Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву elec-flüg (6389)

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end organ
noun Date: 1875 a structure forming the end of a neural path and consisting of an effector or a receptor with its associated nerve terminations
end plate
noun Date: 1878 a complex terminal treelike branching of the axon of a motor neuron that contacts with a muscle fiber
end point
noun Date: 1899 1. a point marking the completion of a process or stage of a process; especially a point in a titration at which a definite effect (as a color change) is ...
end run
noun Date: 1902 1. a football play in which the ballcarrier attempts to run wide around the end of the line; specifically sweep 3e 2. an evasive trick or maneuver
end table
noun Date: 1851 a small table usually about the height of the arm of a chair that is used beside a larger piece of furniture (as a sofa)
end user
noun Date: circa 1945 the ultimate consumer of a finished product
end zone
noun Date: circa 1916 the area at either end of a football field between the goal line and the end line
end-
or endo- combining form Etymology: French, from Greek, from endon within; akin to Greek en in, Old Latin indu, Hittite andan within — more at in 1. within ; inside — ...
end-run
transitive verb Date: 1952 to avoid artfully
end-stage
adjective Date: 1977 being or occurring in the final stages of a terminal disease or condition
end-stopped
adjective Date: 1877 marked by a logical or rhetorical pause at the end — compare run-on
end-time
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1917 the time of the prophesied end of the world ; Armageddon
endamage
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century to cause loss or damage to
endanger
verb (-dangered; endangering) Date: 1964 transitive verb to bring into danger or peril intransitive verb to create a dangerous situation • endangerment noun
endangered
adjective Date: 1964 being or relating to an endangered species
endangered species
noun Date: 1964 a species threatened with extinction; broadly anyone or anything whose continued existence is threatened
endangerment
noun see endanger
Endara (Galimany)
biographical name Guillermo 1936- president of Panama (1989-94)
endarch
adjective Date: 1900 formed or taking place from inner cells outward
endarterectomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: New Latin endarterium intima of an artery (from end- + arteria artery) + English -ectomy Date: 1974 surgical removal of the inner layer of an ...
endbrain
noun Date: 1927 telencephalon
endear
transitive verb Date: 1580 1. obsolete to make higher in cost, value, or estimation 2. to cause to become beloved or admired • endearingly adverb
endearingly
adverb see endear
endearment
noun Date: 1610 1. a word or an act (as a caress) expressing affection 2. the act or process of endearing
endeavor
I. verb (endeavored; endeavoring) Etymology: Middle English endeveren to exert oneself, from en- + dever duty — more at devoir Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. ...
endeavour
chiefly British variant of endeavor
Endecott
or Endicott biographical name John 1588-1665 colonial governor of Massachusetts
ended
adjective see end I
endemic
I. adjective Etymology: French endémique, from endémie endemic disease, from Greek endēmia action of dwelling, from endēmos endemic, from en in + dēmos people, populace — ...
endemically
adverb see endemic I
endemicity
noun see endemic I
endemism
noun see endemic I
Enderbury
geographical name island (atoll) central Pacific in the Phoenix Islands chain of Kiribati
endergonic
adjective Etymology: end- + Greek ergon work — more at work Date: 1940 endothermic 1
endexine
noun Date: 1947 an inner membranous layer of the exine
endgame
noun Date: 1881 the stage of a chess game after major reduction of forces; also the final stage of some action or process
Endicott
biographical name see Endecott
Endicott Mountains
geographical name mountains N Alaska, the central part of the Brooks Range
ending
noun Date: before 12th century something that constitutes an end: as a. conclusion b. one or more letters or syllables added to a word base especially in inflection
endive
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin endivia, from Late Greek entybion, from Latin intubus Date: 14th century 1. an annual or biennial composite ...
endleaf
noun Date: 1888 endpaper
endless
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. being or seeming to be without end 2. extremely numerous 3. joined at the ends • endlessly adverb • endlessness noun
endlessly
adverb see endless
endlessness
noun see endless
endlong
adverb Etymology: Middle English endelong, alteration of andlong, from Old English andlang along, from andlang, preposition — more at along Date: 13th century archaic ...
