Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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emit
transitive verb (emitted; emitting) Etymology: Latin emittere to send out, from e- + mittere to send Date: 1598 1. a. to throw or give off or out (as light or heat) b. ...
emittance
noun Date: 1940 1. the energy radiated by the surface of a body per second per unit area 2. emissivity
emitter
noun see emit
Emmanuel
variant of Immanuel
Emme
geographical name river about 50 miles (80 kilometers) central Switzerland in E Bern canton
Emmen
geographical name commune NE Netherlands population 93,107
emmenagogue
noun Etymology: Greek emmēna menses (from neuter plural of emmēnos monthly, from en- + mēn month) + English -agogue — more at moon Date: circa 1732 an agent that ...
Emmental
noun see Emmentaler
Emmentaler
or Emmenthaler or Emmental or Emmenthal noun Etymology: German, from Emmental, Switzerland Date: 1902 Swiss cheese
Emmenthal
noun see Emmentaler
Emmenthaler
noun see Emmentaler
emmer
noun Etymology: German, from Old High German amari Date: circa 1900 an ancient tetraploid wheat (Triticum dicoccum) that has spikelets with two hard red kernels which remain ...
emmet
noun Etymology: Middle English emete, from Old English æmette ant — more at ant Date: before 12th century chiefly dialect ant
Emmet
biographical name Robert 1778-1803 Irish nationalist & rebel
Emmy
noun (plural Emmys) Etymology: from alteration of Immy, nickname for image orthicon (a camera tube used in television) Date: 1949 a statuette awarded annually by a ...
emodin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary emodi- (from New Latin Rheum emodi, species of rhubarb) + 1-in Date: 1858 an orange crystalline phenolic compound C15H10O5 ...
emollient
I. adjective Etymology: Latin emollient-, emolliens, present participle of emollire to soften, from e- + mollis soft — more at mollify Date: 1626 1. making soft or supple; ...
emolument
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin emolumentum advantage, from emolere to produce by grinding, from e- + molere to grind — more at meal Date: 15th century 1. the ...
emote
intransitive verb (emoted; emoting) Etymology: back-formation from emotion Date: 1917 to give expression to emotion especially in acting • emoter noun
emoter
noun see emote
emoticon
noun Etymology: emotion + icon Date: 1987 a group of keyboard characters (as :-)) that typically represents a facial expression or suggests an attitude or emotion and that is ...
emotion
noun Etymology: Middle French, from emouvoir to stir up, from Old French esmovoir, from Latin emovēre to remove, displace, from e- + movēre to move Date: 1579 1. a. ...
emotional
adjective Date: 1834 1. of or relating to emotion 2. dominated by or prone to emotion 3. appealing to or arousing emotion 4. markedly aroused or agitated in ...
emotionalism
noun Date: 1865 1. a tendency to regard things emotionally 2. undue indulgence in or display of emotion
emotionalist
noun Date: 1865 1. one who bases a theory or policy on an emotional conviction 2. one prone to emotionalism • emotionalistic adjective
emotionalistic
adjective see emotionalist
emotionality
noun see emotional
emotionalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1879 to give an emotional quality to
emotionally
adverb see emotional
emotionless
adjective Date: 1843 showing, having, or expressing no emotion • emotionlessness noun • emotionlessly adverb
emotionlessly
adverb see emotionless
emotionlessness
noun see emotionless
emotive
adjective Date: 1830 1. of or relating to the emotions 2. appealing to or expressing emotion • emotively adverb • emotivity noun
emotively
adverb see emotive
emotivity
noun see emotive
emp
abbreviation emperor; empress
EMP
abbreviation electromagnetic pulse
empanada
noun Etymology: American Spanish, from Spanish, feminine of empanado, past participle of empanar to bread, from em- (from Latin in-) + pan bread, from Latin panis — more at ...
empanel
variant of impanel
empathetic
adjective Date: 1932 involving, eliciting, characterized by, or based on empathy • empathetically adverb
empathetically
adverb see empathetic
empathic
adjective Date: 1909 empathetic • empathically adverb
empathically
adverb see empathic
empathise
British variant of empathize
empathize
intransitive verb (-thized; -thizing) Date: circa 1921 to experience empathy
empathizer
noun see empathize
empathy
noun Etymology: Greek empatheia, literally, passion, from empathēs emotional, from em- + pathos feelings, emotion — more at pathos Date: 1850 1. the imaginative projection ...
