurally related to vanillin and is obtained especially from plant sources (as aspen bark)
fervency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 15th century fervor
fervent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin fervent-, fervens, present participle of fervēre to boil, froth — more at barm Date: ...
fervently
adverb see fervent
fervid
adjective Etymology: Latin fervidus, from fervēre Date: 1599 1. very hot ; burning 2. marked by often extreme fervor Synonyms: see impassioned • fervidly adverb • ...
fervidly
adverb see fervid
fervidness
noun see fervid
fervor
noun Etymology: Middle English fervour, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French fervur, from Latin fervor, from fervēre Date: 14th century 1. intensity of feeling or ...
fervour
chiefly British variant of fervor
Fès
geographical name see Fez
fescennine
adjective Etymology: Latin fescennini (versus), ribald songs sung at rustic weddings, probably from Fescinninus of Fescennium, from Fescennium, town in Etruria Date: 1601 ...
fescue
noun Etymology: Middle English festu stalk, straw, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin festucum, from Latin festuca Date: 1589 1. a small pointer (as a stick) used to point ...
fescue foot
noun Date: 1949 a disease of the feet of cattle resembling ergotism that is associated with feeding on fescue grass and especially tall fescue
fess
I. noun also fesse Etymology: Middle English fesse, from Anglo-French faisse band, from Latin fascia — more at fascia Date: 15th century 1. a broad horizontal bar across ...
fesse
noun see fess I
Fessenden
biographical name William Pitt 1806-1869 American politician; secretary of the treasury (1864-65)
fest
noun Etymology: German, from Fest celebration, from Latin festum — more at feast a gathering, event, or show having a specified focus — often used in combination
festal
adjective Etymology: Latin festum Date: 15th century of or relating to a feast or festival ; festive • festally adverb
festally
adverb see festal
fester
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French festre, from Latin fistula pipe, fistulous ulcer Date: 14th century a suppurating sore ; pustule II. verb (festered; ...
festina lente
foreign term Etymology: Latin make haste slowly
festinate
I. verb (-nated; -nating) Date: 1596 hasten II. adjective Etymology: Latin festinatus, past participle of festinare to hasten; perhaps akin to Middle Irish bras forceful, ...
festinately
adverb see festinate II
festival
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin festivus festive Date: 14th century of, relating to, appropriate to, or set apart as a festival II. ...
festivalgoer
noun Date: 1959 one who attends a festival
festive
adjective Etymology: Latin festivus, from festum Date: 1613 1. of, relating to, or suitable for a feast or festival 2. joyful, gay • festively adverb • ...
festively
adverb see festive
festiveness
noun see festive
festivity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century 1. festival 1 2. the quality or state of being festive ; gaiety 3. festive activity
festoon
I. noun Etymology: French feston, from Italian festone, from festa festival, from Latin — more at feast Date: 1630 1. a decorative chain or strip hanging between two ...
festoonery
noun Date: 1836 an arrangement of festoons
Festschrift
noun (plural Festschriften or Festschrifts) Etymology: German, from Fest celebration + Schrift writing Date: 1898 a volume of writings by different authors presented as a ...
Festus
biographical name Porcius died circa A.D. 62 Roman procurator of Judea (58 or 60-62)
FET
abbreviation 1. Federal excise tax 2. field-effect transistor
feta
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: New Greek (tyri) pheta, from tyri cheese + pheta slice, from Italian fetta — more at fettuccine Date: 1915 a white moderately hard ...
fetal
adjective Date: 1811 of, relating to, or being a fetus
fetal alcohol syndrome
noun Date: 1974 a highly variable group of birth defects including mental retardation, deficient growth, and malformations of the skull and face that tend to occur in the ...
fetal hemoglobin
noun Date: 1950 a hemoglobin variant that predominates in the blood of a newborn and persists in increased proportions in some forms of anemia (as thalassemia)
fetal position
noun Date: 1963 a position (as of a sleeping person) in which the body lies curled up on one side with the arms and legs drawn up and the head bowed forward and which is ...
fetch
I. verb Etymology: Middle English fecchen, from Old English fetian, feccan; perhaps akin to Old English fōt foot — more at foot Date: before 12th century transitive verb ...
fetch up
verb Date: 1599 transitive verb 1. to bring up or out ; produce 2. to make up (as lost time) 3. to bring to a stop intransitive verb to reach a standstill, ...
fetcher
noun see fetch I
fetching
adjective Date: 1880 attractive, pleasing • fetchingly adverb
fetchingly
adverb see fetching
fete
I. noun or fête Etymology: Middle English fete, from Middle French, from Old French feste — more at feast Date: 15th century 1. festival 2. a. a lavish often outdoor ...