endmost
adjective Date: before 12th century situated at the very end
endnote
noun Date: 1926 a note placed at the end of the text
endo-
combining form see end-
endobiotic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1900 dwelling within the cells or tissues of a host
endocardial
adjective Date: circa 1849 1. situated within the heart 2. of or relating to the endocardium
endocarditis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1839 inflammation of the lining of the heart and its valves
endocardium
noun (plural endocardia) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1864 a thin serous membrane lining the cavities of the heart
endocarp
noun Etymology: French endocarpe Date: 1830 the inner layer of the pericarp of a fruit (as an apple or orange) when it consists of two or more layers of different texture or ...
endocast
noun Date: 1949 endocranial cast
endochondral
adjective Date: 1882 relating to, formed by, or being ossification that takes place from centers arising in cartilage and involves deposition of lime salts in the cartilage ...
endocranial cast
noun Date: 1923 a cast of the cranial cavity showing the approximate shape of the brain
endocrine
I. adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary end- + Greek krinein to separate — more at certain Date: 1914 1. secreting internally; specifically producing ...
endocrine gland
noun Date: 1914 a gland (as the thyroid or the pituitary) that produces an endocrine secretion — called also ductless gland
endocrinologic
or endocrinological adjective Date: circa 1934 involving or relating to the endocrine glands or secretions or to endocrinology
endocrinological
adjective see endocrinologic
endocrinologist
noun see endocrinology
endocrinology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1913 a branch of medicine concerned with the structure, function, and disorders of the endocrine glands • ...
endocytosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from end- + -cytosis (as in phagocytosis) Date: 1963 incorporation of substances into a cell by phagocytosis or pinocytosis • endocytotic ...
endocytotic
adjective see endocytosis
endoderm
noun Etymology: French endoderme, from end- + Greek derma skin — more at derm- Date: 1861 the innermost of the three primary germ layers of an embryo that is the source of ...
endodermal
adjective see endoderm
endodermis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1884 the innermost tissue of the cortex in many roots and stems
endodontic
adjective see endodontics
endodontically
adverb see endodontics
endodontics
noun plural but singular in construction Etymology: end- + odont- + -ics Date: 1946 a branch of dentistry concerned with diseases of the pulp • endodontic adjective • ...
endodontist
noun see endodontics
endoenzyme
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1909 an enzyme that functions inside the cell
endoergic
adjective Date: 1940 absorbing energy ; endothermic
endogamous
adjective see endogamy
endogamy
noun Date: 1865 marriage within a specific group as required by custom or law • endogamous adjective
endogenic
adjective Date: circa 1904 1. of or relating to metamorphism taking place within a planet or moon 2. endogenous
endogenous
adjective Date: 1830 1. growing or produced by growth from deep tissue 2. a. caused by factors inside the organism or system b. produced or synthesized within the ...
endogenously
adverb see endogenous
endolithic
adjective Date: 1886 living within or penetrating deeply into stony substances (as rocks or coral)
endolymph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1839 the watery fluid in the membranous labyrinth of the ear • endolymphatic adjective
endolymphatic
adjective see endolymph
endometrial
adjective see endometrium
endometriosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1925 the presence and growth of functioning endometrial tissue in places other than the uterus that often results in severe pain and ...
endometritis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1872 inflammation of the endometrium
endometrium
noun (plural endometria) Etymology: New Latin, from end- + Greek mētra uterus, from mētr-, mētēr mother — more at mother Date: circa 1882 the mucous membrane lining ...
endomitosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1942 division of chromosomes not followed by nuclear division that results in an increased number of chromosomes in the cell • endomitotic ...
endomitotic
adjective see endomitosis
endomixis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from end- + Greek mixis act of mixing, from mignynai to mix — more at mix Date: 1914 a periodic nuclear reorganization in ciliated protozoans
endomorph
noun Etymology: endoderm + -morph Date: 1940 an endomorphic individual
endomorphic
adjective Etymology: endoderm + -morphic; from the predominance in such types of structures developed from the endoderm Date: 1940 1. of or relating to the component in W. H. ...
endomorphism
noun Date: 1909 a homomorphism that maps a mathematical set into itself — compare isomorphism
endomorphy
noun see endomorphic
endonuclease
noun Date: 1962 an enzyme that breaks down a nucleotide chain into two or more shorter chains by cleaving the internal covalent bonds linking nucleotides — compare ...