Empedocles
biographical name circa 490-430 B.C. Greek philosopher & statesman
empennage
noun Etymology: French, feathers of an arrow, empennage, from empenner to feather an arrow, from em- 1en- + penne feather, from Middle French — more at pen Date: 1909 the ...
emperor
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French emperur, from Latin imperator, literally, commander, from imperare to command, from in- + parare to prepare, order — more at ...
emperor penguin
noun Date: 1885 a penguin (Aptenodytes forsteri) that is the largest known and that is noted for the male's habit of incubating the egg between the feet and a fold of ...
emperorship
noun see emperor
empery
noun (plural emperies) Etymology: Middle English emperie, from Anglo-French — more at empire Date: 1533 wide dominion ; empire
emphasis
noun (plural emphases) Etymology: Latin, from Greek, exposition, emphasis, from emphainein to indicate, from en- + phainein to show — more at fancy Date: 1573 1. a. ...
emphasise
British variant of emphasize
emphasize
transitive verb (-sized; -sizing) Date: circa 1806 to place emphasis on ; stress
emphatic
adjective Etymology: Greek emphatikos, from emphainein Date: 1635 1. uttered with or marked by emphasis 2. tending to express oneself in forceful speech or to take ...
emphatically
adverb see emphatic
emphysema
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek emphysēma, from emphysan to inflate, from em- 2en- + physan to blow, from physa breath — more at pustule Date: 1661 a condition ...
emphysematous
adjective see emphysema
emphysemic
adjective see emphysema
empire
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French empire, empirie, from Latin imperium absolute authority, empire, from imperare to command — more at emperor Date: 14th ...
Empire
adjective Etymology: French, from (le premier) Empire the first Empire of France Date: 1860 of, relating to, or characteristic of a style (as of clothing or furniture) ...
Empire Day
noun Date: 1902 Commonwealth Day — used before the official adoption of Commonwealth Day in 1958
empiric
noun Etymology: Latin empiricus, from Greek empeirikos doctor relying on experience alone, from empeiria experience, from em- 2en- + peiran to attempt — more at fear Date: ...
empirical
also empiric adjective Date: 1569 1. originating in or based on observation or experience 2. relying on experience or observation alone often without due regard for system ...
empirical formula
noun Date: 1878 a chemical formula showing the simplest ratio of elements in a compound rather than the total number of atoms in the molecule
empirically
adverb see empirical
empiricism
noun Date: 1657 1. a. a former school of medical practice founded on experience without the aid of science or theory b. quackery, charlatanry 2. a. the practice of ...
empiricist
noun see empiricism
emplace
transitive verb Etymology: back-formation from emplacement Date: 1865 to put into position
emplacement
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French emplacer to emplace, from en- + place Date: 1802 1. the situation or location of something 2. a prepared position for weapons or ...
emplane
variant of enplane
employ
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English emploien, from Anglo-French empleier, emploier, emplier to entangle, apply, make use of, from Latin implicare to enfold, involve, ...
employability
noun see employable I
employable
I. adjective Date: 1593 capable of being employed • employability noun II. noun Date: 1934 one who is employable
employe
noun see employee
employee
also employe noun Date: 1822 one employed by another usually for wages or salary and in a position below the executive level
employer
noun see employ I
employment
noun Date: 15th century 1. use, purpose 2. a. activity in which one engages or is employed b. an instance of such activity 3. the act of employing ; the state of ...
employment agency
noun Date: 1888 an agency whose business is to find jobs for people seeking them or to find people to fill jobs that are open
empoison
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English empoysonen, from Anglo-French empoisener, from en- + poison poison Date: 14th century 1. archaic poison 2. embitter • ...
empoisonment
noun see empoison
Emporia
geographical name city E central Kansas population 26,760
emporium
noun (plural -riums; also emporia) Etymology: Latin, from Greek emporion, from emporos traveler, trader, from em- 2en- + poros passage, journey — more at fare Date: 1586 ...
empower
transitive verb Date: 1648 1. to give official authority or legal power to 2. enable 1a 3. to promote the self-actualization or influence of
empowerment
noun see empower
empress
noun Etymology: Middle English emperice, from Anglo-French, feminine of emperur emperor Date: 12th century 1. the wife or widow of an emperor 2. a woman who is the ...