fête
I. noun see fete I II. transitive verb see fete II
fête champêtre
noun (plural fêtes champêtres) Etymology: French, literally, rural festival Date: 1774 an outdoor entertainment
feti-
combining form see feto-
fetich
noun see fetish
fetichism
noun see fetishism
feticide
noun Date: 1842 the act of causing the death of a fetus
fetid
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin foetidus, from foetēre to stink Date: 15th century having a heavy offensive smell Synonyms: see malodorous • fetidly ...
fetidly
adverb see fetid
fetidness
noun see fetid
fetish
also fetich noun Etymology: French & Portuguese; French fétiche, from Portuguese feitiço, from feitiço artificial, false, from Latin facticius factitious Date: 1613 1. ...
fetishism
also fetichism noun Date: 1801 1. belief in magical fetishes 2. extravagant irrational devotion 3. the pathological displacement of erotic interest and satisfaction to a ...
fetishist
noun see fetishism
fetishistic
adjective see fetishism
fetishistically
adverb see fetishism
fetishize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1920 to make a fetish of ; treat or regard with fetishism
fetlock
noun Etymology: Middle English fitlok, fetlak; akin to Old English fōt foot Date: 14th century 1. a. a projection bearing a tuft of hair on the back of the leg above the ...
feto-
or feti- combining form Etymology: New Latin fetus fetus
fetologist
noun see fetology
fetology
noun Date: 1965 a branch of medical science concerned with the study and treatment of the fetus in the uterus • fetologist noun
fetoprotein
noun Date: 1965 any of several fetal antigens present in the adult in some abnormal conditions
fetor
noun Etymology: Middle English fetoure, from Latin foetor, from foetēre Date: 15th century a strong offensive smell ; stench
fetoscope
noun Date: 1972 1. an endoscope for visual examination of the pregnant uterus 2. a stethoscope for listening to the fetal heartbeat • fetoscopy noun
fetoscopy
noun see fetoscope
fetter
I. noun Etymology: Middle English feter, from Old English; akin to Old English fōt foot Date: before 12th century 1. a chain or shackle for the feet 2. something that ...
fettle
I. noun Etymology: 2fettle Date: 1740 state or condition of health, fitness, wholeness, spirit, or form — often used in the phrase in fine fettle II. transitive ...
fettuccine
or fettuccini or fettucine or fettucini noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Italian, plural of fettuccina, diminutive of fettuccia small slice, ribbon, ...
fettuccine Alfredo
noun Etymology: from Alfredo all'Augusteo, restaurant in Rome where it originated Date: 1961 a dish consisting of fettuccine with butter, Parmesan cheese, cream, and ...
fettuccine all'Alfredo
noun see fettuccine Alfredo
fettuccini
noun plural but singular or plural in construction see fettuccine
fettucine
noun plural but singular or plural in construction see fettuccine
fettucini
noun plural but singular or plural in construction see fettuccine
fetus
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, act of bearing young, offspring; akin to Latin fetus newly delivered, fruitful — more at feminine Date: 14th century an unborn ...
Feuchtwanger
biographical name Lion 1884-1958 German novelist & dramatist
feud
I. noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English feide, from Anglo-French *faide, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German fēhida hostility, feud, Old English fāh hostile ...
feudal
adjective Date: 1602 1. of, relating to, or having the characteristics of a medieval fee 2. of, relating to, or suggestive of feudalism • feudally adverb
feudalism
noun Date: circa 1818 1. the system of political organization prevailing in Europe from the 9th to about the 15th centuries having as its basis the relation of lord to vassal ...
feudalist
noun see feudalism
feudalistic
adjective see feudalism
feudality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1790 1. the quality or state of being feudal 2. a feudal holding, domain, or concentration of power
feudalization
noun see feudalize
feudalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1828 to make feudal • feudalization noun
feudally
adverb see feudal
feudatory
I. adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin feudatorius, from feudare to enfeoff, from feudum Date: 1592 1. owing feudal allegiance 2. being under the overlordship of a foreign ...
feudist
I. noun Date: 1607 a specialist in feudal law II. noun Date: 1901 one who feuds
Feuillet
biographical name Octave 1821-1890 French novelist & dramatist
feuilleton
noun Etymology: French, from feuillet sheet of paper, from Old French foillet, diminutive of foille leaf — more at foil Date: 1845 1. a part of a European newspaper or ...
feuilletonism
noun see feuilleton
feuilletonist
noun see feuilleton
Feulgen
adjective Date: 1928 of, relating to, utilizing, or staining by the Feulgen reaction
Feulgen reaction
noun Etymology: Robert Feulgen died 1955 German physiologist Date: 1928 the development of a brilliant purple color by DNA in a microscopic preparation stained with a ...

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