endonucleolytic
adjective Etymology: end- + nucleo- + -lytic Date: 1967 cleaving a nucleotide chain into two parts at an internal point
endoparasite
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1882 a parasite that lives in the internal organs or tissues of its host • endoparasitic adjective • ...
endoparasitic
adjective see endoparasite
endoparasitism
noun see endoparasite
endopeptidase
noun Date: 1936 any of a group of enzymes that hydrolyze peptide bonds within the long chains of protein molecules ; protease — compare exopeptidase
endoperoxide
noun Date: 1962 any of various biosynthetic intermediates in the formation of prostaglandins
endophyte
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1835 an organism (as a bacterium or fungus) living within a plant • endophytic adjective
endophytic
adjective see endophyte
endoplasm
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1882 the inner relatively fluid part of the cytoplasm • endoplasmic adjective
endoplasmic
adjective see endoplasm
endoplasmic reticulum
noun Date: 1947 a system of interconnected vesicular and lamellar cytoplasmic membranes that functions especially in the transport of materials within the cell and that is ...
endopolyploid
adjective see endopolyploidy
endopolyploidy
noun Date: 1945 a polyploid state in which the chromosomes have divided repeatedly without subsequent division of the nucleus or cell • endopolyploid adjective
endorphin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary endogenous + morphine Date: 1976 any of a group of endogenous peptides (as enkephalin) found especially in the brain that ...
endorsable
adjective see endorse
endorse
also indorse transitive verb (-dorsed; -dorsing) Etymology: alteration of obsolete endoss, from Middle English endosen, from Anglo-French endosser, to put on, don, write on the ...
endorsee
noun see endorse
endorsement
also indorsement noun Date: 1547 1. the act or process of endorsing 2. a. something that is written in the process of endorsing b. a provision added to an insurance ...
endorser
noun see endorse
endoscope
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1861 an illuminated usually fiber-optic flexible or rigid tubular instrument for visualizing the interior of a ...
endoscopic
adjective Date: 1853 of, relating to, or performed by means of an endoscope or endoscopy • endoscopically adverb
endoscopically
adverb see endoscopic
endoscopy
noun see endoscope
endoskeletal
adjective see endoskeleton
endoskeleton
noun Date: circa 1847 an internal skeleton or supporting framework in an animal • endoskeletal adjective
endosome
noun Date: 1887 a vesicle formed by the invagination and pinching off of the cell membrane during endocytosis
endosperm
noun Etymology: French endosperme, from end- + Greek sperma seed — more at sperm Date: 1819 a nutritive tissue in seed plants formed within the embryo sac by division of ...
endosperm nucleus
noun Date: circa 1902 the triploid nucleus formed in the embryo sac of a seed plant by fusion of a sperm nucleus with two polar nuclei or with a nucleus formed by the prior ...
endospore
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1875 an asexual spore developed within the cell especially in bacteria
endosteal
adjective Date: circa 1868 1. of or relating to the endosteum 2. located within bone or cartilage • endosteally adverb
endosteally
adverb see endosteal
endosteum
noun (plural endostea) Etymology: New Latin, from end- + Greek osteon bone — more at osseous Date: circa 1881 the layer of vascular connective tissue lining the medullary ...
endostyle
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary end- + Greek stylos pillar — more at steer Date: 1854 a pair of parallel longitudinal folds projecting into the ...
endosulfan
noun Etymology: endo- + sulf- + 3-an Date: 1961 a toxic crystalline chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticide and acaricide C9H6Cl6O3S used especially on food crops
endosymbiont
noun see endosymbiosis
endosymbiosis
noun Date: circa 1940 symbiosis in which a symbiont dwells within the body of its symbiotic partner • endosymbiont noun • endosymbiotic adjective
endosymbiotic
adjective see endosymbiosis
endothecium
noun (plural endothecia) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1832 the inner lining of a mature anther
endothelial
adjective see endothelium
endothelioma
noun (plural -mas or endotheliomata) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1880 a tumor developing from endothelial tissue
endothelium
noun (plural endothelia) Etymology: New Latin, from end- + -thelium (as in epithelium) Date: 1872 1. an epithelium of mesodermal origin composed of a single layer of thin ...
endotherm
noun Date: 1940 a warm-blooded animal
endothermic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1884 1. characterized by or formed with absorption of heat 2. warm-blooded
endothermy
noun Date: 1922 physiological generation and regulation of body temperature by metabolic means ; the property or state of being warm-blooded
endotoxic
adjective see endotoxin
endotoxin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1904 a toxic heat-stable lipopolysaccharide substance present in the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria that ...