empressement
noun Etymology: French, from (s')empresser to hurry, from en- + presser to press Date: 1709 demonstrative warmth or cordiality
emprise
noun Etymology: Middle English, undertaking, from Anglo-French, from emprendre to undertake, from Vulgar Latin *imprehendere, from Latin in- + prehendere to seize — more at ...
emptily
adverb see empty I
emptiness
noun see empty I
empty
I. adjective (emptier; -est) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ǣmettig unoccupied, from ǣmetta leisure, perhaps from ǣ- without + -metta (probably akin to mōtan ...
empty calories
noun plural Date: 1955 calories from food that supplies energy but is not nutritionally balanced
empty nester
noun Date: 1962 a parent whose children have grown and moved away from home
Empty Quarter
geographical name Rub‘ al-Khali
empty-handed
adjective Date: 1589 1. having or bringing nothing 2. having acquired or gained nothing
empty-headed
adjective Date: 1640 vacuous 2
empty-nest syndrome
noun Date: 1972 an emotional letdown often experienced by an empty nester
empurple
verb (empurpled; empurpling) Date: 1590 transitive verb to tinge or color purple intransitive verb to become purple
empyema
noun (plural empyemata or -emas) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek empyēma, from empyein to suppurate, from em- 2en- + pyon pus — more at foul Date: circa 1605 the ...
empyemic
adjective see empyema
empyreal
adjective Etymology: Late Latin empyrius, empyreus, from Late Greek empyrios, from Greek em- 2en- + pyr fire Date: 15th century 1. of or relating to the empyrean ; celestial ...
empyrean
I. adjective Date: 15th century empyreal II. noun Date: circa 1610 1. a. the highest heaven or heavenly sphere in ancient and medieval cosmology usually consisting of ...
EMS
abbreviation emergency medical service; emergency medical services
Ems
geographical name 1. river 231 miles (372 kilometers) NW Germany flowing N into North Sea 2. (or Bad Ems) town W Germany SE of Koblenz population 10,358
EMT
noun Etymology: emergency medical technician Date: 1972 a specially trained medical technician certified to provide basic emergency services (as cardiopulmonary ...
emu
I. noun Etymology: modification of Portuguese ema cassowary Date: 1656 a swift-running Australian ratite bird (Dromaius novae-hollandiae) with undeveloped wings that is ...
emulate
I. transitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin aemulatus, past participle of aemulari, from aemulus rivaling Date: 1582 1. a. to strive to equal or excel b. ...
emulation
noun Date: 1542 1. obsolete ambitious or envious rivalry 2. ambition or endeavor to equal or excel others (as in achievement) 3. a. imitation b. the use of or ...
emulative
adjective see emulation
emulatively
adverb see emulation
emulator
noun Date: 1589 1. one that emulates 2. hardware or software that permits programs written for one computer to be run on another computer
emulous
adjective Date: 1535 1. a. inspired by or deriving from a desire to emulate b. ambitious or eager to emulate 2. obsolete jealous • emulously adverb • emulousness ...
emulously
adverb see emulous
emulousness
noun see emulous
emulsifiable
adjective see emulsify
emulsification
noun see emulsify
emulsifier
noun Date: 1888 one that emulsifies; especially a surface-active agent (as a soap) promoting the formation and stabilization of an emulsion
emulsify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Date: 1859 to disperse (as an oil) in an emulsion; also to convert (two or more immiscible liquids) into an emulsion • emulsifiable ...
emulsion
noun Etymology: New Latin emulsion-, emulsio, from Latin emulgēre to milk out, from e- + mulgēre to milk; akin to Old English melcan to milk, Greek amelgein Date: 1612 1. ...
en
noun Date: 1792 1. the width of a piece of type half the width of an em 2. the letter n
en ami
foreign term Etymology: French as a friend
en banc
adverb or adjective Etymology: French, on the bench Date: 1863 in full court ; with full judiciary authority
en bloc
adverb or adjective Etymology: French Date: 1861 as a whole ; in a mass
en brochette
adjective Etymology: French Date: circa 1909 of food cooked or served on a skewer
en clair
adverb or adjective Etymology: French, in clear Date: circa 1897 in plain language
en effet
foreign term Etymology: French in fact ; indeed
en famille
foreign term Etymology: French in or with one's family ; at home ; informally
en garçon
foreign term Etymology: French as or like a bachelor
en garde
foreign term Etymology: French on guard
en masse
adverb Etymology: French Date: 1795 in a body ; as a whole
en pantoufles
foreign term Etymology: French in slippers ; at ease ; informally
en passant
adverb Etymology: French Date: 1665 1. in passing 2. — used in chess of the capture of a pawn as it makes a first move of two squares by an enemy pawn that threatens the ...