endotracheal
adjective Date: 1910 1. placed within the trachea 2. applied or effected through the trachea
endotrophic
adjective Date: 1899 of a mycorrhiza penetrating into the associated root and ramifying between the cells — compare ectotrophic
endow
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French endower, from en- + dower, douer to endow, from Latin dotare, from dot-, dos gift, dowry — more at date Date: ...
endowment
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of endowing 2. something that is endowed; specifically the part of an institution's income derived from donations 3. natural ...
endpaper
noun Date: 1818 a once-folded sheet of paper having one leaf pasted flat against the inside of the front or back cover of a book and the other pasted at the base to the first ...
endpoint
noun see end point 2
endrin
noun Etymology: end- + dieldrin Date: 1952 a toxic chlorinated hydrocarbon C12H8Cl6O that is a stereoisomer of dieldrin used especially formerly as an insecticide
endue
or indue transitive verb (endued or indued; enduing or induing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enduire to introduce, imbue, from Latin inducere — more at induce ...
endurable
adjective Date: 1796 capable of being endured ; bearable • endurably adverb
endurably
adverb see endurable
endurance
noun Date: 15th century 1. permanence, duration
endure
verb (endured; enduring) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French endurer, from Vulgar Latin *indurare, from Latin, to harden, from in- + durare to harden, endure — more ...
enduring
adjective Date: 15th century lasting, durable • enduringly adverb • enduringness noun
enduringly
adverb see enduring
enduringness
noun see enduring
enduro
noun (plural enduros) Etymology: endurance + -o (Italian or Spanish masculine noun ending) Date: 1935 a long race (as for automobiles or motorcycles) stressing endurance ...
endways
adverb or adjective Date: circa 1608 1. in or toward the direction of the ends ; lengthwise 2. with the end forward (as toward the observer) 3. on end ; upright
endwise
adverb or adjective Date: 1655 endways
Endymion
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Endymiōn Date: 1567 a beautiful youth loved by Selene in Greek mythology
ENE
abbreviation east-northeast
enema
noun (plural enemas; also enemata) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from enienai to inject, from en- + hienai to send — more at jet Date: 15th century 1. the injection of ...
enemy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: Middle English enemi, from Anglo-French, from Latin inimicus, from in- 1in- + amicus friend — more at amiable Date: 13th century 1. one that ...
energetic
adjective Etymology: Greek energētikos, from energein to be active, from energos Date: 1651 1. operating with or marked by vigor or effect 2. marked by energy ; strenuous ...
energetically
adverb see energetic
energetics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1855 1. a branch of mechanics that deals primarily with energy and its transformations 2. the total energy relations and ...
energise
British variant of energize
energization
noun see energize
energize
verb (-gized; -gizing) Date: 1750 transitive verb 1. to make energetic, vigorous, or active
energizer
noun see energize
energy
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: Late Latin energia, from Greek energeia activity, from energos active, from en in + ergon work — more at work Date: 1599 1. a. dynamic ...
energy level
noun Date: 1910 one of the stable states of constant energy that may be assumed by a physical system — used especially of the quantum states of electrons in atoms and of ...
energy state
noun see energy level
enervate
I. adjective Date: 1603 lacking physical, mental, or moral vigor ; enervated II. transitive verb (-vated; -vating) Etymology: Latin enervatus, past participle of enervare, ...
enervatingly
adverb see enervate II
enervation
noun see enervate II
Enescu
biographical name Gheorghe or George French Enesco Georges 1881-1955 Romanian composer
enfant chéri
foreign term Etymology: French loved or pampered child ; one that is highly favored
enfant gâté
foreign term Etymology: French spoiled child
enfant terrible
noun (plural enfants terribles) Etymology: French, literally, terrifying child Date: 1851 1. a. a child whose inopportune remarks cause embarrassment b. a person known ...
enfants perdus
foreign term Etymology: French lost children ; soldiers sent to a dangerous post
enfeeble
transitive verb (enfeebled; enfeebling) Etymology: Middle English enfeblen, from Anglo-French enfebler, enfeblir, from en- + feble feeble Date: 14th century to make feeble ; ...
enfeeblement
noun see enfeeble
enfeoff
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English enfeoffen, from Anglo-French enfeffer, enfeoffer, from en- + fé, fief fief Date: 15th century to invest with a fief or fee • ...
enfeoffment
noun see enfeoff
enfetter
transitive verb Date: 1599 to bind in fetters ; enchain
Enfield
geographical name 1. town N Connecticut population 45,212 2. borough of N Greater London, England population 248,900
Enfield rifle
noun Etymology: Enfield, England Date: 1854 a .30 caliber bolt-action repeating rifle used by United States and British troops in World War I
enfilade
I. noun Etymology: French, from enfiler to thread, enfilade, from Old French, to thread, from en- + fil thread — more at file Date: circa 1730 1. an interconnected group of ...
enfin
foreign term Etymology: French in conclusion ; in a word
enflame
variant of inflame
enfleurage
noun Etymology: French, from enfleurer to saturate with the perfume of flowers, from en- 1en- + fleur flower, from Old French flor — more at flower Date: 1855 a process of ...
enfold
transitive verb Date: 1566 1. a. to cover with or as if with folds ; envelop b. to surround with a covering ; contain 2. to clasp within the arms ; embrace
enforce
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enforcer, from en- + force force Date: 14th century 1. to give force to ; strengthen 2. to urge with energy ...
enforceability
noun see enforce
enforceable
adjective see enforce
enforcement
noun see enforce
enforcer
noun Date: 1580 1. one that enforces 2. a. a violent criminal employed by a crime syndicate; especially hit man 1 b. player (as in ice hockey) known for rough play ...
enframe
transitive verb Date: 1615 frame 6 • enframement noun
enframement
noun see enframe
enfranchise
transitive verb (-chised; -chising) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French enfranchiss-, stem of enfranchir, from en- + franc free — more at frank Date: 15th century ...
enfranchisement
noun see enfranchise
eng
abbreviation 1. engine 2. engineer; engineering
Engadine
geographical name valley of upper Inn River 60 miles (96 kilometers) long E Switzerland in Graubünden
engage
verb (engaged; engaging) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French engager, from en- + gage pledge, gage Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to offer (as one's word) ...
engagé
adjective Etymology: French, past participle of engager to engage Date: 1946 committed to or supportive of a cause
engaged
adjective Date: 1629 1. involved in activity ; occupied, busy 2. pledged to be married ; betrothed 3. greatly interested ; committed 4. involved especially in a hostile ...
engagement
noun Date: 1601 1. a. an arrangement to meet or be present at a specified time and place b. a job or period of employment especially as a performer 2. something that ...
engaging
adjective Date: 1673 tending to draw favorable attention or interest ; attractive • engagingly adverb
engagingly
adverb see engaging
Engelmann spruce
noun Etymology: George Engelmann died 1884 American botanist Date: 1866 a large spruce (Picea engelmannii) of the Rocky mountain region and British Columbia that yields a ...
Engels
biographical name Friedrich 1820-1895 German socialist
engender
verb (engendered; engendering) Etymology: Middle English engendren, from Anglo-French engendrer, from Latin ingenerare, from in- + generare to generate Date: 14th century ...
engild
transitive verb Date: 15th century to make bright with or as if with light
engine
I. noun Etymology: Middle English engin, from Anglo-French, from Latin ingenium natural disposition, talent, from in- + gignere to beget — more at kin Date: 13th century 1. ...
engine driver
noun Date: 1828 British engineer 4
engineer
I. noun Etymology: Middle English engineour, from Anglo-French, from enginer to devise, construct, from engin Date: 14th century 1. a member of a military group devoted to ...
engineering
noun Date: 1720 1. the activities or function of an engineer 2. a. the application of science and mathematics by which the properties of matter and the sources of energy ...
engineless
adjective see engine I
enginery
noun Date: 1641 instruments of war
engird
transitive verb Date: 1566 archaic gird, encompass
engirdle
transitive verb Date: 1596 girdle 1
England
geographical name 1. (or Late Latin Anglia) country S Great Britain; a division of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland capital London area 50,333 square ...
Englewood
geographical name 1. city N central Colorado S of Denver population 31,727 2. city NE New Jersey on the Hudson population 26,203
English
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English englisc, from Engle (plural) Angles Date: before 12th century of, relating to, or characteristic of England, the ...