en plein air
foreign term Etymology: French in the open air
en plein jour
foreign term Etymology: French in broad day
en poste
foreign term Etymology: French in a diplomatic post
en prise
adjective Etymology: French, literally, engaged, within grasp Date: 1820 of a chess piece exposed to capture
en règle
foreign term Etymology: French in order ; in due form
en retard
foreign term Etymology: French behind time ; late
en retraite
foreign term Etymology: French in retreat ; in retirement
en revanche
foreign term Etymology: French in return ; in compensation
en route
adverb or adjective Etymology: French Date: 1779 on or along the way
en secondes noces
foreign term Etymology: French in a second marriage
en suite
adverb or adjective Etymology: French Date: 1812 so as to form a suite ; connected ; also so as to make a matching set
en-
I. prefix also em- Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin in-, im-, from in 1. put into or onto ; cover with ; go into or onto — in verbs formed from ...
enable
transitive verb (enabled; enabling) Date: 15th century 1. a. to provide with the means or opportunity b. to make possible, practical, or easy c. to cause to ...
enabler
noun Date: 1615 one that enables another to achieve an end; especially one who enables another to persist in self-destructive behavior (as substance abuse) by providing ...
enact
transitive verb Date: 15th century 1. to establish by legal and authoritative act; specifically to make (as a bill) into law 2. act out • enactor noun
enactment
noun Date: 1792 1. the act of enacting ; the state of being enacted 2. something (as a law) that has been enacted
enactor
noun see enact
enalapril
noun Etymology: perhaps from phenyl + alanyl + -pril, alteration of proline Date: 1982 an antihypertensive drug C20H28N2O5 that is an ACE inhibitor administered orally in the ...
enamel
I. transitive verb (-eled or -elled; -eling or enamelling) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enameller, from en- + asmal, esmal enamel, of Germanic origin; akin to ...
enameler
noun see enamel I
enamelist
noun see enamel I
enamelware
noun Date: 1903 metalware (as kitchen utensils) coated with enamel
enamine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary en- (alteration of -ene) + amine Date: 1942 an amine containing the double bond linkage C=C–N
enamor
transitive verb (-ored; enamoring) Etymology: Middle English enamouren, from Anglo-French enamourer, from en- + amour love — more at amour Date: 14th century 1. to inflame ...
enamour
chiefly British variant of enamor
enantiomer
noun Etymology: Greek enantios + English -mer Date: circa 1929 either of a pair of chemical compounds whose molecular structures have a nonsuperimposable mirror-image ...
enantiomeric
adjective see enantiomer
enantiomorph
noun Etymology: Greek enantios opposite (from enanti facing, from en in + anti against) + International Scientific Vocabulary -morph -morph Date: 1885 1. enantiomer 2. ...
enantiomorphic
adjective see enantiomorph
enantiomorphism
noun see enantiomorph
enantiomorphous
adjective see enantiomorph
enation
noun Etymology: Latin enatus, past participle of enasci to rise out of, from e- + nasci to be born — more at nation Date: circa 1842 an outgrowth from the surface of an ...
enc
or encl abbreviation enclosure
encaenia
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Usage: often capitalized Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, dedication festival, from Greek enkainia, from en + kainos new — ...
encage
transitive verb Date: 1592 cage 1
encamp
verb Date: 1563 intransitive verb to set up or occupy a camp transitive verb to place or establish in a camp
encampment
noun Date: 1598 1. a. the place where a group (as a body of troops) is encamped b. the individuals that make up an encampment 2. the act of encamping ; the state of ...
encapsulate
verb (-lated; -lating) Date: 1872 transitive verb 1. to enclose in or as if in a capsule 2. epitomize, summarize intransitive verb to become encapsulated • ...
encapsulated
adjective Date: 1894 1. surrounded by a gelatinous or membranous envelope 2. condensed
encapsulation
noun see encapsulate
encapsule
transitive verb (-suled; -suling) Date: 1877 encapsulate
encase
transitive verb Date: 1633 to enclose in or as if in a case
encasement
noun Date: 1741 the act or process of encasing ; the state of being encased; also case, covering
encash
transitive verb Date: 1861 British cash • encashable adjective, chiefly British • encashment noun, chiefly British
encashable
adjective see encash
encashment
noun see encash
encaustic
noun Etymology: encaustic, adjective, from Latin encausticus, from Greek enkaustikos, from enkaiein to burn in, from en- + kaiein to burn Date: 1601 a paint made from pigment ...
enceinte
I. adjective Etymology: French, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *incenta, alteration of Latin incient-, inciens being with young, modification of Greek enkyos pregnant, from en- + ...
encephal-
or encephalo- combining form Etymology: French encéphal-, from Greek enkephal-, from enkephalos, from en- + kephalē head — more at cephalic brain
encephalitic
adjective see encephalitis
encephalitis
noun (plural encephalitides) Date: 1843 inflammation of the brain • encephalitic adjective
encephalitogen
noun see encephalitogenic
encephalitogenic
adjective Date: 1923 tending to cause encephalitis • encephalitogen noun
encephalo-
combining form see encephal-
encephalogram
noun Date: 1928 an X-ray picture of the brain made by encephalography
encephalograph
noun Date: 1928 1. encephalogram 2. electroencephalograph
encephalography
noun Date: 1922 radiography of the brain after the cerebrospinal fluid has been replaced by a gas (as air)
encephalomyelitis
noun (plural encephalomyelitides) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1908 concurrent inflammation of the brain and spinal cord; specifically equine encephalitis
encephalomyocarditis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1947 an acute febrile disease especially of swine and some nonhuman primates caused by a picornavirus (species Encephalomyocarditis virus of ...
encephalon
noun (plural encephala) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek enkephalos Date: 1741 the vertebrate brain
encephalopathic
adjective see encephalopathy
encephalopathy
noun (plural -thies) Date: 1866 a disease of the brain; especially one involving alterations of brain structure • encephalopathic adjective
enchain
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English encheynen, from Anglo-French enchaener, from en- + chaene chain Date: 14th century to bind or hold with or as if with chains • ...
enchainment
noun see enchain
enchant
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enchanter, from Latin incantare, from in- + cantare to sing — more at chant Date: 14th century 1. to influence ...
Enchanted Mesa
geographical name sandstone butte W New Mexico NE of Acoma
enchanter
noun Date: 13th century one that enchants; especially sorcerer
enchanting
adjective Date: 1593 charming • enchantingly adverb
enchantingly
adverb see enchanting
enchantment
noun Date: 13th century 1. a. the act or art of enchanting b. the quality or state of being enchanted 2. something that enchants
enchantress
noun Date: 14th century 1. a woman who practices magic ; sorceress 2. a fascinating or beautiful woman
enchase
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, to emboss, from Anglo-French enchaser to set (gems), from en- + case, chase case, box, shrine, from Latin capsa case — more at case ...
enchilada
noun Etymology: American Spanish, from feminine of enchilado, past participle of enchilar to season with chili, from Spanish en- 1en- + chile chili Date: 1887 1. a usually ...
enchiridion
noun (plural enchiridia) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek encheiridion, from en in + cheir hand — more at in, chir- Date: 15th century handbook, manual
Encinitas
geographical name city S California on coast N of San Diego population 58,014
encipher
transitive verb Date: 1577 to convert (a message) into cipher • encipherer noun • encipherment noun
encipherer
noun see encipher
encipherment
noun see encipher
encircle
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English enserclen Date: 15th century 1. to form a circle around ; surround 2. to pass completely around • encirclement noun
encirclement
noun see encircle
encl
abbreviation see enc
enclasp
transitive verb Date: 1584 to seize and hold ; embrace
enclave
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from enclaver to enclose, from Vulgar Latin *inclavare to lock up, from Latin in- + clavis key — more at clavicle Date: 1868 a ...
enclitic
noun Etymology: Late Latin encliticus, from Greek enklitikos, from enklinesthai to lean on, from en- + klinein to lean — more at lean Date: circa 1663 a clitic that is ...
enclose
also inclose transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, probably from enclos enclosed, from Anglo-French, past participle of enclore to enclose, from Vulgar Latin *inclaudere, ...
enclosure
also inclosure noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or action of enclosing ; the quality or state of being enclosed 2. something that encloses 3. something enclosed
encode
transitive verb Date: circa 1919 1. a. to convert (as a body of information) from one system of communication into another; especially to convert (a message) into code ...