English breakfast
noun Date: 1807 1. a substantial breakfast (as of eggs, ham or bacon, toast, and cereal) 2. congou; broadly any similar black tea
English Channel
or French La Manche geographical name strait between S England & N France connecting North Sea & Atlantic Ocean
English cocker spaniel
noun Date: 1948 any of a breed of active friendly spaniels that have square muzzles, wide noses, and heads which are typically half muzzle and half skull with the forehead and ...
English daisy
noun Date: 1852 daisy 1a
English foxhound
noun Date: 1845 any of a breed of medium-sized foxhounds developed in England and characterized by a muscular body, bi- or tri-colored short coat, and lightly fringed tail
English holly
noun Date: 1865 a Eurasian holly (Ilex aquifolium) with glossy green leaves and persistent red berries that is widely planted in the United States
English horn
noun Etymology: translation of Italian corno inglese Date: 1838 a double-reed woodwind instrument resembling the oboe in design but having a longer tube and a range a fifth ...
English ivy
noun Date: 1624 ivy 1
English muffin
noun Date: 1884 bread dough rolled and cut into rounds, baked on a griddle, and split and toasted just before eating
English pea
noun Date: 1634 Southern pea 1a, b
English saddle
noun Date: 1739 a saddle with long side bars, steel cantle and pommel, no horn, and a leather seat supported by webbing stretched between the saddlebow and cantle — see ...
English setter
noun Date: 1845 any of a breed of dogs often trained as bird dogs and characterized by a moderately long flat silky coat of white or white with color and by feathering on the ...
English shepherd
noun Date: 1950 any of a breed of vigorous medium-sized working dogs with a long and glossy black coat usually with tan to brown markings that was developed in England for ...
English sonnet
noun Date: 1890 a sonnet consisting of three quatrains and a couplet with a rhyme scheme of abab cdcd efef gg — called also Shakespearean sonnet
English sparrow
noun Date: 1876 house sparrow
English springer
noun see English springer spaniel
English springer spaniel
noun Date: 1929 any of a breed of springer spaniels having a muscular build and a moderately long silky coat usually of black-and-white or liver and white hair — called ...
English system
noun Date: 1821 the foot-pound-second system of units
English toy spaniel
noun Date: circa 1934 any of a breed of small blocky spaniels with well-rounded upper skull projecting forward toward the short turned-up nose
English walnut
noun Date: 1760 a Eurasian walnut (Juglans regia) with large edible nuts and hard richly figured wood; also its nut or wood
English yew
noun Date: 1615 yew 1a(1)
Englishman
noun Date: before 12th century a native or inhabitant of England
Englishness
noun see English I
Englishry
noun Date: 1620 the state, fact, or quality of being English ; englishness
Englishwoman
noun Date: 15th century a woman of English birth, nationality, or origin
engorge
verb Etymology: Middle French engorgier, from Old French, to devour, from en- + gorge throat — more at gorge Date: 1515 transitive verb gorge, glut; especially to fill ...
engorgement
noun see engorge
engr
abbreviation 1. engineer 2. engraved; engraver; engraving
engraft
verb Date: 1549 transitive verb 1. to join or fasten as if by grafting 2. graft 1 3. graft 3 intransitive verb 1. to become grafted and begin functioning normally ...
engraftment
noun see engraft
engrailed
adjective Etymology: Middle English engreled, from Anglo-French engreslé, literally, reduced, thinned, from en- + gresle slender, from Latin gracilis Date: 15th century 1. ...
engrain
variant of ingrain
engrained
variant of ingrained
engrainedly
adverb see ingrained
engram
also engramme noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1908 a hypothetical change in neural tissue postulated in order to account for persistence of memory
engramme
noun see engram
engrave
transitive verb (engraved; engraving) Etymology: Middle French engraver, from en- + graver to grave, of Germanic origin; akin to Old English grafan to grave Date: 1509 1. ...
engraver
noun see engrave
engraving
noun Date: 1599 1. the act or process of one that engraves 2. something that is engraved: as a. an engraved printing surface b. engraved work 3. an impression from ...
engross
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French engrosser to put (a legal document) in final form, from Medieval Latin ingrossare, from in grossam (put) into final ...
engrosser
noun see engross
engrossing
adjective Date: 1749 taking up the attention completely ; absorbing • engrossingly adverb

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