encoder
noun see encode
encomiast
noun Etymology: Greek enkōmiastēs, from enkōmiazein to praise, from enkōmion Date: 1599 one that praises ; eulogist • encomiastic adjective
encomiastic
adjective see encomiast
encomium
noun (plural -miums; also encomia) Etymology: Latin, from Greek enkōmion, from en in + kōmos revel, celebration Date: 1567 glowing and warmly enthusiastic praise; also an ...
encompass
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century 1. a. to form a circle about ; enclose b. obsolete to go completely around 2. a. envelop b. ...
encompassment
noun see encompass
encore
noun Etymology: French, still, again Date: 1712 1. a demand for repetition or reappearance made by an audience 2. a. a reappearance or additional performance demanded by ...
encounter
I. verb (encountered; encountering) Etymology: Middle English encountren, from Anglo-French encuntrer, from Medieval Latin incontrare, from Late Latin incontra toward, from ...
encounter group
noun Date: 1967 a usually unstructured group that seeks to develop the capacity of the individual to express feelings and to form emotional ties by unrestrained ...
encourage
transitive verb (-aged; -aging) Etymology: Middle English encoragen, from Anglo-French encorager, from en- + curage courage Date: 15th century 1. a. to inspire with ...
encouragement
noun Date: 1549 1. the act of encouraging ; the state of being encouraged 2. something that encourages
encourager
noun see encourage
encouraging
adjective Date: 1593 giving hope or promise • encouragingly adverb
encouragingly
adverb see encouraging
encrimson
transitive verb Date: 1597 to make or dye crimson
encroach
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English encrochen to get, seize, from Anglo-French encrocher, from en- + croc, croche hook — more at crochet Date: 1528 1. to enter by ...
encroacher
noun see encroach
encroachment
noun see encroach
encrust
also incrust verb Etymology: probably from Latin incrustare, from in- + crusta crust Date: 1596 transitive verb to cover, line, or overlay with or as if with a crust ...
encrustation
variant of incrustation
encrypt
transitive verb Etymology: en- + crypt- (as in cryptogram) Date: 1944 1. encipher 2. encode 1a • encryption noun
encryption
noun see encrypt
enculturate
verb see enculturation
enculturation
noun Date: 1948 the process by which an individual learns the traditional content of a culture and assimilates its practices and values • enculturate verb
encumber
transitive verb (-cumbered; encumbering) Etymology: Middle English encombren, from Anglo-French encumbrer, from en- + Middle French combre dam, weir Date: 14th century 1. ...
encumbrance
noun Date: 1535 1. something that encumbers ; impediment, burden 2. a claim (as a mortgage) against property
encumbrancer
noun Date: 1858 one that holds an encumbrance
ency
or encyc abbreviation encyclopedia
encyc
abbreviation see ency
encyclical
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin encyclicus, from Greek enkyklios circular, general, from en in + kyklos circle — more at in, wheel Date: 1647 addressed to all the ...
encyclopaedia
chiefly British variant of encyclopedia
encyclopaedic
chiefly British variant of encyclopedic
encyclopedia
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin encyclopaedia course of general education, from Greek enkyklios + paideia education, child rearing, from paid-, pais child — more at few Date: ...
encyclopedic
adjective Date: 1824 of, relating to, or suggestive of an encyclopedia or its methods of treating or covering a subject ; comprehensive • encyclopedically adverb
encyclopedically
adverb see encyclopedic
encyclopedism
noun Date: 1833 the quality or state of being encyclopedic
encyclopedist
noun Date: 1651 1. one who compiles or writes for an encyclopedia 2. often capitalized one of the writers of a French encyclopedia (1751-80) who were identified with the ...
encyst
verb Date: 1720 transitive verb to enclose in a cyst intransitive verb to form or become enclosed in a cyst • encystment noun
encystment
noun see encyst
end
I. noun Etymology: Middle English ende, from Old English; akin to Old High German enti end, Latin ante before, Greek anti against Date: before 12th century 1. a. the part ...
end around
noun Date: 1926 a football play in which an offensive end comes behind the line of scrimmage to take a handoff and attempts to carry the ball around the opposite flank
end brush
noun Date: circa 1891 end plate
end line
noun Date: 1893 a line marking an end or boundary especially of a playing area: as a. a line at either end of a football field 10 yards beyond and parallel to the goal ...
end man
noun Date: 1865 a man at each end of the line of performers in a minstrel show who engages in comic repartee with the interlocutor

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